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Brunel Law School

International Human Rights Law LLM Fact File The programme is available Full-time: •

September (12 months)

January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also Part-time: •

September (24 months)

January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Fees for 2013/14 entry UK/EU students: £8,000 full-time, £4,000 part-time (per annum) International students: £13,500 fulltime, £6,750 part-time (per annum) Please check the Brunel Website, www.brunel.ac.uk, for funding opportunities and scholarships Fees quoted are per annum and are subject to an annual increase – please check website for up to date details

Entry Requirements The normal requirement for admission will be a good undergraduate honours degree (minimum 2:2 or overseas equivalent) in law. The School may consider other applicants based on their qualifications, experience and potential to successfully to undertake and complete the course. Such applications are considered on a case by case basis by the Postgraduate Director.

English Language Requirements • IELTS: 6.5 (min 6 in all areas) • TOEFL Paper test: 580 (TWE 4.5) • TOEFL Internet test: 92 (R20, L20, S20, W20) • Pearson: 59 (51 in all subscores) • BrunELT: 65% (min 60% in all areas)

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Students will be expected to critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, and gain a deep understanding of international human rights law, as well as its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law. This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

Brunel also offers our own BrunELT English Test and accepts a range of other language courses. We also have a range of Pre-sessional English free language courses, for students who do not meet these requirements, or who wish to improve their English.

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International Human Rights Law LLM This course offers a detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection. Further, it provides an overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection. Several contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection are examined, including the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights; human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors; the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights; the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees; women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking; the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights. Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context. This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics (see list below). The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

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Publications from Brunel Law Lecturers:

Related Courses

• Ilias Bantekas, International Human Rights Law and Practice, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

• LLM International and Comparative Criminal Justice

• Javaid Rehman, International Human Rights Law, Longman, 2010. • Ben Chigara, Southern African Development Community Land Issues: Towards A New Sustainable Land Relations Policy, Routledge,2012. Amnesty in International Law: The Legality under International Law of National Amnesty Laws, Longman, 2002. • Manisuli Senyonjo, Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in International Law, Hart Publishing, 2009; International Human Rights Law, Ashgate, 2010; The African Regional Human Rights System, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2012. • Ayesha Shahid, Silent Voices, Untold Stories: Women Domestic Workers in Pakistan and their Struggle for Empowerment, Oxford University Press, 2010. • Andreas Dimopoulos, Persons Issues in Human Rights Protection of Intellectually Disabled Persons, Ashgate, 2010. • Alexandra Xanthaki, Indigenous Rights and United Nations Standards: Self-determination, Culture and Land, Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Aims • To enable graduates to develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law. • To equip graduates with critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law. • To enable graduates to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law. • To provide graduates with the professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law. • To provide gradutates with a detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

• LLM Master of Laws

Special Features Flexible start times and learning options Programme available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to both tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres The Law School benefits from active research centres, including the Human Rights Centre and the URC on Media, Security and Human Rights, which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences. The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on International Human Rights, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and . LLM students will be expected to actively participate. Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights, and it is important to us that all staff are included in our Research Assessment’s (RAE). In the last RAE in 2008, 50% of our research was rated as worldleading or internationally excellent, and in 1996 RAE we were rated 4A, and in the 2001 RAE 5A. Some of the International Conferences held at Brunel Law School, in relation to Human Rights include: • The Expert Seminar in International Indigenous peoples’ rights ‘Indigenous Peoples’ Languages and Cultures’, in March 2012, organised in collaboration with the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. • The International Conference on ‘Islamic Law and International Law’, in September 2011, with the participation of members of the ILA Committee on Islamic and International Law, including the former Judge at the International Court of Justice, and Former Jordan’s Prime Minister, His Excellency Judge Awn S. Al-Khasawneh, Chair of the ILA committee of Islamic Law. • The International Conference on Islam, Religion and Sexuality, in July 2013, with the participation of a number of international experts and academics from all over the world.

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Extra-curricular activities

Elective Modules

The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits, and most notably, the visit to the European Court of Human Rights, available to students taking Regional Human Rights Law. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

In addition to the above core modules, an LLM student will have to take 60 credits of taught modules by choosing any of the following elective modules:

Research skills The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Term I • International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2 • Comparative Criminal Justice (15 credits) 2 • Minority and Indigenous Rights (15 credits) 2 • Disability and Human Rights (15 credits) 2 • Privacy and Data Protection (15 credits) 2 • Public International Law (15 credits) 2 • Law and Medical Ethics (15 credits) 2 Term II • International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2

Career Support

• International Criminal Justice (15 credits) 2

Students benefit from the University’s award winning ‘Placement and Careers Centre’ who offer specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare `graduates for their chosen career.

• Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

Course Content The LLM International Human Rights Law is normally awarded to students who successfully complete taught modules of 120 credits and a dissertation weighted at 60 credits (180 credits in total).

• Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2 • International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2 • International Labour Law I (15 credits) 2 • International Labour Law II (15 credits) 2 • World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights 2 ** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Note: modules are subject to withdrawal at the School’s discretion.

Compulsory Taught Modules Term I Theory and Practice of the European Convention on Human Rights (15 credits) 1 UN Human Rights Regime (15 credits) 1

Term II American and the African System of Human Rights (15 credits) 1 Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1 * The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

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Teaching and Learning The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there is 16 hours of teaching per credit module, and this is usually a combination of teaching methods. This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations, including: Prof Javaid Rehman Prof Rehman is a world- leading expert in International and Islamic law. Professor Rehman has written extensively on the subject of Islamic Law, International human rights and minority rights. His recent works include International Human Rights Law (Longman, 2010), Islamic State Practices, International Law and the threat from Terrorism (Hart Publishing, 2005), and (with SC Breau) (eds.) Religion, Human Rights and International law (Martinus Nijhoff publishers, 2007). As a member of the International Law Association, Professor Rehman is the co-rapporteur of the Committee of International Law and Islamic Law. He is on the editorial boards of several journals, is the General Managing Editor of the Asian Yearbook of International Law (AYIL) and is a joint co-editor of the Journal of Islamic State Practices in International Law (JISPIL). Professor Rehman has been involved at various levels of policy making, and has also acted as an advisor to various governmental as non-governmental organisations on counter-terrorism issues as well as civil liberties and human rights law. Professor Ilias Bantekas Prof Bantekas is a world-wide recognised expert international law. Prior to Brunel, he has held several other appointments at the Universities of Westminster, Liverpool, Trier, Harvard, Cleveland State University, Miami, the International Institute of Humanitarian Law at San Remo, SOAS (University of London), Rosario (Bogota) and others. He has also worked as a legal expert for the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and has advised governments, private clients and NGOs on matters of general international law, foreign investment law and arbitration. In 2000 he was awarded the Paul Reuter Prize by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) for his doctoral thesis.

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Professor Ben Chigara Prof Chigara is a leading international law expert. He is the founding Director of the Centre for International and Public Law (CIPL) that was inaugurated by Lord Bill Brett on 11 May 2004 and the founding Director of Brunel University’s flagship Master of Law programmes in International Economic Law; International Intellectual Property; and European and International Commercial Law. He was also the founding Deputy Head (Operations) of Brunel Law School during and after its 2006 transition and advancement from a law department to a fully independent school. He is the author of several refereed books, book chapters and journal articles. He is consultant to the European Scientific Foundation (ESF); European Commission (EC); the International Labour Organization (ILO); and the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe’s (OSCE) Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR). He has links with Public Administration International (PAI); The Oxford Research Group (ORG); and The British Institute of International and Comparative Law (BIICL). He has recently given talks on contemporary legal issues at The Uinited Nations (Geneva); Hawasa University (Ethiopia); Potchefstroon University (South Africa); The London School of Economics; Birmingham University; Brunel University; The University of Peshawar Pakistan; Abo Akademi Institute of Human Rights - Turku, Finland; University of Cape Town - South Africa; Brandeis Law School - University of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Dr Alexandra Xanthaki, Reader in Law Dr Xanthaki is a world- leading expert in International minority and indigenous peoples’ rights, and a member of the International Law Association Committee. Alexandra’s work focuses on indigenous rights and the concept of multiculturalism in international law. Her monograph Indigenous Rights and United Nations Standards: Selfdetermination, Culture and Land (CUP, 2007) is considered a reference source in the field and her edited collection (with Stephen Allen) on “Reflections on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples “ (Hart Publishing, 2011) is being reprint. Alexandra’s links with IGOs include her co-operation with the former UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Issues, an ILO study on Maori participation in the New Zealand Parliament and her role as a human rights expert on several projects funded by the European Commission. In 2012, Dr Xanthaki was invited by the Kuala Lumpur Bar to discuss indigenous land rights in Malaysia and ways forward. She is currently working on a monograph on multiculturalism in international law.

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Dr Manisuli Senyonjo, Senior Lecturer in Law Dr Senyonjo is a leading human rights expert, with a worldwide renowned expertise in human rights, focusing in particular in Economic, social and cultural rights and in the regional systems of human rights protection. He has published three books, which are used for this course: ‘African Regional Human Rights System: 30 Years after the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights’ Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2011; International human rights law: Six decades after the UDHR and beyond. Ashgate and ‘Economic, social and cultural rights in international law, Hart Publishing, 2010. Dr Ayesha Shahid, Lecturer in Law Ayesha is an expert in International Human Rights law, focusing in particular in Islamic law and human Rights. Her monograph titled “Silent Voices, Untold Stories Women Domestic Workers and their Struggle for Empowerment” has been published by the Oxford University Press. It is a sociolegal study about law, empowerment and access to justice for women domestic workers in Pakistan. By using feminist legal perspectives, Islamic perspectives on women’s work and legal pluralism, the study questions the efficacy of law as a tool for empowering women domestic workers in their struggle against exploitative treatment in the workplace. Her research articles have been published in renowned journals and she has also carried out a number of research projects for international organisations. Ayesha was given the prestigious Warwick Postgraduate Research fellowship Award in 2002. She also received a Postgraduate Diploma in teaching ‘Human Rights Law’ from Columbia University, USA in 2000. Dr Andreas Dimopoulos, Lecturer in Law Andreas is an expert in International Human Rights law, focusing particularly in the interrelation between disability and human rights. His research involves aspects of medical law, bioethics, discrimination Law. He has published a number of articles in international leading jounrals, and has also recently published a book on Intellectual Disability and Human Rights Law (‘Persons Issues in Human Rights Protection of Intellectually Disabled Persons, Ashgate, 2010).

Assessment The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Employability Brunel University has always placed great emphasis on developing graduates who can be innovative, adding value to society through their work. Brunel students become the kind of graduates whom employers want to recruit and as a result they currently enjoy the 13th highest starting salaries in the UK. This success is down to several factors: • creative and forward-looking subjects • an award-winning careers service • the entrepreneurial spirit

Careers Brunel University has always placed great emphasis on developing graduates who can be innovative, adding value to society through their work. Brunel students become the kind of graduates whom employers want to recruit and as a result they currently enjoy some of the highest starting salaries in the UK. This success is down to several factors: • combining academic study with work experience • creative and forward-looking subjects • an award-winning careers service • working while they study

Dr Eleni Polymenopoulou, Lecturer in Law.

• the entrepreneurial spirit

Eleni is an expert in cultural human rights. Her research interests include cultural, as well as political, social and anthropological readings of human rights; questions related to the accommodation of diversity, religions (particularly Islam); the intersections between arts and the law. She has published a number of articles in leading international journals (ICLQ, Fordham Journal of IL, German Yearbook of IL) and has been invited in a number of international conferences.

The human rights programme is suitable for students who are looking for career opportunities in human rights advocacy or in governmental and non-governmental human rights organisations at the national and international level, as well as for students interested in pursuing an academic career.

Please note that lecturers may vary from year to year.

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Enquiries For Academic enquiries please contact Jenny King, Senior PG Programme Administrator Brunel Law School Brunel University Email j.king@brunel.ac.uk Tel +44 (0)1895 267316 Fax +44 (0)1895 810476 Web www.brunel.ac.uk/law Course Director: Dr Mihail Danov

For admission enquiries please contact our admissions or international team Admissions Office Brunel University Uxbridge Middlesex UB8 3PH Tel +44 (0)1895 265265 Fax +44 (0)1895 269790 Email admissions@brunel.ac.uk Brunel International Brunel University Uxbridge Middlesex UB8 3PH Tel +44 (0)1895 265519 Fax +44 (0)1895 269700 Email international@brunel.ac.uk

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