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CONTENTS

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27 News Our latest shopping wishlists, the dining chairs to buy now and the colour combination that’s taking over the high street. Plus, why designer Tim Rundle is the name to know

31

41 Design We take a closer look at String, the brand behind Sweden’s bestselling furniture concept, and chat with textile designer Dame Zandra Rhodes about her cultural influences

53 Architecture London’s upcoming landmarks and the secrets of Ricardo Bofill’s Les Espaces D’Abraxas 57 The new shopkeepers Discover the independent design shops bringing originality to the high street

COVER IMAGE: LISA COHEN (PHOTOGRAPHY), BREE LEECH (STYLING) SUBS COVER IMAGE: BEN ANDERS (PHOTOGRAPHY), HANNAH BORT (STYLING)

87 Living room in need of a stylish update? You’ll find a wealth of ideas and looks that are perfect for relaxation in our edit

COLOUR SPECIAL

Bright ideas for colourful cooks and rose-gold fittings for glamorous washrooms

65 Decorating with colour is simple! All you need is our guide to the season’s inspiring palettes and paints to try

COV E R 36

L O V E YO U R L O U N G E

51 Kitchens & bathrooms

STYLE

44 Decorating New wallpapers, paints and fabrics, the complete lowdown on updating your banister and top tips from London-based interior designer Rachel Chudley

N E W S S TA N D This beautiful sage green living room – one of the looks from our Love Your Lounge feature, p87 – is by Dulux Australia

S U B S C R I B E R The colours of the

1970s are back – here Gucci wallpaper, a table by Minotti and a bench by AYTM add class, p72

MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 17


CONTENTS 104 Colour makes a home This small east London flat has a big personality

114 Whispering pine Plywood gives this Brooklyn studio a light, airy look

118 Wild at heart Immaculately

curated like a bouquet, this florist’s home in Antwerp is brimming with colour

124 The human scale This pied-à-

terre in Brussels shows how the contrast of light and dark can add character

132 London pride Brass, sage green and marble make this bijou Brutalist apartment look rich and inviting

138 Reflected glory This compact

home in Florence uses cleverly placed mirrors to enhance the sense of space

146 Black in action The owner of this studio in Vladivostok, Russia, knows the decorating power of darker shades

150 Poet’s corner There’s a lightness of touch in this classic Parisian garret

156 Kaleidoscopic pattern Designer

Pierre-Marie Agin’s petite French flat is filled with joyful prints and vivid shades

162 Charmed living This home’s new

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171 News Discover the new Louvre outpost

in Abu Dhabi, a design fair with a difference in Monaco and a quartet of new boutique hotels in Paris. Plus, we show you how to get a taste of Lisbon in London and explore 2018’s hottest ski breaks

179 Gardens Meet Fox Flowers, the new

British brand designing, manufacturing and selling beautiful and realistic faux blooms

181 Getaway We visit Iceland’s capital Reykjavík, whose booming design scene and coffee culture is as much of an attraction as the country’s hot springs and amazing views of the Northern Lights

F I N A L LY

24 Subscribe Fantastic offers for our most loyal readers 185 Stockists Where to buy everything in this issue 194 Fine print We reveal this month’s eye-catching fabric 18 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018

CORRECTIONS: CLEMENCE LEBOULANGER STYLED OUR FEBRUARY COVER HOUSE, BUT HER CREDIT WAS OMITTED. THE PRICE FOR THE FLEXFORM ‘ZEFIRO’ TABLE IN OUR FEBRUARY ISSUE IS INCORRECT – THE PRICE STATED WAS FOR THE SMALLEST, 45X45CM MODEL

HOMES

ESCAPE

horseshoe-shaped layout encourages the Italian sun to stream into every room


CO LO U R informs every area of our lives. From red ‘Stop’ signs to flashing blue police sirens, green traffic lights to blinking yellow Belisha beacons, our reactions to the colours we come into contact with on a daily basis are often instinctive and emotive; something we don’t even have to think about. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case when it comes to combining shades ourselves – whether it’s deciding what to wear, or, more crucially, decorating our homes, working out what could or should go together is often a tricky decision. To help with this dilemma, this month we’ve come up with our first dedicated Colour section. Inside, you’ll find considered advice on what paint schemes work and why. We reveal how the Scandinavians are moving away from all things white and choosing brighter hues, and why 1970s shades are making a comeback. Plus, our resident colour expert Kassia St Clair explores how decorating with certain hues can affect your emotions. However, this month’s issue is not only a celebration of colour. It’s also our annual examination of the world’s most beautiful small spaces – an acknowledgement that not all of us live in lofty mansions with high ceilings and expansive rooms, but instead have to come up with clever ways to make the most of what we’ve got. Living, as I do, in a compact London apartment, the creative, space-savvy ideas used in this month’s properties have got me thinking. My DIY to-do list now includes adding more mirrored surfaces (see our Vigone home on p138) and trying out unexpected shades, like those in British designer Laura Fulmine’s home on p104. Whether it’s combining colours yourself or being brave with your own use of space, be inspired and be bold! PS. Be sure to check out our new bathroom and tile range, now exclusively available

PICTURE: JAMES MCNAUGHT

at Bathstore. The ‘Transition’ collection by ELLE Decoration is a beautiful, curated edit of stylish products with which you can create a truly personal bathroom.

Executive Editor

Follow me on

Instagram: @mrbspriggs

Twitter: @ELLEDecoBen

Visit elledecoration.co.uk MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 21


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24 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018


ST YLE DESIGN

/ P E O P L E / D E C O R AT I N G / A R C H I T E C T U R E

Edited by A MY MOOREA WONG

HOP TO IT Like the insect after which they are named, Knoll’s ‘Grasshopper’ tables possess great poise and grace, described by their designer Piero Lissoni as ‘weightless and compact objects, so thin that they look able to lift up and take to the air’. Long, slender legs finished in chrome (burnished or lacquered) support a thinly sliced top crafted out of glass, Statuarietto marble or less common materials such as ruby red marble or fossilised wood. From £3,870 (knolleurope.com).


THE GREAT DIVIDE Italian brand Caccaro’s ‘SideView’ is a sideboard, a room divider and clothes hanger. This multitasking wonder can be placed almost anywhere in the home – use it as a partition in an open-plan space, to create a stylish entrance zone by the front door, or as a standout storage piece. You can experiment for yourself at the brand’s new showroom on London’s King’s Road. From £2,350 (caccaro.it).

FOUR OF THE BEST DINING CHAIRS Backrests and seats that seem to hover, or arms that are more (or less) than they seem – the latest chair designs put clever style twists back at the head of the table. Choose from our top picks…

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2 3 TIME FOR A BED The ‘Wallis’ is, somewhat surprisingly, British creative Russell Pinch’s first-ever bed design, produced to celebrate the one-year anniversary of his collaboration with Heal’s. Its look is defined by a gently curved headboard and prominent ash feet. £1,899 as pictured (heals.com).

4 1 ‘Willow.2’ oak chair, £325, Joined + Jointed (joinedandjointed.com) 2 ‘Ming’ aluminium and ash chair, £365, Stellar Works (stellarworks.com) 3 ‘Ella’ chair by Porada, £2,050, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk) 4 ‘Keyko’ chair in black lacquered ash, from £1,297, Gallotti Radice (gallottiradice.it)


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COMPILED BY: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURES: PHILIP VILE, ALESSANDRO GRUETZMACHER, ELEVEN1, ANDREA GARUTI

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SUNSHINE AND CLEAR SKIES Prepare your home for the coming of spring with the most cheery of colour palettes 1 Tropical (Green Sky) print by Stu Ross, £80 unframed, Print Club London (printclublondon.com) 2 ‘Bedford Square’ paint, £46 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.com) 3 ‘Cherry L’ pendant light by Petite Friture, £392, Silvera (silveraltd.co.uk) 4 ‘Eye’ rug, £350, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 5 ‘Tamburo Mirror Side Table’, £185, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) 6 ‘Sem’ carafe by Federica Bubani, £89 for two, Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com) 7 ‘Blush’ ceramic mug, £12, Yonder Living (yonderliving.com) 8 ‘932 MB1 Quartet’ armchair by Mario Bellini, from £3,250, Cassina (cassina.com) 9 ‘Curved Concave’ cushion cover in ‘Honey & Rose’, £65, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) 10 ‘Fullmoon’ mirror by Skagerak, £195, Skandium (skandium.com) 11 ‘Large Apothecary’ vase, £25, Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.com) 12 ‘Giraffe’ console table, £672, &New (andnew.co.uk)

MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 29


CARIBBEAN FLAVOUR At 107 years old, Danish design brand Fredericia isn’t slowing down. Its revival continues with the latest incarnation of the ‘Trinidad’ chair by designer Nanna Ditzel. Inspired by the elaborate fretwork that covers buildings in the Caribbean, the seat has been updated in neutral tones, such as this ‘Smoked Oak’ stain. From £493 ( fredericia.com).

LIFE’S LUXURIES Modern designs in rich fabrics define Love Your Home’s aesthetic – nothing less than we’d expect from previous ELLE Decoration style editor Abi Boura, who founded the brand. We’d happily curl up between the ‘Oscar’ armchair’s supersized wings and elegant pleats. From £1,320 with footstool in ‘Pinot Noir’ velvet (love-your-home.co.uk).

T O T A L LY T A C T I L E Tom Dixon’s ‘Abstract’ cushions, part of the brand’s second collection of soft furnishings, are hand-tufted by skilled artisans in Varanasi, northern India, using the same process that creates tapestries. The thick, woolly patterns are formed in a mixture of loops and tufts of varied heights, impossible to achieve by machine. £100 each (tomdixon.net).


STYLE

THREE OF THE BEST BOOKS TO HELP YOU BRING THE ART OF MINDFULNESS HOME A Monk’s Guide to a Clean House and Mind Shin-Buddhist monk Shoukei Matsumoto believes we can all benefit from the ancient Zen notion that house cleaning clears out ‘the gloom in our hearts’. Sage advice and practical tips on how to polish, dust and scrub your way to a serene state of mind (£4.99, Penguin).

THE RISING SUN Created by Shanghai-based designers and architects Neri & Hu in collaboration with renowned Italian lighting brand Artemide, the limited edition ‘nh1217’ light is a contemporary take on the traditional Chinese lantern. Both beautiful and practical, the blown-glass sphere is attached to a brass loop, meaning it can either be used as a freestanding lamp, hooked onto the wall or even carried around. £155 (artemide.com).

PICTURES: ENOK HOLSEGAARD, PIERPAOLO FERRARI

Mindful Thoughts for City Dwellers: The Joy of Urban Living Lucy Anna Scott, yoga teacher and founder of independent magazine Lost in London, a quirky guide to the greener side of the capital, offers stories and advice on how to find nature and comradeship in the sometimes-isolating and always hectic metropolis (£5.99, Quarto).

Finding Sisu: In Search of Courage, Strength and Happiness the Finnish Way Already billed as Finland’s answer to hygge, sisu is a national ethos that loosely translates as persevering over time or in adversity. On the home front, this is about putting in the time to restore favourite pieces and embrace ‘improve don’t move’. Expert Katja Pantzar explains it all (£16.99, Hodder & Stoughton).

RHUBARB & CUSTARD This classic dessert combination is the hottest dish in interiors right now, as subdued yellows and dusky pinks mix together up and down the high street. To offset this burst of sugar, the best examples of the trend are opting for graphic patterns and colour blocking. J by Jasper Conran’s bedding for Debenhams (above, duvet set, £80; debenhams.com) demonstrates the look to great effect. If you want just a nibble of something sweet, opt for a statement accessory – from cushions to lampshades and rugs, there’s plenty of choice. Left, from top ‘Divided Squares’ cushion cover, £39, West Elm (westelm.co.uk). ‘Kelim Squares’ rug by Ferm Living, from £79, Amara (amara.com). ‘Tufted Colourblock’ lampshade, £98, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com)

MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 31


STYLE

THE BRIGHTER HOME

Even a small pop of colour can enliven a space – dot these joyful accessories around to instantly lift your mood

‘Layered’ teal mirror, £38.50, Haidée Drew (haideedrew.com)

FIND YOUR TRIBE

‘Bright Ceramicist’ vase in ‘Cobalt’, £29, West Elm (westelm.co.uk)

Bring a flash of South American vibrancy into your home with A Rum Fellow’s capsule collection, made in partnership with Shipibo tribeswomen from the Peruvian rainforest. The Shipibo tribe creates each piece communally, before hand-embroidering the geometric designs, which are influenced by the dazzling music, energy and environment of their Amazonian surroundings. Cushions, £265 each, ‘Asca’ rug, £840 per square metre (arumfellow.com).

‘Cosworth’ vase, £25, Habitat (habitat.co.uk)

PICTURE: BJARNI B JACOBSEN FOTOGRAFI

‘Rulla’ bottle by Markku Salo, £40, Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com)

‘Lundstrøm’ bowl by Nicholai Wiig Hansen for Raawii, £45.50, Twenty Twenty One (twentytwentyone.com)

ROCK STAR Sandstone, the most humble of construction materials, is getting its moment in the design spotlight, thanks to Swoon Editions. Two slabs of this raw stone decorate the doors of the brand’s beautiful, new ‘Phoebe’ cabinet. Will its naturally occurring, slightly metallic pink and grey tones see it overtake marble as the stone du jour? Watch this space... £549 (swooneditions.com).

MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 33


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CHERRY BLOSSOM IN BLOOM The delicate colours of this Japanese plant are the perfect inspiration for a restful bedroom 1 ‘Ornament’ wallpaper by Tamara Piilora, £48 per square metre, Feathr (feathr.com) 2 ‘Treviso’ pendant light, £99, Swoon Editions (swooneditions.com) 3 ‘Leather IV’ paint, £46.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) 4 ‘Harvey’ nightstand by Rodolfo Dordoni, £3,440, Minotti (minottilondon.com) 5 Pink ombre vase, £16, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 6 ‘Sculpt’ grey porcelain vase by Ferm Living, £49, Trouva (trouva.com) 7 ‘Desdemone’ bed by N Nasrallah & C Horner, from £2,911, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset-westend.co.uk) 8 ‘Alexandra’ chest of drawers with mirror by MannMade, £1,475, &Ratio (andratio.co.uk) 9 ‘Wizlet’ rug by Farrow & Ball, from £1,150, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com)

COMPILED BY: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES

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STYLE

THE SCENT OF SUCCESS Heritage British scent brand Atkinsons, once perfumer to the likes of Queen Victoria, Napoleon and Lawrence of Arabia, has updated its boutique at London’s 41 Burlington Arcade to reflect modern luxuries. Designer Christopher Jenner filled the three-storey space with decadent materials that echo Atkinsons opulent scents – think book-matched Rio Nero marble, gleaming verre églomisé and original furniture, such as the patinated brass drawers and pink onyx wall sconces designed by Jenner especially for the shop (atkinsons1799.com). ZEST FOR LIFE

PICTURES: MJ CHAPMAN, RORY T SEDDON/CAPTURE FACTORY, MICHAEL FRANKE

The satsuma tones of French designer Jean-Marie Massaud’s ‘Iida’ coffee table are a cheerful addition to Poliform’s latest range. Its Onyx Amber marble top (held in a bronze brass frame) is just the vibrant addition our homes need at this time of year. £3,886 (poliform.it).

BURNING DESIRES The best hand-poured candles, all made in the UK

KALEIDOSCOPIC COLOUR Fellowstead candles, handmade in London, are an ‘ode to all things leafy and herby’. From £10 for a travel candle (fellowstead.com).

Evermore’s organic coconut wax candles can be personalised with calligraphy labels. From £16 (ever morelondon.com).

Seven Seventeen donates £1 from each candle sold to a mental health charity. From £14 (sevenseventeen. myshopify.com).

Fronted by glass panes in a tempting array of hues, Jonathan Adler’s ‘Harlequin’ console will energise any room. It’s a masterclass in how to mix colours – while individually subtle, its dusky tones combine to form a dancing palette of lively triangles, anchored by a brass-edged white frame and elegant hairpin legs. £3,950 (uk.jonathanadler.com). MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 35


STYLE

NAME TO KNOW TIM RUNDLE

What’s Rundle’s background? Born in Auckland, he was keen on drawing from an early age and always wanted to design. ‘All of the designers I admired – Arne Jacobsen, Poul Kjærholm – had originally studied architecture though, so I thought that’s what you do.’ Specialising in industrial design back in New Zealand, he worked for Formworks Design – creating cutting-edge transport and farming systems – before moving to London to head up the design teams at two of the most renowned modern British brands, Tom Dixon and Conran & Partners. Why is he making waves now? Having left Conran & Partners in 2015 to set up on his own, things are now really getting going for the talented designer. Rundle’s Hackney Wick studio has just enough space for a flexible team consisting of a couple of freelance designers and a student from the Royal College of Art product design school (where he teaches one day a week). There’s also a pottery wheel for Rundle’s wife, designer and ceramicist Lauren van Uden (studiolvu.com). Any projects we should know about? You can find his furniture range for Australian brand SP01 in London store Silvera – we love the ‘Shu-Ying’ chairs, which are sleek on the outside, but wrinkled or, as Rundle puts it, ‘more human’ on the inside (top, from £1,858). The marble and glass ‘Mohana’ side table (far right, £685) is also a highlight (sp01design.com). What does the future hold? A roster of projects are set to launch this spring, including a mistily ribbed pendant light for New Zealand brand Resident (above right); a spherical bulb for Danish label Menu (near right) and some genius kitchen equipment with British favourite Joseph Joseph. Rundle is also designing a watch, something he’s never done before, for Sydney-based Mr Wolf. ‘From full-scale architecture projects to furniture, it’s a learning curve and pretty cool,’ says Rundle. All in a year’s work (timrundle.net). 36 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: TAOKI OKANO, JESSICA MACCORMICK

Architecture, agricultural machines, airplane interiors and, now, armchairs. Meet the New Zealand-born industrial designer who has worked for the best of British and is now ready to fly solo


STYLE

D E S T I N AT I O N S T O R E C H A P L I N S

Sometimes, bigger is better. This London-based emporium of modern furniture stocks a breathtakingly broad selection of design brands What’s the store’s history? James Chaplin opened his eponymous furniture shop in north London in 1993. It may have been small to begin with, but rapid expansion saw it upsize to its current 2,322-square-metre home in Hatch End. Its mission is to vanquish the need to visit multiple stores for every different brand or product on your interiors shopping list. Today, it is known as a tried-and-trusted stockist. What will I find there? The latest collections by heavyweight brands, such as B&B Italia, Porro, Ligne Roset, Porada, Cattelan Italia and Hulsta, alongside classics by Panton, Le Corbusier and the Eames, plus a few new collections from emerging designers. The standard is consistently high: ‘If any piece cannot stand on its own on a plinth and be considered something of beauty, then it will not make it into our selection,’ says James Chaplin’s son Simon, who now runs the company.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: EMANUELLE TORTORA

Chaplins may be big, but its staff are knowledgeable and passionate enough to ensure that only the best of modern design makes it onto the shop floor What makes it unique? Its size. The impressive scale of the store means that Chaplins can stock a lot of any given piece – in different colourways, materials and dimensions. ‘We also have the freedom to buy into trends quickly, without having to constantly analyse figures,’ says James Press, Chaplins’ head of marketing. What makes it a must-visit? Unusually for a shop housing large furniture, roomsets change regularly and rapidly – there will be something new to see on each visit. This might explain Chaplins’ mix of customers – as Simon Chaplin tells us: ‘Our clients range from young footballers to retired couples looking to refurnish their homes now that their children have flown the nest.’ And if I can’t make it to the store? If you aren’t based near London, we recommend using Chaplins’ richly stocked online store. The ‘Live Chat’ puts you through to members of the team who – rejoice! – actually exist and are happy and speedy to assist. 477–507 Uxbridge Road, Hatch End HA5 (chaplins.co.uk)

SHOP THE BEST OF CHAPLINS

Simon Chaplin picks his four favourite pieces available now ‘Series 28’ pendant light by Omer Abel for Bocci, £6,990

‘Spyder’ dining table by Philip Jackson for Cattelan Italia, from £2,300

‘DS-2100 Skeleton Chair’ by De Sede, £4,735

‘Togo’ sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, £1,881

MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 39


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M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E DAME ZANDRA RHODES

An arbiter of taste tells us what they are reading, watching, listening to and more

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ©ALVARO LEIVA/ROBERT HARDING, ALAMY, SYLVAIN DELEU PHOTOGRAPHER, ESTATE OF EVELYN HOFER/GETTY

In the 1970s, Dame Zandra Rhodes’ textile designs earned her the nickname ‘Princess of Punk’, and her printed dresses from the era are collectors’ items – her greatest hits have recently been recreated by hand, and are available to buy on Matchesfashion.com. In 2003, Rhodes founded London’s Fashion and Textile Museum, and she still works at her headquarters above the building. Last year she converted some of 2 her prints into rugs, in collaboration with Floor Story (from £350, floorstory.co.uk; @zandra_rhodes_; zandrarhodes.com). My all-time favourite piece of music is Boléro by Maurice Ravel (3). As my original mentor [fashion editor] Diana Vreeland (7) said, ‘The eye has to travel’, but now that I can’t travel extensively for inspiration, music has become important for letting my imagination run wild. The record that makes me feel instantly happy is Strawberry Fields Forever by The Beatles, although we recently played the album ABBA Gold at a staff party and danced until we dropped. I also find Brian Eno’s constant re-creations very inspiring. At the moment I’m reading The Secret Lives of Colour (6) by [ELLE Decoration columnist] Kassia St Clair. I heard about it on BBC Radio 4, which I listen to even in America. I recommend the book to all creatives – and non-creatives, too!

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My favourite film is either Casablanca (2) or Sleepless in Seattle (4) depending on my mood, but, for visual stimulation, I’m a huge fan of [director and screenwriter] Peter Greenaway. His films have a postsurrealist, dream-like quality that I often think about in my own work. The quote that I regularly refer to is ‘Good, better, best, never let it rest. ’Til your good is better and your better, best.’ My mum taught dressmaking in London during the war and used to say this to us. My favourite museum? It’s difficult to choose between London’s V&A and New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art (8) – their shows are always mindblowing. Both of these venues gave me the inspiration to set up the Fashion and Textile Museum. As fashion started to speed up, I wanted to preserve craft knowledge, techniques and the intellectual side of things. I love to collect modern British pottery by Carol McNicoll and Kate Malone (5), sculptural mirrored objects by Andrew Logan and paintings by Duggie Fields. Their pieces shape my life. If I won the lottery, the work of art I’d buy would be a David Hockney painting. He was at the Royal College of Art ahead of me, so I’ve always looked up to him. He’s a brilliant artist who captured the American West Coast in an individual way, and turned Yorkshire into California. My favourite place in the world is India (1). The colours there are richer and purer than anywhere else. There are seemingly no rules about what you can do with colour in India, and I always like to break out of the confines of what is good taste, as defined by the self-titled ‘fashion capitals’. My ideal night is a dinner party at home, cooked by me. I once had dinner with Salvador Dalí. If only all parties could be like that. We can but try. I have designed my home to be fun, colourful and uplifting, with my crazy china everywhere, and more people make my home more fun. It’s the formula for staying young. MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 41


STYLE

H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D S T R I N G

Makers of the shelving system that’s Sweden’s bestselling furniture design

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DID YOU KNOW? FOUR FA C T S A B O U T S T R I N G

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One of String’s first orders (in 1950) was for shelving to furnish offices at the United Nations headquarters in New York, designed by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer.

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On the brand’s 60th birthday in 2009, the String shelving system was classified as a work of Applied Art under copyright law, giving it the same protection from imitators as artworks and books – a very rare privilege for a piece of furniture.

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In 2017, the Swedish post office marked the 100th anniversary of Nils Strinning’s birth by launching a stamp featuring his iconic shelves – proof of the extent to which his much-loved design has entered the country’s popular consciousness.

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In keeping with modern technology, String now has a free-to-download iPhone app that allows you to build your own shelving system in a virtual room. Search for ‘String’ in the App Store.

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: MARCUS LAWETT

‘Everything has a prehistory, and this one is about laziness and wire’ is Swedish design professor Kerstin Wickman’s analysis of the origins of the String shelving system. There was an element of serendipity to the success of this classic, for the concept was already half-formed in the mind of its creator Nils ‘Nisse’ Strinning (1917–2006) when, in 1949, Swedish publisher Bonnier launched a competition to design a bookcase for its affordable editions. Strinning, then a young architecture student, had already designed one of the world’s earliest dish racks for a company named Elfa. Made of the then newly invented plastic-coated wire, its basket-like structure formed the basis for the String system’s ladder framework, which Strinning developed with his wife Kajsa, a fellow architect. He later claimed to have had his ‘eureka’ moment for the design while sitting on the loo. Bonnier received 194 entries in the competition, but the Strinnings’ design was a clear winner: affordable, easy to assemble and versatile. Its wood veneer shelves could be placed on any of the ladder rungs to suit the height of the owner’s books – a simple idea, elegantly executed. To say that the String system was a hit would be an understatement. In Europe, it has sold more units than any other Swedish furniture design, and in 1950s Colombia, shelf deliveries were paid for in emeralds. There was a temporary dip in fortunes in the 1970s, however, when the design fell out of fashion, and even Strinning began referring to his masterwork as ‘those bloody shelves’. Production ceased at this time, but the pendulum eventually swung back. By the time Swedish entrepreneurs Peter Erlandsson and Pär Josefsson revived the String brand in 2005, the shelves were a cult buy. To celebrate the relaunch of his work, Strinning created the ‘String Pocket’ (far right) – a smaller version of his classic – at the age of 88. Since his death, the brand he left behind has continued to launch new products, including its ‘String Works’ office storage (top) and the ‘String +’ accessories by Anna Von Schewen and Björn Dahlström, which bring the company back to its roots, as they bear a resemblance to Strinning’s dish rack. string.se


DECOR ATING /

C L A S S I C D AY Fans of designer Lucienne Day, rejoice. Two of her 1960s carpet patterns have been resurrected as floor runners with a modern twist. The boldly patterned ‘Squares and Diamonds’ (below, top) and ‘Octagon’ (bottom) form part of Alternative Flooring’s ‘Quirky Runners’ collection, which launched this month. Lorna Haigh, the brand’s creative and marketing director, says: ‘They are works of art – in fact, Day referred to her designs as “art by the yard”, and we couldn’t agree more.’ The carpets were initially produced in 1964 by Wilton Carpets, Alternative Flooring’s sister company, and the new runners are now being made in the same factory as the original range. £93.80 per metre (alternativeflooring.com; robinandluciennedayfoundation.org).

INSIDE THE PALACE WALLS We may not all be lucky enough to own a Moroccan palace, but now we can recreate some of their grandeur at home with the ‘Bahia’ doorway panel from the new collection by Martyn Lawrence Bullard for Cole & Son. Intricately hand-sketched and shaded to a realistic effect, it’s ideal for creating the illusion of a doorway at the end of a corridor or in a large living room. Team with the ‘Jali Trellis’ wallpaper from the same collection – a floral motif with the appearance of carved stonework. Bullard’s collection references both Eastern and Western cultures – you’ll find other designs inspired by the hanging gardens of Babylon, Arabic tiles and the palm trees of Hollywood. ‘Bahia’, £450 per panel; ‘Jali Trellis’, £95 per roll (cole-and-son.com).


W H AT L I E S B E N E AT H Little Greene has launched its ‘Archive Trails II’ collection, inspired by wallpaper remnants found in historic homes by English Heritage and Manchester’s Whitworth Art Gallery and redesigned for 21st-century interiors. Our favourite is this ‘Monroe’ wallpaper, £92 per roll (littlegreene.com).

HOME ON THE RANGE Channel your inner cowboy and add a touch of ranch style to your interiors with these smart ‘Hair on Hide’ borders from Samuel & Sons, made from supple natural cowhide in muted tones. There are three designs to choose from – the chevron-patterned ‘Sequence’, the 3D-effect ‘Prism’, and ‘Hexagon’, which has a modern, graphic feel. The borders are very versatile – use them to trim drapery or upholstery, or even apply them to walls to add an elegant finishing touch. Prices start at £120 per metre (samuelandsons.com).

WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURES: RADU PALICICA, PAUL RAESIDE

CHALK IT UP Annie Sloan has joined forces with Oxfam to create a new chalk paint in a green inspired by the colour of a field of alliums. For every pot of ‘Lem Lem’ (which means ‘to flourish’in Ethiopian) sold, profits will go to the charity’s Ethiopian Seed Project. £18.95 for one litre (anniesloan.com; oxfam.org.uk). SHEER DELIGHTS The delicate geometric patchwork on this fine ‘Pennant’ fabric makes it an ideal window dressing for those who aren’t too keen on print, but want to add just a touch of texture. The design is taken from Mark Alexander’s ‘Handcrafted Modern’ collection, just one of the studio’s seven new ranges. Referencing ancient craft, artisan techniques and classic Modernist shapes in its understated patterns, it uses fine yarns, cashmere, silk, lambswool and linen for relaxed luxury in a natural, earthy palette. £90 per metre (markalexander.com).

GLAZED PERFECTION Neisha Crosland’s latest collaboration with De Ferranti, the ‘Floris’ collection, comprises nine designs, featuring florals, geometrics and tendrils. The tiles are all made from terracotta – some have a lustreware glaze, while others maintain a raw texture. From £480 per square metre (deferranti.com).

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D E C O R AT I N G

FOUR OF THE BEST BRANDS FOR BANISTERS BEST FOR DIY Cheshire Mouldings A family-run business founded in 1988, Cheshire Mouldings provides a range of classic and contemporary stair parts, as well as complete stair kits in pine, hemlock, oak and primed white ready for painting (cheshire mouldings.co.uk). BEST FOR CLASSIC OAK Broadleaf For over a decade, Broadleaf has been supplying traditional and modern solid wood staircases throughout the UK and beyond. It can offer off-the-shelf parts, as well as customised looks (broadleaf timber.com).

D E S I G N D E TA I L S B A N I S T E R S

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: LAURE JOLIET, ALYSSA KAPITO (DESIGNER), TOM SULLAM, JAKE FITZJONES

It’s time to show this often-overlooked hallway feature some attention Replacing tired banisters is a cost-effective way to update your staircase with minimum disruption. This can mean installing a new handrail and spindles (the sticks that support the handrail) or a balustrade, which can be done by a skilled carpenter or DIY expert. However, Vanessa Garrett at Broadleaf, which specialises in oak staircases, warns that newel posts – the uprights at the top and bottom of the stairs – are a fundamental part of the banister’s structure, so they can’t be replaced as easily: ‘they can sometimes be cut right down and a new post fixed to the existing base, so you could swap a traditional wooden post for a modern design, for example, but this is a complex job’. Some specialist companies can install hidden fixings to change the style of your banister without the newel having to be replaced completely. ‘We can make the newels disappear so that you’re left with a blank canvas,’ says Richard McLane, founder and creative director at staircase design firm Bisca. ‘This means you can create a seamless staircase.’ When replacing a balustrade, choose between traditional timber, glass, iron, steel or solid plaster. ‘The style of your house, who lives there and cleaning and maintenance are all important factors in making the right decision,’ advises McLane. For example, glass balustrades can help increase your home’s feeling of space and light, but may not be the best option if you have children – unless you’re happy to regularly polish away handprints. ‘Hand-forged iron always looks good in period properties,’ says McLane. ‘There’s also been a move away from steel handrails towards more tactile materials, such as leather or timber.’ Lastly, remember that it’s important to consider the measurements of your landing – not just the staircase – when getting your quote.

BEST FOR BESPOKE Bisca Bisca designs and manufactures banisters, starting with a client’s brief and taking care of everything from design to installation. Materials include wrought iron, bronze, glass, wood and plaster (bisca.co.uk). BEST FOR GLASS BALUSTRADES Richard Burbidge Established by Henry Burbidge in 1867, Richard Burbidge designs and manufactures staircase parts. It can supply three styles of off-the-shelf staircases with sleek and stylish glass balustrades (richard burbidge.com).

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D E C O R AT I N G

DECORATOR INDEX RACHEL CHUDLEY

The up-and-coming London designer reveals the influences and passions behind her colourful, inventive style Who is she? Rachel Chudley set up her London Fields studio in 2015 and is a rising star of the British interior design scene. Her USP is a dual expertise in decorating and artworks: she has a BA in History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and also studied at the Interior Designers Institute in California. Her studio team is made up of artists, product engineers and designers. She also works regularly with renowned American colour consultant and palette expert to the 1 Metropolitan Museum of Art, Donald Kaufman, as well as the iconic American architect Philip Johnson. What’s her style? ‘Painterly, personal, whimsical and eclectic,’ she says. ‘I’m inspired by the houses designed by the Futurists, the Marchesa Casati’s fabled gold rooms and faded British glamour.’ Chudley’s previous projects epitomise her aesthetic of colourful, arty spaces updated with a modern twist – the bright vicarage in east London (1) full of geometric shapes, the Islington townhouse, complete with Andy Warhol prints (2) and the decadent warehouse conversion in east London (3) adorned with plants. The origins of Chudley’s passion for decorating are suitably romantic. ‘I became fascinated by interiors as a child, when I fell in love with a green wallpaper decorated with pineapples that my grandmother had in her hallway,’ she explains. ‘When she told me that pineapples were traditionally a symbol of welcome, it sparked an obsession.’ Chudley lives with her husband in a converted stable in east London, which is ‘a canvas for some of my wackier ideas’. What is she currently working on? A family home in Hampstead, London, that is being designed around an art collection and an Edinburgh townhouse where the challenge is ‘creating light, warm spaces that look out onto rather grey skies’. One of Chudley’s favoured techniques is to study the nature and daylight outside a building, using these to inform the colours inside. She says ‘The challenges of working with unusual spaces push me to be more inventive. I like working with people who want to get behind fun ideas; luckily, I find these people own all sorts of properties.’ rachelchudley.com 3

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‘I’d describe my style as painterly, personal, whimsical and eclectic – I’m inspired by the houses designed by the Futurists, the Marchesa Casati’s fabled gold rooms and faded British glamour’ EXPERT ADVICE

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

Rachel Chudley’s guide to decorating with art Where to begin When working with an amazing view or work of art, I design around it. You can use the angles of furniture, the patterns of rugs and textiles, and the colours of walls to draw your gaze towards something. Choose what you love I believe you should always buy art before deciding where to put it. It’s always good to invest in promising new artists making great work. The Cob Gallery (cobgallery.com) is a great resource for this.

Consider the shape of the room In a small space, I like to create warmth and impact with pattern, but for large, open spaces, I look for a standalone piece to cultivate drama. Consider which elements of a room you’d like to highlight. Colour inspiration I like to think of wall colours like a sweet box or jewellery case; the shade you choose affects the work you hang. Pick the part of an artwork you’d like to highlight and form palette ideas by complementing it.

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KITCHENS & BATHROOMS /

GOLD RUSH

INDUSTRIAL EDGE

All of hardware brand CEA’s bathroom fittings now come in this glamorous brushed ‘Light Gold’ finish. Try the ‘ZIQQ’ range by Mario Tessarollo and Daniela Lovato, which has an asymmetric shape to add a design edge to your morning routine. ‘ZIQ49XL’ mixers and hand shower, from £1,460 for a set of two; ‘ZIQ53XS’ Delrin shower head, from £1,363 (ceadesign.it).

The ‘Industry’ kitchen at Espresso Designs combines natural materials and a modern aesthetic. Its bank of spacious drawers is crafted from reclaimed, sun-bleached fir – featuring characterful knots and signs of ageing. The opposing sides are made from sleek metal panels and the worktop cut from ‘Grigio Carnico’ marble, both contrasting beautifully with the time-worn timber. From £35,000 (espressodesign.co.uk).

WORDS: SARAH BARRATT PICTURES: MASSIMO MARCANTE, GETTY, HEARST STUDIOS

COOK IN COLOUR John Lewis of Hungerford’s kitchen cabinets now come in a palette including 17 lively new hues, such as (from top) saffronyellow ‘Indian Summer’, warm ‘Tangerine’, pink ‘Snapdragon’ and leafy ‘Evergreen’, all in a durable Satin Eggshell finish. Kitchens from £17,500 ( john-lewis.co.uk).

B O L D E R B AT H I N G Add some brightness to your bathroom with Apaiser’s ‘Chameleon S Series’ of baths and basins, which come in a bevy of bright, rainbow shades to blend into – or stand out from – any scheme. ‘Battersea Blue’ bath from £9,185, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com).

PASTEL PARTY Pared-back Scandi style meets Italian flair with Cielo’s ‘I Catini’ range of bathroom furniture – its exposed steel frame contrasting with the round ceramic bowl, which comes in 16 soft tones. The collection also includes mirrors and accessories. Basin with stand, from £1,580; mirror, from £396, CP Hart (cphart.co.uk).

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ARCHITECTURE / COLOURFUL HORIZONS London’s upcoming landmarks come clad in burnt orange and pink OLYMPICOPOLIS by Allies and Morrison Architects The Stratford Waterfront proposal for the Olympic Park includes new outposts for the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A East), Sadler’s Wells Theatre, the US Smithsonian Institution, the London College of Fashion and University College London. The terracotta-coloured brick complex has been designed as a series of irregularly stacked blocks, incorporating cantilevered overhangs and rooftop terraces. Due for completion in 2022 (alliesandmorrison.com).

R7 by Duggan Morris Architects Exit King’s Cross station, head north along King’s Boulevard and you will spot this pink silhouette in the distance. ‘Part of our brief was to make it eye-catching,’ says Joe Morris of Duggan Morris Architects of the façade’s powder-coated aluminium fin details, embossed motifs and sculptural balconies. The R7 will include offices, galleries, restaurants and a cinema (dugganmorrisarchitects.com).

4 PANCRAS SQUARE by Eric Parry Architects The regeneration of King’s Cross continues with Pancras Square’s newest resident. Snapped up by Universal Music for its new offices, the building consists of a large trapezoid structure with an exposed frame wrapped protectively around an internal glass box. Over time, the steel will continue to weather, forming a natural patina in rust-coloured hues (ericparryarchitects.co.uk).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: DIRK LINDNER

I N S P I R E Y O U R WA N D E R L U S T

‘Destination: Architecture’ (£19.95, Phaidon) is the ultimate travel guide for the architecturally curious, featuring 1,000 of today’s most compelling buildings by the world’s finest architects. Not just for architecture lovers, the 560-page tome is also a valuable reference for anyone wanting to enjoy some culture during their journeys. The book is divided and subdivided by continents and countries, with each selected building – including landmark works by Jean Nouvel, David Chipperfield and Shigeru Ban – beautifully illustrated.

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ARCHITECTURE

A R C H I T E C T U R A L I C O N L E S E S PA C E S D ’ A B R A X A S B Y R I C A R D O B O F I L L In Marne-la-Vallée, a small suburb east of Paris, France, lies a monumental complex designed by perhaps one of the most successful European architects of our time. A household name in his home country, Catalan architect Ricardo Bofill has earned a ‘Starchitect’ reputation across the world, and for good reason. He creates incredibly striking work, which ranges from entire city master plans to private residences and avant-garde pieces of social housing – his vast portfolio includes Walden 7, a huge, rust-red apartment block on the outskirts of Barcelona, and the geometric La Muralla Roja (‘The Red Wall’), another famous housing project that brightens up the town of Calpe on Spain’s Costa Blanca with its rainbow of red, pink, orange and blue tones. Completed in 1982, Bofill’s plan for Les Espaces d’Abraxas was to create a new, utopian vision for social high-rise living – a somewhat different approach to what French maestro Le Corbusier was doing at the time with his large, community-planned schemes, which were simple, pared-back and minimalist. Bofill aimed to bring a sense of awe and drama to housing. Les Espaces d’Abraxas centres on an ancient amphitheatre blueprint with three main focal points – Le Palacio, Le Théâtre and L’Arc. Le Palacio (‘The Palace’) comprises three 18-storey 54 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018

residential towers arranged in a U-shape, offering panoramic views from their 441 apartments. Le Théâtre (‘The Theatre’, pictured) is a large semicircle of 30 apartments curved around a public square, while L’Arc (‘The Bow’) is an arch-shaped structure that sits in the middle of this square, hosting 20 homes. Unlike most of the affordable housing that sprang up in the 1950s and 60s, Les Espaces d’Abraxas was not constructed using concrete, but instead with a variety of stones in different colours and textures, each one hand-crafted off site. Rich in symbolism and with many historic architectural references, the design fulfils its role as an urban and social focal point and a place for its inhabitants to take pride in. Prefabricated in gigantic stone panels to hide any joints, the postmodern building was influenced by a wide variety of styles, from grand château and baroque palaces to Mediterranean piazzas and public spaces in ancient Egypt. Not only has the complex become a place of pilgrimage for architects and photographers, but also for Hollywood studios – Les Espaces d’Abraxas features in two cult dystopian films, Brazil and The Hunger Games. It’s a piece of architecture that is synonymous with inspiration for creatives worldwide. Les Espaces d’Abraxas, Clos des Aulnes, 93160 Noisy-le-Grand, France

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS

A dramatic Parisian monument that’s both housing estate and Hollywood backdrop


THE NEW SHOPKEEPERS

The last decade has been a turbulent one for the nation’s independent shopkeepers, with several beloved design stores forced to close their doors, but now things are looking a lot brighter. Ali Morris discovers the shops that are bringing colour and originality back to the high street

UNLIMITED Occupying a corner spot in Brighton’s bustling North Laine, interiors store and gallery Unlimited wears its heart on its fantastically decorated façade. Adorned with bold, bright murals, the shop front hints at the graphic-led design products and prints that can be found within. For its owners, husband-and-wife team Patrick and Sara Morrissey, the opening of Unlimited in the summer of 2013 seemed like a natural evolution. The duo had been running their own graphic design studio of the same name for many years in Brighton. During this time, they would showcase the work of their creative peers alongside their own at pop-up exhibitions. ‘The shop has evolved from this,’ explains Sara. ‘It’s in response to what we love and are inspired by, and our passion for bringing great design to the fore.’ A mix of artworks, cushions, jewellery, ceramics and refurbished vintage furniture populates the space, making Unlimited a shopping experience that the Morrisseys says is ‘somewhere between a gallery and a living space’. 10 Church Street, Brighton BN1 (unlimitedshop.co.uk) ➤ MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 57


A NEW TRIBE

CARO Part of a growing creative enclave in the picturesque town of Bruton, Somerset, Caro is a design store, coffee shop and guesthouse opened by ex-Londoner Natalie Jones in the summer of 2015. ‘There aren’t many shop fronts in Bruton, so when I saw this old bakery come onto the property market, I swooped in straight away,’ says Jones of the terraced-cottage shop space she has carefully renovated with the help of Emil Eve architects. Inside, Jones has perfectly combined the heritage-listed property’s original features with modern furniture, accessories and lifestyle products from the likes of Hay, Aesop and local independent makers. The store, she explains, is about ‘encouraging the enjoyment of simple pleasures and everyday luxuries’. In Bruton, Caro’s customers are a mixture of excited holidaymakers and local shoppers. ‘A rural town has a different set of rules to those of a city,’ says Jones. ‘Bruton attracts some fascinating people, and I have been lucky enough to welcome many of these customers to both the shop and the B&B. There is nothing more gratifying than sharing a coffee and a pleasant chat with people you admire and who have chosen to stay or shop in your store.’ Eager to shape her brand into the ultimate lifestyle destination, Jones also offers an interior design service and has her sights set on bringing a fitness concept to Caro in the future. At present, she is renovating an outbuilding in the courtyard, which she says will be used for supper clubs and intimate events. ‘With retail becoming ever more digital, there’s even more reason for unique retail spaces to open. People are up for travelling far and wide to experience something special,’ she says. 9 Quaperlake Street, Bruton BA10 (carosomerset.com)

‘I’d wanted to open my own shop for a long time, but always thought it was a bit of a pipe-dream,’ says Ella Jones, founder of stylish homeware store A New Tribe. ‘My background is in fashion design, but my real passion has long been interiors.’ Opened on London’s Chatsworth Road in 2016, the shop offers a wonderfully vibrant assortment of interior objects and textiles sourced from independent designers and small brands from around the world, such as blankets created by LA-based brand BFGF, green glass fish carafes by Paola Navone for Serax, and Jones’ own scented candles. Alongside these pieces, A New Tribe also showcases new and vintage Moroccan Boucherouite, Azilal and Beni Ourain rugs, which Jones sources and produces through her other business, The Rug Trade. ‘I work with artisans in Morocco to create unique products, and also with local designers on collaborations,’ explains Jones, who knows the importance of offering customers something unusual. ‘Many of the brands I stock are hard to get hold of within the UK, or I may even be the only UK stockist.’ Despite its relatively small footprint, the shop has plenty of wall space for hanging rugs and the bespoke fittings, designed by Jones’ husband, product designer Magnus Pettersen, help to maximise floor space. ‘It’s liberating having the opportunity to create a store filled with objects that I’m totally passionate about,’ says Jones. ‘It’s even more rewarding when people come into the shop and appreciate and get excited about these products, too.’ 92A Chatsworth Road, London E5 (anewtribe.co.uk)


THE NEW SHOPKEEPERS

OBJECTS OF USE

‘We are strongly against throwawayism. We can instinctively feel the quality of an item, and know if we want to bring that object into our lives’

Tucked away among Oxford’s dreaming spires, Objects of Use is a store dedicated to utilitarian furniture and household items that are made to last. Owners Hazel and Alex Dexter, who originally opened the store in Ironbridge in 2007 before relocating to Oxford in 2011, describe themselves as being ‘against throwawayism’. Old museum cabinets and pharmacists’ drawers are stocked with items the duo has selected based on their quality and craftsmanship. ‘We can instinctively feel the quality of an item, and know if we want to bring that object into our lives,’ explains Hazel. Current favourites include Cumbrian hand-dipped beeswax candles and horn spoons made at Britain’s last hornworks in Lancashire. ‘All of the items in our store have a label attached with information about their provenance and usage,’ explain the Dexters. Passionate about preserving craft heritage in the UK, the couple are currently working on a line of collaborative projects with local makers. ‘So far, we’ve created a blanket and a pottery range, and plans are also in place for products with woodworkers, brush makers and weavers,’ says Hazel. ‘We feel that the UK needs to look outwards for inspiration on how to support traditional skills before they are all lost for good.’ 6 Lincoln House, Market Street, Oxford OX1 (objectsofuse.com) ➤ MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 59


THE NEW SHOPKEEPERS

SHOP MORE OF THE UK’S BEST INDIE STORES… CENTURY GENERAL STORE, EDINBURGH Serving up renowned coffee as well as simple but beautifully made household items, from enamelware to skincare by locally based brand Lucky Cloud, this charming wedge-shaped cafe and shop is situated in the city’s Abbeyhill neighbourhood (centurygeneralstore.com)

FIG + SPARROW, MANCHESTER Located on Oldham Street in Manchester’s Northern Quarter, Fig + Sparrow is a lifestyle store and coffee house with a vibe that owners Jan and Emily Dixon describe as ‘Scandi-Industrial’. A highlight is the candles made using the shop’s waste coffee grounds (figandsparrow.co.uk)

LIFE STORY Just off Edinburgh’s elegant Broughton Street – known as a local treasure trove of independent brands – is Life Story, an interiors store and coffee shop specialising in clean-lined Scottish and Scandinavian design products. Run by Susan Doherty since 2014, Life Story is inspired by the many concept stores she discovered during her travels through the cities of Melbourne, Copenhagen and Stockholm. ‘My aim was to bring to Edinburgh the kind of store that I seek out when abroad – an inspiring place where you just feel at home,’ she explains. ‘My mind just wouldn’t let go of the idea, so I wrote a one-page business plan and took that entrepreneurial leap of faith.’ A distinctive shop front with two large black-framed windows leads customers into a bright, Scandinavian-style interior. Here, objects are artfully displayed across a system of pegboards and shelving units made from (OSB) sterling board. Popular items include geometric hanging planters by Polymorphics and aromatherapy skincare products by Mirins Copenhagen. With a background in the realm of digital design, Doherty is particularly astute about the importance of combining the store’s online presence with its bricks-and-mortar location. ‘What we’ve been witnessing is online and offline merging together, and the role of both channels in the delivery of the customer experience is reinforced: they are equally important,’ she says. ‘The physical store helps to inspire new ideas, while online and social media remain very important for storytelling, reaching out to our niche customer base and building relationships.’ 53 London Street, Edinburgh EH3 ( lifestoryshop.com) 60 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018

HENDY’S HOME, HASTINGS Owner Alastair Hendy’s much-loved Edwardian-inspired store on the south coast transports customers to a beautiful bygone era with its brilliant selection of brushes, enamelware and housekeeping accoutrements (aghendy.com)

NATIVE & CO, LONDON An homage to the simple beauty of Japanese and Taiwanese craftsmanship, this shop, located just off west London’s Westbourne Grove, is the picture of serenity. As well as sourcing products from makers in Taiwan and Japan, founders Sharon Jo-Yun Hung and Chris Yoshiro Green also produce their own furniture line (nativeandco.com)

RE OBJECTS, NEWCASTLE This converted workshop at the back of a filling station in Corbridge, located on the outskirts of Newcastle, is absolutely full to the brim with recycled, rescued and restored furniture and interesting objects for the home (re-foundobjects.com)

RESIDENT, FROME Opened in 2015 in a Grade II-listed townhouse, Resident’s retail offering runs the lifestyle gamut from books and magazines to homeware and clothing. Meanwhile, creative workshops covering subjects such as calligraphy and weaving feed customers’ creativity (residentstore.co.uk)

RYDER & HOPE, LYME REGIS The pretty seaside town of Lyme Regis plays host to this welcoming interiors store that is packed full of natural wood furniture, pot plants and utilitarian homewares (ryderandhope.com)

TOJO, GLASGOW Found in the heart of Glasgow’s Merchant City, Tojo’s comprehensive range of contemporary furniture and lighting by all of the design greats, from Vitra to Marimekko, is a must-see for serious interiors aficionados (tojodesign.com)


COLOUR I N S P I R AT I O N

/ D E C O R AT I N G I D E A S / PA I N T S T O T RY / E X P E R T A D V I C E

SHADES FOR A NEW SEASON

PICTURE: ADRIANO BRUSAFERRI

We’re making decorating with colour simple. Discover the Nordic palette that’s exciting interior designers around the world, and why 1970s shades are back! Plus, the easy-to-achieve paint schemes that will transform your home…

Vases by Ceramiche Milesi (ceramichemilesi.com), all painted in colours from the ‘Matmotion’ collection by Novacolor (novacolor.it)


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NORTHERN BRIGHTS

Traditionally, Scandinavian decor has been light and white, but in recent years, pale shades have been increasingly replaced with stronger, bolder hues in a variety of exciting combinations. Author of ‘New Nordic Colour’, Antonia Af Petersens, explains why these new palettes are inspiring the world To many of us, the term ‘Nordic colour’ may seem like something of a contradiction in terms. The quintessential Nordic home is not known for its vibrant use of colour. Instead, the classic Scandi look, as seen in interiors magazines and Nordic Noir TV series, portrays white walls and floors, black-framed windows, tasteful monochrome prints on the walls and a smattering of leafy houseplants. The geographical position of the Nordic region results in striking seasonal variations – long days that stretch into light evenings in the summer, and almost never-ending darkness and cold during autumn and winter months. Unsurprisingly, the meteorological conditions dictate how people work, play and live in the region, and the scant daylight during the winter is the main reason that Scandinavians constantly seek light, brightness and warmth. However, in recent years, something has changed. The Nordic colour palette is moving away from cool whites and pale greys, and stronger hues are making an appearance. The common denominator is that white walls have been replaced with more colourful shades, but it is also possible to determine three different strands within this new approach: bold accents, majestic pastels and dark eclectic. Here, we explore these new palettes further and discover how to embrace modern colour the Nordic way. ➤ MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 67


‘Pale walls may remain, yet now they are enlivened by vivid highlights in the shape of daring furniture and decorative detailing’

BOLD ACCENTS This palette provides variety and choice. Pale or white walls may remain in some Scandi homes, yet now they are enlivened by vivid, striking highlights in the shape of decorative features, colourful kitchen cabinets and daring furniture designs. This style embraces the brave details that stand out and add character to an interior. Choose one colour to use as a common thread throughout your space, then combine it with a complementary shade. Many paint companies have done the job for you and developed colour palettes where each hue is easy to match with another. Focus on one or two large areas or elements, and match them with smaller details in the form of textiles or smaller accessories. Bold details can be balanced by neutral walls or teamed with an accent wall. Choose your colour with care, as it plays an important role in how the room will appear. To create a sense of space and light, use a lighter neutral on the walls and pick out the woodwork and architectural details in a darker hue. You can make a long, narrow room feel wider and squarer if the two shorter walls at either end are painted in a darker shade. ‘Bold Accents’ is a palette that’s easy to achieve, and it will suit anyone who likes variety and change. Base your interior decisions on a room’s size, light and layout, and experiment with colour on the floor, walls, furniture and fixtures. Even if your tastes tend to change, it’s worth investing in classic designs and experimenting with wall colour when you feel the need for something new. 68 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018


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MAJESTIC PASTELS This lighter interpretation of the new Nordic colours is not so much about delicate, sugared-almond hues, but instead focuses on strong, sophisticated pastel shades with a fresh feel. For those who love colour but prefer paler hues, pastels are a great alternative. Again, it’s essential to take natural light and the aspect of a space into account. Light from the north or northwest will make colours look cooler and harder, so you may want to compensate by choosing a warm hue. Conversely, rooms with light from the south and east will already feel warm and bright. It is possible to draw parallels between the pastel colours that are appearing now and the hues that were popular in Scandinavia during the Gustavian era of the 1780s. The shades so popular then – pearly grey, duck egg blue and salmon pink – are back. Then, clean lines were characteristic of the look, but today it is an austere aesthetic that is desirable, rather than classic shapes. You can mix pastel-painted walls with natural materials, such as stone and wood. Also consider teaming them with mirrors and shiny metals. Reflective surfaces create the illusion of a luminous interior by reflecting light, offering contrast to a muted background. Shades of pink and pale blue go well together, as pink is a warm colour and balances blue-grey effectively. It brings a sense of energy and peace, while blues are calming and refreshing. As most modern pastels have black undertones, shades of grey will harmonise with them perfectly. If you are tempted by grey, bear in mind that it can be perceived as cold in north-facing rooms. To avoid a chilly effect, opt for a warm grey with yellow or red undertones. ➤


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‘Deep, intense hues – think dusk blue, storm grey and forest green, inspired by the dramatic tones of the Nordic landscape – are combined with unusual details and global inf luences’

DARK ECLECTIC Perhaps as a reaction to spacious, white, bright interiors, the ‘Dark Eclectic’ look is typified by a use of deep, intense shades – think dusk blue, storm grey and forest green, inspired by the dramatic tones of the Nordic landscape. Plants and natural materials, such as wood and leather, combine with eclectic details to create an interior that is best displayed against a dark background. Nature is a huge source of interiors inspiration in Scandinavia, perhaps now more so than ever. Increasingly crowded cities and a rapid rate of urbanisation have led to a yearning for the natural environment, and these desires are reflected in decorating trends that embrace organic colours, textures and materials. The eclectic part of this style, meanwhile, is something of a backlash against the minimalism that has been on trend in recent years. Instead of a pared-down look, Scandinavians now like to mix it up, and the new darker palette is accompanied by global influences, teamed with personal mementoes and antiques. New Nordic Colour: Decorating With a Vibrant Modern Palette by Antonia Af Petersens, with photography by Beth Evans, is out now (Ryland Peters & Small). You can get the book for the special price of £14.99, including postage and packaging (RRP £19.99) – call Macmillan Direct on 01256 302 699 and quote MA2 70 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018


From left ‘Corridor’ fabric in ‘Candy’ (used as curtains), £159.50 per square metre, Lelièvre (lelievreparis.com). ‘Grecia’ pouf by Bloomingville, £365, Out There Interiors (outthereinteriors.com). ‘Tufty-Time’ sofa by Patricia Urquiola, from £5,638, B&B Italia (bebitalia.com). ‘Sanati’ velvet cushion in ‘Amber’, £95, AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Bardiglio’ cushion, £80, Designers Guild (designersguild.com). ‘Sheepskin’ cushion, £115, Broste Copenhagen (brostecopenhagen.com). ‘Kalgan’ throw, £795, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Diaspro’ console table by Roberto Giacomucci, £6,000, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Spatia’ vase by AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Flowerpot VP3’ table lamp by &Tradition, £349, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Torei’ coffee table, £4,116, Cassina (cassina.com). ‘Unity’ tray, £47, AYTM (aytm.dk). Tumblers by Ichendorf Milano, £19 each, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Bottle’, £235; ‘Ring’ decorative object, £240, both by Elisa


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Styling HANNAH BORT Photography BEN ANDERS Styling Assistants MILLY BRUCE, OLIVIA ALDER

Ossino for Living Divani, Silvera (silveraltd.co.uk). Teapot by Bowles and Linares, £275, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Bench’ ottoman by Woodnotes, £1,188, Skandium (skandium.com). Hard To Explain artwork by Daniel Fletcher, £1,950, Tappan (tappancollective.com). ‘LL04’ lounge chair by Maarten Van Severen, £5,650, Boffi (boffi.com). ‘9602’ floor light by Paavo Tynell for Gubi, £799, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). Paints include ‘Wortle Light’ emulsion (on main wall), £43 for 2.5 litres, Sanderson (stylelibrary.com) and ‘Ashes of Roses’ emulsion (on the column), £42 for 2.5 litres; ‘Stone-Dark-Warm’ emulsion (on inside of column), £42 for 2.5 litres, both Little Greene (littlegreene.com). ‘Antelope’ rubber flooring, £58 per square metre, Colour Flooring (colourflooring.co.uk) ➤

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From left ‘Still’ side table by Rodolfo Dordoni, £1,634, Minotti (minottilondon.com). ‘Pacay’ medium clay vase, from £599, Kose Milano (kosemilano.com). ‘Carla’ rug, £3,740, Birgit Israel (birgitisrael.com). ‘Kalgan’ cushion (on floor), £160, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Angui’ bench, £455, AYTM (aytm.dk). Brown cushion covered in ‘Ceramic Havane 755-01’ fabric, £100 per square metre, Lelièvre (lelievreparis.com). Orange cushion covered in ‘Zigzag’ fabric by Créations Métaphores, £139.20 per square metre, Abbott + Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk). ‘Salon Mosaic Sand’ oblong cushion, £96, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Heron’ print wallpaper (used as artwork), £255 as pictured, Gucci (gucci.com). For paint colours, see opening spread


From left ‘Narciso’ wall light by Lazzarini & Pickering, £6,661 as shown, Marta Sala Éditions (martasalaeditions.it). ‘Stay’ armchair by Space Copenhagen for Gubi, £1,839, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). Cushion covered in ‘Dandy’ fabric by Créations Métaphores, £139.80 per square metre, Abbott + Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk). Drinks trolley, £395, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk). ‘Tall’ jug by Jochen Holz, £130, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Mixed Cuttings’ and ‘Blocks’ glasses by Pols Potten, both £92 for six, Amara (amara.com). ‘Stenia’ small box, £25, Broste Copenhagen (brostecopenhagen.com). ‘Graphicos’ large box by Tous Les Trois, £72; ‘Memoire d’une Trame’ rug by Constance Frapolli, £2,133, both Ligne Roset (ligne-roset-westend.co.uk). ‘D.153.1’ armchair by Giò Ponti, £3,894, Molteni & C (molteni.it). ‘Art Deco 1970s’ screen, £7,400, Talisman (talismanlondon.com). ‘Noor’ side table by Christophe Delcourt, £2,640, Minotti (minottilondon.com). ‘Blocks’ glass, as before. ‘Mobach Lustre Glaze’ vase by Kasper Mobach, £125, Birgit Israel (birgitisrael.com). Curtains in ‘Romeo & Giulietta’ silk velvet, £391 per square metre, Dedar (dedar.com). For paint colours, see opening spread ➤

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From left ‘Jacques’ pouf by Rodolfo Dordoni, £1,650, Minotti (minottilondon.com). ‘Linea’ rug by Tacchini Edizioni, £3,613, Silvera (silveraltd.co.uk). ‘Mobile Chandelier 5’ floor light, £10,500, Michael Anastassiades (michaelanastassiades.com). ‘Gemma’ grey chairs by Draga & Aurel for Baxter, £2,360 each, Silvera (silveraltd.co.uk). ‘Analog’ dining table by Jaime Hayón for Fritz Hansen, £1,829, Heal’s (heals.com). Linen napkins in ‘Coral’, £12.50 each, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Aegean’ soup bowls by L’Objet, £70 each; ‘Arc’ plates by Richard Brendon, £50 each, both Harrods (harrods.com). ‘Arris’ tea plates, £130 for four; ‘Arris’ octagonal plate, £45, both Wedgwood (wedgwood.co.uk). ‘Tvis’ rose gold cutlery, £14.15 per piece, Broste Copenhagen (brostecopenhagen.com). ‘Blocks’ and ‘Mixed Cuttings’ wine glasses by Pols Potten, both £92 for six, Amara (amara.com). ‘Varia’ vase, £99, AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Meltware’ pan by Maaike Seegers, £325, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Thea Special Edition’ chair with geometric pattern by Draga & Aurel, £3,354, Baxter (baxter.it) ➤

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This page, from left ‘Arcos’ chair, £917, Arper (arper.com). ‘Marcel’ desk, £3,643, Julian Chichester (julianchichester.com). Cut Up Colour print by Berit Mogensen Lopez, £45, Stilleben (stilleben.dk). ‘Amber & Pink’ bottle by Ichendorf Milano, £75, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Arc’ teapot, £120; cup and saucer, £95, both by Richard Brendon, Harrods (harrods.com). ‘E63’ lamp by Umberto Riva for Tacchini Edizioni, £1,007, Silvera (silveraltd.co.uk). ‘Ikebana’ vase by Jaime Hayón, £144, Fritz Hansen (fritzhansen.com). ‘Dama Natural’ rug, £5,505, Poliform (poliformuk.com). ‘Lilac Shadow’ paint, £43 for 2.5 litres, Sanderson (stylelibrary.com) Opposite, from left ‘Dita’ shelving unit by Pagnon & Pelhaître, £1,155; ‘Graphicos’ boxes, from £72 each, both Ligne Roset (ligne-rose-westend.co.uk). Bowl, £220; ‘Ring’ decorative object, £240, both by Elisa Ossino for Living Divani, Silvera (silveraltd.co.uk). ‘Skyfall II’ rug by Andre Fu, £10,020, Tai Ping (houseoftaiping.com). Curtain in ‘Zodiac’ fabric by Créations Métaphores, £136 per square metre, Abbott + Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk). Desk and chair, as before. ‘5321’ lamp by Paavo Tynell for Gubi, £429, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Trylli’ bottle, £172; ‘Palma Alta Astratto’ vase, £1,060, both Kose Milano (kosemilano.com). ‘Wax Form’ cup by Maaike Seegers, £150, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Cloud’ pouf by Massimo Castagna, £2,484, Gallotti & Radice (gallottiradice.com). ‘Coria’ leather cushion, £86, AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Salon’ cushion, £79, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Concertina’ wall lamp, £1,200, Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com)


THE PALETTE BOOK

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Combining different shades can be tricky, but getting it right is a crucial decorating skill. Luckily, we’ve made it easy with four colour schemes that will transform your home, plus expert tips and a foolproof guide to paint finishes

SHADES OF PALE ‘Neutral and quiet, delicate and calm, gentle and still’: these are all descriptions that Cassandra Ellis gives to the ‘Whites and Pales’ group of hues in her recently launched ‘Ellis Paint Collection’. ‘These colours wrap around you; they are part of the fabric of your home without being overwhelming or attention-seeking,’ she says. ‘A warm white is perfect to use as a contrast against a gossamer-like neutral grey or a stony plaster shade.’ At natural paint brand Edward Bulmer Paint, white and grey are the all-time bestsellers. ‘The way you mix a grey will lend it to another shade on the colour wheel – so, for instance, a bluey-grey goes well with a hot orange sofa,’ says founder and colour specialist Edward Bulmer. ‘A deep, dark grey with a strong weight of pigment has an enveloping effect and, when lit well and mixed with a tonal clay or a silvery-white shade, results in a room full of atmosphere.’

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1 ‘Gregory’s Den’, £38 for 2.5 litres, Earthborn (earthbornpaints.co.uk) 2 ‘Dawn Mist No.32’, £44 for 2.5 litres, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) 3 ‘Cloud White’, £59 for 2.5 litres, Cassandra Ellis (cassandraellis.co.uk) 4 ‘Ash Grey’, £45 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer Paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk) 5 ‘Oyster White’, £43 for 2.5 litres, Sanderson (stylelibrary.com/sanderson) 6 ‘Worsted’, £60 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com)


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WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES:PHOTOPIA PHOTOGRAPHY, ANDY GORE LTD

GREEN AND BLUE ‘We see blue and green together every day in nature, and there’s something comforting about that,’ says Farrow & Ball’s colour consultant, Joa Studholme, who disagrees with the old adage that the two hues should never be put together. ‘Green is often seen as protective, a shade that feels very secure, while blues are calm. They work best together when both have the same weight of colour and amount of pigment, so that one 5 doesn’t dominate the other.’ Studholme reports that paint is being used in less traditional ways: think two colours on the same wall, or a room painted in green and paired with blue window frames, rather than the conventional white. For Cathryn Helsby, marketing manager at Earthborn, using tonal shades of green makes for a sophisticated scheme. ‘In a bedroom, for instance, follow those hues through with bed linens or a rug.’ 1 ‘Duck Egg’ (on upper wall); ‘Attingham Blue’ (on lower wall); ‘May Queen’ (pink stripe), all £18.50 for 2.5 litres, Crown (crownpaints.co.uk) 2 ‘Burn After Painting’, £36 for 2.5 litres, Colour Makes People Happy (makespeoplehappy.co.uk) 3 ‘Poison’ (on front wall); ‘Serpentine’ (on back wall), both £46 for 2.5 litres, Zoffany (stylelibrary.com/zoffany) 4 ‘Kasbouri N°1’ (with a hint of white), £24 for 1kg, Emery & Cie (emeryetcie.com) 5 ‘Hobby Wood’, £38 for 2.5 litres, Earthborn (earthbornpaints.co.uk) 6 ‘Invisible Green’, £45 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer Paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk) 7 ‘Misty Morning’ (on upper wall); ‘Heart Wood’ (on middle wall), both £27.56 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) ➤

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EARTHY NEUTRALS Millenial pink has grown up and toned down, becoming part of a softer palette that comprises English garden hues of powder rose, wild primrose yellow and hydrangea lilac. ‘These are nature’s colours: warm and embracing, they resonate in times of uncertainty,’ says Marianne Shillingford, creative director of Dulux, which named ‘Heart Wood’ – a warm heather shade – its Colour of the Year for 2018. ‘Dusky hues of mauve and violet can create environments in which we dream and think. Layering plum with accents of chalky pinks and caramels works wonderfully with natural materials, such as pale beech wood.’ Ruth 4 Mottershead, marketing director at Little Greene, agrees that the combination of these colours can make a room feel more relaxing. Last year, the company published The Little Book of Colour, a pocket-sized handbook that suggests the perfect partner for each shade. ‘For a contemporary look, pair a mid-strength blush pink with a lead grey that contains a little red oxide. They contrast in a subtle way while still complementing each other.’

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1 Vases, left to right: ‘Soft Grey’; ‘Mid Grey’; ‘Chocolate’; ‘Plum’; ‘Grey’; Background: ‘Ivory’, all ‘Suede’ emulsion, from £18.99 for 1.25 litres, Crown (crownpaints.co.uk) 2 ‘Rocky Horse’, £40 for 2.5 litres, Earthborn (earthbornpaints.co.uk) 3 ‘Wooded Solace’ (lighter wall); ‘Blackberry Bush’ (darker wall); 4 ‘Heart Wood’ (in arch); ‘Pink Parchment’ (on wall), all £27.56 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) 5 ‘Cleopatra’s Nose’, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 6 ‘Perennial Grey’ (on wall); ‘Dorchester Pink’ (on top shelf); ‘Grey Moss’ (on skirting), all £42 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 7 ‘Pink Champagne’, £39 for 2.5 litres, Eicó (eico.co.uk) 7


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SAND AND CLAY Exotic spice shades, rich terracotta and golden ochre are all dramatic colours that can make an immediate impact in a room – especially if you paint the same hue on the walls and ceiling. ‘It’s 4 a way of immersing yourself in a single colour, whether it’s vibrant orange in an entertaining space or a cocooning tobacco shade in a bedroom,’ says Peter Gomez, head of design at Zoffany. ‘Pair these colours with tonal furniture: for example, orange walls with pink chairs.’ To create balance between light and dark, add in a colour from the opposite group as a highlight. ‘A squid ink hue with a thick stripe of a livelier shade, such as a sandy yellow, is an adventurous way to approach paint,’ says Little Greene’s Ruth Mottershead. 1 ‘Tigers Eye’ (on left); ‘Bone Black’ (on right), both £46 for 2.5 litres, Zoffany (stylelibrary.com/zoffany) 2 ‘Quick Kiss’ (on main wall), £13.50 for 1.25 litres; ‘Mustard Jar’ (on fireplace), £14.50 for 2.5 litres, Crown (crownpaints.co.uk) 3 ‘India Yellow’, £45 for 2.5 litres, Farrow &Ball (farrow-ball.com) 4 ‘Humpty Dumpty’, £40 for 2.5 litres, Earthborn (earthbornpaints.co.uk) 5 ‘Film, Television And Theatre 008’, £44 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.com) 6 ‘Squid Ink’ (on walls); ‘Rufus’ (stripe), both from £45.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)

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A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO PAINTING Don’t know the difference between primer and satin? Unsure which works best where? Here’s our guide...

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: ANDY GORE LTD

GLOSS A thick paint with a shiny finish that reflects lots of light. Gloss works well in high-traffic areas and on surfaces that get brushed and bumped regularly, such as skirting boards and door frames. If using on plaster walls, they need to be in good condition, as any imperfections will show. SATIN AND SILK Available in wall paint, wood paint and metal paint, silk and satin are mid-sheen paints (silk is associated with walls, satin is for woodwork).

A great choice if you want a paint with a slight shine that’s easy to wipe clean. Better at hiding surface imperfections than a high gloss. EGGSHELL This paint has a more delicate sheen than satin and is better at resisting moisture than matt. Suitable for most surfaces, including walls and primed metals, such as radiators. It’s also particularly good for giving woodwork a classic look. MATT Smooth and non-reflective, matt paint is excellent at disguising

the flaws in less-than-perfect walls – it creates a soft, natural look. PRIMER An undercoat that can be used to prepare bare wood, plaster or metal surfaces before painting. It increases paint durability and stops the paint being absorbed into the wall. Different types of surfaces, such as metal or wood, require different primers. BRUSHES Choose the width of your brush based on the area that you’re painting: 50mm for smaller areas such as skirting

boards, door frames and architraves; 100-150mm for ceilings and walls. A synthetic bristle is best used with water-based paints for a fine finish, while a natural bristle is ideal for solvent-based paints. ROLLERS These are excellent for painting any large surfaces in your home. They come in short pile (for fine, flat surfaces), medium pile (for smooth surfaces and most walls) and long pile (for textured surfaces). Foam rollers are best for gloss paint and varnish.

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C ? AN Y P P Throughout the ages, humans have attributed mood-altering power to colours. But is it real? And, if so, which shades can create a happy and peaceful home? We investigate the history and science behind the emotional effects of hues Words KASSIA ST CLAIR

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In a book published in 1810, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote that only ‘savage nations, uneducated people, and children’ enjoyed vivid colours. He is far from the only person to believe intellectual and aesthetic purity are best expressed in monochrome: Le Corbusier, John Pawson and Steve Jobs have all flirted with this idea. Belittling colour, though, seems obtuse. The ability to discern different hues is thought to have given our ancestors an advantage: they were better able to distinguish ripe fruits amongst dense leaves. In the millennia since, their descendants have faithfully used their colourful vision not only to seek out and make dyes and paints of every shade imaginable, but to clothe themselves and their homes with them, too. Indeed, colour is so ingrained in our psyches, there is even evidence that we can use it to alter our moods. In 1979, Alexander G Schauss, an American psychiatrist, announced that he had discovered a way to switch off criminal aggression. The secret, he said, was a shade known as Baker-Miller pink. Tests on men presented with blue or pink cards seemed to show that, if exposed to the latter, their strength and willingness to fight evaporated. Schauss’s findings are still put into practice today, with prisons in the US and Europe painting cells pink. Furthermore, Kendall Jenner recently painted a room in her home Baker-Miller: she’d heard that it can supress appetite. Schauss’s experiments – and results – are now widely contested, but no matter what scientists say, pink remains a soothing bedroom choice. Fired Earth’s ‘Hansel and Gretel’ matt emulsion is a pretty take on Baker-Miller, while the ‘Prosthetic Limb’ flat wall paint by Colour Makes People Happy feels a little more sophisticated. If you are looking to get fired up, red may be the answer. The Villa of Mysteries – a Roman villa near Pompeii famed for its unusual frescos and destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79AD – contained a room which had walls doused in expensive vermilion. Decorating with so much red suggests a desire to create a strong reaction. Indeed, the colour red is also linked to improved focus. In one study, researchers at the University of British Columbia tested the effects of exposure to red and blue and found that people looking at a red screen were better at memory and proof-reading tests, while those shown blue performed better at more creative tasks. If you require both characteristics, try decorating using rugs


COLOUR

by Farrow & Ball for The Rug Company; tax returns could be filed atop one in ‘Keepers Red’, while conversations would sparkle in a living room lined with a rug in ‘Wooster’ blue. Green, like pink, is often linked with calmness and serenity, perhaps because of its association with nature. The Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku (forest bathing) – spending time in green environments – has been found to lower blood pressure, blood glucose levels and stress hormones. In fact, it’s been part of the Japanese national health program since 1982. The abundance of leafy wallpaper designs sprouting up on the high street of late attest to the lasting power of green – try ‘Royal Fernery’ from Cole & Son or ‘Hassel’ in dark green by Sandberg. Of course, responses to colour vary from person to person and culture to culture. Byzantine kings associated deep purple with royalty and insisted their wives give birth in rooms paved with the

PICTURES: TAMPA BAY TIMES/ZUMAPRESS.COM, ALAMY, GETTY

Green is linked with serenity – the practice of spending time in green environments is part of Japan’s national health program plum-toned rock porphyry; in China, a rich golden yellow was the favoured imperial hue. The link between a shade and a mood can be learned – an effect known as conditioning. If you have a strong memory or mood associated with a hue, it’s likely the result of repeated exposure to it in a particular context. If your childhood bedroom was yellow, for example, this colour will continue to have strong emotional resonance for you. It’s best to work with such emotive habits rather than against them. The shade from your childhood bedroom would likely still work well, as it would encourage a feeling of security and help you fall asleep more quickly. It would be a bad choice for an office, where you want to feel alert. No matter what your favourite shade, colour is essential: while an all-white room can look wonderful, an all-white home would soon begin to pall. The American heiress Gloria Vanderbilt once wrote that ‘Decorating is autobiography’: few would want their home to be a blank page.

Clockwise from bottom left ‘Royal Fernery’ wallpaper, £195 per roll, Cole & Son (cole-and-son.com). ‘Prosthetic Limb’ paint, £45 for 2.5 litres, Colour Makes People Happy (makespeoplehappy.com). The yellow roof of The Forbidden City, China. ‘Hansel and Gretel’ paint, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Fired Earth (firedearth.com). Prison cell painted Baker-Miller pink. Bamboo forest in Japan. ‘Wooster’ and ‘Keepers Red’ rugs, both by Farrow & Ball, £330 per square metre, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com). Vermilion mural in The Villa of Mysteries, Pompeii. Plum-toned porphyry rock

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LOVE YOUR

LOUNGE It’s where you relax, unwind and enjoy the comforts of home, so your living room deserves decorating attention. Be inspired by our edit of the best looks

HISTORIC PALETTE

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: CHRISTOPHER STURMAN/TRUNK ARCHI VE

This moody living room by Uruguayan designer Fernando Santangelo (fernandosantangelo.com) is decorated using muddied shades of olive, midnight blue and charcoal, which echo the landscape in the 19th-century Old Master-style painting on the wall. The scheme’s completed with a velvet sofa – try the ‘Elsa’ in ‘Ochre’, available at The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ➤

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SAGE ADVICE With garden-facing glass doors, a tree growing indoors and herb coloured walls, this living room designed for the Australian outpost of Dulux paint evokes a sense of serenity. Calm needn’t mean plain, though. The addition of a peach and salmon pink sofa, patterned cushions, bold artworks and a graphic rug – available at Halcyon Lake (halcyonlake.com) – make sure this is a space that invigorates the imagination as well as relaxing the mind. For a similar wall colour, try Dulux’s ‘Willow Tree’ or ‘Fresh Sage’ (dulux.co.uk). ➤

Make sure that your living room is a colourful space that invigorates the imagination as well as relaxing the mind


WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: LISA COHEN (PHOTOGRAPHY), BREE LEECH (STYLING)

LIVING ROOMS

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Turn your living room into a zen retreat with a palette of textured white. Stockholm-based studio Whyte Lilja (whyte-lilja.com) complements natural tones with shapely pieces, such as Zanotta’s ‘Pianoalto’ sofa (zanotta.it), and Jaime Hayón’s ‘Palette JH7’ coffee table for &Tradition (available at Made In Design; madeindesign.co.uk) and ‘Aballs’ chandelier for Parachilna (try Monologue; monologuelondon.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: OLLE NORDELL (PHOTOGRAPHY), TALCIK & DEMOVICOVA (VISUALISATION)

RESERVED NATURE


LIVING ROOMS

RETRO REVIVAL

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

We’ve been welcoming back the colours of the 1970s this year (see our shoot on p72), but this fantastical lounge takes the trend a step further. Its creator, Russian designer Daria Zinovatnaya (zinovatnaya.com), uses 2018’s hottest palette to create a mural across the walls, ceiling and floor. The sofa by Paustian (paustian.com) adds a final flourish of apricot. ➤

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WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: STEPHAN JULLIARD


LIVING ROOMS

BREAKING THE MOULD A dramatic artwork in its own right, the sculptural fireplace steals the show in this characterful living room. French studio Damien Langlois-Meurinne (dl-m.fr) juxtaposed the sweeping lines of the bespoke plaster surround with softly curved classic furniture, from ‘Lady’ armchairs by Marco Zanuso for Cassina (cassina.com) to a Vladimir Kagan sofa (vladimirkagan.com) and a vintage brass coffee table by Armand Jonckers – try 1st Dibs (1stdibs.com). ➤

The sweeping lines of this new statement fireplace look timelessly elegant when paired with classic designs

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AHEAD OF THE CURVE

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

Let your sofa shape your space. This bespoke pink perch snakes through the lounge in a farmhouse in Provence, converted by Parisian interior architect Pierre Yovanovitch (pierreyovanovitch.com). For a similar sofa, we suggest the ‘Arcolor LH’ by Jaime Hayón for Arflex from Aram (aram.co.uk). The ‘squashed’ ceramic coffee table is by French craftsperson Armelle Benoit (armellebenoit.fr).


LIVING ROOMS

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: LISA COHEN (PHOTOGRAPHY), BREE LEECH (STYLING)

SEA OF CALM Greens, greys and blues radiate tranquillity, as this room, painted ‘Goyder Green’ by the Australian arm of Dulux paint, illustrates. ‘Mint Macaroon’ is a good alternative in the UK (dulux.co.uk). Note how the ‘Tweet’ coffee table by Gino Carollo for Calligaris (calligaris.co.uk) matches the marble fireplace. ➤

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RAW BEAUTY Designed to adhere to the fundamentals of Japanese aesthetic wabi-sabi, this living space in the Tribeca penthouse at New York’s The Greenwich Hotel embraces modest design and the imperfection of natural materials. Make like its creators, Belgian interior designer Axel Vervoordt and Japanese architect Tatsuro Miki, and leave limewashed walls unadorned, wood untreated and flooring simple. Here, the concrete floor is covered in a large sisal rug – try Crucial Trading (crucial-trading.com). ➤

The Japanese wabi-sabi style encourages the appreciation of imperfection and the grace of natural materials


WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: NIKOLAS KOENIG

LIVING ROOMS

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LIVING ROOMS

MAGIC CARPETS

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: ANITTA BEHRENDT/LIVING INSIDE

Comfort begins beneath your feet, and Thilde Santin, who added this charming patchwork carpet to her home in Copenhagen, knows this better than most. Get the look by layering vintage and new Berber rugs by Larusi (larusi.com) or colourful, affordable options from Habitat (habitat.co.uk).

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HOMES LONDON

/ N E W Y O R K / PA R I S / F L O R E N C E / V L A D I V O S T O K

S M A L L S PAC E S


S M A L L S PA C E S

‘PEOPLE OFTEN SHY AWAY FROM USING BOLD SHADES IN SMALLER SPACES, BUT I THINK COLOUR MAKES A HOME MORE INVITING, GIVING EACH ROOM ITS OWN PERSONALITY’ A modest home that celebrates big colours? This east London flat’s owner, interior designer Laura Fulmine, has gleefully thrown away the decorating rule book Words TESSA PEARSON Photography MICHAEL SINCLAIR

Living room The green walls, painted in ‘Crocodile’ from Colours by B&Q, complement the antique and vintage furniture, including a Danish rosewood tallboy from Chase & Sorensen. The ceiling pendant, bought on Ebay, is a 1960s model by German designer Florian Schulz. The wall lamp is also German, from the same period, discovered at a local market Stockist details on p185 ➤

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T H E A PA RT M E N T It’s hard to picture this now characterful two-bedroom apartment as an all-white space, but that’s exactly how it remained for two years while interior designer and stylist Laura Fulmine figured out exactly what she wanted to do with it. Laura, who lives with her partner, photographer John Short, moved into this modest east London home four years ago and spent a year doing it up. ‘I think it helps to live in a home for a while to get a feel for it, rather than rushing to decorate straight away,’ she says. The 57-square-metre apartment is located on the first floor of a turn-of-the-last-century mansion block near Dalston, which immediately piqued Laura’s creative interest due to its red brick façade and large sash windows. ‘The layout of the flat itself is beautiful,’ she adds. ‘It has a spacious central hallway, around which the various rooms are spread, like the branches of a tree.’ T H E I N S P I R AT I O N Laura’s home was habitable when she moved in, but needed to be shown a bit of love. ‘I didn’t have a plan for the interior, it just evolved over time. I’m drawn to minimalist houses, but I could never live in one.’ The first task on the to-do list for this project was stripping the layers of paint from the original wooden doors, floors, skirting boards and window frames. ‘The windows in this apartment are amazing, but they seemed less striking when painted white. The natural wood makes a feature of them, and the neutral tone was easier to work with when deciding on colours for the walls.’ Deep, striking shades were, in part, chosen to brilliantly complement Laura’s curated mixture of antiques. ‘I have a love of Italian design from the 1950s to the 80s, and I like pairing pieces that may not obviously go together,’ she says.

THE COLOUR SCHEME ‘Despite this home’s small proportions, I was keen to use daring colours to define the various spaces,’ Laura explains. ‘Particularly as the flat is on a corner, so the sun travels round to each room throughout the day.’ To this end, the kitchen is painted bright white to make the most of the morning light, while, in contrast, the bedroom, that only gets the sun at the very end of the day, is a moody midnight blue. ‘Pale shades can feel cold in a room that doesn’t get much daylight. This blue makes more of the darkness, and it’s very calming and therapeutic,’ she says. This bedroom was, in fact, painted a total of three times before ‘Hicks Blue’ by Little Greene was decided upon, and just as many varieties of green were deliberated over until the perfect chalky, mossy hue of ‘Crocodile’ from Colours by B&Q made its way onto the living room walls. ‘I’m obsessed with green. I have a lot of marble and brass, which it pairs with perfectly,’ adds Laura. The heritage-inspired ‘Café Pink’ by Sanderson Paints, used in the study, was selected after a trip to London’s Victoria & Albert museum, when the landmark’s style struck a chord. ‘I think that colour makes a home inviting and you become more conscious of moving between different zones,’ says Laura. ‘It can actually make a place feel bigger.’ laurafulmine.com


‘DESPITE THIS HOME’S SMALL PROPORTIONS, I WAS KEEN TO USE DARING COLOURS TO DEFINE THE SPACES. PARTICULARLY AS THE FLAT IS ON A CORNER, SO THE SUN TRAVELS TO EACH ROOM THROUGHOUT THE DAY’

Above, from left Interior designer and homeowner Laura Fulmine. A mid-century Danish armchair sits in the corner of the living room, beside a vintage floor lamp bought from an art dealer in Copenhagen. The rich blue sofa is the ‘Hackney’ by Hay, dressed with a playfully bright cushion by Nathalie Du Pasquier, also from Hay. The bright, white hallway is the calm heart of this colourful home, decorated with an antique mirror from Kempton market and a vintage ‘Bumling’ pendant light by Anders Pehrson from Chase & Sorensen Stockist details on p185 ➤

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‘I LOVE ITALIAN DESIGN FROM THE 1950S TO THE 80S, AND I LIKE PAIRING PIECES THAT MAY NOT OBVIOUSLY GO TOGETHER’

Study ‘Café Pink’ by Sanderson Paints fills this room with gentle warmth, binding together art, objects and furniture. The chair (above left) is a vintage French design with bright red legs. The green metal cabinet from Ikea provides another pop of colour, sat beside a vintage desk, rumoured to be an original Giò Ponti piece. The rug is a vintage Larusi design, discovered in Copenhagen Stockist details on p185 ➤

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‘THE KITCHEN IS PAINTED BRIGHT WHITE TO MAKE THE MOST OF THE MORNING LIGHT’

Kitchen Reclaimed tiles from Bert & May, originally from a convent in Spain, cover the floor, and the white cabinetry is by Simon Jones Studio, topped with a marble worktop and splashback. An Ikea table occupies a cosy corner, surrounded by red, cord-seat dining chairs from Geoffrey Drayton and a vintage bench, complete with original velvet upholstery Stockist details on p185 ➤

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‘PALE SHADES CAN FEEL COLD IN A ROOM THAT DOESN’T GET MUCH DAYLIGHT. THIS DEEP BLUE MAKES MORE OF THE DARKNESS’

HOW TO USE UNEXPECTED COLOUR T O E N H A N C E S M A L L - S PA C E L I V I N G

Interior designer Laura Fulmine shares the essential things to remember when using statement shades EXPERIMENT You don’t have to get it right first time. Rectifying an unsuccessful paint job is much easier than it might seem, particularly when there’s less wall to cover.

Assess the effect of natural and artificial light on the colours you’re considering. Paint swatches on paper and place them in areas of sunlight, as well as shady alcoves. CREATE A VISUAL PALATE CLEANSER Too much colour can be overwhelming in a compact home. Balance out bold shades with calmer areas decorated in whites or soft neutrals. DECLUTTER Whatever colour you choose, filling a house with lots of stuff is going to have an impact on how big it feels. Invest in built-in storage and only display favourite things. CONSIDER COLOUR PSYCHOLOGY Your chosen palette can affect how you feel, which is intensified in a small home. It’s worth looking into the emotional effects of different shades before choosing, taking into account how you use your space. LOOK TO THE LIGHT

Bathroom This peaceful room’s marble floor and wall tiles are from Fired Earth. A slender, wall-mounted cabinet from Ikea keeps clutter hidden away, while the vintage ‘Butterfly’ stool by Sori Yanagi for Vitra adds to the calm look Bedroom Painted ‘Hicks Blue’ by Little Greene, with linen bedding by Larusi and a headboard upholstered in ‘Metovia’ fabric by Zimmer + Rohde, this space is a dark and tranquil retreat Stockist details on p185

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S M A L L S PA C E S

WHISPERING PINE

With its subtle blush tone, Radiata pine plywood gives this Brooklyn studio a light, airy look Words ELLIE TENNANT Photography MICHAEL VAHRENWALD

THE HOUSE Set in a former chocolate factory in the Bedford-Stuyvesant area of Brooklyn, New York, fashion designer Victoria Bartlett’s apartment has a bright, open feel, despite the two huge concrete columns that take up no small part of the 93-square-metre space. That’s all thanks to Jaffer Kolb and Ivi Diamantopoulou of New York-based design practice New Affiliates. ‘When we first saw the studio, it was a typical “developer apartment”, featuring poor quality materials and appliances,’ remembers Jaffer. ‘Pipes were boxed out, which led to a feeling of closed darkness, and there was a mezzanine sleeping area that was 2.5 metres tall with a one-metre space beneath, so that when you opened the front door, you were confronted with a cave of storage.’ The designers wanted a more dynamic layout, so they moved the mezzanine floor – host to the bedroom – to a less imposing position. 114 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2018

THE LIGHT In order to maximise daylight and space in the apartment, New Affiliates started from scratch, removing plasterboard walls, exposing pipes and ripping out the existing kitchen, leaving a roomier, more open-plan design. Walls and ceilings were painted cool white and the floorboards were bleached. Next, they installed a brand-new mezzanine structure with distinct spaces for sleeping, studying and storage. ‘The old mezzanine floor was a thick concrete plate,’ says Ivi. ‘We used a thin steel floor slab instead, so we gained nearly 30 centimetres of space.’ This might sound like a bulky design, but it actually enhances the feeling of openness. ‘You can make a small apartment appear more airy by celebrating volume and solidness, as long as you puncture it with enough windows, cuts and openings,’ explains Jaffer. ‘Here, that is achieved by creating a huge cut-out in the walls between the kitchen and the study beyond.’

T H E M AT E R I A L At the request of homeowner Victoria, designers Jaffer and Ivi took inspiration from the minimalist artist Donald Judd and used plywood throughout the interior, both to build the mezzanine structure and for cabinet doors in the kitchen area. The budget for the project was limited, so at just over £20 per 1.2 x 2.4 metre sheet, plywood was a practical choice. ‘We looked at different kinds of plywood and settled on Radiata – a type of pine – for two reasons,’ says Ivi. ‘Firstly, because we are averse to having too much yellow in the scheme – it makes everything look a little dingy – and Radiata has a pink undertone. Secondly, because it has a rich grain, almost akin to zebra striping, so it’s decorative but with a roughness, and – apart from a coat of urethane to seal it – requires very little preparation.’ Using a single key material works well in this small space – the effect is uncluttered and clean. new-affiliates.us


Kitchen The worktops are made from the ‘Cosmopolitan White’ finish by Caesarstone, while a high-gloss coloured section on the island provides a luxurious touch. The dining table is by Paul McCobb and the mid-century chair is by Arthur Umanoff Stockist details on p185 ➤


THE FLOORPLAN

‘YOU CAN MAKE A SMALL SPACE APPEAR MORE AIRY BY CELEBRATING VOLUME AND SOLIDNESS, AS LONG AS YOU PUNCTURE IT WITH ENOUGH WINDOWS, CUTS AND OPENINGS’

Office This minimalist workspace is tucked away next to the stairwell and kitchen. Try Pamono for similar 1960s desks Bedroom Victoria’s cat Shoppy can usually be found here, on the bespoke bed designed by Nathaniel Wojtalik Stockist details on p185

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S M A L L S PA C E S

W I L D AT Antwerp-based florist Mark Colle has created a home that, much like his stylish bouquets, is immaculately curated and brimming with vibrant colour Words FAYE WINDRIDGE Photography HELENIO BARBETTA/LIVING INSIDE Styling CHIARA DAL CANTO

Open-plan living The staircase leads to the bedroom and studio that overlooks the kitchen below. A concrete planter with lush foliage acts as an indoor garden Kitchen The central island houses the sink and the cantilevered table transforms the space into a dining area, with Harry Bertoia’s ‘Diamond’ and ‘Side’ chairs from Knoll. Flea-market finds, including Danish glassware, decorate the open shelves from String Stockist details on p185 ➤


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his apartment, located on the top floor of a 1930s building in Antwerp, Belgium, belongs to florist Mark Colle and is characterised by flashes of colour. Colle has become renowned for the big floral installations he creates at Baltimore Bloemen, his bijou flower shop in the city centre – the walls of flowers he created for Raf Simons’ first show for Dior in 2012 required almost a million stems. He may be known for super-sized displays, but Mark prefers hand-tying more modest bouquets. It’s this eye for taking the small and making it special that has transformed his own apartment. Used to going with his gut and making instinctive decisions, Mark bought his home the day after spotting an advert for it on Facebook. It had been recently renovated, providing a neutral canvas for him to layer in his collections. The upshot is a calm yet comfortable home that’s big on personality. The open-plan flat has a kitchen and living area on the first floor, and a bedroom, bathroom and studio tucked under the eaves. White paint and resin floors form a simple, bright backdrop, which is offset in the living area by warm wooden cladding and an oversized concrete planter. ‘My indoor garden is made up of plants that nobody wanted,’ says Mark. ‘It’s an army of leftovers.’ Disproving the notion that small spaces should be clutter free, he has used his favourite objects to create displays: a wall of shelving for his vinyl record collection, and ceramics grouped on the hearth. ‘I didn’t really think the style of the interior through,’ he says, ‘It’s eclectic, which is just the way I like it.’ markcolle.com; baltimorebloemen.be


’MY INDOOR GARDEN IS MADE UP OF PLANTS THAT NOBODY WANTED TO BUY. IT’S AN ARMY OF LEFTOVERS FROM THE SHOP THAT KEEPS ON GROWING’ Living room Design classics such as Harry Bertoia’s ‘Diamond’ chairs sit beside vintage pieces. The sofa packs a visual punch, recovered in blue fabric by Raf Simons for Kvadrat. The 1950s nest of tables is from a flea market. The rug is from the ‘Sahar’ collection by Haynes Robinson for N.Vrouyr gallery and a ‘Tulip’ table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll sits in the centre of the room. The vases arranged on the windowsill are by Belgian ceramist Hubert Bequet Stockist details on p185 ➤

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‘I‘M FOND OF BIZARRE COLOUR COMBINATIONS. I WAS DRIVEN BY AN OBSESSION WITH FILMMAKER JOHN WATERS, WHO HAD A BIG IMPACT ON ME’


Hallway The object in the centre of the space is the scratcher for Mark’s cat, Jacqueline Bedroom As in the living room, the walls here are covered in wood panelling, softening the stark white used in the rest of the apartment. The bed is dressed in blue – a recurring decorative motif. Mark’s huge trainer collection has become an ornamental element – a self-confessed sneakerhead, he owns every single pair that Raf Simons has designed Stockist details on p185

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S M A L L S PA C E S

‘WHEN A HOME IS SM ALLER, IT’S This homely pied-à-terre in Brussels, by interior designer Joris Van Apers, demonstrates how the contrast of


ON A MORE HUM AN SCALE’ light and dark can add character to compact spaces

Words CHARLOTTE BROOK Photography MICHAEL PAUL/LIVING INSIDE


R

eceived wisdom warns us against dark colours in small spaces. But, when one Ardennes-living Belgian couple tasked Flemish interior designer and craftsman Joris Van Apers with transforming this 90-squaremetre flat at the top of a 1950s apartment block in Brussels into a serene, one-bedroom piedà-terre, he threw that myth out of the window. After calling on what he calls ‘the old trick’ of knocking down dividing walls to make an openplan space, he painted the living area, bathroom, main bedroom and a guest room a luminous off-white, produced using six layers of chalky limewash. But the central hallway? Darkest matt green, almost black. It’s a dusky foil to the rooms that lead off from it on all sides. ‘The use of an intense colour emphasises the spaciousness and levity of the rooms directly next to it,’ Joris says. ‘It’s all about creating contrast.’ Continuity is maintained by the upcycled pine floorboards that run throughout. Joris’ interior design studio grew out of his parents’ reclaimed materials company, so the fittings and a lot of the furniture were handmade in his specialist salvage workshops. ‘We like to make,’ says Joris. And there are many charming one-off additions in this home, from the bespoke-built, green marble-topped cupboard that invisibly houses a new radiator to the re-worked French beams that have been transformed into kitchen units, topped with black slate. It’s very clear from the attention to detail in this apartment that Joris enjoys working on small homes. ‘I think that the idea of “the bigger the better” is just a bit too American for me,’ he says. vanapers.be

Living room (previous spread) A slate coffee table designed by Joris Van Apers faces white Eames chairs Kitchen The table and galley-style cabinets are crafted by Joris Van Apers, while the chairs are from the Axel Vervoordt ‘Home’ range Stockist details on p185 ➤


Hallway The rhombuspatterned parquet flooring is made from patinated pine and the door leading into the spare room is clad in mirror – ‘I love playful surprises that create intrigue,’ says interior designer Joris Stockist details on p185


H O W T O C R E AT E S PA C E USING LIGHT AND SHADE

Interior designer Joris Van Apers’ tricks for adding drama to smaller homes ‘Darker or more intense colours make the mind imagine things,’ Joris says. ‘They make a space more mysterious.’ A room can seem to swell or have more potential when you can’t immediately see its dimensions. WINDOWS If there is no natural light, don’t try and artificially lighten a room. Embrace its darkness and turn it into a USP by painting it a statement, atmospheric shade. MIRRORS Particularly in a shady room, mirrors can further distort a person’s sense of space and can trick the eye into thinking that a room is almost double its size. FLOORING If you paint a small room dark, be sure to keep the flooring pale to prevent it from feeling too cavernous. LIGHTING Don’t ruin the atmosphere of a sultry small room with spotlights. Stick to vintage sconce lights or table lamps. ➤ COLOUR


Bathroom The mirror on the wall, with its industrial metal frame, was designed by Joris to match the door frame Bedroom Designed by Joris, the storage in this space is all bespoke, from the built-in wardrobes to the headboard that’s also a bookshelf Stockist details on p185


LONDON PRIDE

S M A L L S PA C E S

Brass, sage green and marble make this Brutalist apartment rich and inviting – proof that luxurious homes come in all sizes Words JAMES RICH Photography OLI DOUGLAS Dining area The chairs and table from West Elm are illuminated by Lee Broom’s ‘Crescent’ pendant light and ‘Fulcrum’ candlesticks. The vinyl parquet tiles are by Amtico Kitchen ‘Suffolk’ cupboards from Neptune, painted in ‘Moss’, topped with marble from the London Marble Company and a ‘Hydrotap’ by Zip Stockist details on p185 ➤

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mall does not mean easy, according to Jordan Cluroe of 2LG Studio, who, along with his partner Russell Whitehead, was commissioned by ELLE Decoration’s Content Director, Pip McCormac, to completely renovate his one-bedroom flat in London’s Waterloo. ‘When you have a team of workmen on site it becomes very difficult to move around,’ he says. But, of course, that wasn’t the only problem in fulfilling a brief that included increasing the limited natural light and creating an ‘Instagrammable kitchen’. There was also a desire to entirely banish the old memories of a space that Pip had lived in six years ago before renting it out. ‘The proportions of the layout were not working and there were a lot of small rooms coming off a dark hallway,’ Russell recalls. Situated on the second floor of a Brutalist block, the 60-squaremetre apartment had a fairly large bedroom, but the kitchen was tiny. Increasing this space was a priority: ‘We removed the existing wall between the bedroom and lounge to create a larger living space,’ Russell says. ‘The old kitchen then became a minimalist bedroom, a cabin-like nook with pockets in the door and a sizeable window to keep it bright.’ The whole apartment now feels more welcoming and inviting, thanks to this focus on maximising light. ‘By adding a sliding wall of smoked glass and brass cladding in the hallway, we made the sun bounce into the space,’ Jordan says. ‘We took this idea of playing with light to the next level by covering the inside of a niche above a dressing table with mirrored glass – it’s an unexpected gentleman’s vanity area, framed by ‘Decanterlight’ pendants by Lee Broom. ‘It doesn’t seem like the same place that felt so gloomy and dark to me before,’ Pip says. ‘The kitchen glimmers with sunshine, making me happy every day.’ Though the emphasis of this project was to create space, it’s also added sophistication to this home. 2lgstudio.com

‘IT JUST DOESN’T SEEM LIKE THE SAME PL ACE THAT FELT SO GLOOMY AND DARK TO ME BEFORE’

Living room The ‘Lexington’ sofa was designed by homeowner Pip for Sofa Workshop. The chair is from John Lewis. The rug is by 2LG Studio for Floor Story, the coffee tables are from La Redoute, and the curtain is made with ‘Retro Arctic’ fabric from Mark Alexander. The planter is from West Elm. ‘Moss’ paint by Neptune has been used on the walls Stockist details on p185 ➤

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HOW TO MAKE A S M A L L S PA C E L O O K L U X E

Designers 2LG Studio reveal three practical tips for stylish homes REMOVE RADIATORS They encroach on the available space. We used vinyl parquet-style flooring tiles from Amtico. They are thin enough to slip underfloor heating beneath, and run throughout the property, for a cohesive flow. REFLECTIVE SURFACES These don’t have to be just mirrors. The polished brass cladding in the door-less walkway bounces light from the living room into the adjoining hall. OPT FOR DELICATE FURNITURE

Think thin legs on chairs, skinny bodies on lamps and narrow sofa spindles, which all allow light to pass easily around and through them, stopping rooms from feeling too boxed in.

THE FLOORPLAN

Bedroom The Brutalist design of the building gets a nod with the use of aluminium ‘Bulk’ lights by Daniel Schofield for Decode London. The bed is an Eve mattress, sunk into a raised floor with built-in storage, while the bed linen is from The White Company Stockist details on p185

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ECT L F

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S M A L L S PA C E S

GLORY

Contrasting medieval architecture with modern design, this tiny Italian apartment uses colour and cleverly placed mirrors to dramatically enhance the sense of space Words AMY BRADFORD Photography SERENA ELLER/VEGA MG


Dining area Jean Prouvé’s ‘Solvay’ table for Vitra is teamed with vintage seating (try Hay’s ‘J77’ chair at Skandium). SCEG Architects designed the mirror – for similar, try AYTM’s ‘Circum’ at Amara. The glass and marble ‘Amp’ pendant lamps are by Normann Copenhagen Stockist details on p185 ➤

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wenty-eight-year-old beauty therapist Martina Parise was well-acquainted with the 14thcentury tower in her village long before she got the chance to live there – it is a beloved landmark in the hamlet, which is located in the Vigone region just outside Turin. When a friend of Martina’s told her his father-in-law was selling an apartment in the tower, she jumped at the chance to buy it. Its age didn’t daunt her: two years after moving in, she asked Turin-based firm SCEG Architects to help her renovate it, drawn in by their experience of creating modern, sympathetic interiors for old buildings. The apartment, which looks out over a tree-lined piazza, boasted striking period features, including timber ceilings and tall windows. But at 90 square metres, the space was challengingly small. Thanks to SCEG Architect’s Eirini Giannakopoulou and Stefano Carera, it no longer feels that way, after they changed the interior to make the rooms feel lighter and bigger. The duo separated the home into three graduated levels: from the living area at the front, the floor rises via a series of shallow steps, so that there are sightlines along the home’s entire length – Martina can view the piazza even from her bedroom on the top level. The architects reinforced the link between indoors and out with a unique slatted wooden structure in front of the living area’s windows, which frames the view and incorporates a terrace-style bench. ‘We imagined the home’s windows as a spyglass on the square,’ says Eirini. Colours and materials are used cleverly to complement the building’s heritage. Eirini chose a palette of nature-inspired greens, sky blues and sand-hued natural lime plaster to mimic the surrounding landscape and the tower’s exterior walls. Each shade is used in small blocks, so that the rooms feel open, rather than box-like. ‘When it came to materials, we decided on lasting finishes such as marble, leather, brass and stone to reference the building’s history,’ says Eirini. ‘The hexagonal stone tiles in the living area echo the flagstones in the piazza. This building has been part of the village’s life for centuries, and we wanted to honour that.’ sceg.it

Kitchen The units were customised by SCEG Architects, with sections of marble and mirrored glass laid in geometric panels that bounce light around for an enhanced sense of space. The wall above is painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Mole’s Breath’, an earthy colour that softens the border between the white units and the original 14th-century ceiling beams Stockist details on p185 ➤


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A PALETTE OF GREENS, SKY BLUES AND SANDY HUES MIMIC THE COLOURS OF THE SUN-DRENCHED PIAZZA OUTSIDE


Living area The ‘My Moon’ coffee table by Diesel Living for Moroso sits beside a ‘Confluences’ sofa by Philippe Nigro for Ligne Roset and ‘Gräshoppa’ floor lamp by Greta Grossman for Gubi, sold at Nest. For similar floor tiles, try Artisans of Devizes Corridor This passage links the living area to the bedrooms Stockist details on p185 ➤

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HOW TO CHOOSE COLOUR F O R A S M A L L E R S PA C E

Assemble the perfect palette for a compact interior with these tips Pale walls teamed with darker floors and ceilings can make the walls seem as though they’re receding, making the space feel more expansive. CHOOSE MUTED TONES These are always more restful for the eye than bright ones – keep the latter for accents. EMBRACE THE DARKNESS A small space in a pale colour is often drab, but when painted midnight blue or forest green, it suddenly feels intimate and jewel-like. STICK TO ONE SHADE In an awkwardly shaped room, try painting the walls, mouldings and ceiling all the same colour. This airbrushes away flaws and creates the impression of a seamless space. CREATE CONTRAST

T HE F L O O R P L A N

Bedroom Both the bed and the dressing mirror are custom designs by SCEG Architects. The pendant lamp by the bed is the ‘Fork’ by Diesel Living with Foscarini, and the circular wall lamp is the ‘Disc and Sphere’ design by Atelier Areti. The curtains, as elsewhere in the apartment, are made from Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Daybreak’ fabric for Kvadrat Stockist details on p185


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S M A L L S PA C E S

BL ACK IN ACTION The owner of this split-level studio in Vladivostok, Russia, knows the decorating power of darker shades Words JAMES CUNNINGHAM Photography TATIANA SHISKINA

Above In the kitchen, two ‘DKW’ chairs by Charles and Ray Eames – available at The Conran Shop – designate a small dining area, ideal for a meal for two Opposite The seating area has a luxurious feel, containing a grey ‘Husk’ sofa by Patricia Urquiola and ‘Eileen’ coffee table by Antonio Citterio, both designed for B&B Italia. The chandelier is a creation by American lighting designer Lindsey Adelman Stockist details on p185 ➤


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pen-plan living reaches new heights in this small apartment in Vladivostok, Russia, designed for its young owner by architect Tatiana Shiskina from INROOM consultancy. To make use of every last bit of the restrictive 24-square-metre space, she decided to fill it vertically, creating an ingenious split-level home. That’s not the only bold design decision on display here, though. Conventional decorating wisdom would have advised a bright, light scheme for this studio, but here white is used sparingly, mainly on the floor and ceiling. In between, the walls are painted pitch black – for a similar shade, try Farrow & Ball’s ‘Railings’ emulsion. Instead of making the rooms appear snug, the dramatic shade contrasts with the white to visually stretch the space, making the ceiling seem loftier than its four metres. It’s a perfect example of why dark colours should never be ruled out when decorating smaller homes. Across its ground floor and mezzanine level, the studio has zones for work, entertaining and sleep. Its considered layout allows for each living area to feel distinct, bright and open. During the day, natural light floods in through the luminous arched windows that

frame the whole apartment. The main downstairs space is laid out with a comfortable seating area, dominated by a tactile grey sofa, as well as a surprisingly well-equipped kitchen – two people can dine comfortably at the island countertop. A small bathroom is located along a hallway beside the kitchen. The cooking and living spaces are cleverly divided by the black metal staircase that leads to the upper level. Here, designated nooks for sleeping, dressing and working are sectioned off by curtains and soft panels. These provide privacy, but can also be pulled back when not required. The study corner, which overlooks the lounge below, is defined by a mid-century desk with tapered legs, while a simple metal clothes rail and narrow cabinets are all the storage space allocated in the compact dressing area (a capsule wardrobe is essential here) which separates the workstation from the bedroom. The bed itself is dressed in dusky grey linens and, in a touch that inspires a feeling of harmony, the same fabric is used on the headboard. Calm and adaptable, this innovative apartment embraces the design challenges that its miniature stature presents, and the result is an exercise in smart, ‘upwards’ living. inroomdesign.com


THIS IS A PERFECT EXAMPLE OF WHY DARK COLOURS SHOULD NEVER BE RULED OUT WHEN DECORATING SMALL HOMES

Opposite Located beside the staircase on the mezzanine level, this study area has a ‘DSR’ chair by Charles and Ray Eames, available at The Conran Shop, and a desk with elegant tapered legs – try the ‘Edelweiss’ design by Made Above You can find textural, grey bedlinen like this at Society Limonta Stockist details on p185

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Words PIP MCCORMAC Photography JEROME GALLAND Styling EMMANUELLE JAVELLE

There’s a lightness of touch in this romantic Parisian garret, imparted by pale woods, strips of mirror and a cosy take on charm

P O E T ’S C O R N E R

S M A L L S PA C E S


Living area The ‘Louis Up’ sofa is by Meridiani, and the ‘Tre Pezzi’ Mongolian wool armchair is by Franco Albini for Cassina. Grey ‘Beetle’ chairs by GamFratesi for Gubi complement the colour scheme. Sebastian Herkner designed the ‘Bell’ coffee tables for Classicon and the floor lamp is by Christophe Pillet for AVMazzega Stockist details on p185 ➤

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Dining room The velvet chairs are a tactile touch – West Elm sells similar Kitchen The lacquered units are from La Quincaillerie. The metallic switches and sockets are from Meljac, while the drawing resting on the worksurface is by Pierre Puvis de Chavannes Stockist details on p185


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magine the classic Parisian apartment. Parquet flooring, full-height windows, a front door that opens right onto the Marais and all of the romance and poetry that goes with this particularly fanciful dream. Of course, all of this also comes with one drawback: the size. For these evocatively-located apartments are small, the light from internal-facing courtyards is dim, and the ceilings are relatively low. That’s what Flora de Gastines and Anne Geistdoerfer, founders of French design agency Double G, discovered when they were commissioned to work on this 90-square-metre space near the Bastille. ‘With its rooms measuring only 280 centimetres high, its main windows all north-facing and some areas without windows entirely, the atmosphere could be pretty stifling,’ says Flora. ‘The owners had chosen it more for its charm than for its floor space.’ The way to approach this small home, Double G decided, was to treat it less as a tiny apartment and more like a mini suite, removing as many partitions as possible to let the light reach in as far as it could. The kitchen and bathroom were built to be unobstructive – they are installed in two boxes inside the living area, shielded by shutters that can be drawn as needed, and connected from the back by a concealed corridor. The sense of warmth throughout was provided by Double G’s use of materials, from natural woods patinated to an inviting gleam to white shutters, brushed oak and aged Versailles parquet. The palette is comforting, with ‘Slaked Lime’ by Little Greene on the walls. To create the illusion of an enlarged space, the window’s surrounds are covered in strips of mirror, reflecting daylight into every corner of the home. The overall effect is far from the poky Parisian garret that every would-be tortured writer dreams of – instead, it’s a vision of roominess and elegance, offering a more modern and practical way of life. doubleg.fr ➤

THE WAY TO APPROACH THIS SMALL HOME, DOUBLE G DECIDED, WAS TO TREAT IT LESS AS A TINY APARTMENT AND MORE LIKE A MINI SUITE MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 153


H O W T O M A K E A S M A L L S PA C E F E E L I N V I T I N G

Whatever its size, give any home a sense of lightness and comfort with these easy-to-follow tips DON’T FIGHT THE SIZE A tiny apartment is never going to look big, no matter what tricks you play, so aim for cosy instead by zoning small areas into galley kitchens or cabin bedrooms. KEEP ROOMS OPEN In this home, even the bathroom is rarely shut away. Invest in furniture you don’t mind seeing all the time. STICK TO ONE MAIN COLOUR Painting the walls, desk, bookshelves and doors in this apartment in Little Greene’s ‘Slaked Lime’ stopped any areas from feeling disjointed. INCLUDE MIRRORED SURFACES These will bounce light around. Note the window surrounds, bathroom wall and coffee tables here.

T HE F L O O R P L A N

THE SENSE OF WARMTH IS PROVIDED BY THE USE OF MATERIALS, FROM NATURAL WOODS PATINATED TO AN INVITING GLEAM TO AGED VERSAILLES PARQUET Bathroom An ‘Amiata’ bathtub by Victoria + Albert is complemented by Dornbracht taps. The wooden vanity unit is from Am.Pm Bedroom A metal lamp by Rubn sits atop the ‘Dauphine’ bedside table by Double G. The artwork above the bed is by Marianne Lang Stockist details on p185

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‘FOR ME, CREATING AND MIXING PATTERNS IS A WAY TO CATCH THE EYE AND PLEASE THE BRAIN’ Designer Pierre-Marie Agin’s petite Parisian apartment packs a kaleidoscopic punch Words AMY MOOREA WONG Photography AMBROISE TEZENAS/PHOTOFOYER


Portrait Pattern-loving homeowner Pierre-Marie stands in front of one of his tapestry designs, handwoven by Manufacture Robert Four d’Aubusson Kitchen/dining room The printed melamine surfaces are by Pierre-Marie. The dining table is also one of his designs, as is the ‘Flowering Camouflage’ rug for Nilufar. The chairs are vintage French pieces from the 1940s Stockist details on p185 ➤

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elcome to the home of graphic designer and illustrator Pierre-Marie Agin. Known for his bold designs for Hermès, packaging for Diptyque and rugs for Milanese gallery Nilufar, all of which fuse references to art, nature, folklore and the supernatural, PierreMarie approached his Parisian apartment in the same way as any other project: by putting decoration at the core. ‘When we found this place, it hadn’t been renovated for decades,’ he says. His architects, Lecoadic-Scotto, restructured the space, creating the perfect white canvas for him to then fill with his beloved patterns. ‘I feel that decoration is usually a low priority,’ says Pierre-Marie. ‘But I believe that pattern always deserves to be centre stage.’ Seizing the opportunity to experiment, he expanded his illustrative skills, transposing his designs onto wallpapers, furniture and ceramics. ‘I remember reading an article proving a link between repetition and pleasure,’ he muses. ‘For me, creating and mixing patterns is a way to catch the eye and please the brain.’ It was the north-facing glass roof which tops the apartment that sealed the deal for Pierre-Marie when he was house-hunting.

‘I need a lot of light to be able to work,’ he explains. The 92-squaremetre home sits in the attic of a townhouse in the creative hub of Nouvelle Athènes, spreading across the fourth and fifth floors. The first level houses a studio, kitchen and dining room, while the bedroom and ensuite are located on the second, with dressing and music rooms on a further mezzanine level. Pierre-Marie’s unapologetic use of clashing prints is part of the growing movement for happy, maximalist design that’s taking hold of the interiors sphere. Do the patterns ever get too much in this space? ‘I would be crazy to say that my apartment is small, especially in Paris, for one person,’ explains Pierre-Marie. ‘My previous home wasn’t even half this size, so now I feel like I have more pages in my book. I can tell a story with more chapters, in real technicolour.’ ‘For some, the colours can be tiring and the decoration too exuberant, but it actually makes me feel very calm,’ says PierreMarie of his unique home. ‘I often stare at a pattern or detail and meditate. It sparks in me the exact blend of serenity and joy I need for inspiration and creativity, and my guests always leave full of positive energy.’ pierremarie.fr


Living room The graduated fireplace, decorative panels and lights are all designed by Pierre-Marie, as is the fabric on the screen, created by him for Paris-based brand Créations Métaphores. The ‘Baisity’ armchair, upholstered in 1980s leather, is by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia and the grey and peach armchairs are by Jean Varvara Stockist details on p185 ➤

‘FOR SOME, THE COLOURS CAN BE TIRING AND THE DECORATION TOO EXUBERANT, BUT IT ACTUALLY MAKES ME FEEL VERY CALM’ MARCH 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 159


Bathroom Gleaming, dark red walls are a glorious backdrop to the bespoke stained-glass window, designed by Pierre-Marie and made by Ateliers Duchemin Bedroom The dark walls make the small bedroom even more cosy and inviting. Fabric by Hermès covers the bed and cushions, as well as hanging from a rail above the bed to function as a decorative headboard Stockist details on p185

‘I FEEL THAT DECORATION IS USUALLY A LOW PRIORITY, BUT I BELIEVE THAT PATTERN ALWAYS DESERVES TO BE CENTRE STAGE’


H O W T O M I X PAT T E R N A N D P R I N T

Designer Pierre-Marie Agin explains how you can bring big style to smaller homes PUT PATTERN FIRST Think about what you want to use, and where, at the very start of the project, so you can design your home around that print. USE COLOUR AS A LINK Incorporate similar tones in different places within the pattern and it will help to pull the whole scheme together. VARY THE SCALE OF YOUR PATTERNS This will add drama and make it easier to differentiate designs. THINK OF EVERYTHING Both hard and soft surfaces should be decorated with equal panache, from rugs and curtains to walls and ceilings. DON’T BE SCARED Pattern can seem overwhelming at first, but it will soon integrate into your space and make it all the more vibrant and exciting.

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D E M G R A N I H C LIV SM

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With a new horseshoe-shaped layout that encourages the Italian sunshine to stream in, this apartment is a real treasure Words BETHAN RYDER Photography BIRGITTA WOLFGANG/ SISTERS AGENCY

Living room This variety of vintage 1950s furniture, including floor lamps, brass tables and armchairs, is sourced from Galerie Flair in Arles, France. The sofa is a 1950s design by Gigi Radice for Minotti, and the red painting behind is by Garth Weiser. The floor is covered in grey linoleum, also from the 1950s Stockist details on p185 ➤


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hen you possess a Florentine apartment that’s blessed with the riverside view E M Forster’s heroine Lucy Honeychurch yearns for in A Room With A View – Ponte Vecchio, Uffizi Palace and all – you would be forgiven for spending all of your time relaxing on the terrace. However, the lucky fashion industry insider who owns this Modernist 1950s home has been very busy. In want of a larger main bedroom and a more spacious living area, he commissioned Rome-based architect Massimo Adario to reconfigure the interior. The result is not merely a room with a view, but a light-filled 250-square-metre flat that offers breathtaking vistas at every glance. Massimo rearranged the apartment into a horseshoe layout, curved around a small courtyard. He removed all of the internal walls, creating a sizeable kitchen from four smaller rooms and reducing the property from three bedrooms to two. He was not, however, given carte blanche. ‘This building was built after this area was destroyed in World War II, but in a way that was sensitive to the medieval architecture that survived. The walls are irregular and the finishes date back to the mid-century – the owner wanted to maintain a classic 1950s Italian feel.’ That local flavour has been achieved by sourcing a collection of elegant, original 1950s furniture designs by the likes of Giò Ponti, Osvaldo Borsani and Franco Albini, but also through a variety of structural and decorative means. Rich, fluted teak has been used to create the kitchen cabinetry and a curved room divider. An original set of double glass doors has been lovingly restored and additional sets, salvaged from similar apartments, installed to replace walls, lending the apartment a light feel. ‘I try to create visual connections between the interior and the outside,’ says Massimo. ‘In most flats, the courtyard would be closed off with curtains. Here, instead, I have used horizontal timber blinds that maintain the views. This new openness creates a generous feeling of space.’ massimoadario.com

Dining room The curved teak wood and brass room divider was made by local artisans and inspired by a similar metal screen in Franco Albini’s Casa Pini in Milan. It surrounds a dining table and chair set designed by Albini and Franca Weekend, which sits below 1950s Murano glass lamps by Venini Stockist details on p185 ➤


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‘THE WALLS ARE IRREGULAR AND THE FINISHES DATE BACK TO THE MID-CENTURY – THE OWNER WANTED TO MAINTAIN A CLASSIC 1950S ITALIAN FEEL’

Entrance and office Divided by a 1950s Franco Albini bookshelf, sourced from Galerie Flair, these rooms both have a marble floor inset with brass detailing. The two leather chairs are by Ross Littell – try 1st Dibs – and the round office table is a 1950s cherry wood design from Galerie Flair. Ornaments, sourced from local antiques stores, decorate the table Stockist details on p185 ➤


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ORIGINAL GLASS DOUBLE DOORS HAVE BEEN LOVINGLY RESTORED AND LEND THIS APARTMENT AN EXPANSIVE, LIGHT FEEL

Bedroom This beautiful bed, designed by Osvaldo Borsani in the 1950s, has been reupholstered in golden silk. Behind, the homeowners’ clothes are displayed in an open wardrobe system by Piero Lissoni for Porro Stockist details on p185


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ESCAPE HOTELS

/ R E S TA U R A N T S / G A R D E N S / G E TAWAY

CHIC PEAKS

The snow’s still good, but the days are warmer – it’s the perfect time to hit our four top ski retreats

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PICTURE: MIKAEL KENNEDY

HOTEL ANVIL Cool Brooklyn design practice Studio Tack has converted this former 1950s ski motel in Wyoming, US, into a hotel that resembles a movie set from a western, but with all mod cons. Every room has a brass rain shower and sheepskin slippers – ideal after a long day’s skiing on the Teton Mountains or snowmobiling to hot springs, both of which hotel staff can help you organise (from £150 per night; anvilhotel.com). Find some resorts closer to home on the next page…

Edited by CHARLOT TE BROOK


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HUUS This stylish but informal new hotel in the exclusive Swiss ski village of Gstaad is the vision of Swedish architect Erik Nissen Johansen of studio Stylt Trampoli, who literally dug deep into the local landscape to source materials: stone to create the front desk was excavated from the bottom of the nearby river Saane. Bonuses for guests include complimentary sledges, backpacks and binoculars, as well as use of the vast spa’s Finnish sauna and herbal steam bath (from £227 per night; huusgstaad.com).

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OVERLOOK LODGE A cross between a chalet and a hotel, Overlook Lodge is a contemporary take on the traditional winter retreat in Cervo, a quaint village just above car-free Zermatt in southern Switzerland. Set up by a group of young Swiss entrepreneurs, it is, as they say, ‘no stuffy, old-school hunting lodge’. Indeed, inside the hotel built from local pine, you’ll find furniture by Hay and lighting by French brand Lampe Gras. It is the magnificent views of the Matterhorn peak, however, that steal the show (from £212 per night; designhotels.com).

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SEVERIN’S In Arlberg, Austria, Severin’s has a chocolate-box chalet exterior that belies the technology (iPad-controlled lighting, Amazon Prime television) and modern interiors within. The walls of the nine suites are covered in reclaimed Tyrolean wood, the ceilings are copper, and all are furnished by Italian superbrand Minotti and hung with artworks curated by Vienna’s Contemporary Art Advisors. Plus, after a day on the Lech and St Anton slopes, there’s a state-of-the-art spa to unwind in (from £611 per night with full board; severins-lech.at).

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ESCAPE

HIGH STAKES DESIGN If you’re in the market for spectacular peoplewatching, sunshine and collectible classics, plan a trip to Monaco for 27–30 April. The Riviera’s crown jewel will be hosting Nomad, a design fair with a difference. Selling rare pieces, the event, held in a candy-white clifftop villa (the former abode of Karl Lagerfeld), is the brainchild of arts businessman Giorgio Pace, who consults for people and places from Louis Vuitton to The Vatican, and curator Nicolas Ballavance-Lecompte. This year, galleries such as Nilufar and David Gill will be installing mini-museums in the villa’s grandiose rooms, which art lovers can visit with a view to acquire or just admire (nomadmonaco.com).

LISBON COMES TO LONDON

PICTURES: GIAN GIOVANOLI, GIULIA PIERMATIRI AND EDOARDO DELILLE/STUDIO VEDET

Britain’s appetite for all things Portuguese – from painted azulejo tiles to creamy pastéis de nata – is growing. Here are three ways to try the Iberian country’s glorious food and drink nearer to home

EAT Portuguese chef Leandro Carreira’s new restaurant Londrino will already be on the must-visit list of any foodies who dined at his low-key residency under Climpson’s Arch in Hackney last year, where he cooked inventive dishes. His new space in Southwark has been overseen by Nathalie Roencwajg of Rare Architecture, who added plaster walls, a timber tiled floor and handmade walnut communal table. Sit at the bar for a plate of Portuguese cheeses served with aged pear (londrino.co.uk).

COOK Nuno Mendes, the Portuguese chef currently cooking at London’s ritzy Chiltern Firehouse, has written a cookbook ode to his home town, Lisboeta. Attempt the authentically tempting salt cod cakes (£26, Bloomsbury).

DRINK Walking into Bar Douro is like stepping off a Lisbon alleyway and back in time. Its owner, Max Graham, grew up in the Douro Valley and was inspired by its old-school cervejarias (breweries) and the kitchens of his childhood. Also located near London Bridge, his bar features walls lined with traditional azulejo tiles, specially commissioned from Ceramica Bicesse, one of Portugal’s last remaining hand-painting factories. Stop by for a cold glass of Meio Queijo – a wine made in north Portugal (bardouro.co.uk).

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‘A MUSEUM LIKE NO OTHER’

This is how Jan-Luc Martinez, the president-director of the Musée du Louvre in Paris describes its new counterpart, the Louvre Abu Dhabi, a museum perched on a purpose-built £18 billion Arabian Peninsula island. For anyone not yet up to speed, here’s the top line: the United Arab Emirates brokered a ‘cultural exchange’ deal with France in 2007 worth £663 million – over half of which went solely towards borrowing the Louvre’s branding for 30 years. French architect Jean Nouvel was hired to design the new building, which features a whitewashed labyrinth of linked spaces, inspired by maze-like medinas, covered by a roof composed of more than 7,000 geometrically overlapping metal stars, through which sun streams to create a ‘rain of light’. On display until 7 April are stellar loans including Van Gogh’s Self-Portrait from the Musée d’Orsay, figurative sculptures from the Rodin museum and a Giacometti from the Centre Pompidou – all of which rub shoulders with the new Louvre’s own acquisitions, such as a Mondrian painting and a stone Grecian sphinx from 6 BC. A shiny, new institution where culture meets controversy (the conditions under which building labourers worked have been much-debated, as has the idea of a landmark institution ‘selling out’), we hope it will live up to its lofty aim to help us ‘see humanity in a new light’ (louvreabudhabi.ae).

PICTURE: ROLAND HALBE

Designed by Jean Nouvel, the Louvre Abu Dhabi has a roof made up of 7,000 overlapping metal stars, which filter a ‘rain of light’ into the galleries below

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PARIS IN THE SPRING A quartet of boutique hotels has opened in the capital PARISTER Despite its name (a curious blend of Paris and hipster, perhaps?), this 45-room hotel (left), designed by Beckmann N’Thépé architects, is warm and welcoming, with an ethos of working with local independent brands. There’s a hammam, a brasserie run by the team behind the nearby Le Distrait wine bar and an exercise studio by start-up CYD Playgrounds (from £221 per night; hotelparister.com).

THE HOXTON Once a one-off in Hackney, east London, The Hoxton hotel is now going international, with branches in Amsterdam and Paris’ 2nd arrondissement (further outposts in Williamsburg, LA and Chicago open later this year). In the French capital, it occupies a heritage-listed 18th-century villa (right) that has been carefully and lovingly converted. The Hoxton team called on Paris design studio Humbert & Poyet to furnish the rooms, and Soho House to oversee the bar and restaurant. You can still expect the chain’s signature perk: a healthy breakfast hung in a paper bag off your room’s door handle (from £86 per night; thehoxton.com).

PICTURES: JÉRÔME GALLARD, JULIE ANSIAU

HOTEL BIENVENUE As this small guesthouse’s recent Instagram caption read: ‘We can never have too many flowers at Hotel Bienvenue’. There are bunches of dahlias, fig trees and riotous botanical wallpapers inside, and a courtyard garden (left) at the back. The elegant interior is the work of French designer Chloé Nègre, who used a warm palette of sorbet hues and darker tones, vintage light fixtures and faux-marble busts by artist Pauline Leyravaud. Look out for the weekly croissant-making classes by the in-house pastry chef (from £106 per night; hotelbienvenue.fr).

HOTEL LE NATIONAL DES ARTS ET MÉTIERS Tables from this hotel’s Venetian-style cicchetteria (tapas bar) spill out onto the pavement, making its elegant entrance pleasingly inconspicuous. Its 70 chic bedrooms, bar and brasserie have all been designed by young Jerusalem-born creative Raphael Navot, whose love of natural stone manifests itself throughout: a staircase carved from black marble, a concrete wall in every bedroom, bathrooms made from terrazzo. Head to the Herbarium bar to roadtest the perfumeinspired cocktail menu – the Sud Sud Sud (cognac, mandarin mousse and bergamot marmalade) sounds particularly delicious (from £149 per night; hotelnational.paris).

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GARDENS /

FAUX REAL

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: SAM DOCKER

Want pretty blooms without the time-consuming upkeep? Enter new British brand Fox Flowers Fox Flowers is filling a hole in the interiors market: its unique product is amazingly realistic fake foliage. Couple Laura and Anthony Smith had been running Olive & The Fox, their lighting and homeware shop, since 2007. Before the store became onlineonly, Laura, a former graphic designer and photographer, was imaginatively styling its interiors, making use of fresh blooms. ‘They were an expensive luxury, but the alternative – artificial flowers – were really awful,’ Anthony recalls. So, they put their minds to creating new artificial stems, buds and blousy foliage to use themselves. Customers kept wanting to buy the displays, so the duo started designing and selling a small collection on the side. ‘They sold out so quickly that we decided to turn our faux flowers into a separate business,’ says Anthony. How do they make them so lifelike? ‘A bunch of flowers that are all in full bloom is easily identifiable as being fake,’ explains Anthony. So, they have a mix: the creamy magnolia stems (right, £26 each) feature both yet-toopen buds and full flowers that look as though they’re about to shed petals. All have bendable wire stems to fit any vase, and are sold individually as well as in pre-made bouquets. ‘You won’t find stiff, formal arrangements,’ says Anthony. ‘Ours are more organic – a bit rough around the edges.’ (foxflowers.co.uk).

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GETAWAY /

REYKJAVÍK

The hot springs and Northern Lights have been enticing explorers to Iceland’s rugged shores for centuries, but these days, there are just as many reasons to visit the capital’s emerging design scene

THE CITY Welcome to the land of fire, ice and

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: THOMAS STANKIEWICZ /LOOK/ROBERT HARDING

groundbreaking architecture (such as the Harpa concert hall, pictured). DesignMarch, Reykjavík’s annual celebration of creativity (15–18 March; designmarch.is) turns 10 this year, and will bring the city to life with exhibitions, open studios and workshops, championing the growing wealth of local designer-makers that rivals those of Iceland’s super-cool Nordic neighbours. We explore more of what the city has to offer both intrepid voyagers and culture vultures. ➤

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WHERE TO STAY This may be the optimum time

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to visit Reykjavík – cool-but-affordable boutique hotels and B&Bs are springing up around town, but the city still feels low-key, free from swanky spas and indentikit hotel chains. Our pick of the trendy guesthouses includes the new Oddsson Hostel (2). A former warehouse situated on the waterside, it has been furnished with a mix of 20th-century classics by Ettore Sottsass and Alessandro Mendini, as well as custom-made metal bunk beds by local design studio Döðlur. The heated rooftop swimming pool is a highlight (from £163 per night; oddsson.is). Vintage furniture, books galore and a farmhouse-style kitchen that guests can cook in are key to Kex Hostel’s appeal (from £87 per night; kexhostel.is), while hotelwise, we recommend the slick, cosmopolitan trappings of Ion City (3, from £255 per night; ioncity.ioniceland.is).

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WINE AND DINE

Although housed in a former salt fish factory, Matur Og Drykkur (4, maturogdrykkur.is) is an extremely cosy spot for dinner. Start with the French cider spiked with homemade liqueur made from locally-found yarrow plants before picking a ‘reimagined’ traditional Icelandic dish, such as halibut soup with mussels, apples and raisins. Feeling brave? Opt for the lamb’s heart with rhubarb. Similarly warm is the welcome at bar Loftið, where a medley of light bulbs dangles overhead. For a low-key supper, head to Mat Bar (matbar.is). This new diner has looks inspired by the 1960s, but the cooking is ultra-contemporary, marrying Italian and Nordic cuisines – try the polenta with pickled carrots or the cod’s cheek with citrusy gremolata.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: TIM GRAHAM/ROBERT HARDING, ALAMY, CAROLINE SCHMIDT & NICOLAI SVANE

BREAKFAST AND LUNCH

First thing in the morning, either head to chic, fern-fringed café Bergsson (bergsson.net) for porridge with skyr, the Nordic answer to yoghurt, or pick up a rejuvenating coffee at NYC-style Reykjavík Roasters (reykjavikroasters.is). Soak up the caffeine with one of bakery Sandholt’s legendary loaves, be it sourdough, a smoked pumpkin seed cobbler or a bread made from enkir, the oldest grain in the world (sandholt.is). Take your binoculars to reclaimed wood-clad The Coocoo’s Nest for lunch, and whale watch whilst eating red onion and fish stew (coocoosnest.is). Alternatively, head out further afield to Fridheimar (fridheimar.is), a tomato-growing greenhouse with space cleared in the vines for a restaurant, whose menu includes limitless bowls of its exceptional soup.


G E T A W AY

ARTS AND CULTURE

Reykjavík’s tallest landmark is Hallgrímskirkja Church (5), which, at 74 metres high is a peak example of Expressionist architecture. It was finished in the 1980s (after 40 years of construction), yet still looks futuristic today. Also looming above the famously brightly-coloured tin houses that line the city’s streets is native architect Ólafur Eliasson’s concert hall and cultural institute, Harpa (harpa.is). Famously controversial due to its £144 million building costs, the glass edifice [see opening page] is inspired by Iceland’s basalt columns. Lastly, The Nordic House (nordichouse.is) is a Modernist must-visit. Finnish architect Alvar Aalto designed the building’s blue ceramic rooftop to mimic its mountainous backdrop. The cultural hub hosts a literary festival, a Fashion Biennale, craft markets and popular evenings of Icelandic jazz music in its charming bistro.

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SHOPPING Along Laugavegur – which translates as ‘wash road’, as it leads to the hot springs where Icelanders used to scrub their linens – there are plenty of independent shops to explore. For modern homeware, head to Hrím, which stocks global brands as well as botanical posters painted in-house, Icelandic moss soaps and local success story Iris Hantverk’s beautiful pine cleaning tools (hrim.is). For treasure-hunting, visit Kolaportið flea market (kolaportid.is) to pick up vintage trinkets, bonkers jewellery that Icelandic songstress Björk would be proud to wear or vintage cashmere – a relic of the Icelandic wool industry, which new brand Farmers’ Market is reviving (farmersmarket.is).

ESCAPE THE CITY

Whatever the weather, there’s no leaving Reykjavík without a wallow in the naturallyheated hot springs. Nearest the city is the surrealist Blue Lagoon (1) where the indulgent should book the ‘premium’ ticket for a fluffy bathrobe, algae mask, slippers and sparkling wine (£72; bluelagoon.com). Hire a car and drive through the Fljot valley, past icy rivers and Icelandic ponies to the newly opened Deplar Farm on the snowy Troll Peninsula, a sheep farm repurposed into a 13-bedroom retreat, complete with minimalist interiors, a spa and the option to head out kayaking or relax in the saltwater pool (from £1,373 per person per night; elevenexperience.com).

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