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THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME MAY 2018 £4.80

THE SECRET OF

SIMPLE LIVING

STEP INSIDE THE WORLD’S MOST SERENE HOMES

BEAUTIFUL SPRING BUYS OUR EDIT FROM THE HIGH STREET & ONLINE

SPA STYLE AT HOME

BATHROOM SPECIAL 05 9 770957 894229

THE BEST OF ITALIAN DESIGN


CONTENTS

STYLE 29 Spring shopping Piet Hein Eek’s new collaboration with Ikea, nine of the best afordable sofas, and our wishlists for this month – plus, all the other new-season buys to check out right now 61

The virtual high street Snap up unique, accessible designs from the comfort of your sofa with our pick of the best independent online retailers

COVER IMAGE (SUBS AND NEWSSTAND): JAKE CURTIS (PHOTOGRAPHY), SANIA PELL (STYLING)

67 Design We chat to Alice Black, co-director of London’s Design Museum, about what’s inspiring her, as well as taking a closer look at two revolutionary furniture brands: GHYCZY and Kettal

73 Decorating The latest wallpapers, paints and fabrics, plus a celebration of silver. Dive into Dimore Studio’s kaleidoscopic fabric collection, rediscover pattern legend De Voysey and meet interior design duo Robinson Van Noort

I TA L I A N D E S I G N 93 In the run-up to the Milan Furniture Fair, we reveal our directory of need-to-know brands and share their latest launches

COVE R

85 Architecture We look at how three derelict buildings in London are being given a new lease of life by architects, and discuss future masterpieces with Jim Olson, founding partner of Olson Kundig 88 Technology A stylish console featuring a high-tech vinyl turntable, headphones with ‘3D sound’ and other gadgets that will update your home

N E W S S TA N D

This month’s cover features pretty, pastel-toned buys from our spring style shoot on p140

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B AT H R O O M S P E C I A L 177 Our edit of the hottest bathroom trends, plus what to buy to get the looks

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CONTENTS 114 Shrine to simplicity Minimalism prevails in this Kiev apartment, which has been designed to complement the pared-back lines of its furniture 122 Soothe your senses Let the muted tones of this Italian home convince you that you don’t have to forego colour and fun to live simply

130 The calmest canvas Stripping this cottage in Honfleur, Normandy, back to its authentic roots allowed it to be seen in a whole new light

140 Spring into action Perfect the new season’s mix of blossom-like pastels and exuberant brights with afordable buys from the high street and beyond 148

Zen master Homeowner Dario Vitale’s passion for Eastern philosophy guided the sensitive restoration of this 1930s oice space in Milan

156 Fade to grey This Cape Town apartment’s muted take on monochrome is a masterclass in bringing comfort and character to a pared-back palette

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Jewel in the dust Caring for the period details of a 19th-century Art Nouveau building needn’t mean living in a shrine to the past, as the owner of this apartment in northern Italy has shown

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ESCAPE

HOMES

130 197 News Dreamy Welsh cabins, three new boutique London hotels and a tiny-but-stylish guesthouse in the Czech Republic. Plus, three of the best cookbooks for global fare, and the lowdown on the just-reopened Hayward Gallery

204 Gardens Everything green-fingered folk need to do this month, from a new exhibition at London’s Garden Museum to planting workshops

207 Getaway We head to Marrakech – the city that inspired Yves Saint Laurent’s love of colour – to explore its chic riads, indulgent spas and the finest purveyors of Berber rugs and Zellige tiles

F I N A L LY 26 Subscribe Fantastic ofers for our most loyal readers 213 Stockists Where to buy everything in this issue 226 Fine print We reveal this month’s eye-catching fabric 20 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018


‘If one’s life is simple, contentment has to come. Simplicity is extremely important for happiness. Having few desires, feeling satisfied with what you have, is very vital…’

PICTURE: JAMES MCNAUGHT

These wise words from the Dalai Lama seemed to ring with a certain truth as the team were compiling the issue you are now reading. With many of us now taking a more mindful approach to life, it’s no wonder that this ethos has particular resonance when it comes to our homes. Ironically, a sense of calm and serenity is not that easy to achieve, especially given the chaos that most of our daily lives entail. So, we wanted to highlight some stunning interiors from around the world where the owners and designers have managed to achieve that everelusive balance of a pared-back aesthetic coupled with real style and personality. There’s no sterile minimalism here – instead, there are new approaches to soothing palettes and curated furnishings. I hope you’re as inspired as I have been by these takes on modern simplicity. An equally considered approach should also be applied to how we shop. To that end, I’ve been influenced by Tara Button and her buy well, buy once maxim (see p57). After all, happiness cannot be found by blindly filling our lives with more and more stuf. So, this month, you’ll also find advice on how to shop more sensibly. Not only do we reveal brilliant accessible buys from the high street and online that you’ll cherish, but we’ll also show you the best Italian brands to invest in – the perfect marriage of design, craftsmanship and quality. Still struggling to find peace? Look no further than the humble bathroom, the one room where you can truly create a haven away from the world. Read our trend edit on p177. Be inspired and relax!

Executive Editor

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Twitter: @ELLEDecoBen

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26 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018


ST YLE DESIGN

SPRING SHOPPING SPECIAL

/ P E O P L E / D E C O R AT I N G / A R C H I T E C T U R E

Edited by A MY MOOREA WONG

Ready for a spending spree? High-street and online stores are offering stylish designs at tempting prices – all you need is our edit of the very best buys… Above ‘Industriell’ armchair (£120) by Piet Hein Eek for Ikea. Turn the page for more about the new collection ➤


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Tell us a bit about the ‘Industriell’ collection… I wanted customers to have the feeling of buying a unique product. This collection is based on the idea of ‘handmade, serial produced’. We developed new ways to work with wood, glass, ceramics and textiles to produce consistently individual items on a large scale. The costs were primarily in the development and as production didn’t change, we were able to create afordable ‘handmade’ pieces. I hope they stand out on the shelves. How did your approach to design differ for such a large market? It remained the same, although I was finally able to use ideas I had previously developed, but that hadn’t materialised because they would have needed to be produced in huge numbers to be cost efective. Working with Ikea made these concepts possible. Why is handcrafting important to The Dutch designer discusses the ethos you? Industrialisation led to so many behind his afordable ‘Industriell’ collection products being ‘perfect’, that today people have diferent perceptions of beauty – you could say that I strive for perfect imperfection. The materials you used seem very raw, was this a conscious choice? Yes, and it was especially important for the wooden pieces. Usually, pine products go through a process to remove the ‘flaws’ – for my collection, we did as little as possible to the wood in order to preserve its character. It’s these natural kinks that give craft objects their individuality, but it was diicult to persuade the people working in the factories to embrace what they usually perceive to be mistakes as something positive. What’s your favourite piece? That’s diicult. Perhaps the armchair (previous page). I remember seeing the prototype and finding it enchanting (ikea.com).

IKEA X PIET HEIN EEK

PICTURES: LUTZ HILGERS, BILDFELDT AB, SANDRA WERUD

Clockwise, from top left Pendant lights, £25 each; shelving unit, £90; glasses, 90p each; plates, £5 each; tea towels (shown as cushion covers), £5.50 for two; chairs, £80 each; dining table, £300; vase, £18, all Ikea (ikea.com)

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WISHLIST

MAKE THEM BLUSH

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Combine reds, dusky pinks and peach tones with hints of gold for a modern, relaxed living room 3

1 ‘Palette’ wallpaper in ‘Albers’, £250 per square metre, Calico Wallpaper (calicowallpaper.com) 2 Diamond shelf, £38, Urban Outfitters (urbanoutfitters.com) 3 ‘Very Well Red’ paint, £46.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) 4 ‘Sapphire’ armchair in ‘Dusty Pink’ velvet, £349, Swoon Editions (swooneditions.com) 5 Mini marble vase by Gray & Willow, £16, House of Fraser (houseofraser.co.uk) 6 ‘Ottoline’ drinks cabinet, £575, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) 7 ‘Kemptown’ table lamp, £45, Next (next.co.uk) 8 Wool-blend rug, £119.99, H&M (hm.com)

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SERVE UP STYLE One half decorated in a smooth glaze speckled with flecks of black, the other a tactile raw ceramic, Next’s ‘Fairford’ tableware will add a charming rustic edge to dinner time. £48 for a 12-piece set (next.co.uk).

UNFINISHED BUSINESS French Connection’s new textile collection celebrates imperfection. Handmade in India, the bedlinen, cushions and throws make a virtue of their unfinished edges, varied thread lengths and uneven patterns. The palette of pale and neutral tones works best when casually combined. From £38 for a cushion ( frenchconnection.com).

CHEVRON SIDEBOARDS

PICTURE: GRAHAM ATKINS-HUGHES

The classic pattern of herringbone parquet has been lifted from the floor and added to these statement pieces of furniture. Here’s our top three takes on this new look…

Sideboards, from top ‘Art Deco’, £699, Furniture Village (furniturevillage.co.uk). ‘Stanford’, £1,119, Content by Terence Conran (contentbyterenceconran.com). ‘Chevron’, £1,125, Cox & Cox (coxandcox.co.uk)

MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 35


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THE COLOUR PURPLE

‘Belle D’Isle’ plate by Leslie Weaver, £14

The rather punchy ‘Ultra Violet’ may be Pantone’s Colour of the Year, but we’re more taken with the earthy plum tones of BoConcept’s ‘Adelaide’ chairs. Paired with the extendable, black-stained oak top of the ‘Ottawa’ table, designed by Karim Rashid, they are dinner party perfection. Table, £1,829; chairs from £389 each (boconcept.com).

Tasseled ‘Nadia’ cushion, £48

4 OF THE BEST ANTHROPOLOGIE

Pom-poms, gilding and artistic patterns – this high-street brand ofers bohemian originality

PICK OF THE BUNCH Floral enthusiasts should head to Marks & Spencer, as it’s launched a collection of 16 glass vases, with one to suit every posey. Developed with the brand’s horticultural team and created by glassmakers in Poland, the pieces can house everything from single stems to bouquets. From £12.50 (marksandspencer.com).

‘Karuma’ glazed terracotta pitcher, £48

‘Shape Study’ rug, £498

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DRAW THE LINE

‘Grey Hexagonal’ glass and tumbler, £9.99 each

Swoon Edition’s new collection, including the ‘Konrad’ open wardrobe (£379) has an industrial quality to it, with carameltoned woods supported by the most minimal of black metal frames (swooneditions.com).

Blue matt and shiny ceramic vase, £19.99

N E W W E AV E With woven metal wire partly obscuring the bulb, House of Fraser’s pendant light by Linea has us dreaming of the shadows it will cast come sundown. £80 (houseofraser.co.uk).

4 OF THE BEST ZARA HOME

The place for trend-led seasonal styles, bold patterns and perfectly priced design staples

Faux leather appliqué linen cushion cover, £29.99

DREAM OF CONRAN Black metal candleholder, £25.99

Sir Terence Conran has partnered with Bensons for Beds to ofer his iconic aesthetic at a fraction of its normal price. Conran describes the sleek ‘Harper’ bed as ‘a piece of furniture that is afordable, beautiful and classic’, its architectural curved headboard doubling as back legs. The cocoon-like, button-backed headboard is available in ‘Dove Grey’ (above), ‘Natural’, ‘Silver’, ‘Pewter’, ‘Blush’ and ‘Teal’. £899 for a double (bensonsforbeds.co.uk). MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 39


SPRING SHOPPING

WISHLIST

INTO THE BLUE Take a deep-sea dive into a palette of moody teal, inky navy and azure shades 3 1

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1 ‘Azuri’ fabric in ‘Petrol’, £68 per metre, Anthology (stylelibrary.com/ anthology) 2 ‘Aubusson Blue’ paint, £39.95 for 2.5 litres, Annie Sloan (anniesloan.com) 3 ‘Pixie’ pendant light, £120, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 4 ‘Underwatery’ art print, £125, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk) 5 ‘Crescent’ swivel chair in ‘Teal’, £599, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 6 Brushed-efect jacquard blanket, £89.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com) 7 ‘Conran Farley’ coffee table, £229, Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.co.uk) 8 ‘Aegean Sea’ handblown glass vase, £12, Curious Egg (curiousegg.com) 9 Velvet ikat cushion by Junipa, £25, House of Fraser (houseofraser.co.uk) 10 ‘Kenny’ blue and grey wool rug, £300, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 9

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40 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

COMPILED BY: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURE: ANDY GORE LTD

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9 OF THE BEST SOFAS COMFORT & STYLE FOR UNDER £2,000

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1 ‘Crawford’ in ‘Bloom’, £1,430, Arlo & Jacob (arloandjacob.com) 2 ‘Can’ in black by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Hay, £1,579, Utility Design (utilitydesign.co.uk) 3 ‘Day Dream’ in dark grey by Design House Stockholm, £1,603, Clippings (clippings.com) 4 ‘Hendrik’ in ‘Seashell’ house basket weave, £990, Sofa.com (sofa.com) 5 ‘Canvas’ in ‘Ash Grey’ by HK Living, £1,475, Out There Interiors (outthereinteriors.com) 6 ‘Julian’ in ‘Iceberg Blue’, £629, Maisons du Monde (maisonsdumonde.com) 7 ‘Slim Jim’ in ‘Old Rose’ vintage velvet, from £1,845, Loaf (loaf.com) 8 ‘Shoreditch’ in ‘Hugo Pale Oat’ with ‘Hugo Mustard’ piping, £1,670, Neptune (neptune.com) 9 ‘James’ in ‘Milkmaid’s Eyes’, £1,250, Perch & Parrow (perchandparrow.com)

MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 43


SPRING SHOPPING

‘Boolu’ vase, £34

‘Emilia’ mug, £16

4 OF THE BEST OLIVER BONAS

One to watch, this brand has a great eye for luxurious details and artisan styling

‘Luxe Loop’ cofee table, £355

EVERYDAY HEROES John Lewis’s ‘Design Project’ range continues to explore how design can be both timeless and relevant to how we live now. Highlights from the current collection include this ‘No.004’ oak sideboard’ (£799), as well as the concrete, brass and black ‘No.045’ task lamp (£75) and the thick wool weave of the ‘No.110’ rug (£160), all of which adhere to the collection’s ethos of working together, as well as standing alone ( johnlewis.com).

SHADES OF THE SEASON

‘Cocktail’ jug, £60

44 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

H&M’s textiles are the easiest way to embrace the New Neutrals trend – our name for the palette of tea rose, lavender and mint that is taking over our homes. ‘It’s all about starting the new season with a pure, calm atmosphere,’ says Evelina Kravaev Söderberg, head of design at the brand. Mix up every shade of these colours with textures and patterns. Cushion covers, from £3.99 each (hm.com).


SPRING SHOPPING

WISHLIST

TROPICAL HOUSE Add an exotic twist to your dining room with lush jungle prints, natural textures and fruity hues

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1 ‘Java’ large rattan shade, £59, Made (made.com) 2 ‘Chic Pink’ paint by Sanderson, £43 for 2.5 litres, Sanderson (stylelibrary.com/sanderson) 3 ‘Lagoon’ wallpaper, £135 per nine-metre roll, Lucy Tifney (lucytifneyshop.com) 4 ‘Huxley’ ten-seater dining table, £650, Next (next.com) 5 Cactus selection in ceramic pot, £25, Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.com) 6 ‘Colorado’ vases, from £14 each, Anthropologie (anthropologie.co.uk) 7 ‘Hogla’ cube floor seat, £110, Oggetto (oggetto.com) 8 ‘Taniko’ rug, £199, Swoon Editions (swooneditions.com)

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MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 47


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NAME TO KNOW AARON PROBYN

This British designer has been setting tabletop trends around the world for years, but now his sights are set on lighting and the launch of his first solo designs

Clockwise, from above ‘Normann’ cutlery (shown twice), £85 for a 16-piece set, Normann Copenhagen (normanncopenhagen.com). ‘Hutton’ pendant light, £250; ‘Harman’ floor light, from £110, both Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Zofia’ salad servers, £39.99; ‘Juniper’ glassware, from £8, both Aaron Probyn (aaronprobyn.com)

How did Probyn get into design? Growing up in London, he left school at 16 – feeling, in his words, ‘uninspired by education’ – to become a carpenter, which was when he discovered the pleasure of making things. ‘I started collecting pieces of mid-century furniture and refurbishing old Anglepoise lights to sell at Portobello Market. It was great hands-on training – it taught me how a product is made, and how and why every component is relevant to the design,’ Probyn says. Re-entering education in 1998 with a more positive outlook, he studied Product and Furniture at Kingston University, where he met visiting lecturer Graham Russell, a designer for Habitat Design Studio. This encounter led to a work placement making prototypes and, before long, Probyn was producing his own products for the brand, before becoming tabletop design manager – a role he held from 2003 to 2008. What’s his style? Soft and minimal, his designs are defined by smooth lines and gentle curves. ‘I want all of my products to transcend trends and be enjoyed for years – they have to be emotionally engaging as

PICTURES: JEPPE SØRENSEN

‘My products have to be emotionally engaging as well as functional’

well as functional,’ explains Probyn. His most recognised design is the ‘Normann’ cutlery range for Normann Copenhagen (above and far left), which has been part of the brand’s collection for the past six years. Why is he on our radar now? He’s just launched his first ever lighting collection, designed for Habitat. From the ‘Hutton’ pendant light’s suspended LED tubes (top) to the ‘Harman’ floor light (right), Probyn found designing lighting to be a more free and emotive process than creating tabletop pieces – ‘there are far fewer gravitational restrictions,’ he says. What’s next? Splitting his time between London and New York, the designer has very recently launched his own tableware collection, which he’s hoping to place in selected independent, design-led stores. ‘I love working on products that are selfbriefed, so I can have complete control over them,’ he adds (aaronprobyn.com).

MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 49


SPRING SHOPPING

SEAT EVERYONE Muji’s ‘PP’ stackable stool allows even those with compact homes to store seating for the whole family – plus guests. The soft outward flare of its base and the way it inclines gently forward make it a stylish and functional buy. £24.95 each (muji.com).

SYMPHONY OF STRIPES It’s the artisanal element of Atkin and Thyme’s ‘Amadeus’ chest of drawers that makes its black and white stripes stand out from the crowd. Intricately hand-crafted from bone and resin inlay with a mango wood base, the slightly of-kilter lines make for a character-filled take on graphic monochrome. £699 (atkinandthyme.co.uk).

TA S S E L TA K E O V E R Rockett St George has teamed up with Moroccan artisans to create a capsule collection of throws. Handwoven on wooden looms, the pieces are updated with a playful edging of supersized tassels. From £145 (rockettstgeorge.co.uk). 50 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018


SPRING SHOPPING

WISHLIST

SUN AND STRIPES Team moody, graphic greys with splashes of sunshine yellow for a modern bedroom scheme

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1 House by John Lewis ‘Jed’ floor lamp, £75, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 2 ‘Eileen’ wallpaper, £135 per ten-metre roll, Ottoline (ottoline.nl) 3 ‘Citron’ Estate Emulsion paint, £45 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) 4 ‘Sjöpenna’ oval pendant lamp, £20, Ikea (ikea.com) 5 ‘Forest Lovers’ print by Christopher DeLorenzo, from £15, Room Fifty (roomfifty.com) 6 ‘Lugano’ bed, from £929, BoConcept (boconcept.com) 7 J by Jasper Conran towels, from £11, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 8 ‘Abstract’ cushion from the ‘Elements’ collection, £20, Dunelm (dunelm.com) 9 ‘Arkin’ rug in mustard, £49, Made (made.com)

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SPRING SHOPPING

A RT O F D I S P L AY

Jasper Morrison’s tray series for Vitra has been updated with two new designs. The ‘High Tray’ ( below, £40), poised on a domed foot, is ideal for showing of treasured items (vitra.com).

Banded throw with corner tassels, £49

‘Thea’ chair in ‘Dusty Blush’, £699

LIGHT AND SHADES

4 OF THE BEST WEST ELM

Elegant shapes and powdery pastels are this company’s considered take on the latest trends ‘Sunkissed Landscape’ rug, from £299

Matthew Hilton’s first foray into lighting, made in collaboration with Heal’s, includes the traditionallyproportioned shade of the ‘Dome’ pendant – which comes in a subdued palette of black, putty and khaki. There’s no need for a bulb, as these come with their own integrated LED light source. £249 (heals.com).

EXTRA LEGROOM Created with modern, compact living in mind, Matthew Long’s ‘Vandelli’ armchair is deep rather than wide, giving the sitter space to stretch their legs. Handmade in Italy, it comes in a selection of rich-toned velvets, including navy blue (below) and emerald. £895, Habitat (habitat.co.uk).

PICTURES: MARC EGGIMANN

‘Mid-Century Art’ display console, £399

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SPRING SHOPPING

SHOP FOR LIFE

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURE: FREMXR

Internet entrepreneur Tara Button is on a mission to make us shop more mindfully. We find out why… Throwaway consumerism is now regarded as a Very Bad Thing and more and more of us aspire to buy only things that will last, but still, the flow of shiny new products vying for our attention is relentless. How do we decide what’s really worth our cash? Step forward Tara Button, ad executive turned crusader for mindful shopping. Five or so years ago, Button found herself living in a cluttered house, with a shopping habit and credit-card debt. She made her living writing TV ads – ‘pushing people to buy things they didn’t necessarily want or need’ – and she was caught in the web herself. Button had an epiphany when her sister engaging and down to earth, it doesn’t even gave her a Le Creuset casserole for her 30th tell us to stop shopping. Rather, it guides us birthday. ‘I had a visceral reaction to it,’ she towards spending in a more rewarding way. remembers. ‘It was the kind of object you ‘The average house has 300,000 objects in pass down to your children. I thought about it, but only a few of those add genuine value how little waste there would be if everything to our lives,’ Button reasons. I owned were like that.’ She began building As an ex-advertising insider, Button is an online database, researching the best well placed to show us how manufacturers products, from T-shirts to kettles (among hoodwink us. Her book explores how planned the vital criteria were obsolescence induces us functionality, materials, ‘The average house to buy more (read the and sustainability). She on lightbulbs) has 300,000 objects section also had a thorough clearand shares tips on how out of her possessions we can all learn to resist in it, but only a few and resolved never again adverts. Most of those add genuine seductive to buy on impulse. importantly perhaps, she In 2016, her website, is an advocate of ‘mindful value to our lives’ BuyMeOnce, made the curation’: taking time to transition from private passion project to establish your taste and putting coveted phenomenon – despite the modest edit of things on a wishlist before spending. products (in the crockery section, only Ultimately, though, Button believes that Denby’s virtually unbreakable stoneware the issue of throwawayism is bigger than makes the grade). ‘In the first fortnight, our own needs. It’s the environmental impact 600,000 people visited the site,’ she says. of our shopping habits that motivates her. Button has now written a book, A Life Less ‘Buying things that last is the best and easiest Throwaway: The Art of Buying for Life (£12.99, thing you can do for the planet,’ she argues. Harper Thorsons), which details her vision Her next focus is her #MakeItLast petition, at length. Some manifestos on minimalist which aims to force manufacturers to label living can seem severe, but not this one; their products with a durability mark. ‘We know that companies are aware roughly how long their products last with normal usage,’ she says. ‘This mark would give consumers a “cost per year” and help them to see which product is the best value.’ She would also like to give worthy designs a BuyMeOnce label. ‘I want it to become a symbol of longevity, just like the Kitemark for safety,’ she enthuses. As her book states, it’s time to throw away our throwaway culture for good.

FIVE THINGS FOR THE HOME YOU SHOULD BUY ONLY ONCE

Tara Button’s pick of long-lasting homewares

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TUMBLERS No glass is unbreakable, but these are tough enough to be used in cafés around the world. ‘Picardie’, £5 for four, Arket (arket.com)

WOOL BLANKET Made using colourfast wool that doesn’t pill, shrink or fade, the ‘Eco-Wise’ blanket by Pendleton will keep you warm for a lifetime. £150 (pendleton woolenmills.co.uk)

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HOB KETTLE This stove-top kettle by Stellar is made of the highest quality steel. It will be making you tea long into your 90s. £67 (buy meonce.com)

4 5 SKILLET The ‘Aus-Ion’ skillet by Solidteknics has a multi-century warranty – if your grandchildren’s children have an issue, they can take it back! From £99.90 (buymeonce.com)

SOFA Wesley Barrell sofas are made in Britain and the frames come with a lifetime guarantee. ‘Campden’, from £2,880 (wesley-barrell.co.uk)

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D E S T I N AT I O N S T O R E L I B E RT Y LONDON

The grande dame of London department stores, which attracts in-the-know design lovers and fashion fans alike

F I V E B U Y S Y O U C A N O N L Y F I N D AT L I B E R T Y

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‘Psychoanalysis’ perfume by Bella Freud, £165

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: JACK MELROSE

‘Indiana’ long silk pyjama set, £295

‘Peacock Garden’ velvet cushion, £110 Ceramics by Luke Edward Hall, from £150

Small ‘Alberto’ plate by Azem William, £195

What’s the store’s history? In 1875, British merchant Sir Arthur Lasenby Liberty opened the doors of a shop on Regent Street called East India House, which purveyed exotic furniture, fabrics and porcelain found in Persia, Asia and Japan. Following sell-out success, it expanded into the eponymous emporium on Great Marlborough Street. What will I find there? Two fashion floors, a vintage clothing boutique, luscious plants (Wild At Heart is the in-store florist), a café, stationery shop, rug room, interiors floor and, since last year, the Mini British Food Hall. Since the mid-20th century, Liberty has been synonymous with Arts & Crafts and Art Nouveau revival-style fabrics designed by its in-house team. The shop’s archive contains over 43,000 designs, and many are still available to buy by the metre in-store. You’ll also find furniture by British names Another Country and SCP, alongside Danish design brands old (Carl Hansen) and new (Hay). What makes the store unique? The Tudor-style mansion housing Liberty, built in 1924 out of the timber taken from a pair of British battleships, is a London landmark, and the shopping venue’s purple carrier bags are as cheering as the rattle of a ‘Liberty coin’ in a box – the magpie-friendly way the store presents its gift vouchers. But what really makes Liberty a must-visit is the clever mix of items on display. ‘Prices range from £10 to £10,000,’ says homeware buyer Bryony Sheridan. ‘There are one-ofs, such as a vintage Peshawar rug, alongside pieces from the big brands.’ What’s next? Visit now to catch the colourful ‘Made In India’ pop-up flea market, featuring beautiful handmade homeware that was found by Liberty’s eagle-eyed buyers and shipped back. Plus, over 9,000 emerging artisans and modern makers responded to this year’s Liberty Open Call, which appealed to new designers: the winner, whose product will be going on sale in-store, will be revealed during London Craft Week (9–13 May). libertylondon.com MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 59


SPRING SHOPPING

SPRING SHOPPING SPECIAL

YOUR VIRTUAL HIGH STREET Snap up unique, afordable designs from the comfort of your sofa – here’s our pick of the best online shops

NAMOKI A platform for makers from the UK and Ireland whose kitchenware, textiles and accessories embody the Japanese design aesthetic of shibui – being beautiful by being understated. Current stock includes concrete planters by Havelock Studio, marbled espresso cups by ceramicist Ida Riveros and linens by Irish label 31 Chapel Lane. ‘Arbor’ sycamore shallow bowl by Alex Carpenter, £80 (namoki.co.uk)

LÜKS LINEN This is the place to pick up Turkish towels (called peshtemals), as well as cosy blankets and throws. There’s a strong emphasis on ethical materials (the brand’s aim is to become a certified organic seller), so all the cotton used is sourced, spun and dyed in Turkey, and the range includes textiles such as the soft ‘Bambu Blanket’, which is woven entirely from bamboo. ‘Cemile’ peshtemal, £33 (lukslinen.com)

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: ANNA BATCHELOR (AERENDE PHOTOGRAPHY), TAMINEH DHONDY (AERENDE STYLING)

THE FUTURE KEPT Run by photographers Jeska and Dean Hearne, this lifestyle brand sells items by independent makers. Products can be searched by price point (nothing costs more than £100) and by categories such as ‘Made by Hand’ and ‘Eco-Friendly’. Look out for cups and bowls by ceramicist Andrea Roman, and leather and waxed canvas camera bags by Rural Kind. Sisal woven baskets, from £16 each (thefuturekept.com)

SKINFLINT This retailer specialises in salvaged and vintage lights from the 1920s to 1970s. Styles include industrial designs (1950s pendants from an Eastern Bloc factory), retro options (glass chandeliers from the Czech Republic) and the new Art Deco collection, consisting of ten ceiling lights. Eastern Bloc factory shade, £330 (skinflintdesign.com)

AERENDE The ethos behind Aerende is that shopping ethically needn’t mean compromising on style. The brand ofers small batch homeware – popular items include linen tea towels, teal stoneware bowls and cherry wood butter knives – crafted by people who are facing social challenges in the UK and are unable to access employment (there is a section on the website dedicated to the makers’ stories, so you know exactly who you’re supporting). The wares are as beautiful as the concept is inspiring. Ceramic candleholders, £13 each; beeswax candles, £8 for two; dinner plates, £15 each; linen napkin set, £35; side plates, £9 each; jug, £24 (aerende.co.uk)

EDIT58 An eclectic mix of globally sourced pieces – green Tamegroute pottery from Morocco, papier maché animal heads from Portugal – and afordable gifts, such as alphabet prints, baskets, wallhangings and own-brand candles. London-based owner Lisa Mehydene ofers a rug sourcing service, too, so if you don’t see anything you like on the website, she’ll try to find a design that’s perfect for you. Tamegroute fruit bowl, £75 (edit58.com)

AUDENZA Colourful and kitsch is the maxim at Audenza – the brand counts the ‘Gatsby’ scalloped, plush velvet armchairs, neon lighting and gold-hammered placemats among its newest oferings, which can easily be found in the ‘Shiny & New’ section of its website. Be sure to take a look its ‘Most Loved’ bestsellers, too – where you’ll find a dusty pink Tibetan sheepskin rug, a flamingo-shaped table lamp and gold cutlery. Expect quirky, eclectic and bold pieces. Mongolian armchair, £708 (audenza.com)

INTO MILLS After three years spent researching and finding suppliers, Sally Ashen set up Into Mills in 2017 to sell the products she is most passionate about. The Lewes-based online retailer concentrates mostly on smaller, decorative accessories – monochrome cushions with Aztec knots, glass tealight holders, hanging cement pots – but there are a few chairs and tables on ofer, too, including the ‘Henri’ cotton velvet armchair, available in mustard or terracotta. Teak boards, from £12.95 each (intomills.com) ➤ MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 61


SPRING SHOPPING

YONDER From indigo mudcloth cushions made in Mali to crackle-glazed vases from the Philippines and leather-handled raia fans made by weavers in Ghana, there is a distinctly global, artisanal feel to Yonder’s wares. There are plenty of vintage pieces, too – Beni Ourain rugs hand-loomed by Berber women in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco and Kantha quilts made by craftswomen in rural North India using sari fabric – plus smaller, playful accessories, such as art prints. Vintage peach Moroccan rug, £105 (yonderliving.com)

MOURNE TEXTILES This third-generation Northern Irish design studio has long been renowned for its textiles. There are tweed curtain and upholstery fabrics for sale by the metre, plus cushions and blankets. The brand prides itself on using timeless techniques, dating back to when its ‘Milano’ rug was first produced in 1951 by founder Gerd Hay-Edie. ‘Classic’ cushions, £125 each (mournetextiles.com)

INGREDIENTS LDN ‘Soulful homewares for slow living’ is how Ingredients Ldn describes itself. This mindful approach to homemaking is evident both in the materials it uses and the pieces themselves, which range from linen bedding and maple cutting boards to a sickle-shaped dust brush made from beech and goats’ hair. Botanical dyed linen napkin sets, £22 each (ingredientsldn.com)

WORDS: EMMA LOVE

CHALK & MOSS Biophilic design is at the heart of Swedish-born, Brighton-based Anna Sjöström Walton’s online shop. That means natural textures and botanical references throughout, from cheese plant art prints to the ‘MIMA’ collection of hardwood furniture by up-and-coming designer-maker John Eadon, and the palest pink dimpled vessels by Linda Bloomfield. Don’t miss the blog on the website, which features Swedish recipes and dreamy getaways. Magazine rack/side table by John Eadon, £895 (chalkandmoss.com)

ROWEN & WREN Functional wares in muted colours abound at this environmentallyconscious online shop, which was co-founded by a former designer for John Lewis – think brass lamps, velvet wingback chairs, green glasses made from recycled bottles and linen table runners. There are collections of soft furnishings, dinnerware and bathroom products. For children, there’s toys, bedding and storage – all without any plastic in sight. ‘Bilton’ brass bathroom shelf, £68 (rowenandwren.co.uk)

OGGETTO Its name very appropriately meaning ‘object’ in Italian, Oggetto provides a range of simple, functional items. Founders Helen and Charlie Camm source considered pieces for daily use (rustic casserole pots, bamboo pendant lights inspired by traditional Indonesian fishing traps, unglazed terracotta teapots) but also design and manufacture their own furniture: the ‘Chesil’ collection, named after the beach near their home in Dorset, features a series of pared-down oak and steel stools, benches and tables. Terracotta teapot, £95 (oggetto.com)

12THIRTEEN A tightly curated collection of unusual pieces by new designers, including ceramicist Ben Sutton, silversmith Caroline McNeill-Moss and MOTE, a Seoul-based scent laboratory. The mix of materials – gilded metal sculptures, a set of terrazzo serving boards, copper snack bowls – is particularly interesting. ‘Unearthed’ bowl by Sevak Zargarian, £70 (12thirteen-store.com)

ATT PYNTA A shared love of Scandinavian-inspired homeware sparked Amanda Nelson and Kai Price’s decision to set up Att Pynta, which ofers certain exclusives: it is the only UK stockist of furniture by Swedish brand MeliMeli Home. The duo has also collaborated with potter Marie L Sundegren on glazed ceramics. ‘Blanca’ velvet sofa by MeliMeli Home, from £2,095 (attpynta.com) MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 63


SPRING SHOPPING

ONLINE FOCUS AMARA

Accent cushion by Muuto, £65; ‘Alcove’ duvet cover, £60 and pillowcase, £15, both by Oliver Desforges; ‘Ripple’ throw by Muuto, £89; ‘Crinkle’ bedspread by Hay, £159; table lamp by Bloomingville, £155; ‘Lexy’ side table by Umbra, £70, all Amara (amara.com)

From left ‘Goya’ cushion by Christian Lacroix, £100; ‘Componibili’ storage unit by Kartell, £106; ‘Tunisi’ pouf by Missoni Home, £385, all Amara (amara.com)

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It’s hard to remember a time when we didn’t shop online. Yet in 2005, when Sam Hood and her husband set up Amara, originally as an interior design business and boutique in Essex, they quickly identified internet retail as a huge gap in the market. ‘Back then, hardly anyone was selling designer homewares online, so unless you lived in a large city, it was hard to access wonderful interiors brands,’ recalls Hood. From the get-go, the couple established relationships with key designers such as William Yeoward and Christian Lacroix and, in an unusual move, have always carried stock. ‘Many online retailers only use the images of products, then when customers buy them, they take six weeks to arrive. Apart from larger pieces, we have the stock, so we can deliver the next day.’ Its extensive, ever-changing range of products has been key to Amara’s success, and although Hood is always on the lookout for interesting brands to add to the site, she has deliberately cut numbers down (at one point, Amara carried around 600 brands – now it’s 250). ‘We decided not to pursue some of the brands selling the kind of items that we’re not known for, such as stationery. By editing our range so that it’s a curated,

cohesive collection of our favourite pieces, it gives us more time to work more closely with our chosen brands to develop the range each season,’ she explains. At any one time, there is always at least one exclusive collection available: currently, it’s a range of Mulberry cushions, and for summer, there will be Missoni Home beach bags. Two years ago, Hood also launched the ‘A by Amara’ homeware collection, which is based around styles she knows will appeal to her customers, and features pieces sourced from designers around the world. Around half of all Amara’s orders are shipped internationally, but for those that aren’t, a handy new click-and-collect service means that purchases can be delivered to a nearby store. ‘Everything is about making the shopping process easier,’ says Hood. Plans for the future include a possible concept store, where customers could use an iPad to order products for next-day delivery. Other than that, Hood wants to continue to spread the word about Amara. ‘Having our own range helps people recognise us as a brand rather than just a shop,’ she explains, ‘and that’s exactly what we want.’ amara.com

WORDS: EMMA LOVE

Sam Hood, co-founder of the design Mecca Amara, is a pioneer of homeware retail’s increasingly web-based world


STYLE

SAVIOUR OF SUMMER Meet Kettal, the outdoor furniture brand that aims to turn the garden into the most stylish space in any home

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: SALVA LOPEZ

Founded in 1966 by Manuel Alorda, Barcelona-based brand Kettal’s boundary-pushing designs have been transforming outdoor furniture for 50 years. In advance of garden party season, we talk to the company’s vice president, Alex Alorda.

Clockwise from below ‘Bitta Full Club’ armchair by Rodolfo Dordoni, from £1,810. Side table by Kettal Studio, £803. Outdoor fabrics. ‘Bela Ropes’; ‘Cala’ chair,£2,929, both by Doshi Levien

How has working with big-name designers shaped the brand? Our first designer item was the ‘Oscar’ chair, created by Oscar Tusquets in 1994, but the biggest step forward came in 2006 with Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Maia’ collection – it reinvented outdoor furniture. The interwoven design was full of energy, character and was diferent to anything seen on the market before. It marked the start of a new phase – we began to work with more designers, such as Jasper Morrison, Hella Jongerius, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec and Doshi Levien. Is innovation important to Kettal? We actively seek out new materials and ways to produce our collections. Our most groundbreaking pieces have to be our fabrics, such as ‘Nido d’Ape’ by Patricia Urquiola. A three-dimensional fabric created as a result of more than two years of research, it’s breathable, washable and resists friction and the elements. Tell us about the design process… The human factor is very important in our factory – manual processes take priority over the mechanical. Eighty five per cent of Kettal’s products are handmade and we do things that wouldn’t be possible on a normal production line. For the Bouroullec brothers’ ‘Stampa’ chair, we combined six different manufacturing techniques, traditional and new, using all the knowledge we’ve built up over 50 years. What’s new? Doshi Levien has redesigned the ropes that are a quintessential part of many of Kettal’s products. Its ‘Bela Ropes’ range and ‘Parallel’ fabrics – which have a weave that allows sunlight to pass through and cast a patterned shadow – will both be used across all our new collections. Also, expect to see even more collaborations with regular and new designers (kettal.es). MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 67


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M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E ALICE BLACK

An arbiter of taste tells us what they’re reading, watching and more

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: PHIL SHARP, ANDREA & VALENTINA, ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES

After nearly ten years throwing her energy into London’s Design Museum, Alice Black (right) has now been appointed co-director alongside Deyan Sudjic OBE. Black’s early banking career in New York, followed by a stint at London’s Imperial War Museum, matched with a strong eye for design, sets her in great stead for the role. Before his death in late 2017, she worked with fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa on a retrospective of his work (1) which opens next month (‘Azzedine Alaïa: The Couturier’, 10 May – 7 October; designmuseum.org). My all-time favourite piece of music has to be The Lady is a Tramp sung by Ella Fitzgerald (2). It makes me feel instantly happy. I love the tune, the irreverence, the humour, and her telling it like it is. I’m listening to concertos by Chopin and Verdi’s La Traviata. Classical music helps me to switch of from my surroundings when I write. I also have a slight penchant for 1980s hip-hop stars, like Grandmaster Flash. And disco always makes me smile. The book that has most influenced me? Les Trois Mousquetaires by Alexandre Dumas showed me the power of a good story. Marcel Proust’s À La Recherche du Temps Perdu was also a key influence. For years, I dreamt of being its high society belle, la Duchesse de Guermantes. At the moment I’m reading Wolf Hall (4) by Hilary Mantel. I listened to her episodes of The Reith Lectures on BBC Radio 4, only half thinking I would be interested in Tudor England, but she’s a brilliant storyteller. My favourite film betrays my French roots… the 1945 Les Enfants du Paradis, starring Arletty and Jean-Louis Barrault, by Marcel Carné. It has such a clever plot.

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‘I am looking forward to seeing Azzedine Alaïa’s most spectacular dresses on display at the Design Museum’

The podcasts I often tune into include BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs and the real-life investigation series S-Town. I’m also in stitches listening to the hilarious My Dad Wrote a Porno. I laugh out loud as I listen to it! I think that my favourite painting is Christ of St John of the Cross by Salvador Dalí. It made a huge impression on me when I first saw it on display during the National Gallery’s ‘Seeing Salvation’ exhibition in 2000. I was so delighted to come across it again recently at the Royal Academy of Arts’s ‘Dalí/Duchamp’ exhibition. It was like bumping into an old friend that you haven’t seen for a long time, but whom you love dearly. If I won the lottery, the piece of art I’d buy would have to be Leonardo da Vinci’s Lady with an Ermine (3). I’d have to win big, EuroMillions-style! I collect shoes… Don’t ask me how many. There’s a French saying: ‘when you love, you don’t count’. My formula for a fun night is dinner with my best girlfriends in a foreign city. Once a year, three of us spend the weekend discovering a new destination. The next place I’m travelling to is Istanbul (5), to take part in a conference on museums and technology. I cannot wait to see the Blue Mosque, Aya Sofya, the Topkapı Palace, Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, the banks of the Bosphorus… I might overdose on culture. 3

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STYLE

I N S I D E S T O RY G H Y C Z Y

‘What makes my aesthetic distinct is the combination of Bauhaus minimalism with Art Deco patterns and details from Egyptian antiquity’

‘GP05’ armchair from the ‘Safari’ series, £2,400

‘T82’ side table from the ‘Pivot’ series, £2,688

‘GP01’ sofa from the ‘Urban’ series, £7,241

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Hungarian-born Peter Ghyczy (1940–) will forever be associated with one design: the ‘Garden Egg’ outdoor chair (above) of 1968. The colourful creation resembled a small UFO, or perhaps a giant Smartie; its plastic shell opening up to reveal a soft, padded seat. Though the chair exuded a real sense of fun, it had a political dimension, too: it was designed in West Germany but manufactured in the Communist East, straddling the gap between two otherwise divided cultures. Its success, especially remarkable as it was Ghyczy’s debut launch, has somewhat overshadowed the rest of the brand’s oeuvre. But a new exhibition and book, timed to coincide with the chair’s 50th anniversary, aim to redress that. ‘Peter Ghyczy: 50 Years of Functionalism’ at the ADAM Brussels Design Museum in Belgium traces the designer’s career from his early days to the foundation of his brand GHYCZY (for those wondering, it’s pronounced ‘gitsi’) in 1971 and his work up to the present day – he remains at the helm of his Netherlands-based company alongside his son, Felix. Visitors will learn about Ghyczy’s training as an architect and engineer, which contributed to the development of his groundbreaking casting and clamping technique for metal and glass. They will also discover his diverse inspirations. ‘What makes my aesthetic distinct is the combination of Bauhaus minimalism with Art Deco patterns and intricate details from Egyptian antiquity,’ he says. ‘My designs revolve around geometric shapes rather than organic forms.’ Those who are inspired to explore further should check out GHYCZY’s furniture and lighting. Though visually simple, the designs are constructed by specialist artisans using painstaking techniques – a methodology that Ghyczy terms ‘slow design’. ‘It means objects that are slow to deteriorate and consider the wellbeing of individuals, society and the environment,’ he explains. From the 16-piece collection for 2018, our pick is the ‘T82’ side table (left), created with Amsterdam-based designers Collective Studio. Its onyx top reveals Ghyczy’s love of precious natural materials. He may be nearing his 80th year, but this prolific talent still has plenty of ideas in store. ghyczy.com

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

The eponymous brand of the designer behind the perfectly playful ‘Garden Egg’ chair


DECOR ATING /

IN THE WEAVE Woven in the UK using eco-friendly materials and techniques, Fox Linton’s textured wools for upholstery are made to last. There are seven designs named after Scottish locations, including the bouclé ‘Iona’ (below), in hues inspired by the landscape. From £204 per metre (foxlinton.com).

C O N S T E L L AT I O N C H I C

DIAMONDS FOREVER

Columbian interior designer Juan Montoya has joined forces with Stepevi to produce a new lunarinspired range of rugs that are truly out of this world. The surface of the moon was a strong influence on Montoya’s work: ‘Its asymmetrical form always intrigued me and put my imagination in a cosmic state,’ he says. The four designs in the ‘Moonlight’ range all feature motifs of the universe, but the star, in our opinion, is the ‘Moon Island Rug’ (above). £2,300 (stepevi.com).

WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURES: ALBERTO MASSIGNAN, PUNTIMMAGINESRL.IT

Studio Art’s luxurious leather wallcoverings now come in diamond-shaped tiles, made to order in Italy, in a range of ten colours. Their 3D forms create striking light and shade efects. ‘Neige’, from £617 per tile (studioart.it).

MAKE SHAPES Domus’s ‘Geometrica’ tiles feature graphic forms that reference the work of the Bauhaus movement and the architecture of Pierre Chareau – think creatively arranged circles and tessellated triangles. Choose from nine designs in a wide range of colours. From £119.10 per square metre (domustiles.co.uk). MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 73


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H O M E LY H U E S Interior designer Cassandra Ellis has been creating paints for years – both for her own home and for her clients’ projects. Now we can all try them, as she’s launched her first range. Explaining the philosophy behind her colours, she says: ‘It’s about making an uplifting backdrop to life.’ Her 18 chosen shades are rooted in those found in nature, and are divided into four harmonious, user-friendly palettes: ‘Whites’, ‘Pales’, ‘Mediums’ and ‘Darks’. ‘They can be used alone or together,’ says Ellis, ‘without any of them being overwhelming or attentionseeking’. Plus, they’re all hand-mixed in London. £59 for 2.5 litres (cassandraellis.co.uk).

NIGHT GARDEN Make a wish on the illustrated dandelion heads in the folk art-like ‘Blue Valentine’ mural, new from Skinwall’s ‘Palingenesi’ collection. Each design is customisable for any wall dimension and can be printed in five diferent surface finishes: smooth, non-woven, vinyl and silk. From £43 per square metre (skinwall.it).

WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURES: JON DAY

R AW B E A U T Y High-quality fabrics in usable shades are De Le Cuona’s forte, and its ‘Rare Alchemy’ range comprises ten new designs. The highlights are ‘Pencil Sketch’ (£190 per metre), a wool sheer woven on a jacquard loom to produce a delicate damask pattern; ‘Origami’ (£190 per metre), a linen with a papery texture; and the versatile ‘Artist Canvas’ (£160 per metre) linen (delecuona.com).

ON THE TILES Parkside, which specialises in contemporary porcelain and ceramic tiles, has just opened a new showroom in London’s Chelsea Cross. Visit to see its exclusive designs in person and to take advantage of its service ofering bespoke versions. 120 Fulham Road, London SW3 (parkside.co.uk). MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 75


D E C O R AT I N G

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X R O B I N S O N VA N N O O R T

This interior design duo are putting the spark back into historic homes with contemporary bespoke furniture

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: MANUEL ANDIAS

Who are they? Husband-andwife team Alister Robinson and Carolyn Van Noort set up their interior design practice in 2001, and now work out of a converted loft in their Edwardian home in Camberwell, south London. The two bring their respective skills to their studio’s projects – Robinson loves bespoke joinery and has recently launched a range of display vitrines under his own name, while Van Noort has just unveiled her new textile collection, which was inspired by a Victorian mathematical parlour game. What’s their style? ‘The majority of our work seems to involve the alteration of historic buildings,’ says Robinson. The duo describe themselves as ‘eclectic Modernists’, with influences ranging from the Arts & Crafts movement to Scandinavian Modernism and experimental Italian designer Joe Colombo. What are their notable projects? The most grandiose is Mead House, a historic eight-bedroom mansion in Berkshire decorated in a rustic-meets-modern style. In addition, several Robinson Van Noort projects have involved joining apartments or houses together, from two Victorian properties in London to a pair of ultra-modern chalet-style apartments in the French Alps. What are they currently working on? A challenging new private dwelling in Cornwall – planning permission wasn’t granted for a permanent dwelling on the site where it’s located, so Robinson and Van Noort created a structure with charcoaled larch cladding and a zinc roof that can theoretically be split in two and transported of-site. ‘It had to be classified as a portable structure or caravan,’ explains Robinson. Their dream project? ‘We would love to design a hotel resort, complete with a spa, sporting facilities and a series of restaurants, as well as artisan stores and an art gallery.’ robinsonvannoort.com; alisterrobinson.com; carolynvannnoort.com

From top An apartment bedroom in the ski resort of Flaine, France. Forest green walls in Mead House, Berkshire. A kitchen with units painted in Little Greene’s ‘Basalt’ in Belsize Park Gardens, London

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Robinson Van Noort’s guide to being creative with bespoke features Don’t go for the obvious Creating space and light is important, but removing all internal walls is not the answer! Instead, make a ‘puncture’ in a wall – even if it’s just a narrow slot – to connect two spaces. This will provide a glimpse of what’s beyond. A place for everything Be creative with bespoke storage. We recently installed a double-sided glazed storage unit in a thick, load-bearing internal wall. On the kitchen side, you open it to access glassware; on the hallway side, the glazing is fixed. Conceal and reveal There are many different ways to use panelling, whether it’s to cover unsightly ducts (with clips for access) or to conceal storage and even doorways. In one of our projects, we covered doors in panelling to form discreet entrances to bedrooms, a bathroom and a corridor. The panelling was sprayed a dark anthracite colour and the spaces behind were decorated in pale tones – it was almost as if you were cutting open an avocado. Get perspective We create tall room dividers that are useful for more than just storage. Your eye travels over them: studies have shown that the human eye needs breaks in the line of sight to register perspective, and it’s this, rather than vast, open areas, that gives us a sense of space. Material world Bronze and brass are magical. By using them as subtle details, you can completely change the feel of a room. We like to experiment with dipping and patinating metals.

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PATTERN KING

Bedroom ‘Temptation’ wallpaper, £150 per roll, Trustworth (trustworth.com) decorates this home in the countryside near New York Wallpapers, from left ‘Woodland Carpet’ and ‘The Purple Bird’, both £150 per roll, Trustworth (trustworth.com). ‘Lioness and Palms’, £140 per roll, CommonRoom (commonroom.co). ‘The House That Jack Built’; ‘Seagulls’; ‘Squirrel and Vine’; ‘The Three Men of Gotham’, all £150 per roll, Trustworth (trustworth.com) Bathroom British designer Luke Edward Hall chose Voysey’s ‘Apothecary’s Garden’ design because of its joyous use of colour

In 1927, Charles Francis Annesley Voysey (1857–1941) looked back on his career at a dinner given to mark his 70th birthday. ‘The public was opposed to birds and, in fact, everything I did,’ he said. ‘My work was never popular…’ Though this seems unduly modest, it’s true that Voysey’s work is hard to categorise; he was variously linked with the Arts & Crafts movement, Gothic design and Modernism. His uncompromising nature made his career as an architect diicult, and he branched out into wallpaper and fabric design chiefly to make ends meet. However, it’s this work for which he’s now best known. There’s a romance to Voysey’s patterns – which are dominated by images of birds, animals and plant forms – that accords with his rustic architectural style. Most of the 50 or so buildings he completed are large houses, with steep pitched roofs, white façades and tall chimneys (his own house, The Orchard in Chorleywood, is a prime example of his signature aesthetic). They borrow from traditional cottage and farmhouse styles, but with details whittled down to the absolute minimum; a Voysey wallpaper would likely be the most elaborate thing inside them. Voysey’s unusual output – understated with bursts of whimsy – put him out of step with his contemporaries. Yet today, the contrast feels absolutely right. Whereas a classic Arts & Crafts interior can appear overdone to modern eyes, we now appreciate one beautiful print used to enliven an otherwise simple room. A perfect example is the bathroom in the London home of designer Luke Edward Hall (right), where Voysey’s ‘Apothecary’s Garden’ pattern (sold by Massachusetts-based company Trustworth, £150 per roll; trustworth.com) is teamed with panelling painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Pigeon’ and green metro tiles. ‘I’ve always liked

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: REBECCA REID, BETH KIRKBY/LOCAL MILK

Arts & Crafts hero Charles Francis Annesley Voysey’s wallpapers are making their way back into contemporary homes. Here, we explore the designer’s life and work


D E C O R AT I N G

Voysey’s designs – they feel optimistic and very English,’ says Hall. ‘We used this wallpaper in here because I like bathrooms to feel as comfortable and stylish as every other room in the home, with armchairs, rugs and so on.’ The ‘Apothecary’s Garden’ design, created in 1926 and inspired by 17th-century herbals, features Voysey’s signature birds alongside butterflies, crickets, bluebells and berries. Trustworth stocks several other designs, including the gothic ‘Hemlock’ (1900) and ‘Angelic Forest’ (1927), which show him at his most original. Key to their appeal is the designer’s joyous use of colour. Spring greens, poppy reds and hyacinth blues are applied with a delicate hand: ‘Nature,’ Voysey once said, ‘never allows her colours to quarrel’. These papers are thus ideally suited to teaming with modern neutrals, although Hall takes a bolder view. ‘I would love to design a room using a Voysey wallpaper and a bright colour on the ceiling,’ he says. ‘His florals would also look great with Italian mid-century furniture and 1970s lighting.’ Other Voysey patterns suggest different possibilities. ‘Lerena’ from Sanderson’s ‘Chiswick Grove’ collection (£60 per roll; stylelibrary.com/sanderson) features a print taken from the Voysey archive of birds, flowers and foliage and comes in soft blues and greens that complement pale wood furniture. The ‘Lioness and Palms’ wallpaper (£140 per roll, CommonRoom; commonroom.co) shows yet another face of the artist. Based on a watercolour from 1918, this blue and gold design begs to be paired with dark timber. Whichever you choose, keep it simple – as Voysey once said, ‘Better frank simplicity than sham elaboration’. For more info, read ‘CFA Voysey: Arts & Crafts Designer’ by Karen Livingstone, Max Donnelly and Linda Parry (£40, V&A Books)

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CLASH RICH

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURE: SILVIA RIVOLTELLA

We delve into Dimore Studio’s fabric collections – a nostalgia-tinged kaleidoscope of patterns

Taking inspiration from patterns your auntie might have chosen back in the 1970s isn’t the most obvious starting point for a fabric collection, but we’ve come to expect startling originality from Dimore Studio (aka Italian designer Emiliano Salci and American partner Britt Moran). There’s a distinct note of 1970s nostalgia to the duo’s work – witness the psychedelic floral carpets and pink satin valances in their series of room installations at London’s Mazzoleni gallery last September. It chimes perfectly with their palette of moody colours and precious materials. Salci and Moran launched their ‘Progetto Tessuti’ textile collection in 2015, having been unable to find designs they liked for residential and commercial projects. They work with fashion textile factories in the Como region of Italy, adding new oferings each year. The ‘Auntie’ fabrics came first, followed by metallics, geometric prints and, in 2017, outdoor textiles. This year, there are designs inspired by the Art Deco movement and Milanese architecture. ‘Our aesthetic is about unexpected, layered atmospheres that are dramatic, yet contained,’ says Salci. ‘We wanted to create something that had not been seen before, so even our stripe patterns are diferent – less defined, and executed in our trademark hues.’ Highlights from the new collection include the baroque-style ‘Sancarlo’ embroidery. ‘It’s inspired by the altar cloths in the San Carlo church in Milan,’ says Moran. A total contrast is ‘The Brown Click’, an Art Deco-style geometric print in retro chocolate shades, and ‘Matzinga’, with metallic reliefs that Moran says have a ‘futuristic-mechanical’ feel. It’s impossible to be cautious with designs like these – you need to see them on a big scale. Clashing prints is something that Dimore Studio heartily endorses. ‘Pattern is essential to an interior,’ says Salci. ‘For us, a rich palette not only evokes luxury, but also a feeling of discovery, allowing you to experience something new every time you look.’ Fabrics from £177 per metre (dimorestudio.eu).

Pictured ‘Push It Two’ jacquard fabric (used as wallcovering), ‘Palm’ carpet for Pierre Frey and ‘Sedia’ chair, all by Dimore Studio

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C O L O U R S I LV E R

Having proved its mettle, this futuristic shade is taking a moment to shine

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PA I N T S T O T R Y

‘Silver’ metallic paint, £15.95 for 250ml, Vintro (vintro.co.uk)

fabrics were fashioned by ‘Silver’ metallic glaze, £55 for 0.94 litres, famed designers such as Pierre Benjamin Moore (benjaminmoore.com) Cardin and André Courrèges into sartorial embodiments of a space-age future. This theme is one that designers have now been returning to, ‘Pewter’ metallic emulsion, £19 for inspired, perhaps, by the buzz 1.25 litres, Crown (crownpaints.co.uk) concerning the launch of tech company SpaceX’s new rocket. In recent months, Balenciaga, Paco Rabanne and Chanel have sent crinkled, conceptual silvered creations down the catwalks, and interior brands have been following suit. Those hankering for silver’s charming, vintage feel might lean into its propensity to age as gracefully as a Venetian palazzo. Rubelli’s ‘Aida’ brocade in ‘Miele’ (£240 per metre; rubelli.com) evokes this feel, as do age-spotted antique mirrors (or try Graham & Green’s new ‘Antiqued Venetian’ mirror for £495; grahamandgreen.co.uk). For a slicker feel, seek out Kaymet’s anodised trays, available at The New Craftsmen (from £43; thenewcraftsmen.com) or, for a slightly cheekier take, Verner Panton’s scrumpled ‘Crash’ trays for Georg Jensen (from £85, Skandium; skandium.com). If you’re buying real silver, remember that it requires investment, both in money and in the time spent helping to maintain its shine. It will be worth it, though: silver is ageless and enduringly, as any Viking hoarder would no doubt agree.

WORDS: KASSIA ST CLAIR PICTURES: STUDIO 33, GETTY IMAGES

In September 2014, all of Derek McLennan’s dreams came true. Since retirement, he had filled his days by indulging in his favourite hobby: PANTONE ® metal detecting. Within 877c one hour of arriving in a cold, damp field in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, his trusty detector chirruped encouragingly and he began to dig. At first, he thought the oddly heavy object in his hand was an old, bent silver spoon, but then he turned it over and noticed the very detailed geometric design marching across its surface. Derek was holding an intricately patterned armband, the first piece of what later proved to be an enormous hoard of Viking silver, buried for safekeeping 11 centuries earlier. Although our love afair with silver is ancient, it is also enduring. Perhaps it is the metal’s mutable nature that helps keep things interesting. Like gold, of course, it is malleable, so can be bent and moulded into almost any form, from giant vessels to the daintiest of dessert forks. Unlike its more glamorous sibling, however, silver oxidises over time, only to be returned to its former mirror brightness with a good rub. While such humble labour over the metal may make silver sound old fashioned, it has somehow also come to stand as a symbol of modernity. In the 1960s, shiny silver


ARCHITECTURE /

CONVERTED CAPITAL We look at how architects and designers are reworking three of London’s run-down buildings

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: © THE ESTATE OF MARVIN RAND, PETER LANDERS, NIKKI STRANGE

PALMSPACE by Eat Work Art In a former east London print factory, the in-house architectural designers that brought us Hackney Downs Studios continue to promote the trend for co-working by creating a light-filled space for start-ups, freelancers and makers. A large steel frame is divided into smaller modules, with desks made from parquet flooring sourced from derelict school buildings (eatworkart.com/palmspace).

GASHOLDERS by WilkinsonEyre Since 1880, the three large Victorian gas holders at London’s King’s Cross have stood as striking relics of the area’s industrial heritage. Now, architecture practice WilkinsonEyre has transformed the vast circular buildings into 145 wedge-shaped apartments, each ofering stunning views and interiors created by Jonathan Tuckey, a leader in remodelling old buildings for modern, luxurious living (gasholderslondon.co.uk).

THE FORGE by Emrys Specialists in quirky residential, cultural and commercial schemes, Emrys has transformed a Grade II*-listed iron works warehouse into a creative co-working space. Designed for Craft Central, a charity that champions craftsmanship, the two-storey birch-plywood structure seeks to provide studio spaces for artisans, makers and designers (craftcentral.org.uk).

AMERICAN California was not only an iconic era for DREAM 1950s Hollywood style, but an exciting time for innovative architecture. Through the expert lens of the late Los Angeles-based photographer Marvin Rand, California Captured (£49.95, Phaidon) showcases some of the most forward-thinking buildings at a time of stunning urban growth. Works include those by architects Rudolph Schindler, Craig Ellwood, Louis Kahn and Welton Becket, who created Pacific Theatres’ Cinerama Dome (left). MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 85


ARCHITECTURE

ASK AN ARCHITECT JIM OLSON

We talk to the founding partner of Seattle-based practice Olson Kundig about inspirations and projects, past and future

‘If Frank Lloyd Wright can build Fallingwater in his 70s, I figure I can still design my masterpiece at my age’ home, Longbranch Cabin (above) in Washington, then I walk in the woods; that’s when ideas come to me. What’s your favourite project? It would be the Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art in Denver, Colorado. I decided to clad the building in terracotta tiles with a yellow glaze – they make it feel like part of the collection it houses. Is there a building that you wish you’d designed? Frank Lloyd Wright’s house, Fallingwater (above), in Pennsylvania. He built it in his 70s, so I figure I can still design my masterpiece at my age, as I’m already in my 70s. I love its poetic form; the way it looks like it’s grown out of the landscape. What does home mean to you? A home should reflect its owner’s personality and be somewhere you feel inspired. I agree with the concept of ‘prospect and refuge’, propounded by geographer Jay Appleton. It explains the need to feel protected, while being able to see distant views; of seeing without being seen. olsonkundig.com Jim Olson: Building, Nature, Art on sale 10 May (£48, Thames & Hudson)

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WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS PICTURES: RAFAEL SOLDI, BENJAMIN BENSCHNEIDER, GETTY IMAGES, FRANCISCO ESTRADA

What made you decide to become an architect? As a child, I loved building forts and treehouses in the woods around my grandparents’ home near Seattle, Washington. Aged 12, I first announced my desire to become an architect and, when I was 18, my dad gave me $500 to build a bunkhouse [a teenage hangout]. He said that if you can make your hobby your career, you’ll always be happy. How would you describe your style? Architecture that weaves itself into its context. I also like the subtlety of natural materials and modest, beautiful buildings. Traditional Japanese houses display a lot of the things I believe in: framing nature, fitting snugly into the environment and incorporating art in an unassuming way. Do your buildings have a recognisable trait? They often feature a circulation ‘spine’ that allows you to see from one end to the other. I like to accentuate the length of a space, with vistas that draw the eye outside. The JW Marriott hotel in Los Cabos (below), for example, is designed to frame views of the ocean and infinity pools. Describe your working process… I tend to focus for a couple of hours alone at my


TECHNOLOGY /

AN ODE TO INDUSTRIAL CHIC Inspired by the iconic split-flap boards once commonplace in train stations, the ‘Vestaboard’ whirs into action at the tap of an app, displaying live Tweets, messages or inspirational quotes. £2,527, pre-order for summer 2019 (vestaboard.com).

MID-CENTURY REMASTERED The Wrensilva ‘Sonos Edition Console’ is a high-end sound system with a retro aesthetic. Crafted from North American walnut and white lacquer, it has a vinyl turntable, Sonos ‘Play:5’ speakers and Wi-Fi technology. £4,000 (wrensilva.com).

SPHERE OF INFLUENCE Alexa, Amazon’s voice-controlled assistant, is now available in the guise of the ‘Echo Spot’. A space-age alarm clock, the compact ‘videosphere’ features a 2.5-inch touchscreen that displays news and includes a camera for video calls. £119 (amazon.co.uk).

THE PERFECT POUR Miele’s ‘KWT 6722 iGS’ wine conditioning unit with ‘SommelierSet’ stores up to 83 bottles in two separate temperature zones, and has a handy holder for exacting oenophiles to chill their glasses in. £4,599 (miele.co.uk).

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Enhance videos filmed on your iPhone with Sennheiser’s ‘Ambeo’ smart headset, which features microphones embedded into both of its ear buds to capture ‘3D sound’, which seems to surround you as you listen back. £259.99 (sennheiser.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY, AMY MOOREA WONG

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I TA L I A N D ES I G N D I R E C TO RY

Italy produces some of the best design in the world. As it gears up for the big launches at this year’s Milan Furniture Fair, we reveal the names you need to know Words AMY BRADFORD

ARCLINEA

Synonymous with kitchen design since 1958, when it unveiled its first fitted kitchen, Arclinea recently began working with architect Antonio Citterio (its chief designer since 1986) on launches that prioritise functionality and organisation. The brand has now joined forces with B&B Italia, whose London showroom plays host to signature looks, such as ‘Convivium’ (right). arclinea.it

ARMANI/CASA

Exuding the same sense of understated luxury as Giorgio Armani’s fashion collections, Armani/Casa fuses Art Deco glamour with Eastern style and lustrous materials – see the classic ‘Adriana’ sofa (left). The brand was born from Armani’s vision of the ideal home; which he sees as a warm, comfortable and sophisticated environment. Newly launched is a reissue of its first-ever design, the brass and walnut ‘Logo’ lamp of 1982. armanicasa.com

ARTEMIDE

Artemide is one of the lighting world’s great innovators. Always seeking out the most interesting new designers, it has just unveiled a collection with inventive Chinese duo Neri&Hu – the ‘NH1217’ light (below) plays with balance and movement. artemide.com

PICTURE: FABRIZIO MARCO NANNINI

B&B ITALIA

One of the biggest hitters in the furniture industry, B&B Italia has made a major contribution to Italian design history since its inception in 1966. Key pieces include Gaetano Pesce’s groundbreaking ‘UP’ armchair (1969), one of the first chairs to be sold vacuum-packed. For 2018, it has unveiled a new collection of outdoor furniture, including the curvaceous ‘Bay’ armchairs (above) by British design duo Doshi Levien. bebitalia.com MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 93


BAXTER Baxter’s quirky style befits its status as one of the younger Italian brands (it was established in 1990). Known for statement sofas – many by Paola Navone, a major collaborator since 2003 – and mid-century-inspired lacquered furniture by Draga & Aurel, it has launched its debut outdoor range. A collaboration between Navone and artist Antonino Sciortino, it includes the ‘Girgenti’ sofa (left), with its on-trend metal frame. baxter.it

BISAZZA Glass mosaic tiles become works of art in the hands of Bisazza, which has commissioned surfaces by everyone from maverick duo Studio Job to fashion house Emilio Pucci. The brand’s output now extends way beyond tiles: it has home and bathroom ranges, decorative oak parquet, and the ‘Cementiles’ cement surfaces – including ‘Swing’ (right) by architect David Rockwell. The 2018 ‘Marmo’ collection is Bisazza’s first range of marble flooring. bisazza.it

BOFFI

BONALDO Bonaldo’s style embraces both the classic and the cutting-edge – its ‘Colors’ sofa by Sergio Bicego, for instance, is elegantly simple, while Alain Gilles’ ‘Big Table’ features a colourful jagged base. Despite the brand’s contemporary feel, its story goes all the way back to 1936, when it was founded by metals expert Giovanni Vittorio Bonaldo. New for 2018 is an octagonal version of the ‘Origami’ table by Gino Carollo (left), with a shape inspired by the Japanese paper art. bonaldo.it

What do you get when you ask A-list architects and designers like Piero Lissoni, Patricia Urquiola and Claudio Silvestrin to create kitchens and bathrooms? Beauty and technological innovation, as showcased in Boi’s showrooms in London and Milan. New launches include Lissoni’s ‘Boi_Code’ washbasins (below), made from precious stones. boffi.com

BONTEMPI

CATTELAN ITALIA

Established in 1963 by brothers Alessandro and Giancarlo Bontempi, this brand is still a family-run business, producing dining tables and chairs, storage and a collection of iron beds. Although most of its furniture is of the ‘hard’ variety – such as the marble-topped ‘Glamour Round’ table (right) and sideboards in solid timber – it also has a range of chairs that can be upholstered in anything from eco leather to velvet. The recently launched ‘Penelope’, with its buttoned backrest, has enormous character. bontempi.it

Founded in 1979 by Giorgio Cattelan and his wife Silvia, Cattelan Italia started out as a table specialist – a field in which it still excels, although it now produces everything from seating to mirrors, too. Its USP is its mastery of materials. New this spring is a fresh twist on the ‘Skorpio Keramik’ dining table (below) by Andrea Lucatello, with a marble-efect ceramic top. cattelanitalia.com


I TA L I A N D E S I G N D I R E C T O RY

CALLIGARIS Antonio Calligaris opened his workshop in Udine, northern Italy, making just one humble chair; today, the company produces more than 800 designs, including the ‘Foyer’ (left). The brand may be celebrating its 95th anniversary this year, but its ‘Code’ range, promoting the work of young talent, shows it’s got its finger on the pulse. calligaris.com

CASSINA Last year, the brand celebrated its 90th year with a book – This Will Be The Place (£65, Rizzoli) – on the future of the home. While it continues to look forward, Cassina is also the manufacturer of some of the finest furniture of the 20th century, including pieces by Le Corbusier and Vico Magistretti. Patricia Urquiola, the company’s art director, designed the new ‘Floe Insel’ sofa (right). cassina.com

ETHIMO

PICTURES: MAURIZIO CAVALLASCA, KRISTA KELTANEN, TOMMASO SARTORI, ANDREA MARTIRADONNA

FENDI CASA Fendi was a pioneer of the crossover between fashion and design, launching its first home collection back in 1987. The latest range turns its attention to powdery shades – the blue velvet ‘Delano’ bed (left) is a case in point. See the full collection at its UK stockist, Global Luxury London. fendi.com; globalluxurylondon.com

A specialist in outdoor furniture, Ethimo takes inspiration from the colours of the Mediterranean. Its look is ultra-contemporary, with new designs including Christophe Pillet’s ‘Grand Life’ sofa (left) and Marc Sadler’s teak ‘Ribot’ range, expanded to include a lounge chair and footstool. ethimo.com

FLEXFORM Capitalising on its heritage as a luxury brand, in 2018 Flexform brings the world ‘New Normal’: a collection of understated pieces in timeless colours and fabrics, such as cashmere, velvet and linen. Antonio Citterio has created designs that exemplify the spirit of the range, including the ‘Tosca’ armchair (below). flexform.it

GALLOTTI & RADICE In 1955, Pierangelo Gallotti and Luigi Radice opened a studio making glass designs. This material is still at the forefront of the brand’s identity today, but the 2018 collection shows how successfully it has expanded into other areas, such as upholstery: the ‘Audrey’ revolving lounge chair (above) by Massimo Castagna comes in the material of the moment: velvet. The marble and brass ‘Oto’ table, designed by Oscar and Gabriele Buratti, has a similar 1970s feel. gallottiradice.it MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 95


I TA L I A N D E S I G N D I R E C T O RY

GIORGETTI

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

I TA L I A N D ES I G N D I R E C TO R Y

Now in its 120th year, this Italian brand is still expanding and innovating in exciting ways

In 1898, in the town of Meda, in Italy’s Brianza region, Luigi Giorgetti opened his modest carpentry workshop to create items to decorate the homes of the Milanese nobility. By the 1920s, the workshop had expanded and Giorgetti had set its sights on America, to which it exported traditional wooden chair frames. The demand from the US came as a happy surprise, forcing the workshop to nail its production system, turning out finely crafted furniture in mass quantities and at speed – lessons that have served Giorgetti well, since today, its products reach more than 85 countries. It wasn’t until the 1970s that the company debuted its first contemporary collections, the ‘Gallery’ and ‘Gazebo’ chairs. The latter featured a groundbreaking carving technique that created a bamboo-like efect on the chair’s back – that prompted the development of an unusual tooling process that’s still used today. The turnkey moment, however, came in the 1980s when the then president of the company, Carlo Giorgetti (Luigi’s grandson), had the foresight to partner with some of the world’s leading architects – Massimo Scolari, Léon Krier and Chi Wing Lo, to name a few – on new products. None had designed furniture before, but the results were modern and boundary-breaking – a description of Giorgetti’s output that’s still accurate. It was also Carlo who had the novel idea to debut the ‘Atelier’ concept – showrooms presented as apartments, dressed exclusively in Giorgetti designs – in 2011. Since the 2015 appointment of Giovanni del Vecchio (formerly of Poltrona Frau and Molteni&C) as CEO, the company has continued to innovate and expand. Not only do the ‘Ateliers’ span Milan to Mumbai and beyond, but the brand has also flexed its muscles for the first time in the kitchen arena, with the debut of the ‘GK.01’ system in 2016. So, what next? Excitingly, real estate. The Giorgetti Houston building project in Texas, US, is due for completion in 2019, featuring 32 fully furnished apartments, all decorated in Giorgetti’s signature modern-luxe style. giorgettimilano.it

Above ‘Aton’ modular sofa by Carlo Colombo Below The ‘GK.01’ kitchen, inside Milan’s stylish Giorgetti store

The ‘Hug’ armchair by Rossella Pugliatti

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HENGE Established in 2007, Henge takes as its starting point what it calls ‘the expressive force of natural materials’ – burnished brass, grey and cofee-coloured marbles and exotic timbers are all part of its palette. The company’s art director, Massimo Castagna, creates furniture that is intended to age beautifully. New designs for 2018 focus on surprising finishes: the ‘Ace’ table is part of a new dining range and features a top made of briar-root mosaic, while the ‘Starlight’ chandelier (above) is crafted from antiqued cast bronze. See the collection at Global Luxury London. henge07.com; globalluxurylondon.com

LEMA Not surprisingly, as it was the first Italian company to develop freestanding and made-to-measure wardrobes, Lema excels at storage. The brand was founded in 1970 by the Meroni family, who still run it today. Their latest innovations include ‘Air Cleaning’, an air-conditioning system for wardrobes that keeps clothes in tip-top condition. The star of the new collection is ‘Faroe’ (above), a seat/container by Gordon Guillaumier that reflects the vogue for hybrid furniture. lemamobili.it

MAXALTO With a focus on fine craftsmanship – the name Maxalto is derived from ‘massa alto’, meaning ‘the highest’ in Venetian dialect – this sister brand to B&B Italia was founded in 1975 with wooden furniture designs by husband-and-wife architects Afra and Tobia Scarpa. Antonio Citterio is now chief designer – his ‘Otium’ sofa (right) is an instant classic. bebitalia.com

KNOLL One of the most important names in 20th-century design, Knoll celebrates its 80th anniversary this year. Founded by Hans Knoll and subsequently helmed by his wife Florence, it has commissioned work by iconic designers including Harry Bertoia, Isamu Noguchi and Eero Saarinen. The latter created the ‘Tulip’ tables in 1957, which have now been reissued in Rosso Rubino marble (coloured marbles are a key trend for 2018). This spring, a new version of the ‘Tulip’ seat (left) with upholstery will be launched. knoll-int.com

LIVING DIVANI Exceptional furniture for the living room, bedroom and outdoors is the hallmark of Living Divani, which is famous for modular sofas such as Piero Lissoni’s ‘Extrasoft’, a series of big, padded cubes. Lissoni is the brand’s art director and brings an interesting mix of new talents on board – among them JapaneseTaiwanese duo Tamaki Design Studio, creators of the new ‘Tombo’ clothes rail (right). livingdivani.it

PICTURE: THOMAS PAGANI, CESARECHIMENTI

LONGHI Longhi specialises in luxurious designs for the living room, many featuring precious materials – the ‘Cohen’ corner sofa, for instance, has built-in niches and shelves in backlit onyx or marble that create a moody glamour by night. Its designs have an on-trend 1960s/70s feel, with lots of polished brass, marble and exotic wood. As well as a reissue of Joe Colombo’s 1963 ‘Elda’ armchair, there’s also the ‘Aluminium Chic’ collection of sliding doors, such as the ‘Land’ design by Alessandro La Spada (left) in smoked glass, brass and boiserie. longhi.it MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 99


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MINOTTI

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS PICTURE: FEDERICO CEDRONE

I TA L I A N D ES I G N D I R E C TO R Y

From top ‘Florida’ outdoor sofa, ‘Colette’ armchair and ‘Caulfield’ tables, all by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti. A portrait of the designer and artistic director. The modular ‘Lawrence’ sofa, also by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti

Artistic director Rodolfo Dordoni is perfectly placed to reflect on this brand’s 70th anniversary

By the time Minotti and designer Rodolfo Dordoni (left) first met and joined forces in 1997, the family-run Italian company was already very firmly established. Founder Alberto Minotti’s business, based in Meda, had boomed since he established it in 1948, fuelled by a surging demand in postwar Italy for new furniture. While studying architecture in Milan in the 1970s, Dordoni was exposed to a rich variety of influences. ‘Milan has a very industrial background, very rational and pragmatic. I was also inspired by the irony of Milan-based Achille Castiglioni’s work and by Ettore Sottsass, ringleader of Italian Postmodernism, which made me less rational and less serious.’ ‘When I first met Roberto and Renato [Alberto Minotti’s sons and joint CEOs of the brand since the 1970s], I remember telling them what my limitations were – my relative inexperience and my inflexibility,’ continues Dordoni. ‘I guess this scared them a bit, but it showed them I was honest. It may have stimulated them.’ The brothers remember this a little diferently: ‘We felt an immediate connection with Rodolfo. He personified the architect-interior designer with cultural roots in Milanese design, with a sensitivity that we intuitively felt was right for Minotti.’ The trio’s strong rapport was swiftly formalised: in 1998, Dordoni was appointed artistic director – a role he has now held for 20 years. His first products for the brand were called ‘Small’, ‘Medium’ and ‘Large’ – ‘Their names borrowed from the fashion world, referencing clothing sizes,’ he explains. Part of Dordoni’s role in the early days was to sharpen the brand’s identity and make it as cohesive as possible.

In 1998, he designed his first entire – typically sleek – collection and created its stand at Milan’s annual Salone del Mobile furniture fair in, he explains, ‘a way that expressed the relationship between a collection and the environment it’s displayed in’. He also oversaw the brand’s marketing and advertising. Dordoni says that, originally, Roberto and Renato were looking for someone whose idea of how to develop the company mirrored their own. Yet, despite valuing teamwork, he sees himself very much as an individual: ‘My main contribution to the company is that I bring a diferent point of view,’ he states. His first important design, he says, was the 1999 ‘Pollock’ sofa, which brought Minotti to international

‘Over these 20 years, the way Minotti and I have worked together has changed dramatically’ attention and helped to kickstart the brand’s tradition for naming pieces after well-known artists. ‘Over the decades,’ says Dordoni, ‘Minotti has become a truly global company’. During his long and fruitful tenure, he has overseen the introduction of his flexible, bestselling ‘Hamilton’ sofa, as well as the ‘Freeman’, ‘Yang’ and ‘Lawrence’ sofas, plus the indoor/outdoor furniture collection, ‘Lifescape’. ‘Over these 20 years, the way Minotti and I have worked together has changed dramatically,’ he says. ‘In the early years, there was an exchange of ideas based on a drawing, then work on a prototype. Now we work together on a prototype, as if making a sculpture.’ It’s a sign of how deep the understanding between company and designer has become. minottilondon.com MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 101


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MOLTENI&C I TA L I A N D ES I G N D I R E C TO R Y

Giulia Molteni’s grandparents founded this iconic brand, but she is looking to its future

I joined Molteni&C after spending four years working in fashion. I started of on the retail side of the business. At the time, we only had stores in Paris, so I opened new locations in London and New York. It Clockwise from was important to understand the family business as top left Giulia well as creating my own role within it. Molteni. ‘Teorema’ My father was very supportive of us joining the drawer units by Ron business, but he always gave us enough freedom to Gilad. ‘D.156.3’ choose something diferent if we wanted to. My brother armchair by Giò Ponti. Giovanni handles the production side of Molteni&C, ‘Gliss Master-Glass’ wardrobe by Vincent but my sister works outside the company. Van Duysen As a child, I didn’t know I was part of such a big family brand. I realised it very, very late – when I went to university. It had just always been part of my life, I used to give out catalogues at the reception at Milan’s annual Salone del Mobile furniture fair, aged 13. We always had designers around the house. Tobia Scarpa, Luca Meda, Aldo Rossi – they all used to be good friends with my father. They would come to visit us at home for dinner, or we would spend the weekend together. I grew up in a house created by Tobia Scarpa, so it was a very design-oriented environment. My father is less and less involved in the business now, but it is his passion and he will never stop working – that is just not in his nature. The firm has evolved into an international lifestyle brand. Today, we produce everything a house needs, from beds to kitchens. There are many big plans. At the Milan Furniture Fair, we will show a series by Ron Gilad, a new storage system by Vincent Van Duysen and a table by Gio Ponti. We will also be presenting a chair by young Italian designer called Francesco Meda – he comes from a design background (his father is industrial designer Alberto Meda), but at the same time, he has his own unique style. molteni.it

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WORDS: TOM MORRIS

In 1934, Angelo and Giuseppina Molteni founded the furniture brand Molteni&C in Italy’s furniture region of Brianza. It passed to their children, Carlo (Giulia’s father), Piero, Mariangela and Luigi; Giulia joined the company in 2007, and her brother Giovanni and cousins Andrea, Pietro and Carlo joined in the following years. Molteni&C now incorporates various strands, including the kitchen brand Dada, oice suppliers UniFor and Citterio, but everything is still made in Italy. Here, Giulia discusses her vision for the family business.


MDF ITALIA Innovations and simplicity are the hallmarks of this brand, which works with global talents including Francesco Rota, Victor Vasilev and Jean-Marie Massaud. The latter is responsible for the highlight of MDF Italia’s new range: the ‘Yale’ bed (left), with its pillow-style headboard. mdfitalia.com

NATUZZI

MERIDIANI

Probably best known for its sofas – such as new star ‘Furrow’ (right) – Natuzzi has just announced Marcel Wanders’ ‘Agronomist’ and ‘Oceanographer’ collections, which are inspired by the landscape of Puglia, the brand’s homeland. natuzzi.co.uk

Created in 1996 by husband-and-wife team Renato Crosti and Laura Ferraro Crosti, Meridiani’s material focus is on textiles inspired by their travels, saddlery leathers and warm woods. The ‘Shine’ collection by Andrea Parisio is iconic, and indoor-outdoor furniture range ‘Blend’ (below) is highly covetable. meridiani.it

POLIFORM

PORADA This year, Porada celebrates its 70th birthday with the launch of the ‘Iron’ collection. As always for the brand, exotic timbers are on show – as seen on the ‘Bayus 2’ storage unit (above) by G & O Buratti. It is also due to release new versions of archive designs and its first home fragrance. porada.it

POLTRONA FRAU Expertise in leather has been this brand’s USP ever since it was founded in Turin in 1912. Today, its heritage is represented by designs, such as the ‘Archibald’ chair by Jean-Marie Massaud (2009). Its latest launch is another Massaud piece, the ‘Byron’ chaise longue (above), with lines inspired by the precision of goldsmithing. poltronafrau.com

PICTURES: LORENZO CAPPELLINI BAIO, ALESSIO D’ANIELLO

This brand’s slick output is intended to address the needs of a ‘Poliform house’, along with sister brand Poliform Kitchens (formerly Varenna). The ‘Chloe’ bed by Carlo Colombo (below) is a classic. poliformuk.com


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REFLEX The first company to use glass as a base for tables, Reflex has evolved from its origins as a family glassworks in the 1940s to become an innovator in the field of Murano glass furniture. Star products include the all-glass ‘Prisma 72’ table. It also produces upholstered seating – see ‘Segno’ (left) – and, under its sister label Angelo, a collection of beds. reflexangelo.com

RIVA 1920

RIMADESIO Maker of every kind of storage you could possibly need – freestanding cupboards, walk-in wardrobes and much more – as well as a smart range of complementary furniture, Rimadesio champions the use of glass for its ability to zone space while also enhancing light. This year marks the 20th anniversary of its classic ‘Zenit’ aluminium shelving, and we’re excited about the new ‘Alambra’ storage system (above) by Giuseppe Bavuso – its transparent glass panels make it a great room divider, as well as a stylish display case. rimadesio.it

Since its beginnings in 1920s Lombardy, this brand has always had hand-crafted wooden furniture at its heart. It has an ethical focus, using natural glues, waxes and oils and sustainable timbers. This year, the brand is introducing two new black wood finishes, ‘Total Black’ and ‘Mystic Black’, as well as the stylish ‘Cambusa Glass’ bar cabinet (right) by Giuliano and Gabriele Cappelletti. riva1920.it

ROSSANA Established in 1953, Rossana was the first kitchen brand to have its designs exhibited in the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Up close, its workmanship is breathtaking, often featuring slabs of exotic marble – the ‘DC10’ kitchen (left) by Vincenzo De Cotiis is a prime example. rossana.uk.com

SALVATORI For the finest marble furniture, bathroom fittings and accessories, look no further than Salvatori, which has been operating out of Tuscany (home to Carrara marble) since 1946. Among its star products are the monumental ‘Love Me, Love Me Not’ tables by Michael Anastassiades, while recent launches include ‘Adda’ (pictured), a bathroom collection by Spanish designer David Lopez Quincoces that combines ribbed walnut with statement marble. salvatori.it

SCAVOLINI Scavolini has been making kitchens for over half a century, and in recent years has launched bathroom and living room furniture, too. Its kitchens are innovative – Nendo’s ‘Qi’ (above) conceals appliances behind elm-efect doors. Coming soon is ‘Diesel Open Workshop’, a kitchen range created with the fashion label. scavolini.design MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 105


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SICIS

SERVETTO This brand started life in 1968 as a patented system for use in tall wardrobes: an elevated clothes rail, that can be pulled downwards. Simple, but clever. Serveto is also innovating out of the wardrobe, with its playful ‘Scacco Matto’ coat stands (above). servetto.it

Known for its incredible Murano glass and marble mosaics, which come in a huge range of styles – from romantic florals to geometric patterns – this brand also creates luxurious furniture. Its artistic flair comes through clearly in its new ‘Jakuchu’ collection, based on the work of 18th-century Japanese artist Itō Jakuchu. ‘Springtime’ (pictured) is an exquisite scene of peach blossom and birds rendered in Venetian glass. sicis.com

TERZANI This lighting brand, established in Florence in 1972, creates statement lights in materials such as crystal and metal, including playful chandeliers by British designer Nigel Coates (‘Angel Falls’ is a cascade of glass figurines). The company has recently created the Terzani Lab to allow it to experiment with cutting-edge techniques, an advance that is reflected in its latest range: the ‘Manta’ pendant light (left) by Dodo Arslan is a glass disc that seems almost liquid. terzani.com

SOCIETY LIMONTA Dress your home with the same flair you would yourself – that’s the idea behind this brand, which makes exquisite textiles for the bedroom, dining room and bathroom. Natural linen is a focus, presented in an ever-changing palette. The new collection is based on 1950s colours and prints – think pink and pistachio green. societylimonta.com

VISIONNAIRE

WALL&DECÒ

Inspired by art and cinema – its latest furniture collection is influenced by Zhang Yimou’s film House of Flying Daggers – this brand also designs interiors for yachts and private jets. In 2018, it is working with new designers, including Roberto Lazzeroni, whose ‘Jason’ table (above) is ideal for the mixed marble trend. visionnaire-home.com

Christian Benini, this brand’s founder, was previously an advertising photographer – hence the graphic quality of its wallpapers. The theme for 2018 is diversity: the ‘News Planet’ wallpaper (above) is a map made up of newsprint. Also look out for the ‘Essential’ 3D textures, featuring designs by Studiopepe and André Fu. wallanddeco.com MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 107


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FUN OF THE FAIR This month, Milan – Italy’s undisputed beating heart of modern design – hosts its annual furniture extravaganza. Here are our top ten highlights

THE MAIN SHOW Five days, 20 pavilions, 2,000 exhibitors and 300,000 expected visitors: the scale of Salone Del Mobile (1, April 17–22), the world’s leading furniture fair held in Milan’s fairground in Rho, northeast of the city, is comprehensive. Alessi, Baxter, Cappellini… this is where the A-Z of Italian heavyweights – plus international brands – unveil designs that will launch later this year. Download the 2018 Salone app to plan your visit. salonemilano.it

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THE POP-UP VENUE For only its second year, Ventura Centrale will host installations in the eight vaults underneath Milano Centrale train station. Our highlights? Artworks created by Japanese sticky tape brand Haru and the all-American design on show at The Diner (2), a stainlesssteel ‘roadside restaurant’ curated by New York-based architect David Rockwell and indie magazine Surface – swing by for a fresh cofee and a grilled cheese sandwich. venturaprojects.com

THE GARDEN PAVILION 2

Bang in front of the city’s gothic Duomo di Milano cathedral, Turin-based architect Carlo Ratti’s studio is installing ‘Living Nature: La Natura dell’Abitare’ (4), a 500-square-metre indoor oasis. Planted by Parisian living-wall specialist Patrick Blanc using pioneering climate-control technology, it allows you to walk through all of the seasons in one afternoon. carloratti.com

THE SCULPTURE TO SNAP

THE DESIGN DISTRICT

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Brera, Milan’s bohemian neighbourhood, is a favourite haunt of seasoned Salone-goers. This year, on Via Lovanio, Lee Broom presents beautiful new lights, suspended planet-style in an installation called ‘Observatory’ (6). Plus, in gallery space The Dream Factory, British brand Romo invites us to a wonderland featuring seven new fabric collections. leebroom.com; romo.com

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

Head to Palazzo Isimbardi to admire the reflections of the historic 16th-century architecture in the futuristic mirrored sculpture (3) by American artist Phillip K Smith III in collaboration with fashion brand COS. Expect to spot it on your Instagram feed.


I TA L I A N D E S I G N D I R E C T O RY

THE BIG EXHIBITION An exhibition titled ‘Stories: Italian Design’ opens in the Triennale design museum, Milan’s answer to London’s V&A, on 14 April, taking us on a whistle-stop tour of the country’s finest designs across all disciplines, produced between 1902 and 1998. The collection includes a vintage Vespa, the iconic foil-wrapped Baci chocolates made in Perugia, plus Achille Castiglioni’s original ‘Arco’ lamp and playful ‘Sedile Mezzadro’ seat. triennale.org

THE NEW LANDMARK Monumental cultural institution Fondazione Prada (5) unveils its final tower during the furniture fair. Like the whole site, the white concrete spire is the brainchild of starchitect Rem Koolhaas, and contains nine cantilevered floors of art. fondazioneprada.org

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THE OPEN HOUSE Osvaldo Borsani, one of the 20th century’s lesser-known Italian design legends, built Villa Borsani in the Milanese suburbs in 1945 – his family has occupied this ode to Modernism ever since. To herald a retrospective of his work that begins at the Triennale in May, they are opening up the house to the curious public for this week only (16–20 April). triennale.org

THE IMMERSIVE EVENT Stone specialist Caesarstone has turned Palazzo dell’Ufficio Elettorale on Corso di Porta Romana – soon to be converted into The Milan Edition, the first of Ian Schrager’s seriously chic hotels in Italy – into ‘Altered States’. A unique experience designed around a circular kitchen island by New York studio Snarkitecture, it will involve water, ice and steam. caesarstone.com

THE COOL SCENE Galleria Rossana Orlandi, the grande dame of avant-garde design, has a star-studded line-up planned. London-based Sé Collection presents its new range designed by Ini Archibong, and Google has sponsored an exhibition curated by trend forecaster Lidewij Edelkoort and designer Kiki van Eijk. rossanaorlandi.com

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HOMES

PICTURE: JAKE CURTIS (PHOTOGRAPHY), SANIA PELL (STYLING)

KIEV

/ BOLOGNA/ HONFLEUR/ MILAN/ CAPE TOWN/ VICENZA

SIMPLE

LIVING From left ‘Vision Atlas’ cabinet by Pierre Mazairac and Karel Boonzaaijer for Pastoe, £1,383, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Dash’ candleholder, £42, Kristina Dam Studio (kristinadam.dk). ‘Grey Glass’ vase, £29.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com). ‘Jar’ ceramic vase by Cecilie Manz for Fritz Hansen, £118, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Sekki’ cup, £14, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Marble Circle’ sculpture, £374, Kristina Dam Studio (kristinadam.dk)


‘Our ethos was to achieve a simplistic look that would highlight collectible items. We do not like controversy between design and pieces of art’ Minimalism prevails in this Kiev apartment, which has been designed to complement the pared-back lines of furniture by Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand Words FLEUR BRITTEN Photography EVGENIY BULATNIKOV AND EMIL DERVISH


Living area An original mobile by late American artist Alexander Calder dances above the ‘Serpentine’ sofa by Vladimir Kagan and the oak-andbamboo lounge chairs designed by Charlotte Perriand and Pierre Jeanneret. The ‘Mobile Chandelier 5’ floor lamp is by Michael Anastassiades Stockist details on p213 ➤


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omes are supposed to serve as sanctuaries from the noise and distractions of modern life. For many of us, however, that din only continues inside, as our carefully curated aesthetics compete with life’s practicalities. Not so in the Beige apartment in Kiev, whose up-and-coming interior architects Evgeniy Bulatnikov and Emil Dervish, both 26 and from Ukraine, have resolved such conflict by eliminating everything other than key decorative features. It is a temple to chic simplicity. One might assume that the starting point for this home’s look was its classical detailing – the ornate ceiling roses and elegant cornicing – but that’s not the case. Every detail of this project was carefully chosen to fit around original furniture designs by the French/Swiss architects and Le Corbusier collaborators, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand, which the owners bought from online auctions. ‘The design of the apartment had to highlight these pieces, rather than distract from them,’ explains Bulatnikov. The building’s arched windows are period features dating from the early 1900s, but the cornicing was commissioned by Bulatnikov and Dervish to create what they call a ‘French/Parisian style’ – a fitting backdrop for the French mid-century masterpieces, which also prevents the simplicity of the scheme from crossing over into starkness. To ensure the restrained design stayed on track, Bulatnikov and Dervish had one simple rule: ‘No bullshit’, deadpans Bulatnikov. All functional details, from plumbing to radiators, and personal items are concealed. The efect is that what features do remain appear in sharper focus. Details that would get lost in a busier home now have added drama and significance. A strict ‘greige’ (a muted blend of grey and beige) palette – specifically ‘Smoke’ paint by Flamant – and herringbone oak flooring, its colour muted by a matt lacquer, creates a sense of flow and cohesion between the rooms, with the subdued colours preventing minimalism from taking on a colder edge. This is a flawless home, where you imagine life really could move at a more measured pace. evgeniybulatnikov.com; emildervish.com

Kitchen The Corian worksurface, topped with a brass tap by Vola, purposefully blends into the wall, so as not to draw attention from the ‘Library’ table by Pierre Jeanneret and cane oice chairs, designed in the 1950s. The delicate brass ‘Calyx’ pendant light by Atelier Areti hangs above the table, while ‘Bob’ wall lights by Michael Anastassiades sit above the cabinetry Detail, above A ‘Habibi’ side table by E15 and ‘Daphine Terra’ floor lamp by Tommaso Cimini for Lumina decorate this calm corner of the open-plan space Stockist details on p213 ➤

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Bathroom The ‘Shui Comfort’ bathtub by Cielo is accompanied by Vola taps Bedroom A replica of a design by Charlotte Perriand from 1959, the bed sits in front of a granite wardrobe that acts as a partition, concealing the bathroom. The ‘Triple Angle’ pendant lights are by Michael Anastassiades Stockist details on p213


S O OT H E YO U R SENSES Let the muted tones of this Italian home convince you that you don’t have to forego colour and fun to live the simple life Words PIP MCCORMAC Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


Living room A dusky shade of duck-egg blue – try Farrow and Ball’s ‘Parma Gray’ – gives this home its cosy feel. The suede sofas are vintage designs by Willy Rizzo and similar rugs can be found at Golran Stockist details on p213 ➤


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here’s a tendency to think minimalism means a lack of colour. That only white surfaces, uncluttered by signs of family life – photographs, mementoes, stacks of mail discarded on your way through the front door – can be classed as truly minimal. But isn’t it time for a perception shift? Could the term perhaps be redefined to mean not a lack of things, but a mood that we can all create – one of calm, homely comfort? That was the thinking behind including this home just outside the picturesque Italian city of Bologna in our simple living edit. Because, even though its owners Valentina Muggia and Giuliano di Paolo have not held back on displaying their beloved items, the choice of soft, pared-back colours – greyish tones of blue, green and white – shows artful restraint. As a result, rooms that could have felt busy or cluttered strike a more tranquil tone. ‘We placed great importance on the influence that colours and craftsmanship can have on our emotions

and wellbeing,’ says Valentina, who runs Borgo delle Tovaglie, a home accessories company, with Guiliano. ‘We could never imagine ourselves living in a house with empty walls,’ adds Guiliano. ‘The small details of our home enrich us and make us feel full of poetry.’ Poetic is indeed a fitting way to describe the ambience of this house, with its gentle, romantic lighting and textures. ‘I love the atmosphere that lamps create,’ Valentina says, referring to the collection of original 1950s designs that pepper each room in her home, giving of a cosy, difused glow. ‘We love to create environments that are characterised by contrasts,’ adds Valentina, alluding perhaps to the aspect of this home that makes it such a masterpiece of minimal design, despite its owners’ refusal to adhere to any of the usual rules of that aesthetic. Here, the rich bustle of everyday family life exists in a space that also allows room to rest and recharge. borgodelletovaglie.com


Den Adjoining the kitchen, this is a peaceful space with sage green walls – try Neptune’s ‘Moss’ paint for similar. The rug is an antique find and the formica-topped side tables from Borgo delle Tovaglie complement its pattern Kitchen A cedar worktop sits above bespoke cabinetry made of oxidised iron. The dramatic ceiling light is a prototype from Valentina’s latest collection for Borgo delle Tovaglie Stockist details on p213 ➤

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MINIMAL COULD BE REDEFINED TO MEAN NOT A LACK OF THINGS, BUT A MOOD THAT WE CAN CREATE – ONE OF CALM, HOMELY COMFORT


Above Vintage Beni Ourain rugs soften the look of this small seating area beside the bedroom. The pendant light is the ‘Moon Lamp’ by Verner Panton Stockist details on p213 ➤

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‘WE COULD NEVER IMAGINE OURSELVES LIVING IN A HOUSE WITH EMPTY WALLS. THE SMALL DETAILS OF OUR HOME ENRICH US AND MAKE US FEEL FULL OF POETRY’


Detail, far left The hall features a large painting by Gabriele Talarico of the owners’ children Bathroom This compact space has a vintage feel, with a basin set into a reclaimed wooden unit and muted harlequin-patterned wallpaper by Valentina Bedroom Bedlinen from Borgo delle Tovaglie is layered to create a sumptuous look. The small artworks above the bedhead are by Italian painter Vasco Bendini Stockist details on p213

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the calmest canvas

Stripping this cottage in Honfleur, Normandy, back to its roots allowed it to be seen in a whole new light, with a modern mix of plywood and parquet providing a simple backdrop for the artworks within Words JEREMY CALLAGHAN Photography GAELLE LE BOULICAUT


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n the Sainte-Catherine quarter of Honfleur, Normandy, a two-storey 1940s house was quietly displaying what estate agents like to describe as potential. Or such was the opinion of magazine editor Jérôme Aumont and his partner, the gallerist and designer Christophe Delcourt, who happened to drive by the house while taking the scenic route home to Paris from Trouville in 2012. ‘There was a very sweet, almost soothing atmosphere,’ says Christophe, who was enticed first by the medieval architecture of the port town, then by the paved streets winding up the hill, and ultimately by the forged-iron, Art Deco shopfront of what was to become their weekend bolthole. ‘The interior was, frankly, very ordinary, with all of the faults these little old village houses have, such as being dark with low ceilings,’ Christophe recalls. ‘But we imagined it as a space to exhibit our own work and display objects by artists we admire,’ adds Jérôme. And so began a process of transforming the house into a sort of living gallery. They kept only the chimney, staircase and the parquet flooring in the living room and bedrooms, creating a minimal backdrop so that attention is focused on the artwork, rather than the space itself. ‘We made the choice to alternate between the dark colour of the original wood and a lighter hue used for the newer constructions and additions,’ says Jérôme. ‘The fact that we were able to conserve some of the original features, such as the staircase and floorboards, really gives a lot of character to the project. I especially like the juxtaposition of elements and the unexpected,’ he adds, looking to his home’s mix of old spruce and modern plywood.

Living Room The ‘Sofa’ by Les Foins sits beneath a ‘Motherboard’ mirror by David/Nicolas for Collection Particulière. They are joined by a ‘Sumo’ cofee table by Dan Yefet Design Studio, an ‘Inventory’ rug by Faye Toogood for CC-Tapis and the ‘SWN’ floor lamp by Frédéric Forest & Clémentine Giaconia for Christophe Delcourt Stockist details on p213 ➤

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Living room Dark wooden pieces, like these candleholders and ‘Chalice’ totem vases by Arno Declercq for Collection Particulière, provide a rustic touch beneath the ‘SWN’ wall light by Frédéric Forest & Clémentine Giaconia for Christophe Delcourt Dining room Samuel Accoceberry’s ‘Rough’ table for Collection Particulière and chairs by Christophe Delcourt create a modern look Stockist details on p213 ➤

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‘I ESPECIALLY LIKE THE JUXTAPOSITION OF ELEMENTS AND THE UNEXPECTED’

Bathroom An Alape ceramic basin and black taps by Dornbracht are silhouetted against square, white ceramic tiles from Winckelmans Hallway Pale plywood has been used to divide the space and artfully contrast with the home’s original features Stockist details on p213 ➤

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Bedroom Made from plywood, the headboard showcases a drawing by designer Frédéric Forest, ceramics by Christiane Perrochon and a ‘Segment’ wall light by Dan Yefet Design Studio. The emerald bed linen is by Society Limonta. A chair by Christophe Delcourt (above) is placed beside ‘Rosae’ pedestals by Goula/Figuera for Collection Particulière Stockist details on p213

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Spring into act ion Perfect the new season’s mixture of blossom-like pastels and exuberant brights with affordable buys from the high street and beyond Photography JAKE CURTIS

PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANTS: REES THOMPSON, CHLOE WINSTANLEY STYLIST ASSISTANTS: MIHAELA BERBECAR, STEPHANIE ILES

Styling SANIA PELL

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This page, from left ‘Drops’ fabric by Patricia Urquiola in ‘0962’, £127 per metre, Kvadrat (kvadrat.dk). ‘Flower Pot’ paint (on pillar); ‘Roben’s Honour’ paint (on wall), both £48.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Crinkle’ throw, £89, Hay (hay.dk). ‘Skogsta’ bench, £40, Ikea (ikea.com). ‘Span’ dining table by Wales & Wales, £765, Joined + Jointed (joinedandjointed.com). Washed linen tablecloth, £89.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com). ‘Odger’ white chair, £65, Ikea (ikea.com). ‘2D’ vase, £43, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset-westend.co.uk). Flowers by Fjura (jura.com). ‘Bubbles and Bottles’ glass vessel by Pols Potten, £59.95, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Andalucia’ small jug, £12, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). Bottle by Hasami Porcelain, £39, Goodhood (goodhoodstore.com). ‘Anthracite Grey’ glass tumbler, £2.99, H&M (hm.com). ‘Bubble’ shot glass by Memento, £7.50, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Library’ wine glass by Pols Potten, £19, SCP (scp.co.uk). Bowl by Hasami Porcelain, £50, Goodhood (goodhoodstore.com). ‘Grain’ pendant light by Jens Fager, £128, Muuto (muuto.com). ‘1F HiRek Shell’ green chair by Komplot Design for Gubi, £276, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Sculptural’ wooden chair, £358, Kristina Dam Studio (kristinadam.dk)

Opposite, from left ‘2D’ vase, as before. ‘Sekki’ cup, £14, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). Tablecloth, as before. Dinner plate in ‘Blossom’, £35, Mud Australia (uk.mudaustralia.com). ‘Sculptural’ chair, as before. ‘Faded linen’ table runner, £25.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com). ‘Andalucia’ jug, as before. Carafe and tumbler, £195; pinch pot, £55, both by Michael Ruh, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Bottle, as before. ‘Driftwood’ hand bell by Grant McGaig, £480, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Glass tumbler, as before. Beaker in ‘Blossom’, £32, Mud Australia (uk.mudaustralia.com). ‘Library’ wine glass, as before. Bowl, as before ➤


From left ‘Duck Egg’ paint (on panelling), £46 for 2.5 litres, Zofany (stylelibrary.com/zofany). Flan dish, £80; small mixing bowl, £70; medium round vase, £99, all Mud Australia (uk.mudaustralia.com). Canvas, stylist’s own. Ficus Elastica plant, £150; pot, £58, both Conservatory Archives (conservatoryarchives.co.uk). ‘Odger’ chairs, £65 each, Ikea (ikea.com). ‘Span’ oak dining table, as before. Yellow cotton tablecloth, £8.99, H&M (hm.com). Pink linen napkins, £19.99 for four, Zara Home (zarahome.com). Cutlery, £8.99 for a four-piece set, H&M (hm.com). ‘Noir’ dinnerware, from £8 for a side plate, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Stockholm 2017’ tray, £17, Ikea (ikea.com). ‘Greta’ black jug, £25, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Colorado’ vase, £28, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com). ‘Ameixa’ bowl, £45, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Collect’ pendant light, £244 (as shown), Ferm Living (fermliving.com). Cabinet fronts, £1,606 (as shown), Custom Fronts (customfronts.co.uk).


‘The Botanist’ eggshell paint (on cabinets), £65.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). Concrete worktop by Andy Pedley, £350 per metre; ‘Cube’ basin, £950, both The Poured Project (thepouredproject.com). Trivets, £110 per set; ‘Five Circles’ coaster, £430 for five, both by Muller Van Severen for Valerie Objects, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Buckle’ jar by Ferm Living, £29, Nest (nest.co.uk). Chopping boards by Hay, from £25 each, Amara (amara.com). ‘Meltware’ pan by Maaike Seegers, £325; Jesmonite black vessel by Olivia Aspinall and Ornamental Grace, £710, both Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘KV1’ tap, £825, Vola (en.vola.com). Salad bowl, £19.99, H&M (hm.com). Jesmonite orange vessel by Olivia Aspinall and Ornamental Grace, £640, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Zero Silo’ pendant lights by Note Design Studio, £250 each, Nest (nest.co.uk). ‘Pharaohs Gold 2’ paint (on kitchen wall and far left), £27.56 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) ➤


This page, from left ‘Roben’s Honour’ paint (on wall), as before. ‘Open Home Ballet’ console table by Doshi Levien, £499, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). ‘Colorado’ vase, as before. ‘Miss Marble’ lamp by Fabien Dumas, £308, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset-westend.co.uk). Ochre small pot by Ferm Living, £24, Goodhood (goodhoodstore.com). Small brass tubular bell by Grant McCaig, £250; ‘Joyous’ candlestick by Iva Polachova, £165, both The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Peak’ brass bonbonniere by Stelton, £54.95, SCP (scp.co.uk). Calathea plant, £12; pot, £48, both Conservatory Archives (conservatoryarchives.co.uk)

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This page, from left ‘The Moor’ rug in ‘Yellow Field’ by All The Way To Paris, £1,099, &Tradition (andtradition.com). ‘Mag’ side table in ‘Pyrolav Light Green’ by Daniel Schofield, £845, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Agate’ tumblers, £6 each, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). Brass coasters by Kiel Mead, £27 each, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Tia Maria’ coffee table in ‘Stone Grey’ by Enrico Franzolini, £570, Moroso (moroso.it). ‘Tota’ vase-bowl, £105, AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Around’ coffee table in dark red by Muuto, £495, Heal’s (heals.com). Metal sculpture, stylist’s own. Tray by Peter Raacke, £80, Pulpo (pulpoproducts.com). Salad bowl, as before. ‘Unity’ half circle tray, £43; quarter circle, £35, AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Fein’ relish fork, £9, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Felt 2’ chair by Delo Lindo for Ligne Roset, £789, Heal’s (heals.com) ➤


From left ‘Steelcut 2’ fabric (as curtain), £116 per metre, Kvadrat (kvadrat.dk). ‘Five’ pouf by Anderssen & Voll, £801, Muuto (muuto.com). ‘Open Home Pondok’ sofa by Doshi Levien, £2,499, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). ‘Melange’ cushion in mustard, £80, Hem (hem.com). ‘Everyday’ throw in ochre, £495, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Pharaohs Gold 2’ paint (on pillar), as before. ‘English Grey’ paint (on wall), £43 for 2.5 litres, Sanderson (stylelibrary.com/sanderson). ‘The Moor’ rug in ‘Red Heather’ by All The Way To Paris, £1,540, &Tradition (andtradition.com). ‘Tia Maria’ coffee table, as before. Metal sculpture, as before. ‘Unity’ quarter circle tray, £35; half circle tray in gold, £47, both AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Ripple’ glass, £48.30 for four, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Close Encounter’ lamp and plant stand by Kerst Koopman, £900, Béton Brut (betonbrut.co.uk). Kalanchoe plant, £18, Conservatory Archives (conservatoryarchives.co.uk). ‘Vision Atlas’ cabinet by Pierre Mazairac and Karel Boonzaaijer for Pastoe, £1,383, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Pink vase,


£19.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com). ‘Sekki’ cup, as before. Grey glass vase, £29.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com). ‘Jar’ ceramic vase by Cecilie Manz for Fritz Hansen, £118, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Unfold’ room divider in ‘Rose’, £1,099, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Primo Terrazzo Tavolini’ side table, £275, Another Brand (anotherbrand.co.uk). The Anatomy of Colour by Patrick Baty £35, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Library’ tumbler by Pols Potten, £15, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Womb’ armchair by Eero Saarinen in ‘Gentil Green’, £3,480, Knoll (knoll-int.com). ‘Cheshire’ floor lamp by GamFratesi, £471, Fontana Arte (fontanaarte.com). ‘Duck Egg’ paint (on low panelling), £46 for 2.5 litres, Zofany (stylelibrary.com/zofany). ‘901’ tea trolley by Alvar Aalto for Artek, £1,698, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Anthracite Grey’ glass carafe, £12.99; wine glasses, £6.99 each, both H&M (hm.com). ‘Library’ wine glasses, as before; brass coasters, as before. ‘Ripple’ glasses, as before. Marble Martini glass, £18, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com)


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Words CLARE SARTIN Photography LAURA FANTACUZZI AND MAXIME GALATI-FOURCADE/PHOTOFOYER Opposite Homeowner Dario Vitale in his living room. The green rug is from Alberto Levi Gallery, while the decorative Japanese screen and rustic dining table and chairs are all vintage pieces. Above the table hangs the string of ‘Light My Table’ bulbs by Studiomie Stockist details on p213 ➤


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D FA L L I N LO L U VE WO with it right away, but I found it hard to see its potential,’ says Dario Vitale of the 170-square-metre former insurance oice he bought in the upmarket Porta Romana district of Milan. The initial excitement that Dario had felt after spotting the ‘for sale’ sign on the beautiful 1930s building he passed every day on his way to work was dented when he stepped inside to discover linoleum floors, a false ceiling and harsh neon lighting. He needn’t have been concerned, though – this building’s original features, from pristine parquet floors and decorative bathroom tiles to gloriously high corniced ceilings, were waiting patiently to be rediscovered. This is an apartment with history – it was once home to the celebrated Italian playwright Dario Fo – and, thanks to a chance encounter with the previous owner, Dario was able to fully imagine its splendour. Inspired, he started to recreate that grandeur, beginning a year-long renovation with the lightest of touches. Today, the flat is bright and spare, sparsely decorated with objects selected for sentimental reasons and displayed with a minimalist’s restraint. ‘I have always been fascinated by two things: the aesthetics of monastic austerity and Eastern philosophies,’ explains Dario. ‘This is why I have ornate Japanese screens, as well as paintings and photographs by Gandhi.’ The influence of Eastern culture sits comfortably beside more rustic elements, such as the large cherry wood dining table lit from above by the school fete-style ‘Light My Table’ string of bulbs by Belgian design firm Studiomie, as well as classic 1950s designs by Italian lighting firm Stilnovo. The key to blending these diferent eras and ideas is keeping everything else simple. The neutral colour of the walls creates a calm, museum-like backdrop that underlines the importance of the few decorative elements on display. The apartment’s serene look is broken up only by splashes of green – the rug in the dining area resembles a perfectly tended lawn, while images of foliage play across Dario’s Japanese screens, and ferns and arrangements of dried flowers are dotted artfully throughout the space. It is not just an appreciation of the natural world that led to this palette choice. ‘As a kid, I read in a newspaper that not many people choose green for their homes because it’s a diicult colour – it’s risky, but one that fascinates intelligent people. Since then, the shade has become a sort of obsession of mine.’ How does Dario feel about his home now that he has successfully uncovered its many concealed charms? ‘It’s a house. That is all. It fulfils real, shared and primitive needs: there’s a living room, a kitchen, a dining room, a bedroom, two bathrooms, a guest room,’ he replies, using his fingers to count out the practical merits. It’s a typically zen answer, but one that underplays Dario’s part in the history of this apartment. Hallway Wall-mounted vintage lamps by Artemide are placed above a stack of well-travelled suitcases and trunks Living room The striking chandelier is a design by Stilnovo from the 1950s – the sofa and corner table are also originals from the same era. The pieces on the table are from Milan-based Stories of Italy, which sells Italian crafts Stockist details on p213 ➤

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Kitchen The wooden cabinets with iron detailing that complements the wall-mounted storage and oven hood were built by Milanese furniture designer Giacomo Moor in collaboration with homeowner Dario. They are paired with a Carrara marble sink and a stainless-steel cooker. A vintage iron-topped table, plus ‘Bucket’ chairs and stools by Dutch designer Piet Hein Eek (available at SCP), create a small dining area. The colourful statement chandelier is another Stilnovo original Stockist details on p213 ➤

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This page In the bedroom, a bedside table made of stacked Louis Vuitton trunks sits beside a mattress, placed on the floor. The Japanese screen depicts a spring landscape and complements the Chinese lantern placed near the door. The brass chandelier is from the ‘Lit Lines’ collection by Michael Anastassiades for Nilufar, and the 40-year-old woven chaise longue is a vintage find Opposite The stairway in the 1930s building that houses this apartment boasts striking arch-shaped windows and a wrought-iron banister Stockist details on p213

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FA D E TO GREY This Cape Town apartment’s muted take on monochrome is a masterclass in bringing comfort and character to a pared-back palette

Words JAMES RICH Photography WARREN HEATH/BUREAUX/LIVING INSIDE Styling SVEN ALBERDING/BUREAUX


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t’s a very modern understanding of the monochromatic style of decorating that not only includes black and white, but also flashes of deep brown and stretches of soft grey. This gentle expansion of the palette doesn’t make it any less minimal, though – the extra tones simply soften some of the classic scheme’s sharper edges, introducing warm texture. This more relaxed approach to the colour scheme also permitted private chef Paula Nel to display all of her favourite art and objects liberally in her loft-style, two-bedroom apartment in Cape Town’s buzzing CBD (Central Business District) without the space looking cluttered. The trick is to keep everything tonally similar. Paula’s home hasn’t been this beautifully curated for long, however. ‘When I bought it five years ago, it looked like any other city apartment, right down to the granite kitchen surfaces – so my first priority was to get the basics right,’ she says, recalling how she replaced the catalogue finishes with polished cement screed floors, painted brick and floor-to-ceiling steel windows. Then came the worn leather, slubby linens, weathered

wood and collections of handmade Japanese knives and artworks, picked up on her travels. When the apartment next door came up for sale, there was no question as to whether or not Paula would make an ofer. ‘I didn’t even think about it,’ she says. Knocking the two spaces together resulted in a home blessed with open-plan spaces that can be separated by large sliding doors made of characterful beaten steel. In total, there are two living rooms – one for late-night movie watching and another for guests – a central cooking and entertaining area and a vast bedroom with its own dressing room and en-suite bathroom. This second wave of renovations also allowed Paula to shift the kitchen into the very centre of her home. Its gleaming Carrara marble countertops, dramatic black cabinetry and open shelves, neatly lined with collections of platters and ceramic bowls, provides a great focal point. Despite now being double its original size, the apartment is still a work in progress: ‘I’ve always got some detail in my mind that needs sorting – maybe it’s a corner that feels like it needs something extra, or a spot that is crying out for art,’ says Paula. No matter what she finds to add to her home, it will always maintain its casually minimal feel.

TEXTURED GREY CEMENT, RAW TIMBER AND LEATHER SOFTENS THE EDGES OF BLACK AND WHITE

Left and previous spread This gallery wall features vintage black-and-white photographs found in Cairo and prints plucked from old books. The skulls were bought at The Evolution Store in New York. The leather sofa is a beautifully worn Chesterfield and the two armchairs are both from local store Pezula Interiors Above The inky wall – try Abigail Ahern’s ‘Hudson Black’ paint – is a dramatic backdrop to an etching by artist Diane Victor. The white sofa is from Klooftique and the bench from an antiques shop in the Karoo, a region of South Africa Stockist details on p213 ➤

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Kitchen With its black cabinets and Carrara marble worktops, this hard-working area is the focal point of private chef Paula’s open-plan home. Try Devol for a similar look Stockist details on p213 ➤


‘I’VE ALWAYS GOT SOME DETAIL IN MY MIND THAT NEEDS SORTING – MAYBE A SPOT THAT’S CRYING OUT FOR ART’

Dining area The table is from Loft Living, while the overhead light is from Pezula Interiors – try Skinflint Design in the UK. Rockett St George sells antiqued mirrors Stockist details on p213 ➤


Bathroom For a similar industrialstyle shower enclosure, try West One Bathrooms. The arch-shaped mirror is from Block & Chisel and the clay chandelier from Pezula Interiors Bedroom White-painted brickwork contrasts brilliantly with the black-and-white photography on the wall. The pendant light hanging low beside the bed is from Weylandts Stockist details on p213


JEWEL IN THE DUST

Caring for the period details of a timeworn 19th-century Art Nouveau building needn’t mean living in a shrine to the past, as the owner of this apartment in northern Italy has shown

Words CHARLOTTE BROOK Photography MONICA SPEZIA/LIVING INSIDE


Living room A ‘Taccia’ table lamp by Achille & Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos sits on a salvaged table beside the ‘Ghost’ sofa by Paola Navone for Gervasoni. An ‘Akari’ paper shade by Isamu Noguchi for Vitra hangs overhead Stockist details on p213 ➤


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ith crumbling beauty Venice to the east and design metropolis Milan to the west, the aesthetic of fashion entrepreneur Carlo Zanuso’s home appears to be a tale of the two cities. When the founder of young Italian clothing brand Pomandère acquired a one-bedroom, first-floor apartment in this fin-de-siècle ‘palazzina’, built in the Liberty (Italy’s answer to Art Nouveau) style, it was the embodiment of faded grandeur. ‘When I first laid eyes on it, I knew that this place was a treasure to be cherished,’ he says. And cherish it he has, but, by illuminating 18th-century oil paintings with warehouse-style lighting and mixing objects discovered at flea markets with 20th-century design classics, he has also rendered it a calm and entirely contemporary space. After a little restoration – sanding and re-polishing the original parquet and terrazzo flooring and cleaning the interior frescoes – Carlo modernised the 120-square-metre space with a light touch. ‘Nothing radical. I did it all myself,’ he points out. There were three key jobs to be tackled: putting in a shower, giving the walls a coat of chalky matt paint and installing an industrial-style kitchen. ‘I wanted my kitchen to resemble a little, old café, so I mixed inox [short for inoxydable, the French for stainless steel] with antiques,’ he says. Carlo’s wall display, featuring a collection of antique pearly white plates, amassed over many years, faces shelves of equally milky, but modern, ceramic tableware from luxury French ceramics brand Astier de Villatte and local artisans. It’s a chic example of this homeowner’s expert eye for mixing old and new – something he says he has always been interested in. Carlo has also subtly brought his home’s architectural opulence – marble stairs, hand-wrought iron banister, neoclassical cornicing, soaring ceilings – down to earth by introducing modest materials such as reclaimed wood, rough linen and Moroccan kilims. Indeed, it’s nature’s contribution to the apartment that he prizes the most: ‘Thanks to the tall windows, the light is the star of the show here. It makes for a very serene space.’ pomandere.com

Opposite Homeowner Carlo Zanuso stands in front of his collection of white plates, artfully arranged across the corner of the wall in the hallway ➤

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‘When I first laid eyes on it, I knew that this place was a treasure to be cherished ’

Living area Eero Saarinen’s ‘Tulip’ table for Knoll stands by a ‘Ghost’ armchair by Paola Navone for Gervasoni. The ‘Flowers’ cofee table is by Roberto Lazzeroni for Lema Stockist details on p213 ➤

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Kitchen The stainless-steel cabinetry was designed by Carlo and custom-made by Italian specialist Alpes Dining room De Padova’s ‘Quadrato’ dining table is flanked by wicker chairs Stockist details on p213 ➤

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Once the embodiment of faded grandeur, this fin-de-siècle Art Nouveau apartment is now a contemporary and serene space

Bedroom The bed is also from Paola Navone’s ‘Ghost’ collection forthis Gervasoni, Above The original details in home, whilethe theparquet side tables are from Roberto from flooring to the grand Lazzeroni’sare ‘Flowers’ collection Lema. doorways, the perfect foil forfor modern The bedlinen is opposite from Merci in Paris. The designsDetail, Photographs of kilim cushions on the floor were made homeowner Gualtiero Sacchi and his wife in Morocco details decorate theStockist wall in the study on p213


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BATHROOM TRENDS THAT WORK Freshen up your home with our edit of the latest bathroom looks, including the most stylish tiles, taps, tubs and more… Words AMY MOOREA WONG Shopping edit KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES

ROCK FOR M ATIONS Stone is the go-to for bathrooms, but it’s statement, decorative slices that we’re coveting now. For instant wow-factor, take inspiration from the monochrome marble-efect porcelain in this bathroom by Russia-based Tolko Interiors ( below; tolkointeriors.ru) and the beautiful bath tub, clad in expressive Crema Violet onyx (right), in this space by Australian company Decus Interiors (decus.com.au).

SHOP THE LOOK

PICTURES: FELIX FOREST, TOLKO INTERIORS, ERIC SWANSON

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1 ‘Calacatta Nuvo’ marble in ‘5131’, £900 per square metre, Caesarstone (caesarstone.co.uk) 2 ‘Calma Bath’ in ‘Marquina Taupe’ by Stone Forest, £45,500, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com) ➤

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PICTURES: SKOVDAL NORDIC/REDTZ.DK, JOSE HEVIA, JONAS BJERRE POULSON/ NORM ARCHITECTS, JONATHAN JAMES

BR ASS HIGHLIGHTS Brass is an on-trend alternative to chrome in the bathroom. Used sparingly, it adds warmth and glamour. Barcelona-based interior designer Miriam Barrio (miriambarrio.com) coated a bath splashback (above left) in metallic tiles, while surface specialists Redtz created the panel in this shower (above; redtz.dk). Even Norm Architects has added slim brass hardware ( left) to its signature minimal look (normcph.com). SHOP THE LOOK

1 1 ‘Sonar’ basin in SaphirKeramik by Patricia Urquiola, £1,370, Laufen (laufen.co.uk) 2 ‘Landmark Industrial’ handshower and slider rail, from £996.72, Samuel Heath (samuel-heath.co.uk) ➤

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SHOP THE LOOK

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1 ‘Cloud’ tiles, £99.95 per square metre, Original Style (originalstyle.com) 2 ‘Parma Gray’ paint, £45 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) 3 ‘I Catini’ basin and stand by Cielo, from £1,580, CP Hart (cphart.co.uk)

POWDER BLUE

PICTURE: MATTIA LOTI

Soft shades create a feeling of tranquillity, but gentle palettes can still pack a design punch. The calming blue of this bathroom created by Belarus-based VizLine Studio (above; behance.net/VizLineStudio) is balanced with natural materials, such as its modern fretwork door. There’s similar textural play at work in this Marazzi bathroom (right), with the brand’s ‘Chalk’ tiles in ‘Avio’ adding depth ( from £36 per square metre; marazzitile.co.uk). ➤

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PICTURE: SHANNON MCGRATH

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1 ‘Gemma’ container by Sebastian Herkner, £1,387 (as shown), Agape (agapedesign.it) 2 ‘Pale Ash No.12’ paint, £59 for 2.5 litres, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) 3 ‘Duet Hexagon’ porcelain tiles in ‘Flax Mix’, from £4.99, Ann Sacks (annsacks.com) 4 ‘Florentine Fondo’ wall finish, from £70 per square metre, Viero (viero.co.uk)

LIGHT CONTEMPOR ARY A colourless scheme is often a fall back in the bathroom, but with just a few design twists, a pale space can be transformed into a spa-like retreat. High-shine finishes should be the first port of call, like these ‘Perla’ tiles by Australian brand Stonetile Ind (above; stonetileind.com.au). Add in metal elements, such as the ‘Canali HD’ tap, which doubles as a towel rail, from Italian brand Neve (top left, £584; livinghouse.co.uk) and a feature basin, such as this piece by Greek brand Bagno Y Bagno (£665.89; bagnobagno.gr). ➤

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THINK PINK

PICTURE: HEIDI LERKENFELDT, PUNTO_IMMAGINE

This colour is dominating bathroom design. Black outlines harden the pretty shade of Russian brand Crosby Studios’ space (left; crosby-studios.com), while Kast Concrete’s ‘Rho’ basins (£1,492; kastconcretebasins.com) heighten the pink tinge of the ‘Arctic’ floor tiles in ‘Siberian’ (below) by Solus Ceramics (£54 per square metre; solusceramics.com). For instant pink, try H&M (bottom, from £3.99 for a hand towel; hm.com).

SHOP THE LOOK 1 ‘Pink Slip’ paint, £59 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (little greene.com) 2 ‘Geometrica’ coloured tiles, from £119 per square metre; patterned, from £130 per square metre, both Domus (domustiles.co.uk) 3 ‘Metropole Pink’ wood-efect porcelain, £36 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) ➤ 2 1

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PICTURES: ALEXANDER JAMES, MASSIMO MARCANTE

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1 ‘Innovo’ tap in satin copper by Cea, £2,847, West One Bathrooms (westonebath rooms.com) 2 ‘Hydrea’ Carrara marble sink, £800, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 3 Classic rose copper radiator, £888, Bisque (bisque.co.uk)

M ARBLE & COPPER Add a contemporary flourish to a timeless Carrara marble bathroom with hits of copper and striking geometric pattern. London-based architects Mwai set a basin into the window alcove (right), suspending a copper-backed mirror in front of the glass to create a frame of light. The deck-mounted Vola tap (£1,308; vola.com) and other pieces of hardware in the same finish beautifully complement the white stone (mwai.co.uk). ➤

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MOROCCAN BLUE The bright Zellige-tile shades of blue are making waves – go traditional with mismatched hues, like US brand Clé’s ‘Fired Opal’ tiles (below, £144 per square metre; cletile.com). Or, for more of a statement, choose Made a Mano’s supersized ‘Ossido’ tiles, each one of which is unique (right, from £500 per square metre; madeamano.com).

SHOP THE LOOK 1 ‘Roker’ tile in ‘Teal Ripple’, £102 per square metre, Johnson Tiles (johnson-tiles.com) 2 ‘Alberta’ tile, £34.56 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) 3 ‘Blue Pearl’ paint, £65.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) 4 ‘Elm’ sink in ‘Storm’, £2,094, Kast Concrete Basins (kastconcretebasins.com) ➤ 1

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STATEMENT CURVES Tiling can work on even the most original of architectural features, such as the gracefully curved walls in these bathrooms. Belgian architects Broekx-Schiepers ( broekx-schiepers.be) covered a shower enclosure in a swathe of glazed white tiles (right) to highlight the circular rooflight. Meanwhile, Barcelona-based studio Arquitectura-G’s penchant for curves led to the creation of this rounded wash space ( below), with circular objects such as the company’s in-house designed ‘Aro’ basin (£542.50; indoors.es) and a simple, round mirror that further echoes the efect.

PICTURES: MAX ZAMBELLI, JOSE HEVIA, STIJN BOLLAERT

SHOP THE LOOK 1 ‘Lotus’ washbasin by Naoto Fukasawa, from £895, Boi (boiuk.com) 2 ‘Breaking the Wave’ tiles in black and grey by Monica Förster Design Studio, both £131 per square metre, Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.se) ➤

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B AT H R O O M S

LINEAR DETAILS Steel outlines are being used to stylishly frame bathrooms. Danish studio Nichba’s shower frame (top left, from £899; nichba-design.dk) has been paired with matching accessories, while Tel Aviv-based interior designer Mayaan Zusman anchors the graphic look with black tiles (above; maayanzusman.co.il). Antonio Lupi’s floating ‘Tandem-Up’ rail (left, £733; antoniolupi.it) add a sculptural element.

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PICTURES: ZEROTREMEDIA, ITAY BENIT, BURGBAD, TOMMASO SARTORI

SHOP THE LOOK 1‘Fontane Bianche’ tap in ‘Matt Gun Metal PVD’ by Fantini, £876, West One Bathrooms (westonebath rooms.com) 2 ‘Mya’ towel rail, £1,373, Ripples (ripplesbathrooms.com) ➤


B AT H R O O M S

VERTICAL TILING

SHOP THE LOOK 1 ‘Raw’ tiles by Piero Lissoni, £228 per square metre, Salvatori (salvatori.it) 2 ‘Aurora’ tiles in ‘Salla’, £9 each, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 1

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PICTURES: GABRIELE SALVATORI, EQUIPE CERAMICAS

In small bathrooms, draw the eye upward and create the illusion of space by turning the typical metro style of tiling on its head. Equipe’s ‘Artisan’ tiles in ‘Aqua’ (above right) and ‘Rose Mallow’ (right) nod to two of our favourite colour trends (both £43 per square metre; equipeceramicas.com), while Tolko Interiors’ bespoke surface, with welded stripes of metal (above), is a contemporary take on the idea (tolkointeriors.ru).


ESCAPE T R AV E L

/ R E S TA U R A N T S / G A R D E N S / C U LT U R E

LIVE THE LEGENDS Environmentally conscious and architecturally inclined holidaymakers, rejoice. The eight portable ‘pods’ designed and built by diferent architectural practices last year, as part of a collaborative competition part-funded by the Welsh government, are all available to rent this summer. The quirky brief was to design a one-room cabin inspired by a Welsh myth, and the winning results are undoubtedly zany – but all are well camouflaged, fitting right into rugged Welsh countryside. Our favourite cabin? Possibly ‘Dragon’s Eye’ (below) by carpenter Carwyn Lloyd Jones, with its stainless steel exterior made to resemble scales, full-height windows, a rotating bed and a woodburning stove. Check the website for dates, locations and how to book (from £425 for a two-night stay; epicretreats.wales).

Edited by CHARLOT TE BROOK


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ESCAPE

LONDON CALLING Schedule a mini-break in one of the capital’s newest boutique hotels

BEST FOR COCKTAIL HOUR My Chelsea The newest branch of the My Hotel group has opened on a Victorian boulevard in SW3. The interiors, courtesy of London practice Design Haus Liberty, are inspired by the borough’s annual RHS Flower Show: architecturally pared-back, but big on botany. We love the greenhousestyle lobby with brass bar and velvet chairs (from £169 per night; myhotels.com).

PICTURES: SIMON BROWN, JASON BAILEY

BEST FOR AFFORDABILITY The Pilgrm This Paddington guesthouse aims to relax traditional hotel rules: there’s no formal check-in (you do so online) and the café feels like a friend’s sitting room. There are velvet armchairs, bookshelves with ferns trailing from them, and homestyle cooking – from a plate of British charcuterie to Jerusalem artichoke soup (from £99 per night; thepilgrm.com). BEST FOR OLD-WORLD CHARM Kettner’s Townhouse A year shy of its 150th anniversary, the Soho society institution Kettner’s – which Napoleon III’s chef Auguste Kettner opened in 1867 and was thereafter frequented by royalty, as well as the likes of Oscar Wilde and Agatha Christie – closed down in 2016. The Grade II-listed Georgian building has now been taken over by the Soho House empire and reopened as a 33-bedroom hotel with a restaurant and Champagne bar. Note the William Morris textiles, hand-painted wallpaper and 1920s chandeliers (from £225 per night; kettnerstownhouse.com). MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 199


CZECH IT OUT Ever considered a break in the Czech Republic’s Carpathian mountains? Us neither, until architect Daniela Hradilová and her husband moved from Prague to settle down in the foothills, and turn an abandoned 200-year-old house into Mezi Plůtky (Czech for ‘In Between the Fences’), a tiny, stylish hotel. It’s easy to get to – Ostrava airport is only 30 minutes away, with thrice-weekly flights from London – and with original features restored, the four bedrooms and communal spaces are now serenely simple. The knowing eye will recognise Swedish designer Karl Andersson’s ‘Soner’ chairs around the dining table and Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Comback’ armchairs for Kartell by the open fire. ‘We wanted to create a home, which is why there is no reception or restaurant,’ Daniela, who welcomes guests herself and cooks breakfast along with her husband, points out. The outdoors, though, is perhaps the main attraction: there is a pond at the far end of the garden, where you are encouraged to take a dip in the morning. After a breakfast of homemade bread with hearty pâté from the local butcher or muesli with tart redcurrants, set of for a day exploring the region’s misty valleys, primeval forests and medieval towns – or just run a bath and help yourself to a glass of South Moravian wine from the honesty bar before a chef-cooked supper (from £115 per night for a standard double; meziplutky.cz).


ESCAPE

THE HAYWARD GALLERY What’s the story? Within the Brutalist-style Southbank Centre in London lies the Hayward Gallery, the visual arts venue, which has just reopened after a two-year closure for a redesign and restoration – just in time for its 50th birthday this year. What’s changed? Architects Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios were briefed to ‘let the light in’. By replacing the famous spiked roof with glass pyramids that allow in controlled daylight, they have achieved this in genius style. More subtly, the labyrinth of concrete surfaces has been cleaned – though, pleasingly, not glossed over or glamorised – and the 1960s galleries are now fully wired and ready for a digital future. What’s on? Exhibitions here will continue to feature contemporary, challenging artists and works. A high-tech display of South Korean installation and immersive performance artist Lee Bul’s work so far, which explores the body in ‘architectural space’, opens on 30 May (until 19 August; southbankcentre.co.uk).

PICTURES: MORLEY VON STERNBERG, JOSEPH ALBERT HAINEY, ROMANA BENNET

L I T E R A RY E S C A P E

For one fortnight a year, the sleepy Welsh town of Hay-on-Wye comes alive with the Hay Festival, a celebration of literature and culture. It was dreamt up around a kitchen table 31 years ago, and has now gone global (who knew there was a Hay Cartagena in Colombia, or Hay Arequipa in Peru?), but the flagship remains the jewel in the crown. This year’s highlights include design critic Alice Rawsthorn’s ‘field guide to design’. Accommodation-wise, Pottery Cottage Clyro (£80 per night; potterycottageclyro.com) and Harp Cottage, with its charming, but neutral interior (£321 for a three-night stay; harpcottage.co.uk) are ideal (24 May–3 June; hayfestival.com). MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 201


ESCAPE

Melbourne cofee house The Penny Drop has opened a British outpost – near central London’s Goodge Street station – in a calm, minimal space created by Australian interior design firm Golden. Its colour palette is seemingly inspired by its wares: milky whitewashed walls, beaded café-au-laitcoloured wood panelling and biscuit-hued terrazzo surfaces (pennydropcofee.co.uk).

N E W O P E N I N G The Michelin-starred chefowners of Dalston’s tiny Pidgin restaurant have taken flight to Soho, where Magpie, an airy space with double the number of seats, is now taking bookings. We love the blue velvet benches, granite plates and ‘Del Toro’ cocktail, combining mezcal, hibiscus and lime (magpie-london.com). 202 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

THE GLOBAL GOURMET

Cook yourself around the world without leaving your kitchen with these three new continent-crossing tomes JAPAN: THE COOKBOOK This hardback has been bound to resemble a sushi-rolling mat. While the pages inside, which are punctuated with atmospheric photographs of misty paddy fields and noodle-making kitchens, do explain the Japanese classics – such as how to make the ultimate maki roll – there are recipes for much lesser-known dishes, too (£29.95, Phaidon). FEASTS FROM THE MIDDLE EAST Delicious though it may be, it’s time to look beyond hummus. Learn to cook other fabulously fragrant Middle Eastern dishes – such as harissa squid, and a semolina, almond and orange blossom honey cake – in this new book from the inventive cook behind Comptoir Libanais, the growing chain of colourful Lebanese restaurants dotted around the UK (£20, Harper Collins). A TABLE IN VENICE  If you don’t let the inevitable life envy distract you too much, this book by Skye McAlpine – a food writer who has lived between Venice and London for most of her life – provides a wonderfully thorough guide to traditional recipes from northern Italy – from meringue semifreddo to artichoke hearts with parsley (£9.99, Bloomsbury).

PICTURES: GARETH GARDNER, MILES WILLIS

COFFEE BREAK


GARDENS /

THIS MONTH’S TO-DO LIST There’s plenty to keep the green-fingered busy, both in the garden and out L O O K T H E P L A N T S M A N - PA I N T E R Cedric Morris was a 20th-century painter whose portrait sitters included his one-time student Lucian Freud, but whose passion, arguably, was plants. Two new exhibitions celebrating his botanical works open this month – ‘Cedric Morris: Beyond The Garden Wall’ at London’s Philip Mould Gallery (philipmould.com) and ‘Cedric Morris: Artist Plantsman’, south of the river at the Garden Museum (gardenmuseum.org.uk).

PLANT THE SEED TO SOW THIS MONTH READ GREENHOUSE ENVY Botanical is a dreamy, image-led new book in which Swiss photographer Samuel Zeller chronicles the plants inside greenhouses in locations from his home town of Geneva to Scotland, Poland and France. This project has turned into a book both useful (there’s a comprehensive plant identification index at the back) and beautiful: the introduction correctly points out the similarities between Zeller’s soft-focus shots of plants through mottled glass and Manet’s Impressionist garden paintings (£16.95, Hoxton Mini Press).

L E A R N H O L I S T I C H O R T I C U LT U R E Gardening is one of the best wellness-boosting activities, so book yourself onto a workshop this summer. Walworth Garden in London (left) ofers courses on topics ranging from DIY herbal medicine to how to maintain an urban garden, with your fee helping to fund gardening education and therapy projects for the local community (from £90 each; walworthgarden.org.uk). Alternatively, in Ireland’s County Clare, collaborative Wild Wednesdays ofers the chance to learn from herbalist Lisa Guinan and forager cook Oonagh O’dwyer, who impart wisdom on subjects from plant-based health to digging bulbs, preparing herbal facials and cooking with British seaweed (£22; irishherbalroots.ie). 204 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: PHILIP MOULD & COMPANY/© THE CEDRIC MORRIS ESTATE, GETTY IMAGES

Nasturtium, the super-easy-to-grow plant whose lily-pad-style leaves and fantastically fluorescent orange flowers perk up any window box, garden or – thanks to their appealingly peppery flavour – salad bowl. Sow seeds outdoors or in pots in May and June for summer blooms (£2.99 per pack, Thompson & Morgan; thompson-morgan.com).


GETAWAY /

MARRAKECH Craftsmanship, culture and couture – it’s time to holiday in the Moroccan city that designer Yves Saint Laurent credited with teaching him the art of colour

THE CITY At the foot of the snow-capped Atlas Mountains lies the Red City, which, despite being only Morocco’s fourth largest after Casablanca, Fez and Tangier, has long topped the hitlist of travellers, from 1960s hippies to spa-seekers and anyone with an appetite for spice – or an eye for handmade design. We’ve unearthed how to track down that authentic, handmade Berber rug or crate of green Zellige tiles, but also where to find quiet corners in the city that is as vibrant culturally as it is architecturally.

WHERE TO STAY There is a relaxing riad

PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES/EYEEM PREMIUM, KASIA GATKOWSKA PHOTOGRAPHY

(the traditional style of Moroccan house, arranged around a courtyard garden) for every traveller. Self-suicient? Book La Maison: the entire house – with its raw plaster surfaces, monochrome palette and banana plants – plus the plunge pool is all yours (sleeps four, £137 per night; airbnb.co.uk). The eagle-eyed owner of El Fenn (below), a stylish 28-room hotel, has just opened a small shop on site – it’s full of books, perfumes, handmade furniture and accessories bought from her secret sources, which there isn’t space for in the house (double rooms from £205 per night; el-fenn.com). ➤


G E T A W AY

the magical Café Sahrij in botanical gardens Le Jardin Secret makes for a perfect afternoon pitstop (lejardinsecretmarrakech.com), while L’Hotel Marrakech (above), Jasper Conran’s 1930s-style five-bedroom bolthole in a 19th-century riad, now welcomes non-guests for an elegant long lunch or dinner. In summer, homestyle sept légumes (such as safron-spiked root vegetables with harissa couscous, followed by fresh dates) are served on the rooftop (l-hotelmarrakech.com). Hit the street food stalls in the medina for a bowl of prune and almond tagine, or try Agadir red mullet and raw fennel salad at modern Moorish restaurant Nomad’s terrace above the spice souk (nomadmarrakech.com).

SHOP A weekend here is an interiors enthusiast’s shopping idyll, but beware of fakes – and always be ready to bargain. For a bona fide Berber rug, head to the store of sourcing legend Mustapha Blaoui, who has furnished many of the chicest riads and can have your rugs shipped to the UK (mustaphablaoui.com). After technicolour Zellige tiles? Book a morning with Mustapha Chouquir, El Fenn hotel’s go-to craft and shopping expert, who can escort you to whichever shop or workshop will fulfil your tile wishes (mustaphachouquir.com). Or for a modern take on handmade cement tiles, visit the headquarters of cool studio Popham Design on Route D’Ourika (pophamdesign.com). For stylish contemporary accessories, hit new lifestyle brand LRNCE, which designs and sells Picasso-esque ceramics made by North African artisans from its by-appointment studio (lrnce.com).

SPA DAYS

All that treasure hunting surely calls for a Dr Hauschka facial and a refreshing swim in the 22-metre swimming pool – housed in a palm-fringed, orangery-style glasshouse – at the 208 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

Royal Mansour hotel’s spectacular, pearly white Moorish-style spa (royalmansour.com). For something more low-key, try a black soap scrub at Hammam De La Rose (hammamdelarose.com).

CULTURE The two Musées Yves Saint Laurent, both designed by the Paris-based Studio KO, have now opened in Paris and Marrakech – the cities between which the couturier split his time. Inside the Moroccan outpost, you’ll find archive sketches and an exhibition of 50 fashion pieces (museeyslmarrakech.com). Behind it lies the Jardin Majorelle, with its dazzling blue Moorish villa, cactus-filled desert garden and the original owner’s Art Deco painting studio. Yves Saint Laurent and his partner Pierre Bergé bought this site to save it from becoming a hotel complex in 1980 – it’s well worth a visit ( jardinmajorelle.com). Art-wise, head to the new Museum of African Contemporary Art Al Maaden (MACAAL), designed by French architect Jean-François Bodin (who masterminded Paris’s Musée Picasso). Its aim is to bring art currently being made across the continent to a new audience: the opening show, ‘Africa Is No Island’ showcases the work of 40 emerging photographers (until 24 August; macaal.org).

ESCAPE THE CITY

Head for the hills to enjoy a restorative night or two at the end of your trip – ideally in one of Berber Lodge’s nine new individual guesthouses. Built from compressed earth and held up by beams of eucalyptus wood, they feature tadelakt and marble bathrooms and simple furniture. Organic gardens provide fresh produce and the 360-degree views of the Atlas mountains are majestic – plus, it’s only 20 minutes’ drive from the medina (doubles from £133; berberlodge.net). Alternatively, rent the sophisticated Amizmiz House, just outside the city (from £6,270 per week; themodernhouse.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: © FONDATION JARDIN MAJORELLE/NICOLAS MATHÉUS, GETTY IMAGES, ALAMY, KASIA GATKOWSKA PHOTOGRAPHY

EAT AND DRINK A carrot juice or black cofee at


Clockwise from top left The famous Koutoubia Mosque. Donkeys are a popular mode of transport in the Red City. The peaceful pool at El Fenn hotel. Crowds gather at the Jemaa el-Fnaa square and marketplace in the medina. A cosy corner in El Fenn hotel’s orange tree courtyard. The bedroom in one of Berber Lodge’s stylish guesthouses. L’Hotel Marrakech, the perfect spot for a long lunch or dinner. The Marrakech-based Musée Yves Saint Laurent’s latticed red brick exterior


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NEW DESIGNER A collection of the most desirable pieces for your home

DYEHOUSE Yorkshire based furniture and homeware brand DYEHOUSE was founded in 2015 by award winning architect and interior designer, Mark Lee. Operating from a converted dyehouse, the brand draws inspiration from the natural, rural surroundings. A meticulously conceived and crafted collection, created from materials that are largely characteristic of Yorkshire – principally oak, steel and leather. All products are made to order and bespoke commissions are welcomed. You can see some of the range at the internationally renowned Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Visit: www.thedyehouse.com +44(0)1484 668 018.

From left: FALL stools, BORE logstore, SCOWLE firepit and FALL bench. Photo ©John Britton.

MISTY INTERIOR Founder Kozue Garner loves using colour, texture, vintage folk and designer textiles to mix and match with traditional skills. She creates very boho to elegant styles to fill your space with joy. Hand stitched curtains, cushions, canopy, headboard and more. Residential, Commercial Projects, works with architects or directly with individual clients. Visit www.mistyinterior.com or email kozue@mistyinterior.com MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 215


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ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection

Hypnos Orthos Elite mattress with Hideaway storage divan and Eleanor headboard in Paris Maroon fabric

WAKE UP BEAUTIFULLY WITH HYPNOS Award-winning British bed manufacturer Hypnos has been handcrafting bespoke, luxury beds and mattresses for the finest homes, hotels and palaces around the world for more than 100 years. Testament to its skill and heritage, the company is the proud holder of a Royal Warrant, awarded by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, which acts as a mark of British craftsmanship. A family-run business, Hypnos places the customer at its heart ensuring each and every bespoke product is designed according

to personal comfort level, size, shape and style, for a beautiful night’s sleep. Specialists in producing handcrafted, sumptuous pocket spring beds, Hypnos combines traditional skills with the finest natural and sustainable materials. All Hypnos beds come with a 10-year guarantee. www.hypnosbeds.com

DAVID STUDWELL David Studwell often uses figures that are synonymous with certain eras, in particular the swinging sixties. Marilyn Monroe, Brigitte Bardot and Steve McQueen all feature in his work evoking a string sense of nostalgia. Studwell reinvents these classic and timeless images through an evolved creative process that incorporates bold and vivid colours, highlighting his influences of Pop Art, popular culture and cult movies. He has exhibited in London and the USA and has high profile clients that include Kate Moss and Nile Rodgers. Featured here is David Bowie, a limited edition silk screen (56 x 45cm, £300). Visit www. davidstudwellgallery.co.uk or email davidstudwell@ gmail.com 216 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

HANDMADEINBRIGHTON.COM This statement piece live-edge table was hand-crafted using traditional techniques by artisans Payne-Vigour. Every aspect of the bespoke commission was carefully considered, from the book-matched timber selection through to the gorgeous brass legs with matching embedded brass stitches and massive ammonite fossil. Find out more from hello@handmadeinbrighton or visit www.handmadeinbrighton.com


BRITISH MADE SOFAS, SOFA BEDS AND BEDS Willow & Hall’s Spring Sale is now on with 10% of all sofas and sofa beds, but as a reader of Elle Decoration they're ofering an exclusive 10% discount of all items. Order by 25 April and use code ELLE25418. Plus, for a limited time only take advantage of free nationwide delivery and free recycling of your old item. Choose from a range of quality handmade furniture such as their sofa beds with 14cm deep mattress options, chaise sofas with hidden storage, beautiful upholstered beds and accessories. All items are made to order by skilled craftsmen in Britain with over 35 years' experience. Designs are available in 130 fabrics and delivered within 4-5 weeks. They also ofer free 14-day no quibble returns on all orders. To explore their range visit their London showroom, shop online at www.willowandhall.co.uk or call 020 8939 3800. Product featured: The Foxham Sofa or Sofa Bed

BOBO1325 BOBO1325 is an innovative, socially conscious design house founded by Beth Travers. Her unique designs have fuelled intrigue and interest from a wide range of clients who see their design choices as an extension of their identity. BOBO1325’s ability to create visually striking pieces, underpinned by messages such as climate control, gender equality and mental health have seen her reap praise from the industry. Distinctive, eye catching and not to be missed. www.bobo1325.com

BYMARIE LONDON Bespoke lampshade designer Marie ofers an extensive collection of custom made lampshades, all made to order. Ofering a mix and match range with over 22 fabric colours and 30 lining colours including metallics, they are perfect for someone looking for that extra-special something. Based in SW London. For more details visit www.bymarie.co.uk or email: bymarie@me.com

BOEME DESIGN We create exceptional furnishing fabrics from all our original artwork. Shown here our wonderful TEMPEST design printed on velvet in the UK. Also available as wallpaper. Exploring a new narrative in abstract textile design. www.boeme.co.uk MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 217


Classifieds | A – Z KITCHENS

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260 DOORS, HOMEWARE & GIFTS

NORTH4.COM DORGLAZE® VISION PANELS FOR DOORS

NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

Unique, organic, ceramic sculptures. Bespoke commissions www.kiramics.com

Björk Haraldsdóttir Contemporary Handbuilt Ceramics

www.ceramicsbybjork.com

Home accessories and lifestyle gifts.

@alboae info@alboae.com / www.alboae.com

218 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE

MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 219


Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE

220 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z INTERIOR DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE

MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 221


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

INTERIOR DESIGN

Anna Casa Interiors has a range of interior design services and packages designed to meet the demands of a faster moving lifestyle and also, to cater to the design requirements of property developers & investors. Specifically designed for new build Properties, whether projects range from modifying just one room to transforming an entire living space. Our developer packages reflect the bespoke, luxury ethos of the Anna Casa design studio, designed and selected by creative director Anna Grace-Davidson. www.annacasainteriors.com Or call +44 (0) 207 352 8008

MASCULINE GLAMOUR

colour with a conscience beautiful | healthy | pure

edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk

222 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

Interiors & Bespoke Furniture casabotelho.com


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

BEDS

WA K E U P B E A U T I F U L LY Handcrafting luxury beds and mattresses using time-honoured methods since 1904 to provide a deeply relaxing and rejuvenating night’s sleep, fulfilling dreams for a long and healthy life.

Visit a Hypnos retailer and design a bed that’s just right for you

www.hypnosbeds.com

Handmade in Britain with a 10-year guarantee

Hypnos is proud to be Carbon Neutral

MAY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 223


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

BATHROOMS & FLOORING

LIGHTING

What’s missing from an Albion bath? Excessive Weight.

Our unique material is strong and durable, yet weighs around 1/3 of the cast iron equivalent. Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 or go to: www.albionbathco.com

LIGHTING & HOMEWARE

www.thefrenchhouse.net

From classical chandeliers to modern statement pieces and more, let us inspire you.

The finest new, antique and reclaimed wood floors

www.woodworksbytedtodd.com

224 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018

t: 020 7384 1485 e: sales@tindle-lighting.co.uk www.tindle-lighting.co.uk


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z OUTDOOR FURNITURE, SCULPTURES & FABRICS

Why compromise?

Expertly hand-woven in sturdy all-weather Rehau Raucord® rattan, with sustainable teak. Curated collection of designs with styles to suit contemporary outdoor spaces. Bespoke in-house design service to support furniture and commercial projects.

Extensive range of leisure furniture for luxury homes, hotels, spas and resorts.

cyan.co.uk 020 8655 6240 JA037 Riviera Armchair LT478 Cadogan Table JA035 Monaco Lounger

www.extex.co.uk

+44 (0)1634 718871

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WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURE: 3 OBJECTIVES

FINE PRINT /

‘HUARI’ BY VILLA NOVA Villa Nova’s new collection is based on traditional mark-making that decorates African, native Central and South American crafts. With its bold, painterly brushstrokes, this is the standout pattern. ‘Huari’ fabric in ‘Carbon’, £35 per metre, Villa Nova (villanova.co.uk)

226 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2018


Elle Decoration - UK (May 2018)  
Elle Decoration - UK (May 2018)  
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