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THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME JANUARY 2018 £4.50

HOW TO LIVE

LUXURIOUSLY Be inspired by the world’s most spectacular homes

SIT TING STYLISHY THE BEST NEW DESIGNER SOFAS

9 770957 894212

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MARBLE MASTERCL ASS WHY COLOURED STONE IS THE ULTIMATE INDULGENCE

THE ENTERTAINING SPECIAL Ways to wow guests, tabletop trends, expert tips and much more PLUS, the last-minute festive touches to try now!


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J A N U A R Y 2 018 STYLE

19 News This month’s shopping wishlists, high-end highstreet sofas you design yourself, cashmere throws, textured cushions and places to buy the world’s best artisan designs

33 Design We sit down with the big names behind the hottest new sofas, chef Skye Gyngell shares her cultural influences and we take a closer look at the luxurious world of Visionnaire

40 What’s hot in 2018 Michelle Ogundehin previews the

new year’s exciting looks, from happy design to everyday luxe

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Kitchens & bathrooms Stylish and practical new designs, from matt black taps to a gem-like bathtub

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Decorating The latest paints, wallpapers and fabrics. Plus, French interior designer Tristan Auer shares his styling 58 secrets and we reveal how to create a cool cloakroom

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Architecture Conran + Partners’ Tim Bowder-Ridger talks about the renovation of London’s Centre Point and more

52 Technology A glamorous

THE COVER

TV, modern radiogram and more

40 63 Newsstand A navy armchair from Gervasoni’s ‘Gray’ collection pairs beautifully with the exquisite details in this Lyon home, p76

ENTERTAINING: WINTER SPECIAL

57 Throw the ultimate dinner party this season, with our 25 top tricks for wowing your guests. Plus, discover the chicest new tabletop trends and handy hosting tips from the experts 23

Subscriber See more of this Australian home’s very modern take on luxury – brass, marble and a pared-back palette – on p108

JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 9


J A N U A R Y 2 018 HOMES

76 Infinite splendour This grand French

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home is proof that it is possible to combine opulent period features with modern living

86 Venetian delights In this exquisite

Venice apartment, the city’s rich history meets the ultimate in contemporary style

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California dreaming Rural but utterly refined, this Lake Tahoe home is a masterful Modernist mix of marble, concrete and cedar wood

108 Symphony of living Composed with

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a rhythmic approach to colour and space, this Melbourne home is elegant and harmonious

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Heart of stone Coloured marble is the ultimate decorative luxury. Use it in artistic new ways, as shown in this Milanese apartment – home to the CEO of stone specialist Salvatori

ESCAPE

145 Getaway We visit

Edinburgh where, nestled between the tartan souvenir shops, there’s an abundance of independent galleries, start-up studios and modern wine bars to be explored

One step beyond Compact but cleverly designed to optimise its laid-back feel, this Cape Town home is elevated by vibrant colour

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Quiet brilliance Luxe living does not always equal all-out extravagance. As this Italian home shows, a restrained palette and clean-cut lines can be equally indulgent

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149 Last chance to see

Culture fans, make haste – these brilliant photography, art, fashion and textile exhibitions will all be closing early in the new year

151 Gardens A lush

living wall is a surprisingly achievable way to bring nature into your home – here’s how to do it, whatever your gardening skill level

FINALLY

16 Subscribe Fantastic offers and discounts for our most loyal readers

153 Stockists Love

something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it

162 Story of the 124 10 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018

Champagne glass Uncorking the fascinating history of society’s love affair with the sparkling stuff

MAIN COVER: FELIX FOREST/LIVING INSIDE (PHOTOGRAPHY) SUBS COVER: SHARYN CAIRNS (PHOTOGRAPHY)

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PICT U R E S

HOM E S

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S U B S CRI B E AN D J O I N THE E L L E DE CO RATI O N V IP CL UB AT E L L E DE CO RATI O N .CO .UK @ELLEDecoUK

@elledecorationuk

ELLE Decoration

ELLE Decoration UK


The party season

is in full swing… And, however you feel about the festive period, it’s hard not to find the gatherings that this time of year brings rather joyful. But, while the Champagne fizzes and glasses clink, it’s also one of the few times when we open up our homes to the scrutiny of our nearest and dearest, which, let’s face it, can feel a little daunting. Fortunately, we can help. This issue includes our 16-page entertaining special (p57), packed with ways to get your home party-ready, whether you’re hosting an intimate dinner or a decadent drinks do. As well as the most beautiful tableware and glasses, we have gorgeous ways to decorate, plus some really useful tips and advice from those who make a living from creating events with wow-factor. Think of this as the interiors equivalent of donning your favourite party outfit – a few winning ways to add some sparkle that will make you feel en pointe when your guests arrive. Surrounded by the glitter and glamour of Christmas and New Year, it’s an apt moment to evaluate the concept of luxury and what it means for homes. In preparation for the predicted uncertainties of 2018, this seems as good a time as ever to embrace all things luxurious, or at least dream of doing so. To help you do this, our featured houses this month offer a dose of indulgent escapism, from understated elegance to the unashamedly OTT. For me, luxury is all about texture and touch (see the apartment of Gabriele Salvatori, owner of the eponymous stone brand, for a lesson in how to maximise marble, p118), so it seems apt that we’ve used a wonderfully tactile paper and a special thick, glossy cover for this issue. As with all things, the devil is in the detail.

PICTURE: JAMES MCNAUGHT

Executive Editor

Follow me on

Instagram: @mrbspriggs

Twitter: @ELLEDecoBen

Visit elledecoration.co.uk JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 15


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STYLE

A RT • A RCHITECTUR E • SHOPPING • DESIGN • DECOR ATING

THE GOLDEN RATIO

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

Balanced delicately on a curved back leg &Ratio’s ‘Sola’ chair (£470) is more like a sculpture than a seat, creating the illusion that gravity somehow doesn’t apply to it. This dynamic, structural look runs through the whole of the brand’s first collection, ‘Volume 1’, which focuses on geometry and minimalism (andratio.co.uk).

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RICH AND GOLDEN Team graphic Art Deco-inspired motifs with modern marble and smart upholstery 1 ‘Lamp Black’ matt emulsion, £42 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 2 ‘Abstraction 3’ poster, £24, Ferm Living (fermliving.com) 3 ‘Slab P20.3’ light canopy with ‘Wool Brown’ finish by Lukas Peet for ANDlight, £1,007, SCP (scp.co.uk) 4 ‘Manifesto Futurista’ fabric in silver, £273.50 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) 5 ‘Polished Concrete’ wallpaper in ‘Old Gold’, £93 per metre, Zoffany (stylelibrary.com/zoffany) 6 ‘Fil Noir’ dining chair (two pictured) by Christophe Delcourt, from £3,410 each, Minotti (minotti.com) 7 ‘Tweed’ dining table by Vincente Garcia and Alessandra Cumini for Zanotta, £3,300, Aram Store (aram.co.uk) 8 Large solid brass candlestick from the ‘Objects’ collection by Jaime Hayón for Fritz Hansen, £143, Skandium (skandium.com) 9 ‘On The Rock’ glasses, £66.50 each, Lee Broom (leebroomstore.com) 10 ‘Chill’ carafe, £102, Nude Glass (nudeglass.com) 11 ‘Iso Isometric’ rectangular rug in yellow by Antwerpduo, £749.95, Moxon London (moxon.london)

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SOFT OPTION The go-to brand for cashmere throws and cushion covers, Oyuna is now stocked in Harrods and Selfridges. Founder Oyuna Tserendorj tells us what makes its pieces stand out What prompted you to create Oyuna? As a Mongolian designer, I wanted to showcase the quality of Mongolian goats’ cashmere. I used to give cashmere presents to friends but thought that the design, colour and finish could be improved. What is so unique about it? It goes through the hands of honest, loving people. Incredible nomads care for the goats, and proud factory workers make our products. Our goats roam freely in beautiful valleys and mountains which get extremely cold; they produce very fine, durable coats. Do you manufacture in Mongolia? We produce all of our cashmere in the capital, Ulaanbaatar. Mongolian-made products are world class and often overlooked – the country is full of talented designers and artisans (oyuna.com). From left ‘Etra’ bedspread, £2,499; ‘Etra’ cushion cover, £249; ‘Seren’ cushion cover, £229; ‘Esra’ travel throw, £549, all Oyuna

O F F T H E WA L L Championing and selling the work of craftspeople from the UK and Europe, The Shop Floor Project has commissioned ceramic artist Katrin Moye to bring to life a series of jugs depicted in the paintings of British artists Mary Fedden, Winifred Nicholson and Vanessa Bell. For ‘Throwing paintings’, Moye studied the expressive two-dimensional forms, bringing them back into the physical world with her potter’s wheel and distorting the shapes to match those on the canvas. The result is a collection of vessels that are both objects of use, and pieces of art in their own right. £285 each (theshopfloorproject.com).


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N E W A R R I VA L

Home furnishings and lifestyle brand Sonder Living has landed in the UK, settling into a 241-square-metre space on Harrods’ third floor. The company, a favourite in the US and Asia, stocks an exclusive array of designer pieces, each as distinctive as the last – Hong Kong-based Maison 55’s forest green ‘Trevor’ sofa ( left) stands out, as does Kelly Hoppen’s signature clean-lined luxe and Andrew Martin’s eclectic and adventurous pieces (sonderliving.com). SHOPPING HOTSPOT The University of the Arts London’s ‘Not just a shop’ is, indeed, more than a retail outlet. Based in London’s Holborn, it showcases products and artwork from the talented alumni at UAL’s six art colleges. While there are recognisable designs from Reiko Kaneko, Tatty Devine and By Alex, it’s a great place for discovering new pieces. 272 High Holborn, London WC1 (notjustashop.arts.ac.uk).

THREE OF THE BEST CANDLEHOLDERS

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: CRISTIAN B, YESHEN VENEMA, PACKSHOTFACTORY WEWORK, JUG AND EGGS BY MARY FEDDEN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK ART COLLECTION, FLOWERS BY WINIFRED NICHOLSON, GIRTON COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, TRUSTEES OF WINIFRED NICHOLSON

‘Anulo’ candlestick by AYTM, £31.15, Made in Design (madeindesign.co.uk)

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‘Marsden’ candleholder, £35, Habitat (habitat.co.uk)

‘Balance’ candleholder, £32, Ferm Living (fermliving.com)

S ET T H E B E N C H M A R K London-based brand Alp’s ‘104’ stool is simplicity at its finest. The engineered black powder-coated steel base comes in two shapes which, as well as working wonderfully alone, sit happily alongside each other to create a bench. The sharp angles of the frame contrast with the soft, handwoven leather weave tops, making for a seat that’s comfortable, with a design edge. £240 per stool (alp-design.co.uk). JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 23


TEXTURED CUSHIONS

The easiest way to add instant winter comfort to your home, these designs all combine materials for a tactile look

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‘Colourblock Woven Overlay’ cushion cover in ‘Rosette’, £39, West Elm (westelm.co.uk)

IMPROVE YOUR MOOD Flexform’s new ‘Mood’ collection by Pisa-based designer Roberto Lazzeroni, inspired by Art Deco and retro shapes, has a cocooning feel. Embellishments have been removed, with the designs focusing on a refined palette of muted blues and greens, along with the occasional hit of red. The range comprises sofas, chairs, tables and beds that feature the amber tones of burnished metal and woods stained to a dark ebony. The ‘Midnight’ bed (above, from £6,763), with its winged headboard, and smaller pieces like the ‘Icaro’, sofa (right, from £6,750), all create sheltered spaces that are perfect for relaxation. Try the collection at the newly revamped flagship store in London’s Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour (flexform.it).

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‘Vintage Boucherouite’ cushion by Edit 58, £180, Liberty (libertylondon.com)

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‘Varese’ cushion in ‘Paprika’, £55, Designers Guild (designersguild.com)

ALL DRESSED UP Arne Jacobsen’s iconic ‘Series 7’ chairs for Fritz Hansen have been given an on-trend update with a sleek coat of rich velvet. In a collaboration with German Fashion brand Lala Berlin, the seats have been covered in the finest Italian-made Dedar velvet, and are available in two lustrous tones – the Merlot-coloured ‘Lala Barberry’, and the deep ‘Lala Caspian Blue’. The collection, which also includes the ‘Dot’ stool, is limited edition, on sale until October 2018. Chairs, from £555; stool, £220, all available at Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk).

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‘Eryn’ tasseled velvet cushion, £48, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com)


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WARM AND INVITING Create a sumptuous decorating scheme with a palette of deep clarets, emerald greens and inky blues 1 ‘Lightoread Hayon P’ floor lamp by Jaime Hayón for Parachilna, £1,075, Monologue (monologuelondon.com) 2 ‘Linara’ fabric in ‘Buxton Blue’, £37.50 per metre, Romo (romo.com) 3 ‘Borough Market’ marble matt emulsion, £44 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.com) 4 ‘Pieces No.2’ poster, £11.95, Desenio (desenio.co.uk) 5 ‘Constellation 2’ wallpaper in ‘Ink’ by Leslie David, £196 per roll, Petite Friture (petitefriture.com) 6 ‘ Collect’ customisable pendant light with high socket pendant and cone shade in ‘Dark Green’by Ferm Living , £184, David Village Lighting (davidvillagelighting.co.uk) 7 ‘Harry’ sofa by Antonio Citterio, from £4,321, B&B Italia (bebitalia.com) 8 ‘Trapez’ cushion in ‘Midnight Blue’ by Fritz Hansen, £100, Royal Design (royaldesign.co.uk) 9 ‘Ypperlig’ cushion cover by Hay, £5, Ikea (ikea.com) 10 ‘Abstracto-1’ rug, £1,500, Floor Story (floorstory.co.uk) 11 ‘Checked Out’ blanket by Hay, £159, Goodhood (goodhoodstore.com) 12 Small round pouf, £540, Rose Uniacke (roseuniacke.com)

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Style | N E W S

HOW TO SHOP THE WORLD Want to bring the very best of global design into your home? Head to these new online marketplaces

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ODEM ATELIER

‘I set out to create a boundary-free space for artists, letting talented individuals do what they do best – experiment,’ explains designer and photographer Nikodem Calczynski, founder of Stockholm-based platform Odem Atelier. The brand’s edited collection includes handmade kitchen and dining pieces, alongside more decorative objects. ‘I want each piece to speak for itself and elevate a room,’ says Calczynski (odematelier.com).

From left Ceramic tray by Karin Bengtsson, £405; bowl by Anne Junsjö, £130; ceramic vases by Dale Karlsson, £84 each

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YUME

Launched in September 2017, Copenhagen-based Yume focuses on ethical and sustainable products. The brand curates its furniture, lighting and lifestyle products based on its Scandi design heritage, mixing in eclectic pieces from Africa and the Far East. ‘We travelled the world sourcing hand-hammered trays from Algeria, pottery crafted in southern Morocco and handmade chairs from sustainable forests in Nicaragua,’ says co-founder Anja Holm (yumecph.com). From left ‘Masaya’ Nicaraguan lounge chair, £887; ‘Tamegroute’ ceramic jar from Draa Valley, Morocco, £102

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ARTEMEST

The first e-commerce site for luxury Italian crafts, Artemest represents almost 300 Italian artisans and designers, including glass masters from Murano and Florentine goldsmiths. ‘Every region in Italy has its own traditions,’ says co-founder Marco Credendino. ‘We wanted to give global visibility to the uniqueness and diversity of our local crafts’. The brand will soon be launching its own label, comprising limited edition pieces from its network of makers (artemest.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

From left ‘Veia III’ vase by Kiasmo, £2,691; selection of vases by Claudia Frignani, from £1,458

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THE KAIROS COLLECTIVE

Showcasing antique and contemporary furniture, lighting and accessories from around the UK, The Kairos Collective’s vision is to make quality design accessible to all. ‘We celebrate individuality,’ says founder Tanya Southworth. ‘Having a one-of-a-kind piece is the ultimate expression of good taste’ (thekairoscollective.com). From left ‘Flamingo’ ice bucket side table by John TomJoe for Portuondo, £2,500; Italian sofa, £3,950


YOU ARE THE DESIGNER Two of our favourite high-street brands have introduced elements of the bespoke. The Heal’s ‘Designed by You’ initiative invites customers to dive in to the design process – in the sofa department, choose the size, back type (cushions or fixed), arm width and height, firmness of cushions, feet type (turned or tapered) and fabric. Your selection will be crafted in East Sussex and delivered within 12 weeks ( from £2,098; heals.com). Meanwhile, The Conran Shop’s ‘Build Your Own Upholstery’ service also allows users to create their dream sofa online. Pick from 15 designs (including the ‘Clarence’, below), six fabrics and 42 colours. Made in Italy, it will arrive at your door in around eight weeks ( from £1,140; conranshop.co.uk).

FRENCH FANCY If you love the look of famously fashionable Parisian concept store Merci, you will be excited to learn that its founder, Marie-France Cohen, has launched a new online site. Démodé sells only the chicest of decorative objects, clothes, fragrances, beauty products and ‘other surprises’ (demode.fr). HISTORIC HOMECOMING In honour of its 130th birthday, British stationery and lifestyle institution Smythson is relocating to 131-132 Bond Street, the site of its original 1887 boutique. The Grade-II Listed Arts and Crafts building now features an interior designed by Waldo Studio, who amalgamated the historic architecture with modern accents including the brand’s bespoke fixtures. ‘Panama’ notebook, £45; ‘Alphabet Cards’, £15 for a set of ten (smythson.com).


Style | N E W S

P L AY T I M E Oliver Bonas’s cheerful side tables echo carefree memories of childhood stacking games, and they work beautifully placed together as well as standing alone. With a combination of bead-like, balancing shapes, each one has an eccentric touch, from the marble and gold discs on ‘Pila’ (£195) to ‘Cono’ (£250), with its pink wooden bobbles (oliverbonas.com).

ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM Named after Disney’s iconic flying pachyderm, Cattelan Italia’s ‘Dumbo’ chair also has endearing wing-like ears. They appear on the backrest, making the design comfortably curve around the body of the sitter. Designed by Italian duo Pocci & Dondoli, it can be upholstered in nubuck or leather and comes in burned oak, matt white or black finishes. From £800, Harrogate Interiors ( harrogateinteriors.co.uk).

MIGHTY OAK

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: EMANUELE TORTORA, BEN ANDERS

Inspired by the sculptural arches of Rio De Janeiro’s Carioca Aqueduct, Another Brand’s ‘Lastra’ collection is constructed from wooden slabs that slot smoothly into place. The range, made of lacquered oak and topped with linoleum in ‘Mushroom’, ‘Pewter’ or ‘Burgundy’ comes in several table types, along with shelving. Table, £1,195; ‘Tall’ shelving, £1,095 (anotherbrand.co.uk).

MAGIC TRICK Norwegian Designer Daniel Rybakken is a bit of an illusionist. His ‘124°’ mirror for Artek has a trick up its sleeve – place an object onto its wooden shelf and it will appear to multiply by three due to the angle of the mirror, which also causes the shelf’s reflection to form a perfect circle. £288, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 29


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FASHION HOUSE

From Peter Pilotto’s technicolour London Design Festival townhouse takeover to Valentino’s collaboration with porcelain producer Ceramiche Piemme, the brightest names in fashion and jewellery are having a love affair with homeware – and the results are spectacular 1

WHO? Since 2013, Madrid-based leather and luxury fashion house Loewe has been headed up by Jonathan Anderson, the Northern Irish designer famous for the avant-garde and boundary-pushing couture sent down the London Fashion Week runway for his own brand, JW Anderson. WHAT? Anderson has brought his love for British craftsmanship to the Spanish brand by delving into founder of the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris’ pattern archive and creating a one-off collection of pieces, from coats to dresses, in iconic Morris & Co prints. ‘I have always been a very big fan of the work of William Morris, from his bookplates to his furniture and textiles,’ Anderson told us. ‘Morris’s patterns translate easily from homeware to fashion, because they are incredibly modern designs that transcend generations.’ (loewe.com).

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1 ‘Bird Charm’ keyring with William Morris ‘Strawberry Thief’ (1883) detail, £225 2 ‘Hammock Camo’ bag in William Morris ‘Honeysuckle’ (1876) print and calf leather, £1,625

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WHO? The glitterati have gone mad for Alessandro Michele’s flamboyant Gucci garments (which feature pussy bows, exotic animals, baroque prints and plenty of colour, of course), since he stepped up to lead the Italian house’s design in 2015. Now, Michele is spearheading the brand’s first-ever foray into homeware in its 97-year history. WHAT? The debut collection includes Chiavari-style dining chairs, velvet-quilted screens, cushions, printed silk wallpapers and beautiful stylised ceramic jars (made by the 1735-founded Florentine porcelain manufacturer Richard Ginori, which the Gucci Group bought in 2013) containing scented candles. The many flora and fauna motifs from Michele’s collections abound: poppies, bees, insects and octopuses, to name a few. The price point is haute, but this is couture for the home. The next interior collection lands later in 2018 (gucci.com).

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WHO? Though most often associated with delicate diamonds and timeless necklaces, earrings and charm bracelets, Tiffany & Co has actually been selling home accessories since its launch in 1837, when it opened as a ‘stationery and fancy goods store’ stocking a range of bronze statues, porcelain objets and decorative mirrors. WHAT? Tiffany Home’s latest collection is the first to have input from new creative director Reed Krakoff, who was formerly involved with fashion brand Coach. His first full collection comes out in spring 2018. The aim of Tiffany Home’s range is to make the everyday extraordinary, with a sense of humour: this has involved taking household basics (party straws, baked-bean cans) and producing them in precious metals or fine porcelain, branding them with dashes of the iconic Tiffany Blue (tiffany.co.uk). 6 ‘Tin can’ sculpture in sterling silver and vermeil with Tiffany Blue enamel, £945 7 ‘Crazy straw’ sculpture in sterling silver with Tiffany Blue enamel, £235

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GUCCI DÉCOR

3 ‘Chiavari’ chair with embroidered tiger, £1,830 4 ‘Fumus’ (birch, orange leaves and beeswax) candle in ‘Star Eye’ porcelain jar, £240 5 Velvet cushion with bee embroidery, £795

TIFFANY HOME

BOHINC STUDIO WHO? A native of Slovenia, London-based Lara Bohinc has forged a stellar career as a jewellery designer – consulting for Cartier and designing her own Art Deco-inspired collections. But Bohinc originally trained in industrial design and, after designing her first piece of furniture in 2014 (a table in collaboration with Lapicida), she has been making tracks towards interiors. WHAT? She has just opened her first studio and showroom in a beautifully converted Victorian townhouse in west London – the perfect heritage-meets-glamour backdrop for her growing line of furniture, decorative objects and lighting. Her love of precious stones prevails across the disciplines. ‘It is liberating designing furniture – you’re not constrained by fashion’s fast seasons, or the weight of a stone on an earring. My furniture pieces are very feminine, I think. Sort of like jewellery for the home.’ (bohincstudio.com). 8 ‘Collision Console’ table in Carrara marble and brushed brass, £20,831 9 Vases, from left ‘Venturi Tooth’, £1,307; ‘Venturi Pear’ (in blue and white), £1,524; ‘Venturi Pumpkin’, £1,951

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

LOEWE


Style | D E S I G N

NAME TO KNOW OEO STUDIO

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS PICTURES: MARIE LOUISE MUNKEGAARD

This multidisciplinary design company skilfully fuses Scandinavian and Eastern aesthetics for a modern take on minimalism

Clockwise from left Flos’s new Copenhagen showroom. OEO Studio’s ‘Coco’ chairs for Gubi. A pitcher designed by the duo for Kaikado. Founders Thomas Lykke and Anne-Marie Buemann

A link has long existed between Far Eastern and Danish design – the punctuated the cavernous space with a dramatic, bespoke metal most famous example being Hans Wegner’s classic 1949 ‘Wishbone’ cage that showcases Brdr Krüger ’s furniture, including its ‘Ferdinand’ chair, which was inspired by a portrait of Danish merchants perched and ‘Theodor’ chairs, also designed by OEO Studio. on Chinese Ming Dynasty chairs. Danish design firm OEO Studio In 2012, the design company collaborated with six craft-based is keeping the tradition alive today. While many of its clients are Japanese firms on a project called Japan Handmade, providing based in Japan, it also creates interiors for restaurants and stores, creative direction and developing products. For Kaikado, a teaand has offices in both Copenhagen and Tokyo. caddy company, it produced items such as teapots, vases and wine Co-founded in 2003 by creative director Thomas Lykke and coolers. The duo also worked as creative directors for Georg Jensen managing partner Anne-Marie Buemann, OEO Studio has an from 2009 to 2011, dreaming up products for the brand, as well affinity with Japanese design partly for as creating the ‘Coco’ chair – with its elegant Lykke’s personal reasons: ‘As a child, my The duo usually capitalise Chanel-esque upholstery and slimline legs grandmother gave me books about Japan, – for Danish brand Gubi in 2016. on an existing space’s and I used to have low furniture and bonsai In 2017, OEO Studio redesigned Flos’s trees in my room,’ he recalls when we meet characterful fabric and raw Copenhagen showroom, animating its bare concrete shell with an expansive staircase in the practice’s white-walled office, which materials, then add their (above left), down which lights appear to is adorned with 1980s posters from design collective Memphis and everything from cascade as if on an old Hollywood movie set. own theatrical flourishes stylish carrier bags to traditional Japanese Some of OEO Studio’s other projects dolls. ‘I think Danish and Japanese designers share certain core have an even richer quality still: it furnished the Tokyo flagship store of Danish jewellery brand Natur & Nicolai Bergmann with values, chiefly simplicity and modesty,’ he continues. The duo are, above all, inspired by materials. When designing cabinets and screens lined with ribbed wood and appropriately restaurants and shops, they usually capitalise on an existing space’s luxurious velvet-upholstered chairs. Similarly opulent is OEO characterful fabrics and raw finishes, then add their own theatrical Studio’s furniture line for Chinese brand Stellar Works. flourishes. They recently designed a showroom in the Copenhagen The company’s inetntion remains clear: to create inviting, not headquarters of furniture company Brdr Krüger, famous for its intimidatingly formal, spaces and products: ‘We like to keep things mid-century aesthetic and for fabricating Kay Bojesen’s iconic casual and human,’ concludes Lykke. ‘You know an interior or 1951 wooden monkey. Here, they exposed swathes of concrete and a piece of furniture works when people want to touch it.’ oeo.dk JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 33


Style | D E S I G N

STYLE ON THE SOFA

Three international super-brands, three new sofas. We take a seat with the big names behind the designs

Toulouse-born and now based in Paris, Massaud has a global outlook that he describes as ‘evolving avant-garde’. New to the prolific MassaudPoliform partnership, which has produced 40 pieces to date, is the ‘Sydney’ sofa – one of many pieces named after vibrant cities that inspire the architect-designer. ‘Poliform is not a conservative brand, but its furniture is classic in proportions and materials. The family behind the company and I get on well and, together, we are modernising a little. We designed this sofa for the contemporary, informal way that people live now. It’s aimed at the younger customer who stays in a five-star hotel, but doesn’t want formal furniture. It should not be part of a three-piece suite! It is low and perfect for reclining. Plus, as it can be configured to fit small or spacious apartments, it can move around with the owner.’ THE FACTS Wooden frame, metal base, available in 31 standard fabric coverings, as well as velvet and leather on request. Matching cushions available. From £12,000 (poliform.it).

ANTONIO CITTERIO ‘ G R A N D S O FÀ’ F O R V I T R A Renowned Italian architect and designer Citterio is a formidable name in furniture design. Big brands from Hermès to Iittala vie to commission his signature designs, and Swiss manufacturer Vitra has joined forces with him to create the state-of-the-art settee that is the ‘Grand Sofà’. ‘There are many big squashy sofas around, but Vitra is respected for its industrial design and clean lines. Working together, we wanted to blend the two,’ says Citterio. ‘There’s a special relationship between designer and manufacturer. Collaboratively, we worked out how to transform a flat drawing into a three-dimensional product, particularly the jigsaw puzzle of fabric panels and seams. It started with a pencil sketch. I don’t design digitally, as computer renders look so sterile. This piece was inspired by a one-off pair of sofas I designed for my apartment in Milan. In a modern home, seating isn’t always up against the wall, which is why the back of this design doubles as a miniature desk or drinks tray. A sofa doesn’t exist in a vacuum! It has to work in the space it’s in.’ THE FACTS Can be upholstered in a choice of three fabrics, in 17 colours. Frame can be polished, or powder-coated black or white. From £5,090 (vitra.com).

PIERO LISSONI ‘ S A K É ’ S O FA F O R B & B I TA L I A Prolific architect-designer Lissoni has created everything from yachts to travertine surfaces and coffee tables. Remarkably, given that he and B&B Italia are both Italian design A-listers, the ‘Saké’ marks their first collaboration. ‘B&B Italia gave me a pretty blank canvas – they just said, “We need your contemporary touch”. The design came from a search for lightness, so the legs are very fine and invisible from some angles. The sofa seems to float,’ he explains. ‘I think furniture should be simple and serene. With this piece, I stripped away the design to make it as lean as possible.’ THE FACTS Upholstered in a choice of 16 fabrics and four leather colourways. Steel base finished in pewter lacquer paint. Various sizes available, and it can be configured as a chaise longue or sofa bed. From £5,537 (bebitalia.com). 34 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: DENIS ROUVRE, FLORIAN BOEHM (STUDIO AKFB)

JEAN MARIE MASSAUD ‘ S Y D N E Y ‘ S O FA FOR POLIFORM


Style | D E S I G N 1

M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E SKYE GYNGELL

An arbiter of taste tells us what they are reading, watching, listening to and more

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: CAROL SACHS, GETTY/ROBERT HARDING WORLD IMAGERY, GETTY, JAMES CHAMPION, NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX/EYEVINE, ALLSTAR/PLAN B ENTERTAINMENT, JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT/UNTITLED 1982/MUSEUM BOIJMANS VAN BEUNINGEN © THE ESTATE OF JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT/LICENSED BY ARTESTAR, NEW YORK/PHOTO BY STUDIO TROMP, ROTTERDAM

A down-to-earth chef – both in theory and in practice – Australian Skye Gyngell left Petersham Nurseries’ Café (for which she’d earned a Michelin star) behind to set up Spring, her own seasonal and superlatively elegant restaurant in Somerset House in 2014. Neoclassical cornicing and a mirror installation by Studio Peascod aside, it’s Gyngell’s 2 ethical entrepreneurship that impresses. It has driven her to launch Scratch, a pre-theatre menu using wonky or surplus fruit and vegetables from the restaurant’s supplier farm (@skyegyngell; springrestaurant.co.uk). My all-time favourite piece of music? I grew up in the 1970s in Sydney, but it was music from the west coast of America that formed the backdrop to my teenage years – I love Joni Mitchell (4), Fleetwood Mac, the Doobie Brothers and any of the Motown classics. At the moment I am listening to Beauty 3 in the Dark (Groove With You) by the Isley Brothers and Mos Def – it’s on repeat. If I want to feel instantly happy, it’s Kiss by Prince. My favourite writer is Tim Winton. I find his beautiful and visceral descriptions of the Australian landscape and his wonderful, flawed characters irresistible. The book I am currently reading is The Gustav Sonata (2) by Rose Tremain. She is another favourite author of mine, and this book is a complete pleasure to read. I’m also dipping into David Tanis’s new 4 book Market Cooking – I really love the way he writes and thinks about food. My favourite film is The Notebook. It’s my girls’ most-loved film [Gyngell has two daughters]. I’ve seen it a thousand times over the years with them and they always cry when we watch it together, which makes me cry – it’s a sort of ritual! Also, Moonlight (7) left me feeling like I couldn’t breathe – I found it utterly beautiful and deeply moving.

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The last exhibition I saw was ‘Boom for Real’, the Basquiat (Untitled, 1982; 3) exhibition at the Barbican, which I loved. I also visited the Agnes Martin retrospective at The Guggenheim (6) last year. It is definitely my exhibition of the decade! I collect cookbooks – I’ve got thousands that I treasure and that inspire me. I’m also drawn to glass objects, and love the work of south London-based glassblower Michael Ruh (5). My favourite place in the world is the far north coast of New South Wales (1), Australia, where my brother lives. It feels like paradise and home at the same time. The Christmas present that I most enjoy giving is jewellery. I give the girls a piece each every year; something simple that they can keep for ever. One of the things I’m most looking forward to, culturally and gastronomically, about the festive season is Christmas pudding. I always feel excited about the prospect of eating it on Christmas Day! On 19 December, in partnership with Street Smart, Spring will host Table, a canteen for homeless and disadvantaged Londoners, paid for by the public. For details on how to donate a meal or volunteer your time, visit springrestaurant.co.uk JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 37


Style | D E S I G N

H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D V I S I O N N A I R E

It seems appropriate that some of Italian design brand Visionnaire’s most high-profile projects should be in the world of travel, styling the interiors of yachts and private planes, for its origins also lie in this sphere. The company was founded in 1959 in Zola Predosa, on the outskirts of Bologna, by brothers Pompeo and Vittorio Cavalli, and specialised in making padded seating for Lancia cars. They christened their firm IPE, an acronym for imbottiture prodotti espansi (expanded padded products). Its technology for moulding polyurethane, a new-generation plastic, was regarded as groundbreaking. Realising that their method could revolutionise furniture construction, the brothers launched their first interiors collection in 1961. However, it was Vittorio Cavalli’s son Luigi and Luigi’s children, Leopold and Eleonore, who

Inf luences and styles may differ, but opulence is a constant across Visionnaire’s collection created the brand as we know it now. The company, renamed in 2004, now includes more than 2,000 items in its furniture collection. Influences differ, from the boxy, 1970s-style of the ‘Babylon’ sofa (above), whose padded form pays tribute to the brand’s heritage, to the Art Deco look of the ‘Bradley’ bed. Opulence, however, is a constant. Personalising spaces is also key – Visionnaire has designed a number of private homes from top to toe, as well as the interiors of hotels and restaurants around the world. ‘Our clients love to collect unique, handcrafted pieces,’ says Leopold Cavalli, explaining why the brand has its own art collection to complement its furniture, carpets and lighting. You can experience the art at its showroom in Milan’s Piazza Cavour, which also boasts a coffee bar and a gallery, aptly named the Wunderkammer (cabinet of curiosities). Can’t make it to Milan? Visit the new Visionnaire store at Harrods, London to experience its art, furniture and accessories. visionnaire-home.com; harrods.com 38 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018

DID YOU KNOW? VISIONNAIRE FACTS

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The brand has 24 stores around the world, in cities such as Miami, Moscow and Beijing, as well as more unexpected locations, from Baku to Tehran.

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Among its best-selling designs in 2017 were the ‘Bastian’ sofa (right), a linear design with slim arms and contrast piping, and the ‘Emotion’ bedroom, which includes a statement padded headboard with integrated display shelves and bedside storage.

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In 2013, Visionnaire unveiled its design for a 12-seater Dornier private jet, kitted out entirely in its own furnishings and finishes, enhanced by futuristic lighting effects.

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Inspired by the idea of green spaces as a modern luxury, Visionnaire’s latest designs focus on eco-friendly materials. The ‘Sunny’ outdoor collection is made using Materiko, a polymorphic resin that can replicate any surface found in nature. Derived from plants, it is 100 per cent recyclable.

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The company has designed hotel interiors around the world, including The Reverie Saigon hotel in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam (left). Here, the brand showed its flair by decorating a suite in pure, plush white and Calacatta marble, with a polished gold spiral staircase at the centre.

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

This purveyor of Italian luxury is more than a furniture brand, extending its reach to interior design, hotels and even private jets


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THE BIG TREND

WHAT’S HOT IN 2018

Ahead of our Trend Issue next month, Michelle Ogundehin previews the new year’s most exciting looks

NEW NEUTRALS

SEXY ECO

HAPPY DESIGN

The colour beige had its day a long time ago as the default choice for homes – however, white had always been right when it came to the desire for a plain backdrop. But no more! Neutrals are an essential part of any decorating arsenal; they are the soothing salve to the colour of your possessions. Except, increasingly, you’re going to be seeing more tea rose, lavender and peach – the new neutrals du jour. Admittedly, these are all colours with a decidedly retro flavour, yet they’re brought bang up to date with big dollops of grey in them. Think muted pastels – more sophisticated versions of whatever came to mind when you first pictured those colour names.

Eco used to mean scratchy fabrics and wobbly pots that, frankly, should have been lobbed straight into the recycling bin. As for eco homes, well, that meant walls made from straw bales and compost toilets. Now, the architecture is sexier, and early adopters and local authorities are embracing the PassivHaus movement – a gold standard in the eco building world. The reason for this increasing interest is simple: building like this is good for the planet (less reliant on unsustainable fuels) and for you, from comfortable room temperatures to better air quality, quieter homes so that you sleep better, and energy bills that are, on average, 90 per cent lower. What’s not to love?

At the same time as the rise and return of gold, which I wrote about in last month’s issue, and as a further reflection on the rejection of black (more on that topic in a moment), there is also a sense of the design world wanting to throw caution to the wind in a decidedly fun way. In a complete volte-face to the New Neutrals, there is a burgeoning trend for taking those retro colours and brightening, heightening and vibrantly mixing and mismatching them. It’s jolly, it’s upbeat and it basically says, ‘well, if the world is going to hell in a handcart, then we will do as we damn well please in our own homes, because we’re living for the moment!’


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6 10 NEW NEUTRALS 1 ‘Herman’ chair in ‘Rose’ by Ferm Living 2 The brass of Broste Copenhagen’s ‘Caspa’ lamp suits this tea rose backdrop 3 Peach is used to perfection in this room shot by picture agency Frank Features SEXY ECO 4 Modern, eco-friendly housing in Vermont, by Ted Porter Architecture 5 Inside a French PassivHaus, designed by architects L’agence Karawitz HAPPY DESIGN 6 ‘Palma’ fabric in ‘Ara’ by Lelievre 7 Missoni Home’s new, cheery designs EVERYDAY LUXE 8 ‘Lyra’ marble and brass candleholders by Dan Yeffet for Ooumm 9 Alabaster ‘Bolky’ pendant light by Atelier Alain Ellouz BRUISE PURPLE 10 ‘Heart Wood’ paint colour by Dulux

PICTURE: LINE KLEIN, SCHNEPP RENOU, AAE-CHRISTEL MARTIN

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BYE BYE BLACK

EVERYDAY LUXE

BRUISE PURPLE

I’ve often noted that the popularity of monochrome acts as a kind of bravery barometer for the nation’s interiors. In other words, when black and white abounds, the zeitgeist is one of caution and a desire for playing it safe with decorating decisions. Conversely, when sales of this traditional look slump, it can be seen as a sign that we’re collectively feeling open to something new. And so it is that, although dark navy and fir green are on the up, absolutist black is on the wane. For furniture, black is out because it’s about being able to see the grain, and for everything else… well, why go black when you could have lavender or peach?

This is a straightforward evolution of the continuing love for precious stones, marbles, lush velvets and other exotic finishes in the home, that first emerged about two years ago – I christened it ‘The New Modern’. These materials are now coming off of the walls and out of the haute-designer toolbox to be used for more utilitarian products. Think pendant lights made from alabaster (above), as well as jade-green velvet sofas and tealight holders crafted from richly veined marbles – both available on the high street. As this trend continues, I predict that its parallel will also emerge – an interest in more ‘Arte Povera’ finishes, from cork to plywood.

Dulux announced its colour of the year for 2018, called ‘Heart Wood’, which it described as a ‘warm neutral with a hint of heather’. I promptly renamed it ‘Bruise Purple’ as, to me, this more accurately conjures up the image of this hue – rather beautiful and transfixing, in the way that the evolution of a real bruise is. This is no easy ‘neutral’, though. It sits neither in the pink nor the purple camp. It is not blue, and certainly not a white-with-a-hint-ofanything. Instead, its heritage is a mix of all of the above – plus the ever on-trend grey. It is, I feel, representative of what we need now: a cool, calm, yet alternative new neutral that can reach out across divides. JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 41


PLANNING YOUR DREAM KITCHEN?

WIN £5,000 IN OUR PRIZE DRAW

IT TAKES JUST TEN MINUTES TO COMPLETE THE SURVEY

EN T ER AT N OW!

Whether you long for sleek, modern, handleless cabinets with granite worktops or prefer a more classic look with in-frame doors, we’d love to discover what kitchen style is your idea of perfection. And when it comes to choosing where to buy, would you rather rely on the expertise of a local independent retailer or opt for the vast choice available at a well-known national brand? Investing in a new kitchen involves a lot of thought and planning, and we’d like to know what you look for in terms of design, price and service. This survey, sponsored by kitchen brand Neptune, only takes ten minutes to complete, and, as a thank you for your input, you will be entered into a prize draw with a chance to win a £5,000 voucher to spend on a new kitchen at a retailer of your choice*. To enter, visit thissurvey.com/dreamkitchenED by midnight on 22 January 2018.

PICTURES: MARK SCOTT, ONE REPRESENTS/BEN ANDERS *THE PRIZE IS REDEEMABLE AGAINST A KITCHEN PURCHASE ONLY

T H I S S U RV E Y.C O M /D R E A M K I T C H E N E D


KITCHENS & BATHROOMS FOUR OF THE BEST B L A C K TA P S

The edgy tones of matt black are having a moment. See below for our top picks that will add drama to a bathroom or kitchen sink

‘K’ lever mixer in black by Gessi Rettangolo, from £399, CP Hart (cphart.co.uk)

RAISING THE BAR Arclinea has landed in the UK, with its kitchens fitting seamlessly in with the sleek designs that fill the B&B Italia showroom on London’s Brompton Road. The kitchens are all designed by Antonio Citterio, with a focus on innovation. For example, the ‘Convivium’ (above) features a teak table/bar, the height of which can be adjusted using an app. From £30,000 (arclinea.com; bebitalia.com).

‘Vaia’ three-hole basin mixer in ‘Dark Platinum Matt’, £1,789, Dornbracht (dornbracht.com)

PEEK-A-BOO DESIGN Knock on the dark black front door of LG’s ‘InstaView’ smart fridge and it instantly turns transparent, meaning you can check the contents without opening it. £6,500, Currys (currys.co.uk) S H E L F A S S E M B LY

‘Haptic’ brass faucet in ‘Vulcano’, from £232, Ritmonio (ritmonio.it)

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

W H AT A G E M

‘Regulator’ basin tap in ‘Shadow’, from £1,300, Waterworks (uk.waterworks.com)

Designed by German architect and carpenter Wolfgang Hartauer, Alape’s ‘Assist’ shelving system was created especially for the bathroom. Made from a series of powder-coated aluminium strips, it can be added to with a selection of boxes, towel rails and dispensers, forming a bespoke arrangement that seems to float on the wall. From £73.20 (alape.com).

Prolific British designer Kelly Hoppen, known for her pared-back luxe aesthetic, has created a new collection for Australian bathroom brand Apaiser. The ‘Bijoux’ bath tubs and basins are inspired by the facets of diamonds, the structural angles on the exterior playing with light and contrasting the smooth surface within. Bath, £4,097; basin, £808 (apaiser.com). JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 43


DECORATING

SHAPE THE FUTURE Bert & May has collaborated with The Conran Shop on a range of tiles inspired by Modernist architecture. There are three graphic motifs: the curve, the line and the square, all in a choice of three chalky colours. Suitable for use indoors and outside, the handmade tiles can be used to create abstract designs (see above). £5.76 per tile or £144 per square metre (conranshop.co.uk; bertandmay.com).

FIND YOUR MUSE Channel the decadence of the 1920s with ‘The Muse’, Zoffany’s new collection. It features five books of cut-velvets, jacquards and wallcoverings, with each design telling the story of a muse and the art she inspires (‘Wyndham’ fabric as curtains; ‘Gala’ fabric on sofa, both above). Fabric, from £80 per metre (stylelibrary.com/zoffany).

CA R P ET U P G R A D E D The latest must-have flooring material is Crucial Trading’s Sisool – 70 per cent wool, 20 per cent sisal and 10 per cent jute. It’s soft enough for bare feet yet hardy enough for high traffic areas. As well as being practical, its herringbone design looks smart, too. Choose from four colours – ‘Smooth Cotton’, ‘Fine Bark’, ‘Classic Steel’ and ‘Light Stone’ (right). £120 per square metre (crucial-trading.com).

P U M P U P T H E PAT T E R N British textile designer Imogen Heath has teamed up with mural specialists Surface View to put a range of her floral and graphic patterns on lampshades, tiles and, of course, wall murals (‘Bluebell’, above). You can customise the scale of the print to suit your space as each piece is made to order. Murals, from £65 per square metre; tiles, from £540 per square metre; lampshades, from £90 (imogenheath.com; surfaceview.co.uk).


BRAND TO KNOW PA R K E R & J U L E S

Founded by Nancy Parker (far left) and Juliet O’Carroll (left) in September 2016, this fabric brand is new, but already turning heads

WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES, CLAUDIA BAILLIE

Parker & Jules may be a newcomer on the fabric scene, but, thanks to the wealth of experience brought to the table by co-founders Nancy Parker and Juliet O’Carroll, it’s fair to say that the brand’s debut collection belies the company’s youth. Parker, a fashion print designer, spent years studying textiles before launching her own London-based studio in 2005, producing fabrics used by Etro and Donna Karan as well as high-street brands. Meanwhile, O’Carroll worked in textile product development before setting up a homeware label, then retrained as an interior designer at KLC School of Design. Their credentials are impeccable. It wasn’t until several years later, however, having met through friends, that they decided to join forces and create their own fabrics for interiors. ‘After years of pared back design and lots of grey, there’s definitely been a resurgence in pattern and maximalism. As a print designer, it felt the right time to explore that,’ says Parker. Working together, the duo began to resize and fine tune Parker’s fashion prints. The result is a collection of complementary linens and velvets called ‘Near & Far’. Made up of three print stories in four colourways, plus a range of smaller scale patterns, the fabrics are sourced almost entirely in the UK (their heavy linen is from Belgium) and digitally printed in Worcestershire. The designs draw inspiration from the Cotswold countryside where the pair both live, mixing that with Eastern influences. ‘Homes are infinitely more interesting when layered with colour and pattern,’ says Parker. ‘Our collection is about fabrics that are easy to coordinate and weave together.’ From £79 per square metre for linen (parkerand jules.com).

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF

Louise Body’s ‘Gold Leaf Leaves’ wallpaper, handpainted to order using gold, silver or copper leaf, is exquisite. Cover a whole wall or simply frame a single panel to create a decorative work of art. From £185 for a three-metre panel (louisebody.com).

THE COLOUR HANDBOOK Left Chair upholstered in ‘Ordnance Survey’ and cushion covered in ‘Bark’ cotton velvet Above A selection of swatches from the ‘Near & Far’ collection

Have trouble choosing between ‘Slacked Lime’ and ‘Welcome Pale’? The subtle shades and conceptual names of modern paint colours can be confusing. Thankfully, the clever folk at Little Greene have created a fool-proof guide to selecting paints, useful for choosing complementary hues for your home. The Little Book of Colour, £10, is available at Little Greene showrooms and online (littlegreene.com). JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 45


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

FIVE OF THE BEST S TAT E M E N T WA L L PA P E R S BEST FOR VICTORIANA House of Hackney This brand is inspired by the past, but its large-scale motifs and pattern-on-pattern style creates a modern look. ‘Artemis’ from the ‘House of Hackney x William Morris’ range, £185 per roll (houseofhackney.com). BEST FOR JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING Cole & Son Check out the ‘Icons’ collection, which features the brand’s best-known designs reworked in new colours. ‘Miami’ in ‘Pastel’ is inspired by the shades of the city’s buildings. £325 per roll (cole-and-son.com). BEST FOR ABSTRACT GEOMETRICS Kit Miles Designer Kit Miles sees pattern everywhere, and interprets it with a surreal twist. Motifs include floor tiles and city skylines, which he distorts into something weird and wonderful. ‘Kubrick’, £1,400 per roll (kitmiles.co.uk).

D E S I G N D E TA I L S T H E C L O A K R O O M

WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURE: RYAN GARVIN

Impress your guests with a small space that demands attention How can I add character to such a tiny room? If you’ve fallen in love with a bold wallpaper pattern – such as the iconic ‘Martinique’ by Beverly Hills Wallpaper (above) used by interior designer Robin Strickler of Design Works – but fear it will overpower a large space, the cloakroom is the perfect place to showcase it. ‘Small spaces are easy to update – plus, they’re some of the less frequented places in the home,’ says Carley Bean, head of design at Cole & Son. ‘They become fun little pockets of design.’ What types of pattern should I use? ‘Conversational wallpapers work well in the cloakroom, as it’s one of the few places where a guest might pay attention to detail and appreciate it,’ says Paul Simmons, co-founder of Timorous Beasties. In wet spaces, it’s wise to coat wallpaper with a layer of varnish to prevent damage – try Decorator’s Varnish (from £9.26 for 500ml of gloss, Polyvine; polyvine.com). You don’t have to stick with wallpaper, though – interior designer Kia Stanford is a big fan of Bisazza’s mosaic tiles. ‘Tiles are much more hard-wearing – geometric and flower patterns are two of my favourites at the moment,’ she says. ‘Use monochrome styles if you don’t feel ready for colour.’ Are there any other ways that I can create an impact? ‘Adding decorative accessories and artworks is another easy way to add instant character,’ says interior designer Afroditi Krassa. Whether you opt for a statement mirror, oversized, checked floor tiles or a piece of taxidermy, the more unique the pieces you choose, the better. Are there any practical considerations? Since you’re dealing with such a small area, it’s best to keep your floor space uncluttered. Look for a sink with a lot of built-in storage – Burlington Bathrooms has an ideal corner vanity unit (£849; burlingtonbathrooms.com).

BEST FOR MODERN CHINOISERIE Witch & Watchman Founder and designer Helen Wilson says she is inspired by the flora she imagines would take over a crumbling mansion in a classic Hollywood movie. ‘Siberia Light’, £240 per roll (witchand watchman.com). BEST FOR GRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION Pierre Frey This family-owned Parisian company is known for its fantastic hand-painted patterns, such as this ‘Sonora’ design in ‘Vert’, which is inspired by the sun setting on cactus plants. £156 per metre (pierrefrey.com).

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Style | D E C O R A T I N G

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X T R I S TA N A U E R

Explore the work of the world’s finest interior designers and pick up some of their personal styling secrets

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add texture, depth and warmth to a space – artistically, they can be very interesting. It’s important to remember never to hang one too near a window, though, otherwise you can see that it’s not flat and it will enhance the shadows. In a hallway or staircase, you can be bold and hang a piece with lots of colour. It doesn‘t matter if it’s full of flashy

Displaying objects When thinking about where to place objects, work out what complements and contrasts well with what, and create mini tableaux. Grouping different types of art – sculpture, paintings and sketches – from the same artist, as I did in my own home in Pigalle with pieces by sculptor Gérard Choain (1), is a nice link.

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WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: PHILIPPE GARCIA, OLIVIER AMSELLEM

Who is he? French interior designer Tristan Auer studied at Penninghen, the school of interior architecture in Paris, before stints working for designers Christian Liaigre and Philippe Starck. ‘I learned different things from each,’ recalls Auer. ‘With Christian, it was all about the attention to detail – it was a question of millimetres when doing a seam or piping. Working for Philippe was more about scenography and the feel of a space.’ In 2002, Auer set up his own design studio. His first project was the interior design of singer Bryan Adams’ beach house in Mustique. ‘He launched my career by introducing 1 me to all the fashion people and rock stars on the island.’ How does he describe his aesthetic? ‘Made to measure,’ he says, explaining: ‘my style and 2 the materials I use change according to each project.’ Yet, there are elements – such as high levels of craftsmanship, elegance and a balance between preserving the old and introducing the new – that remain consistent whether Auer is designing a hotel in Moscow or an apartment in central Paris (3). He also puts an emphasis on the ‘way a space flows’, listing his inspirations as fashion haute couture and luxury. ‘Sensuality is important,’ he says. ‘We judge too much on what we see. When you sit on a sofa, you should be able to close your eyes and feel comfort.’ Where are his most notable projects? Auer redesigned the public spaces at the Hotel de Crillon in Paris (2), which re-opened in 2017 after a four-year renovation. ‘The interior design mixes different styles and periods, from the classical 18th-century to the contemporary – for me, that’s what makes it very rich,’ he says. Everything, from the furniture to the textiles, is bespoke and has been made by French craftspeople. Auer also designs bespoke furniture for brands such as Christophe Delcourt and Holly Hunt, including the ‘Edie’ sofa (4). What is he currently working on? Projects E X P E R T A D V I C E Tristan Auer’s guide to decorating your space include a 50-storey residential tower in Dubai, and the Hotel Temple in Le Marais, Paris, which The approach Think of an interior as if it orange, because you only walk past it. In will open in 2019. ‘The eclectic interior will be were a movie, where the fast-paced action somewhere like the living room, where you inspired by the 16th-century neighbourhood,’ is mixed with quieter scenes. Don’t put objects spend more time, the art needs to feel restful. everywhere: you need moments of drama Furniture When you’re thinking about explains Auer. In September, he branched out and moments of calm. Try and be open to where to place the key pieces of furniture, into designing interiors for vintage cars (the using materials and colours you haven’t tried such as a bed or a sofa, don’t just consider new venture was launched via Instagram: before. It’s also important to create pockets how it looks in the room. It’s also important @tristanauer_cartailoring) and he has already of surprise: the bathroom is the perfect place to lie on the bed or sit on the sofa and reflect completed four vehicles, including a 1973 Citroen for a painting or sculpture, for example. on what you can see from there. You want to for the Hotel de Crillon. tristanauer.com Artworks I like tapestries a lot, as they find the best possible view within the space.


ARCHITECTURE 1

ASK AN ARCHITECT TIM BOWDER-RIDGER

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: GETTY/TETRA IMAGES, ALAMY, KIT OATES, EDMUND SUMNER

We talk to architect Tim BowderRidger, CEO and Senior Partner of Conran + Partners, whose recent projects include the regeneration of London’s iconic Centre Point tower

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What first inspired you to become an architect? While I was growing up, my family travelled and lived abroad for long periods of time. My parents were keen for their children to be exposed to all things cultural. We visited many historical sites – one that most inspired me to become an architect was the Hagia Sophia (1) in Istanbul. The emotional effect of its internal spaces makes my heart miss a beat, some 1,500 years after it was built. How would you describe your architectural aesthetic? Contemporary, accessible aspiration. We are not interested in fashion or flashiness in our 2 designs. We are not designing for our peers, but only for the users of our buildings. The greatest compliment we can be given is for people to take ownership of the spaces we have created and to love them for many years. Conran + Partners is about to complete work on two iconic London buildings: the Barbican’s Blake Tower (5) and Centre Point (2). Tell us about that process. Both projects are about reinventing landmarks that, until recently, had fallen largely out of popular favour. However, the buildings are both important parts of our 20th century architectural heritage, and, while flawed in some of the ways they were originally designed, we have shown how they can be rejuvenated to ensure their relevance to future generations. What has it been like working with Sir Terence Conran? Challenging and, at times, infuriating. His natural, and usually spot-on, intuition can throw me off balance sometimes, but he’s always inspiring. Terence’s key piece of advice to me has been to look for the possible in everything and never to let the nay-sayers stop me from doing what I believe in. It’s always been a very motivating mantra, which I try to 4 follow in everything that I do.

Is there a building that you wish you had designed? The Neues Museum in Berlin (3) by David Chipperfield Architects. It represents a lot of what I believe in, in terms of reinvention and cultural sustainability. The careful layering of the old and new, and the bold simplicity for which Chipperfield is rightly recognised. What are you working on at the moment? Typically our practice has more than 20 projects running at the same time across several different time zones. Currently, we are designing two Park Hyatt hotels, one in Jakarta and one in Auckland, while working on housing regeneration projects in London (including one in the former Walthamstow Stadium, 4) and a co-living scheme in Vienna. What does the word ‘home’ mean to you? A place where you can be yourself. Somewhere that is a physical manifestation of an individual’s personality… a place to be just a little self-centred. What is the big challenge faced by architects today? Not to allow bureaucracy and the negative attitudes present in our society to get in the way of what architects should be doing: creating better spaces for people to live, work and play in. It is always important to retain an architect’s most fundamental asset: optimism. 5 If you weren’t an architect, what would you be? Probably an equestrian. Like architecture, equestrianism is about pushing the limits of what is possible whilst having to think outside of oneself. When done properly, it is a thing of beauty. conranandpartners.com JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 51


TECHNOLOGY

G R A P E E X P E C TAT I O N S

The ‘Üllo’ wine purifier removes the sulphites (added as a preservative by vineyards) from your favourite tipple, restoring its natural taste and minimising the chances of a hangover. £70, plus £3 per filter (ullowine.com).

THE GOLD CHANNEL

N E V E R M I S S A B E AT Cooking is a science, but what if a mixer could help you cheat your way to success? The strangely named ‘OptiMUM’ by Bosch has sensors that stop mixing when egg whites are perfectly fluffy or dough well kneaded. £700 (bosch-home.co.uk).

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REMIXING A CLASSIC The radiogram – a radio combined with a gramophone – was a popular piece of furniture in the 1960s. This modern version, the Ruark Audio ‘R7 MkIII’, features wireless streaming technology, a beautifully woven fabric grille and enough oomph to power any party. £2,200, John Lewis ( johnlewis.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURES: ANDREAS BOHLENDER PHOTOGRAPHIE & VISUAL STORYTELLING, D BLACKMORE, JUSTIN MARIMON

This, says German tech brand Loewe, is the future of home entertainment: a television that is also a work of art. The ‘Bild X’ TV concept, created in collaboration with London-based designer Bodo Sperlein, is a piece of fine furniture, not to be hidden in the corner of the room. Its OLED screen is suspended by strong magnets within a frame of gold that is supported by a circular marble base. Why is the display held up magnetically? Well, that’s the smart bit. You can upgrade your screen, removing it from the frame and replacing it with a new model. Available summer 2018 (loewe.tv).


ENTERTAINING

wınter specıal

PICTURE: PIA ULIN (PHOTOGRAPHY) AND LOTTA AGATON (STYLING) FOR BLOSSA GLÖGG

The festive season is in full swing, the invitations are sent, and now it’s time to concentrate on the details that turn a dinner into a dinner party, with our top 25 tips, tricks and trends

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INFORMAL INDULGENCE

At this time of year, every meal becomes a celebration of family and friendship. They don’t all need to be formal, though. We love the relaxed, bistro style of this table, ideal for Christmas Day brunch.

Get the look ‘Pallo’ glass vase by Carina Seth Andersson, £34, Heimelig (heimelig-shop.com). Plates by Birgitta Watz, from £76 each, Artilleriet (artilleriet.se). Washed linen tablecloth, £34.99, H&M (hm.com)


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TIME FOR TEA The classic British tradition gets a makeover with Bethan Gray’s ‘Victoria’ teaset for Editions Milano, made from hand-carved Tuscan Arabescato marble. Teapot, £1,020; teacup and saucer, £528; milk jug, £480; spoons, £312 for two (bethangray.com).

Sandia Chang, chef and sommelier Always make sure your guests have plenty to drink, and don’t spend too much time in the kitchen. You should be entertaining your guests right up until you see them out of the door.

4 T H E A R T O F T H E PA R T Y HOW TO BE AN EXCEPTIONAL HOST

HOW TO BE A WONDERFUL GUEST

1. Prepare in advance Make a note of each attendee’s name and their key interests, the less obvious the better – these are conversational hooks. Work out the links between people with similar interests so that you know who should meet whom. 2. Delegate responsibility Ask your partner or a friend to greet arrivals at the door and serve drinks. 3. Position yourself Make sure you’re standing where people will gather once they’ve picked up a drink. This way, you’re on hand to make introductions. 4. Introduce people Visitors always want to speak to the host – they

1. Do as the host asks Replying to the invitation as soon as you can is a good start. You will have been asked to arrive at a certain time – see that you do. 2. Ask to be introduced Guests can often be left to mingle by themselves nowadays, which can be a struggle – so be proactive and give the host a nudge. 3. Don’t fall into the small talk trap Ask the person you’re speaking to their view on a recent news topic – this gets away from the dull ‘what do you do?’, ‘how did you get here?’ openers and presents an opportunity to express personality.

know them well and want to catch up – but to create a buzz, the most important thing is to get people mingling with each other. 5. Be courteous It’s polite to tell each person something about the other in order for them to create interesting conversation – you want to encourage dialogue without giving too much away. 6. Watch the room Once you’ve made an introduction, move away. Don’t get stuck and spend too much time with one person. The ideal host should be monitoring the room like a waiter, watching to see that everyone is happy.

4. Be attractive to others Those who make an effort to look nice contribute to a party’s success – but being attractive is also about your mood; to have a friendly demeanor is to be a good guest. 5. Don’t try to ‘make an impression’ Participate in others’ conversations rather than taking the limelight. Make sure you are being inclusive and remember to circulate. Think of it as being a player in a team game. 6. Say goodbye graciously Find the host and thank them. Slinking off in the hope they won’t notice is the height of bad manners.

WORDS: SARAH BARRATT, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: PICASA, TIMO JUNTTILA

The importance of actually hosting – introducing guests and ensuring everyone mingles – is often overlooked. Rachel Fay, the UK’s first ‘professional introducer’ (rachelfay.co.uk) shares the skills you need to ensure your next festive soirée will be a roaring social success


Style | E N T E R T A I N I N G

5 INTO THE BLUE

Since cobalt was used to colour Chinese porcelain in the 14th century, blue has been a recurring guest at the dinner table. Today, the decorations may not be as intricate as Chinoiserie or Delftware, but there is still plenty of choice. Here, we select the three best blue and white plates to buy now.

‘Queensland’ dinner plate by Melanie McEvoy, £22, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com)

‘Touch of Blue’ dinner plate by Modus Design, from £11, Heal’s (heals.com)

‘Taika’ dinner plate, £28, Iittala (iittala.com)

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C E L E B R AT E B R I T I S H B U B B LY

The number of acres planted with grapevines in England and Wales has grown by over 100 per cent in the last ten years, according to English Wine Producers – even French Champagne house Tattinger sowed vines in Kent last summer. It’s the perfect excuse to make this the year you serve British bubbles. For an early taster, head to Ridgeview in the South Downs to take the tour and sip its citrussy ‘Bloomsbury’ blend (£27 per bottle; ridgeview.co.uk).

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JACKSON & LEVINE

London’s hottest supperclub duo, Laura Jackson ( far left) and Alice Levine (left) have inspired a generation of foodies to open the doors to their own homes and start cooking for guests. We catch up with them to discuss dinner party dos and don’ts, as well as how to create the right mood… How do you approach decorating a dining room? It’s about creating ambience, which sets the tone for the evening. A few flowers or some greenery and a stylish napkin can transform the most mundane of tables. Be inventive with simple things – we love painting empty mussel or oyster shells gold and using them to hold salt and pepper, or making name cards using mini snow globes or leaves. What are your tabletop must-haves? Coloured glassware – our go-to shops are Habitat and Zara Home. We’re not precious with wine glasses, we prefer non-stemmed glasses, such as beakers or bistro tumblers. Also, tablecloths are important, they can improve the most unsightly of tables. Do you have a pre-event checklist? You need to make sure the crockery and glassware is clean and organised. It will also help if there is an order for the food to be prepped, cooked and served. Get the playlist ready, drinks chilled and cocktails made (early arrivals should expect to be recruited for these last-minute jobs). Give yourself five minutes to get changed before anyone arrives. Any advice on what to serve? Our general rule is to choose a cold starter, hot main and a cold dessert. That way, you’re not in the kitchen all night, and you can enjoy the time with your guests – they have come to see you, after all. How do you create a great party atmosphere? Candles are a must [see the essential guide to festive aromas on p74]. There is nothing more indulgent than walking into a room filled with scent (although avoid anything too heavily floral). Are there any essential tips for first-time hosts? Abundance is key – don’t run out of wine. Serve food on communal platters, as it helps to break the ice, and keep your menu simple. If you’re new to hosting, now isn’t the time to be Heston! Which of your events have been the most memorable? Last year, we hosted three consecutive supperclubs, tweaking the look each night to a different colour theme – dusky pink, dove grey and navy (below and right). Each scheme gave the space a whole new lease of life. What do you enjoy most about hosting? The cacophony of chatter and laughter, glasses being topped up and stories told. jacksonandlevine.com

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FLORAL FLOURISHES Snow-white flowers look more modern than holly and ivy. Be inspired by lifestyle blog My Little Fabric (mylittlefabric.com) and florist Ma Plante Mon Bonheur’s celebration of hellebore – known as the Christmas rose


PICTURE: ALINE CARON

Style | E N T E R T A I N I N G

Get the look For a similar tablecloth, try the ‘Signature Plus’ in ‘Forest Green’, from £4.36, Richard Haworth (richardhaworth.co.uk). Glass water goblets, £2.99 each, Zara Home (zarahome.com). Gold cutlery, from £34.52 for four forks, Cyrillus (cyrillus.com). For similar plates, try the ‘Kuro’ by Also Home, £14 each, Trouva (trouva.com)

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11 W I N C O C K T A I L H O U R Invest in a drinks cabinet with space to store a wealth of liquors and liqueurs

Swoon Editions’ ‘Herning’ is made from acacia with slashes of inlaid brass. £499 (swooneditions.com)

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COOL, CALM AND COLLECTED Add a casual, effortlessly stylish feel to your dinner parties with artisanal touches and natural materials. Murmur’s Portuguese stoneware crockery ( from £9 for a bowl) comes in organic shapes that look inviting in the brand’s three tonal shades of indigo, chartreuse and grey. Pair with its linen ( from £6 for a napkin) that’s been gently crumpled (murmur.co.uk).

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The ‘Toshi’ bar cabinet houses drawers, a bottle rack and shelves. £599, Atkin and Thyme (atkinandthyme.co.uk)

S AY C H E E S E

Tempt your guests with this cheeseboard made of solid walnut with a sterling silver inlay and a silver-topped glass dome – it will dress up any table. Handmade by London-based silversmith Shona Marsh, the design features delicate dial markings, so you’re certain to cut that chunk of Roquefort at just the right angle. £1,760, William & Son (williamandson.com).

Its charcoal colouring and geometric pattern makes the ‘Webster’ drinks cabinet brilliantly alluring. £599, Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.com)


Style | E N T E R T A I N I N G

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HOW TO SET A TABLE Author Chloe Lieske’s new book addresses exactly this question, offering cheerful instructions on how to make each meal stylish. We asked her to share her secrets

A good place to start is with linens – they set the tone of the table. The patterns or colours you pick might influence the plates that you choose. You don’t need lots of things on the table – sometimes the simple option is the most elegant. Also, modern table setting has fewer rules. Don’t get caught up in having the ‘proper’ pieces: play with what you have. Bring out a special serving dish or some vintage china for dessert. Invest in quality cutlery. Sterling silver will last forever and go with any tableware. Pieces with a little weight have a nice feel in the hand. Mixing and matching tableware is big at the moment, either with different sets or vintage finds. The versatility of bowls is also being explored – shallow dishes are standing in for plates and nesting bowls are being used for storage. It’s the finishing touches that make different table settings stand out – things like serving dishes, linens, and centrepieces or floral arrangements. Set the table the night before for a decorative breakfast in the morning. Being able to enjoy a meal without rushing is a real luxury. For more inspiration, read ‘How To Set A Table’ by Chloe Lieske (£9.99, Ebury Press), on sale now

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Natalia Miyar, designer I adore vintage crystal – it reminds me of my glamorous grandmother. I like to mix traditional pieces with modern favourites for a one-of-a-kind festive table.

W I N T E R E N T E R TA I N I N G T I P S

FIONA LEAHY

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: STUDIO 33, ALPHA SMOOT, BETH EVANS

Known for masterminding extravagant occasions for the fashion, art and entertainment worlds, Leahy is an expert on the latest tabletop trends. Here, she shares her advice What’s the first thing to do when planning a party? Always set a theme and develop the aesthetic by using Pinterest or moodboards for inspiration. Also, it may sound boring, but decide on a budget. How do you go about setting a table? I like having groupings of vases and candles to create pockets of interest. Add place settings with names, too. They give a personal touch and make guests feel special. What new styles have caught your eye? I love the idea of ‘matchimalism’, where the tabletop is maximalist and matching at the same time. I choose matching tablecloths, napkins and Christmas crackers. I also think hand-painted, textured plates are having a moment – I love the ‘Geranium’ charger plates at Maison Numen. What’s the best dinner you have been to? My 40th birthday party in Aynhoe Park, Oxfordshire. It was gold themed – the colour is a favourite of mine, as it’s immediately warm and promises a good time. All the guests wore gold and all the decorations were gold, from the objects on the table to the balloons, and the gold leaf on the food. How do you create a great party atmosphere? Music is important. It’s also about inviting a diverse and fun group of friends. A great party atmosphere needs good vibrations! fionaleahy.com

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FRUITS OF THE FOREST Embrace this year’s charming take on tradition with scatterings of nuts and berries. Lifestyle blog Lobster and Swan (lobsterandswan.com) has paired them with table decorations in the shape of woodland animals


PICTURE: JESKA HEARNE/LOBSTERANDSWAN.COM

Style | E N T E R T A I N I N G

Get the look For a similar tablecloth, try Volga Linen (volgalinen.co.uk). ‘Nostalgic Ornaments’ used as favours for guests, £32 for a set of three; ‘Anmut’ teacup, £17.90; saucer, £12; ‘Miss Desiree’ Champagne flutes, £23.50 each; ‘Blacksmith’ hammered cutlery, £259 for a 30-piece set, all Villeroy & Boch (villeroy-boch.co.uk). Beeswax candles, £10 each, The Future Kept (thefuturekept.com)

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Glassware is as important as the drink within it – so invest in a set that will add sparkle to your digestifs. Richard Brendon’s ‘Fluted’ range is a modern take on a classic Art Deco design, with ridges which refract light. Decanter, £235; ‘Old Fashioned’ glasses; from £65 each, ice bucket, £130 (richardbrendon.com).

Margot Henderson, chef When I entertain, I like organised chaos. People feel more relaxed around a little bit of disorder. Guests shouldn’t be scared of the table and the glasses – or of the host! FOUR OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS

From canapés to cocktails, add these delicious dinner party recipes to your repertoire

Party Food by Peter Callahan is filled with recipes for finger food by ‘the king of hors d’oeuvres’ – think adventurous bites such as wasabi macarons. Find ideas to suit buffets and seated dinners (£28, Penguin Random House).

Sharing Plates by Luke Mangan encourages conversation and interaction, with each recipe designed to be shared by the whole table. Perfect for lazy weekend brunches and showstopping suppers (£18.99, Murdoch Books).

Gatherings by Flora Shedden specialises in relaxed recipes, with chapters including ‘food to fling together’ and ‘sweet plates and puds’. Reach for this book if planning a laid-back gettogether (£25, Michell Beazley).

Good Together: Drink & Feast with Mr Lyan and Friends by Ryan Chetiyawardana features recipes for food and cocktails compiled by some of the world’s finest chefs and mixologists (£20, Frances Lincoln).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: JOHNNY MILLER

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AFTER-DINNER DRAMA


Style | E N T E R T A I N I N G

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ATHENA CALDERONE

As her debut recipe book, ‘Cook Beautiful’ (£25, Abrams) makes its way to kitchen shelves, the founder of lifestyle blog Eye Swoon shares her thoughts on decorating for dinner parties and reveals her essential tricks for adding seasonal splendour to cosy winter gatherings

19 D E S I G N E R B L O O M S

Your next on-trend floral centrepiece is just a click away, as big names lend their expertise to postal flower services. Fashion designer Emilia Wickstead has created a pair of brushed metal vases for Flowerbx (above right, from £30 without flowers; flowerbx.com), while celebrated British florist Nikki Tibbles has put together seasonal bouquets for Bloom & Wild (above left, from £40; bloomandwild.com).

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THE MODERN PUNCH BOWL

Cocktail jugs take the stress out of serving elaborate drinks – guests can just top themselves up. Dressed with herbs and berries, this simple glass version from The White Company looks delicious. Jug with stirrer, £45; ‘Belgravia’ tumblers, £25 for a set of four (thewhitecompany.com).

Why is the way a dining space looks so important? Our eyes are what first draw us into an environment – aesthetics produce an evening’s ambience. I always try to create a feast for the senses when I gather with guests around the table. What are your tabletop decorating essentials? An artful and alluring space is the overall aim – so you need a cohesive colour palette, layered with texture. In designing the experience, I love to play with opposition to create intrigue, pairing something sleek with something that has a time-worn patina, or mixing metals. A touch of the handmade is always appreciated at the table, but this doesn’t need to be complicated – ‘simple ideas with thoughtful execution’ is my motto. How do you make a table look inviting? At this time of year, it’s dark, lush scenes – they are the perfect antidote to the chill of winter. A key ingredient to making the table feel welcoming is warmth, so heat up the atmosphere both visually and literally – a flickering flame makes any dinner feel luxurious. Any simple ideas for creating contemporary table settings? I’ve noticed natural elements, such as fruits and vegetables, being used in lieu of flowers recently. Incorporate winter-abundant varieties – place pomegranates or olive branches down the centre of the table in place of a garland, or tie bundles of fragrant winter herbs together and place one on top of each guest’s dinner plate. Do you have any advice for hosting winter soirées? There is something seriously magical about a winter meal! Focus on creating a convivial environment that entices guests to linger for hours. Invite the season onto the table – create a signature cocktail using a seasonal ingredient, such as grapefruit. Add an overflowing cheeseboard and abundant red wine. What’s more important, the food or the space? They absolutely must work in tandem to be successful. The one enhances the other, creating a memorable and all-encompassing experience. eye-swoon.com

Turn over to discover how to steal one of Athena Calderone’s table looks…

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MIDNIGHT FEAST

PICTURE: JOHNNY MILLER

Make a virtue of this season’s long, dark nights (more time for revelry!) by setting your table with moody, atmospheric colours. Blogger and author Athena Calderone has chosen black plates, cutlery and linen

Get the look ‘Orkney’ tablecloth, £99; napkins, from £15 each, all Rough Linen (roughlinen.com). Dinner plates, from £35 each, Speck and Stone (speckandstone.com). ‘Duna’ matt black cutlery by Cutipol, £315 for a 24-piece set, Amara (amara.com). ‘Blackline’ wooden serving board, from £133, Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co (blackcreekmt.com)

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W I N T E R E N T E R TA I N I N G T I P S

SUNDAY SUPPERS

We talk to Karen Mordechai, founder of Brooklyn-based ‘food and design community’ Sunday Suppers, about how to throw a pared-back, stylish dinner party. Her third book, ‘Simple Fare: Fall and Winter’ is out now (£25, Abrams) What kind of mood do you go for with your table styling? I like creating calm spaces that help people to feel comfortable and enjoy spending time with each other, which is what a good meal is about. How do you set the table for a winter dinner? We like to keep it simple and straightforward, using a mix of ceramics in a variety of tones and textures. Layering whites or neutral tones works well, and bring the outside in with some seasonal greens – you can lay them onto the tablecloth or set a small sprig at each table setting. What do you serve at festive events? We prepare our meals in tune with the seasons. In winter, that means comfort – so our meals tend to be heartier and more nourishing. Serving something like a big bowl of squid ink pasta alongside some crusty bread can be brilliantly dramatic. Do you have one top hosting tip? Give yourself ample time to get everything ready. If you are having a lot of guests over, have a prep day. Preparing the components of each dish is more important than actually cooking them. You want everything to be as fresh as possible, so try not to cook until the day of the dinner. sunday-suppers.com

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ED REEVE, PAUL WINCH-FURNESS, JENNIFER CAUSEY

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Samyukta Nair, chef With our fast-paced lives, it’s nice to make the time to break bread with near and dear ones. I like to keep my dinner parties small, never more than eight, so that everyone gets to chat.

25 IF ALL ELSE FAILS… BOOK A PRIVATE DINING ROOM These three venues offer the perfect party space without any of the cooking or cleaning

Daphne’s, west London This Chelsea restaurant’s conservatory, redesigned by architecture practice Martin Brudnizki, allows up to 40 guests to dine in luxury (daphnes-restaurant.co.uk).

The Bothy, Glasgow Waiters in kilts serve modern dishes in this venue’s superlatively cosy upstairs dining room, which seats 22. Candles and an open fire set the scene (bothyglasgow.co.uk).

Bistrotheque, east London Decorate this brasserie’s private dining space, with space for up to 90 guests, however you wish. The team can even book a pianist to play the Baby Grand (bistrotheque.com).  JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 71


Style | E N T E R T A I N I N G

THE SCENT OF CHRISTMAS symbolised the ability of light to drive out darkness. A constant What does Christmas smell like? Cinnamon, oranges, burning logs and rich mulled wine are all probable answers. We eagerly fire was also a rare freedom and luxury special to Christmas, which, for most people, would have been the main holiday of the year. anticipate all of these festive aromas and, at a time of year when we’re likely to have lots of guests, we hope that our homes pass the Seen from this perspective, our love of woody scents takes on seasonal sniff test. Sales of home fragrance go through the roof in a whole new dimension. Diptyque’s limited edition ‘Feu d’Agrumes’ December – up a staggering 430 per cent on the September average candle is a modern incarnation of an old custom, evoking fragrant at John Lewis – and it’s not just because most of us are stumped orange rind tossed into the flames of an open fire. for imaginative gift ideas. Brands such as Jo Malone and Diptyque If the Yule log was partly about festive extravagance, the use now offer up their annual celebratory candles to customers as an of spices was entirely so. Cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and vanilla absolutely essential part of the Yuletide experience. But why are were rare and expensive in medieval and Elizabethan times, and so were only really used as a special Christmas treat in mulled wine we so attracted to traditional Christmas scents? Science, history and psychology all play a role. Part of the reason and spiced cakes. Although these luxurious spices have become we gravitate towards the smell of wood fires, more commonplace, they still evoke a sense spices and winter greenery at Christmas of festive warmth and comfort, which is why is chemistry, explains Michael Donovan, spices are such popular ingredients in home FOUR OF THE BEST founder of lifestyle store Roullier White. scents at this time of year. The ‘Joyeux Noël’ FESTIVE CANDLES ‘Smell travels via evaporation through the candle by Frédéric Malle is one of the most air. In warm weather, this happens quickly, interesting examples – combining cinnamon, ‘Green Almond so lighter scents such as citrus are potent. amber and pine with an unexpected note & Redcurrant’ However, in cold weather, there is much less of candyfloss, it suggests Christmas trees, candle, £120, evaporation, and fragrances need to be more open fires and spiced cake, all at the same time. Jo Malone (jomalone.co.uk) intense for us to be able to smell them.’ One question remains: now that we have Equally powerful in shaping our choice thousands of Christmas scents in the form of winter scents is a web of historical customs. of candles and diffusers to choose from, how The practice of decorating with evergreen do we make sure our homes reflect our ‘Joyeux Noël’ candle, £60, plants reached its peak in medieval times, favourites and smell celebration-ready at all Frédéric Malle when holly, bay, ivy, laurel and rosemary times? Roullier White’s Michael Donovan (fredericmalle.com) were regarded as symbols of enduring life burns the pine-scented ‘Cypres’ candle by in the deep midwinter. The fact that many Rigaud in his hallway (always lit about half of these winter plants were strongly aromatic an hour before guests arrive) and has diffusers ‘Nazareth’ candle was simply an added bonus. in his kitchen and bathroom ‘for a consistent by Cire Trudon, Traditionally, this winter greenery was amount of scent’ in the background. He also £78, Selfridges burned at the end of the Christmas period to recommends having a room spray as a back(selfridges.com) avoid bringing bad luck on the household. up plan if you forget to light the candles early It also produced a wonderful smell. And this enough, as they work instantly. is where our second main seasonal scent The main thing to remember, however, is ‘Feu d’Agrumes’ obsession comes in – the log fire. The Yule that all fragrances – not just Christmassy ones candle, from log was once made of real timber rather than – are bound up with memory. ‘What we are £28, Diptyque chocolate, and selected on Christmas Eve trying to do is to create new scent memories (diptyqueparis.co.uk) to provide enough fuel for the entire festive for ourselves and loved ones,’ says Donovan. season. Keeping the log fire burning bright That sounds like a tradition worth keeping. 72 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD ILLUSTRATION: BABETH LAFON

Home fragrance takes on added significance at this time of year, when aromas of pine trees, spices and log fires abound. Here, we explore the stories behind our favourite festive candles


MELBOUR NE • CONEGLI A NO • LYON • CA PE TOW N • V ENICE • L A KE TA HOE

HOMES

Our New Year’s resolution is to inspire you to live more luxuriously. Of course, luxury has many interpretations – from understated monochrome opulence in Italy to all-out French splendour, this month’s homes have it all…


I n f i n ite splendou r This grand French apartment is proof that it is possible to combine luxurious period features with contemporary living Words TRISH LORENZ Photography FELIX FOREST/ LIVING INSIDE

Living room A ‘Chemise XL’ sofa by Piero Lissoni for Lema and tables by Living Divani, Carl Hansen & Søn and Atipico add a modern touch to this space. The rugs are by Maison Hand and the table lamp is the ‘Mantis BS3’ by Bernard Schottlander for DCW Éditions Stockist details on p153 ➤


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his 380-square-metre five-bedroom, five-bathroom apartment sits on a square in the heart of Lyon’s prestigious Ainay District. It is home to Dominique Chevalier and her nine-year-old daughter Mathilde. When Dominique found the apartment, which dates back to 1851, it was run down and in need of love. She worked with Pierre Emmanuel Martin and Stéphane Garotin, the French duo behind design consultancy and interiors brand Maison Hand, to restore it to its former glory and, following a sixmonth renovation, moved in March 2014. Luxurious in the grandest sense of the word, the apartment has vast rooms with high ceilings, tall French windows, intricate cornicing, wood panelling and beautiful parquet floors. ‘Everything here is oversized, from the dimensions of the rooms to the number of windows,’ says Pierre Emmanuel. ‘Nobody builds houses like this today.’ Despite the evident grandeur, Dominique and Maison Hand have eschewed formality to create a liveable, contemporary home. ‘Dominique wanted to create an interior that felt bourgeois, but not too serious,’ says Pierre Emmanuel. ‘She wanted something that was a bit relaxed.’ To achieve that brief, Maison Hand used sumptuous materials, including linen, marble and dark wood, and added modern touches, such as the largely monochrome palette and the dramatic curving steel staircase that leads from the bedroom to the en-suite. The layout was also adapted to make the space function more effectively for modern living. As the old kitchen was a small, windowless space, the former dining room was converted into a convivial eat-in kitchen. ‘I love it now, with its bespoke cabinetry and balance of dark and light marble,’ says Dominique. Working with architect Michel Bessoud, Maison Hand also relocated the main bedroom to the front of the apartment to take advantage of the private balcony. Although this is a very refined home, it is not a house for lavish entertaining. Dominique prefers small gatherings of friends and spending time with her daughter. ‘There’s an intimate spot to sit by the fireplace and a room for watching TV while remaining close to the inviting kitchen. We have a long dining table in the living room for larger sit-down dinners, but we don’t use it much – normally it’s just a place to display flowers,’ she says. Sometimes, the greatest luxury of all is a house that works perfectly for you. maison-hand.com

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Dining area The table, from the St-Paul Home collection, is surrounded by ‘Wishbone’ chairs by Hans J Wegner from Carl Hansen & Søn. The floor lamp is the ‘Oda Big’ by Sebastian Herkner for Pulpo Opposite This armchair, from the Gervasoni ‘Gray’ collection, is paired with a side table from Snowdrops Copenhagen’s ‘Sky’ collection and vases from House Doctor Stockist details on p153 ➤


The apartment is luxurious in the grandest sense of the word: vast, rooms, high ceilings, wood panelling and beautiful parquet floors

Above An elegant and contemporary Editions Serge Mouille wall light sits above a ‘Long Island’ sideboard designed by Christophe Pillet for Lema – the perfect place to display art and treasures Kitchen The cabinetry is bespoke, commissioned from Modulis. Marble countertops, also by Modulis, up the luxury factor. The gold taps are by Arne Jacobsen from Vola (try Panik Design in the UK). The dramatic pendant light is the ‘Light Ring’ by Henge (available at Global Luxury London) Stockist details on p153 ➤

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A largely monochrome palette and sumptuous materials, such as marble and dark wood, add a modern touch to this period home

Kitchen This informal dining table is hewn from dark marble. It was designed by Maison Hand and made by Modulis. The stools are the ‘Wendela’ by Serener for Functionals Above A bespoke curved iron staircase, designed by the homeowner, is one of the many modern additions to this period property. It leads from the main bedroom to the upstairs en-suite and dressing room Stockist details on p153 ➤

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HOW TO CREATE A LUXE LOOK

Pierre Emmanuel Martin from Maison Hand shares his design secrets Space is the real luxury. Find ways to maximise it. In the living room of this house, the mirrors face each other to create a sensation of infinity. It is almost like the Hall of Mirrors in the Palace of Versailles. Respect the origins of the house and work to preserve the feel of the property. We spent a lot of time renovating the spectacular parquet flooring. The panelling in the living room was restored with gold leaf. Create a layout that reflects your lifestyle. We changed the house around to create cosy nooks for Dominique and her daughter. Make the most of materials. Marble, stone and wood can really up the luxury factor.

Bedroom South facing, this space is flooded with light. The Hans J Wegner ‘Shell’ chair from Carl Hansen & Søn and Editions Serge Mouille floor lamp are positioned in front of an artwork by Gerd Pfeiffer. The desk is by Sarah Lavoine and the rug, designed by Maison Hand, was handmade in Morocco Stockist details on p153

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a n e t i n e V delights The city’s rich history meets the ultimate in modern elegance in this exquisite Venice apartment Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography CAROLA RIPAMONTI

Opposite A burnt-sienna wall with curved eucalyptus-wood boiserie towers over a pair of ‘618’ chairs by Carlo Scarpa and cork side tables from Vitra in the communal hallway Left The colours and culture of the city have all influenced the design of this home Stockist details on p153 ➤


Entrance hall A chandelier by Commute Design presides over a colourful sideboard by Finn Juhl (available at Nest) and ‘Bench One’ by Another Country, upholstered in Kvadrat’s ‘Pillar’ fabric Stockist details on p153 ➤


alls the colour of Venice’s canals, Murano glass lamps and accents of brass are just a few of the jewels in this luxurious, highly contemporary apartment, located in a 19th-century property overlooking a narrow canal in Sestiere San Marco. A former office, the listed building had very few original features remaining when its redesign began, the exception being its ornate parquet flooring. This gave architects Andrea Marcante and Adelaide Testa virtually free creative rein. Inside, the apartment is eclectic and decadent: the pair combined mid-century and modern-day pieces with strong nods to the work of the Memphis Group, 1970s design and Art Deco. Luxurious pieces – from a velvet upholstered bench by Another Country to brass kitchen cabinets – combine with rainbow-coloured furniture, including Finn Juhl’s 1950s sideboard and Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Shimmer’ coffee table for Glas Italia. ‘Italian design is smart and elegant, but also fun,’ says Andrea. An entrance area with a black wooden floor leads to the living room, its doorway surrounded by a bright crimson metal frame that snakes throughout the apartment visually connecting its rooms. ‘We chose a strong, Venetian red, as favoured by the Renaissance painters,’ says Andrea. ‘It’s quite common in local architecture.’ The two bedrooms feature bedspreads made from Rubelli fabrics that mirror the traditional Venetian flecked terrazzo floors and the graphic details of the apartment’s crimson framework. In the living room, by way of contrast, an elegant brass structure frames the fenestration. ‘Windows are traditionally quite small in Venetian homes and, as this is a listed building, there was little we could do about it,’ says Andrea. ‘The brass frame enlarges them, and enhances their relationship with the cityscape.’ Similarly, Murano glass lamps in various colours have been used to reflect the light that shimmers across the canals at twilight. Andrea and Adelaide have worked their magic on the entire building, including the communal stairwell, which now creates a striking first impression. The grey walls are painted with linear designs, a modern version of the architrave that would have once adorned the space. A seating area, which overlooks gondolas passing by on the canal, sits beneath an extraordinary double-height wall rendered in burnt sienna, with curved, sculptured boiserie in eucalyptus wood. Andrea describes it as a ‘smoker’s corner’. ‘It’s a big hallway, so we asked ourselves how we could make the best use of it and incorporate the amazing view,’ says Andrea. ‘It’s rare to find such a contemporary interior in Venice. We have tried to create a new relationship with the city for the homeowners – one that meets their needs, but still reflects its history and culture.’ marcante-testa.it; uda.it

‘For the metal frame we chose a Venetian red, as favoured by the Renaissance painters. It’s quite common in local architecture’

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Dining area A Le Corbusier ‘LC15’ table (available at Aram Store) dominates the room, surrounded by Konstantin Grcic’s ‘Rival’ chairs for Artek (available at Viaduct) whose colour reflects the red metal framework of the door. The ‘Flow[T]’ pendant lights above the table are by Nao Tamura at WonderGlass Stockist details on p153 ➤


Living room The ‘Shimmer’ coffee tables by Patricia Urquiola for Glas Italia (available at Twentytwentyone) and ‘Lake Green’ rug by Raw Edges for Golran are a counterpoint to the dusky shades of the room. A Serge Mouille floor lamp stands beside two ‘Digamma’ armchairs by Ignazio Gardella from Santa & Cole Stockist details on p153 ➤


Kitchen Constructed from eucalyptus wood and brass, the units and fridge doors were designed by Marcante-Testa and realised by Materia Designs and Om Project. They feature worktops made of black ‘Polaris’ by Abet Laminati Opposite Mini Moderns’ ‘Vanessa’ wallpaper decorates both the kitchen and hallway Stockist details on p153 ➤


Bathroom Custom-made cabinet is topped by a pastel blue Bette washbasin and taps from Bellosta. The ‘Randaccio’ mirror is by Giò Ponti, and the black ‘Alouette’ wall light by Atelier Areti Bedroom A red, twisted-metal bed frame mimics the metal detailing that threads the apartment together Stockist details on p153


CALIFORNIA DREAMING Rural but utterly refined, this Lake Tahoe home is a masterful Modernist mix of marble, concrete and cedar wood, which is framed by scenic forest vistas

Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

Photography JOE FLETCHER/OTTO


merica’s Sierra Nevada mountains seduce skiers from all over the world, including one London-based family who visited for a one-off adventure holiday and, seven years later, have built a house here. Having snapped up a desirable lakeside plot of land, they asked Faulkner Architects to design the retreat, which they wanted to use for extended stays, as well as for hosting friends and family. ‘The H-shaped house’s design follows patterns of light, shade, slope and shelter,’ says lead architect Greg Faulkner. A pair of two-storey ‘sheds’, each containing six bedrooms, are linked by a double-height communal space built principally of glass, through which daylight streams and shifts throughout the day. ‘We wanted to weave the house into the existing topography,’ Faulkner explains, ‘for the light, building and landscape to respond to one another.’ In terms of volume, this meant they could play with scale. The kitchen and dining space’s ceiling soars to more than four metres, yet doesn’t make it a third of the way up the cedar, fir, aspen and pine trees it rubs shoulders with. During blizzards, this space is the warm, calm eye of the storm, surrounded by snowfall on all sides, but rendered cosy by the low fireplace. See even more of this When it came to materials, Faulkner and contemporary mountain the couple chose to clad the house in cedar, retreat, plus our edit of which they blackened in the Japanese shou the world’s most beautiful sugi ban style, scorching it on-site. This countryside homes, in gives the timber a patina, links the house ELLE Decoration Country to its arboreal environment and, more Volume 11, on sale now. pragmatically, protects it from forest fires. For more inspiration, Tahoe-based interior designer Sarah Jones follow us on Twitter installed Californian walnut flooring to and Facebook make true Faulkner’s vision that ‘here, @ELLEDecoCountry outside is inside and inside is outside’. Breaking up the architecture’s clean lines, an almost-cosmic Bocci chandelier floats over the dining table and glowing pendant lights by New York studio Niche Design hang in the kitchen. In the living room, a soft rug from artisan specialist Tufenkian leads to dove-grey B&B Italia sofas, perfect for sinking into after a long day on the slopes. faulknerarchitects.com; sarahjonesinteriordesign.com Living room The travertine-clad fireplace is the focus of this space. A B&B Italia sofa and pair of armchairs frame the log fire and sit on a custom-made Tufenkian rug. Interior designer Sarah Jones designed the coffee table in glass and walnut. The two floor lamps are the ‘Charlton’ by Aerin, available at Circa Lighting Stockist details on p153 ➤

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DURING BLIZZARDS, THIS SPACE IS THE WARM, CALM EYE OF THE STORM, SURROUNDED BY SNOW BUT RENDERED COSY BY THE FIREPLACE Opposite The architect introduced concrete to create a contemporary but natural interior scheme (fabricated by Calibrated Concrete Construction). The backdrop perfectly frames this dramatic custom-made blackened-steel staircase with walnut treads. At the edge of the living room sits a grey leather chair and ottoman from Minotti Above The concrete-clad foyer is overlooked by ceiling beams. A simple walnut bench is suspended in front of the window and creates a seat with breathtaking views of the forest. Above it hangs a Bocci light suspended from copper wire Stockist details on p153 ➤

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Dining area A Lindsey Adelman ‘Branching’ chandelier crowns the dining area. The table and chairs are by New York-based company Desiron Kitchen This small seating area is accented by the ‘Circular 3’ chandelier with ‘Pod’ pendants by Niche Modern Stockist details on p153 ➤

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Bathroom A ‘Le Soleil’ lamp by Foscarini is suspended above a ‘Barcelona’ tub by Victoria +Albert and a Kallista floor-standing tap (available from West One Bathrooms) Bedroom The grey upholstered chair is by Viccarbe from furniture store Lepere in New York, and the ‘Bubble’ pendant light in the window is by George Nelson (try Nest) Stockist details on p153

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CALIFORNIAN WALNUT FLOORING MAKES TRUE FAULKNER’S VISION THAT ‘HERE, OUTSIDE IS INSIDE AND INSIDE IS OUTSIDE’


SYM PH O NY OF LIVING Composed with a rhythmic approach to colour and space, this Melbourne home is part design showroom, part family retreat Words AMY BRADFORD Photography SHARYN CAIRNS

n surveying this calm, elegant home in Melbourne’s Toorak Village, you are struck by the balanced interplay of black, white and grey shades, and by the subtle touches of luxury in the form of marble and brass accents. The smallest detail appears to have been carefully considered, right down to the symmetrical pairings of objects and furniture in the hallway. This sensitivity to tone is no accident, for Gillianne Griffiths, the interior architect behind the design, previously enjoyed a career in the music world. ‘Like music, design involves combining shapes and composing rhythms to produce a harmonious outcome,’ she explains. Gillianne’s clients were property developers Jonathan Ji and U-Fhern Chang, who share the four-bedroom home with their one-year-old daughter, Juliette. When they bought the house, they needed to strike a balance between formality and relaxation, as they intended to use their new home for work as well as for family time. Gillianne’s solution was a sensitive renovation that contrasts light, bright communal spaces with darker, moodier private zones. ‘Jonathan and U-Fhern entertain clients regularly, and they wanted to show off what they can do as property developers,’ says Gillianne, who created a formal sitting room in which to host meetings at the opposite end of the house from the more relaxed family lounge, dining area and kitchen. The rooms on public view are predominantly white with dark-toned furniture, but Gillianne turned this balance on its head in the bedroom and study, where inky blue-black walls create a more cocooning feel. She also laid grey carpet in the bedrooms and on the firstfloor landing, which strikes a different note to the oak parquet flooring at ground level. Jonathan and U-Fhern are delighted with their new home, so much so that they are planning to work with Gillianne in a professional context in the future. Like a fine musical performance, this design partnership is too good to be performed just once. studiogriffiths.com.au

Hallway This area is designed as a formal, elegant room in its own right. The black-stained oak ‘New York’ sideboard is by Australian brand Grazia & Co, and the ‘Orbit’ brass and marble table lamp is by American lighting company Workstead (available from Another Country in the UK). The painting is Blue Lines by Terri Brooks, available from the Flinders Lane Gallery in Melbourne Stockist details on p153 ➤


Dining area/kitchen GamFratesi’s ‘Beetle’ chairs for Gubi surround the table. The ‘Heracleum II’ pendant light by Bertjan Pot for Moooi is available from Utility Design. The artwork is by a friend of the family, artist Athena Bangwu. The bespoke-designed kitchen features an island in ‘Portsea Grey’ limestone – try Lapicida for a selection of grey stones. For similar bar stools, try the ‘Offcut’ design by Tom Dixon Stockist details on p153 ➤


Living area This room is an informal place for the family to relax. The ‘Togo’ sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset is a classic 1970s piece, designed for comfort, and surrounds the ‘Flower Mono’ coffee table by Christine Schwarzer for Swedese. The ‘Hawaii’ mirror is by Australian company Misura – for similar, try the ‘Sweet’ series by Gervasoni. The TV blends in beautifully with the display shelves, which are made from the same timber veneer as the kitchen cabinets at the other end of the space Stockist details on p153 ➤


This page An ‘Anoon’ drinks trolley from By Lassen (available from Connox) sits below a series of sculptures by artist Iva Viana, bought from Melbourne gallery Figgoscope Curates Opposite The formal living room is furnished with a ‘Ruché’ armchair by Inga Sempé for Ligne Roset and a rug by Australian brand Halcyon Lake (Cristian Zuzunaga’s ‘Digit’ rugs for Woven are similar). The ‘IC F2’ floor lamp is by Michael Anastassiades for Flos (available at Nest) Stockist details on p153 ➤

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‘LIKE MUSIC, DESIGN INVOLVES COMPOSING RHYTHMS TO PRODUCE A HARMONIOUS OUTCOME’


Bathroom A Cristalplant bathtub and Elba marble wall and floor tiles are set against black fittings to create a pure look in this en-suite. Antonio Lupi’s ‘Baia’ bathtub at West One Bathrooms is similar. For marble tiles, visit Domus, and for black sanitaryware, try Vola Main bedroom At either side of the bed stand brass ‘Lektor’ table lamps by Niclas Hoflin for Rubn, available at Twentytwentyone. For a similar throw, try John Hanly at Liberty Stockist details on p153

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THE BALANCED INTERPLAY OF BLACK, WHITE AND GREY SHADES IS HEIGHTENED BY SMALL TOUCHES OF LUXURY


Words FLAVIA GIORGI Photography GIORGIO POSSENTI

Coloured marble is the ultimate decorative luxury. Use it in artistic new ways, as shown in this Milanese apartment

H E A R T O F S TO N E


Home to Gabriele Salvatori, CEO of the eponymous family-run Italian brand that specialises in beautiful marble, this apartment in Brera, a fashionable district in Milan, is testament to the artistic possibilities of this most luxurious of materials. Designed by long-time Salvatori collaborator, architect and stylist Elisa Ossino, the interior marries a respect for the original period features of the property with a love of pushing the boundaries of design. ‘Our idea was to really highlight the use of marble,’ she says. ‘Salvatori’s world revolves around it, and this space was the perfect place to experiment.’ (salvatori.it) Living room (left and previous spread) Two artworks created by Elisa Ossino using white Bianco Carrara, pink Rosa Portogallo, green Verde Alpi and yellow Travertino Giallo marbles dominate this room. The ‘Love Me, Love Me Not’ Noir St Laurent marble coffee table by Michael Anastassides is topped with stone bottles from the ‘Omaggio a Morandi’ collection, also by Elisa Ossino for Salvatori. The red sofa is the ‘Ile Club’ by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani, while the small ‘Dritto’ side table (left) is also by Lissoni, for Salvatori. The chairs are a fibreglass design by Merat and a bowl-shaped seat with leather straps by Bo Bardi Above An ‘LC7’ chair by Charlotte Perriand for Cassina sits in the hallway, and in the corner of the living room there’s a ‘Trunk’ daybed by David Lopez Quincoces for Living Divani, with a ‘Love Me, Love Me Not’ Verde Alpi marble side table by Michael Anastassiades for Salvatori Stockist details on p153 ➤

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ORIGINAL ARTWORKS AND EXQUISITE MARQUETRY DISPLAY THE EXCITING DECORATIVE POSSIBILITIES OF MARBLE

Kitchen The cabinets are a geometric work of inlaid marquetry, designed by Elisa Ossino and made using a range of coloured marbles. The countertop is grey veined Gris du Marais marble. Crafted from Rosa Portagallo marble, the dining table is part of the ‘Love Me, Love Me Not’ collection by Michael Anastassiades, while the chairs are the ‘MHC.3 Miss’ design by Tobia Scarpa for Molteni & C Bathroom Salvatori’s ‘Tratti’ tiles by Elisa Ossino are interspersed with rods of black aluminium to create a play of textures. The ‘Archimede Rectangle’ mirrors are also by Ossino, as are the Carrara marble accessories from the ‘Fontane Bianche’ range and the taps, designed for Salvatori and Fantini Rubinetti Bedroom When working on the interior for this apartment, Elisa Ossino aimed to create a dialogue between warm and cool colours. Here, the deep teal hue of the walls brings out the shades in the original terrazzo flooring Stockist details on p153

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STEP Words AMY BRADFORD Photography GREG COX/BUREAUX/LIVING INSIDE Styling SVEN ALBERDING

BEYOND

ONE

Compact but cleverly designed to optimise its laid-back, luxurious feel, this Cape Town home is elevated by stylish materials and vibrant colour


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t seems entirely appropriate that the two-bedroom Cape Town home shared by furniture importer Craig TaborRaeside and his lawyer husband Christian should have been designed over the dinner table. They love to entertain friends in their open-plan living area, or on the huge roof terrace, which offers panoramic views of the city. Craig, whose company Créma imports European design brands such as Hay, Tom Dixon and Vitra to South Africa, first bought the house in 2006 and rented it out for a few years before deciding to remodel it to suit his own style. He enlisted the help of a friend, Chris van Niekerk of The Fold Architects, to create a ‘warm and modern’ layout for the building, which was arrived at very informally, ‘over good food and drink’. In the end, the only part of the original 1980s house that was retained was the rendered façade – absolutely everything else is new. Chris was given carte blanche. ‘I love his work, so I didn’t really give him a detailed brief,’ Craig recalls. ‘My only request was the vertical garden in the alleyway that separates our house from next door. We’re in the middle of the city, so there was no other way for me to have a garden.’ There is, however, a spacious terrace on the roof, complete with pagoda and swimming pool, that’s always in use when the weather is

good. The house’s welcoming atmosphere is hinted at even before you get inside the front door, thanks to the bright red masonry. This was matched to ‘Marsala’, Pantone’s Colour of the Year in 2015 (chosen to mark the year Craig and Christian moved in). ‘Historically, this area was known for its multicoloured houses – each one is different,’ says Craig, who added a selection of exotic plants for an even bolder look. Indoors, the décor reflects Craig and Christian’s taste for contemporary, refined design, with lighting by Tom Dixon and furniture by Danish brands Gubi and Hay. ‘To me, luxury is about fine materials such as marble, leather and brass, as well as the rareness of an object,’ says Craig, whose prize finds include a set of original 1950s dining chairs by Norman Cherner. ‘I like things that are timeless or difficult to find. Comfort is really important to me, too, and we’ve expressed that through the easy, open flow of this space.’ Where does the couple spend most time? ‘The kitchen. It’s the first thing you see when you come into the house and, for us, it’s the heart of any home. Everyone ends up in here.’ With the house’s lush vertical garden adding a splash of green just beyond the windows, we can see why – this abode is a real urban oasis. crema.co.za; thefold.co.za

Exterior Craig Tabor-Raeside (left) and his husband Christian outside their home, painted in Pantone’s 2015 Colour of the Year, ‘Marsala’ Ground floor Cement floors and an architectural steel staircase add character to this open-plan space. The slatted steel walkway on the landing above allows light to flood down from a skylight in the roof Stockist details on p153 ➤

126 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018


Living room Furnished with a huge corner sofa, which was bought locally (B&B Italia’s ‘Charles’ by Antonio Citterio is similar) and a bespoke rug by Moooi Carpets, this space is brilliantly inviting. Behind the sofa stands a ‘Drumbox’ lamp by Diesel for Foscarini. The ‘Masculo’ chairs are by GamFratesi for Gubi, as are the ‘TS’ marble-topped coffee tables. The brass ‘Slit’ side table, in a mirror finish, is by Hay. On the wall is a pair of photographs by Kenyan photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo Stockist details on p153 ➤

JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 129


Dining area A steel ‘Foundry’ table by South African designer Gregor Jenkin is surrounded by walnut ‘Cherner’ chairs, designed by Norman Cherner in 1958 (available at The Conran Shop). The ‘Plane Round’ and ‘Plane Triangle’ lights are by Tom Dixon Kitchen Designed by German brand Blum, the cast-concrete island and steel and granite worktops look sleek and modern, as do the ‘Slab’ bar stools and ‘Stone’ marble pendant light, both by Tom Dixon Stockist details on p153 ➤

130 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018


‘To me, luxury is about fine materials such as marble, leather and brass, as well as the rareness of an object’

Bedrooms This wooden bed frame is handmade and stands out against the room’s black walls (try Farrow & Ball’s ‘Off-Black’). Above it hangs an artwork which depicts the Sani Pass in South Africa. A patterned green cushion, bought on a trip to Tokyo (try the ‘Lucienne Day’ collection at John Lewis for similar) adds colour. The ‘Strap’ mirror (above) is by Hay and the map of Africa fashioned from book pages (situated in the guest bedroom, right) was picked up at a local market Stockist details on p153

132 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018


QUIET BRILLIANCE

Luxe living does not always equal extravagance. As this Italian home shows, a restrained palette and clean-cut lines can be equally indulgent

Words JACKIE DALY Photography MADS MOGENSEN Production MARTIN HUNGLINGER

Living room Simply furnished with a ‘Charles’ sofa by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia, as well as a ‘Tolomeo’ floor lamp by Michele De Lucchi and Giancarlo Fassina for Artemide and a custom-made black oak console by Falegnameria Vancini Donato, this is a calm space Stockist details on p153 ➤


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he rolling countryside around Conegliano, a small Italian hill town close to the city of Venice, is known for producing Prosecco (among other wines). The green foothills of the Alps, which rise majestically at the edge of the vineyards, form a protective barrier around the area, creating optimum growing conditions for the grapes. It is here, on a plot encircled by a huge 4,000-square-metre secluded garden, that Massimo Formenton of the architectural practice Parisotto + Formenton has built a Modernist home with a simple and elegant aesthetic. The house is beautifully refined, from the clean lines of the building to the monochrome palette of the interior. The rigorously minimal scheme was inspired by the homeowners, who wanted a ‘quiet and simple’ home; a space reduced to its essence, with no clutter or fuss. The layout was conceived around the traditional Japanese idea of open yet connected rooms, each of them furnished sparingly and with care. All necessary items are stored away in closets, which were specially designed to work as the only visual partitions between living areas. This pared-back decoration gives the space an airy ambience, with a focus on the quality of the materials used. Different textures, from the grain of the dark wood to the patina of the concrete, are the only ornamentation required. Indeed, Formenton describes the concrete walls as ‘alive – in no need of decoration’. United by a joint passion for exploring the mountains and entertaining friends at home, the homeowners also required a property that suited their indoor-outdoor lifestyle. With large seating and dining areas situated on the covered patios that surround this home, there’s a real sense of openness. Fittingly for a house located in a wine region, it also includes a well-stocked cellar, with a fridge that can store many different varieties of wine, all at the ideal temperature. Whether you want to enjoy a glass of Malbec in front of the fire or sip a Sauvignon Blanc on the patio, this home is the perfect, sophisticated setting. studioparisottoeformenton.it

136 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018


QUIET AND SIMPLE IN DESIGN, THIS IS A HOME REDUCED TO ITS ESSENCE, WITHOUT CLUTTER OR FUSS

Exterior Architect Massimo Formenton stands on one of this home’s patios, in front of the building’s streamlined façade Above A ‘Cicognino’ side table by Franco Albini for Cassina is placed in front of the fireplace. The painting beside the fire is a work by Italian artist Romeo Michelotto Stockist details on p153 ➤


EVERYTHING IS REFINED, FROM THE CLEAN LINES OF THE BUILDING TO THE MONOCHROME PALETTE OF THE INTERIOR

Seating area Displayed on the console behind the sofa is a selection of vase by Rina Menardi Kitchen Handleless cabinets by Bulthaup complement the simple lines of the table Stockist details on p153 ➤

138 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018


Dining area The ‘Xilos’ table by Antoni Citterio for Maxalto (available at B&B Italia) is paired with ‘Luisa’ chairs by Franco Albini for Cassina. The oversized pendant light is the ‘Sonora’ by Vico Magistretti for Oluce Stockist details on p153 ➤


THE CONCRETE WALLS ARE ‘ALIVE – IN NO NEED OF DECORATION’, RELYING INSTEAD ON THEIR BEAUTIFUL TEXTURE

Bedroom Concrete walls create a sedate tone, while the tabletop version of the ‘Tolomeo’ lamp by Artemide and a B&B Italia bed are the stars of this scheme Stockist details on p153

142 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2018


ELLE Decoration, the style magazine for your home, brings you the world’s most beautiful houses in the country

Volume 11

O N SAL E N OW


ESCAPE

HOTELS • R ESTAUR A NTS • GA R DENS • GETAWAYS

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL

EDINBURGH

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: ALAMY

The Scottish capital’s steep, cobbled streets are lined with tartan souvenir shops and bistros serving fresh North Sea mussels, but also independent galleries, start-up studios and modern wine bars

THE CITY Edinburgh excels at Christmas: a high chance of snowfall, a traditional helter-skelter and ice skating in St Andrew’s Square, plus the delights of Hogmanay on 31 December. It’s all a jolly exercise in good, old-fashioned fun. But while Glasgow has long been considered the bigger and more boundary-pushing Scottish city, creative people, places and spaces have been busy opening their doors in Edinburgh. Away from the – albeit beguiling – downtown trill of bagpipes, the northern quarters of New Town and Stockbridge are low-key but increasingly enterprising neighbourhoods to wander through over a long weekend. ➤


WHERE TO STAY Eden Locke (2), a new ‘aparthotel’, brings the elegant, edgy feel of Lower Manhattan to a traditional sandstone Georgian townhouse. Designed by New York-based practice Gryzwinski+Pons, it features a cool café, craft beer and cocktail bar, but the serviced studio flats’ fully equipped marble kitchens (stocked with T2 tea, coffee and wholegrain Rude Health granola) are a perfect solution if you prefer to retreat and cook your own meals (from £140 per night; lockeliving.com). Another clever conversion is Dunstane House (3), a Victorian villa that interior designer Hannah Lohan has transformed into a chic-but-cosy hotel with a mix of contemporary and chintz, featuring great British touches such as Jane Churchill peacock wallpaper and Orkney tweed chairs (from £174 per night; thedunstane.com).

BREAKFAST AND LUNCH

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Begin Sunday with an espresso at one of Scottish coffee sourcer Artisan Roast’s two cafés (artisanroast.co.uk) before heading to Stockbridge farmers’ market for a freshly-baked croissant and to choose from all manner of locally-produced ingredients, from fresh langoustine to Perthshire leeks or a slab of ewe’s cheese (stockbridgemarket.com). Italian delicatessen Valvona & Crolla, which TV chef Nigella Lawson makes a beeline for whenever she’s in town, is a purveyor of everything from artichokes and cured Milanese salami to handmade amaretti biscuits (valvonacrolla.co.uk). Walk along Edinburgh’s ‘river’, the Water of Leith, and call in at Quay Commons, a new waterside kitchen curing meats, cooking stews and, at this moment, steeping homemade panettone, ready for Christmas (quaycommons.co).


Escape | G E T A W AY

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PICTURES: JOHN SINCLAIR 2006/NATIONAL TRUST FOR SCOTLAND, NICHOLAS WORLEY, RITA PLATTS, GETTY

WINE AND DINE Wine bar Smith & Gertrude SHOP Both New Town and Stockbridge are excellent for recently opened behind a navy-painted façade in Stockbridge village offering ‘wine, cheese and company’ – a glass of Catalan cava and a bowl of Marcona almonds is a good way to see in the early evening (smithandgertrude.com). Try Timberyard for dinner: the former Victorian theatre props warehouse (and timber yard), now run by Andrew and Lisa Radford and their family, is warmed by wood-burning stoves. The couple cook clever combinations such as cod, coastal herbs and white asparagus, or buckwheat, raspberry and crème fraîche pudding (timberyard.co). Similarly seasonal and inventive is the menu at The Gardener’s Cottage, an 1836 lodge in Royal Terrace Gardens where guests sit along communal tables in a whitewashed dining space (thegardenerscottage.co). Wildcard: for an off-the-wall dinner, head up to Old Town and check out The Witchery, a famously gothic banqueting room (thewitchery.com).

homeware hunting. ‘If you like an old-fashioned Aladdin’s Cave, this is for you,’ says Unicorn Antiques of its emporium in a former dairy on Dundas Street. They are not wrong – from old Murano glass chandeliers to salvaged trestle tables, door knobs and the odd kilt, so long as an item is ‘old, curious or useful’, they’ll stock it (unicornantiques.co.uk). For colourful clothes and tableware by independent makers, visit Dick’s (dicks-edinburgh.co.uk). Just around the corner at Pad Lifestyle’s airy store (5), big-name designers sit beside independent artisans, such as young Scottish painter Hatti Pattisson’s textiles (padlifestyle.com). Buy a big bunch of Scottish blooms (including thistles, veronica and seedheads) and bars by Edinburgh chocolatiers Coco wrapped in graphic papers in florist Narcissus (narcissusflowers.co.uk), and jumpsuits or Japanese ceramics at Biscuit (biscuit.clothing).

ARTS AND CULTURE In Edinburgh, you can ESCAPE THE CITY see modern makers, mid-century art and Georgian splendour, all in a weekend: Custom Lane is a design studio that holds regular exhibitions and open days. Just Shapes, an exhibition/workshop hosted with design brand Tom Pigeon, runs until 21 January. Plus: the café’s cakes, made by vegan company Grams, are a delight (customlane.co). Visit the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art to see ‘A New Era: Scottish Modern Art 1900-1950’, then wander the landscaped gardens to spot works by Rachel Whiteread and Barbara Hepworth (nationalgalleries.org). The Georgian House (1) is a typical 18th-century Robert Adams townhouse, restored to showcase the original owners’ art and furnishings (nts.org.uk).

A stride up the ancient (dormant!) volcano of Arthur’s Seat (4) – about two hours’ round trip – is the way Edinburghians have blown away the cobwebs for centuries. Or take a 30-minute train along the coast to the sandy beaches and fresh lobster shacks of North Berwick. Ideally, plan a day trip around a secret cinema or pop-up dinner hosted by cook and photographer Amanda Farnese Heath in a walled garden or warehouse (for events and dates, visit themadmarchhare.com). Planning ahead? Head to the sculpture park, particularly landscape architect Charles Jencks’ contoured lawn and lakes, at Jupiter Artland – so-called for its out-of-town location in Edinburgh’s ‘orbit’ – when it reopens in May ( jupiterartland.org). JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 147


Escape | N E W S

LAST CHANCE TO SEE

Culture fans, make haste – these enthralling exhibitions all close early in the new year

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WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK. PICTURE: NATIONAL MUSEUMS OF SCOTLAND, STEPHEN WHITE © OF TURNER CONTEMPORARY, GOVERNMENT ART COLLECTION/UK, LOUISE DAHL-WOLFE/COLLECTION STALEY WISE GALLERY

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TEXTILE DESIGN FASHION

MIXED MEDIA

‘LOUISE DAHL-WOLFE: A STYLE OF HER OWN’ at Fashion and Textile Museum, London (1) Dahl-Wolfe was Harper’s Bazaar’s leading photographer from 1936 to 1958, a tenure from which many snaps are showcased here (until 21 January; ftmlondon.org).

‘TRACEY EMIN ‘‘MY BED’’/JMW TURNER’ at Turner Contemporary, Margate’ (3) In a provocative mix of old and modern, original Young British Artist Emin has combined atmospheric seascapes and stormy skies by Turner with her seminal piece of work, My Bed (until 14 January; turnercontemporary.org).

COLOUR THEORY ‘SEURAT TO RILEY: THE ART OF PERCEPTION’ at The Holburne Museum, Bath A look at the illusions in 20th-century Optical Art, exemplified by Bridget Riley’s Blaze 4 (2), as well as dizzying ‘vorticism’ pieces and French painter Georges Seurat’s dotted ‘pointillist’ works (until 21 January; holburne.org).

LANDSCAPES ‘SHELTER FROM THE STORM: JOHN SELL COTMAN’ at Leeds Art Gallery’ Peruse luminous inky blue and moss green watercolours by the 19th-century painter, and Leeds-based contemporary artist Hondartza Fraga’s modern responses to them (until 21 January; leeds.gov.uk).

‘MAY MORRIS: ART AND LIFE’ at The William Morris Gallery, London (4) This bright and beautiful exhibition of 80 works from collections around the UK demonstrates the little-known fact that the younger daughter of design hero William was a prolific artist, illustrator and member of the Arts and Crafts movement in her own right (until 6 28 January; wmgallery.org.uk).

ILLUSTRATIONS ‘JOHN YEOMAN AND QUENTIN BLAKE: 50 YEARS OF CHILDREN’S BOOKS’ at House of Illustration, London See 50 years’ worth of national treasure Blake’s pictures drawn for children’s author Yeoman, with whom he created even more books than he did with Roald Dahl. Prepare to be charmed (until 4 March; houseofillustration.org.uk). JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 149


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GARDENS THE LIVING WALL Plant a jungle in your home without taking up a single square metre of floor space. A lush living wall is a surprisingly achievable way to bring nature into your living room. We dig deeper into this horticulture trend and reveal how you can grow your own (whatever your gardening skill) WHO STARTED THE TREND? French botanist Patrick Blanc, a specialist in tropical forest undergrowth, created the first indoor living wall in 1986 and remains an expert today, working on projects across the globe (verticalgardenpatrickblanc.com). WHERE CAN I FIND INSPIRATION IN THE UK? We’ve always loved the 160-square-metre living wall in Anthropologie’s flagship store on London’s Regent Street (far right), where grasses squash in next to orchids, spider plants and peace lilies. Also in the capital is the UK’s largest living wall – home to over 10,000 herbaceous plants – which decorates the exterior of The Rubens Hotel near Buckingham Palace. WHAT’S GREAT ABOUT THEM? As well as looking amazing, a living wall can filter dust, deaden noise and keep you cool in the summer. It may even improve your wellbeing – according to research by eco-friendly architects ANS Global (ansgroupglobal.com), plant walls can soothe anxiety levels by up to 37 per cent.

WORDS: TOM BAILEY, CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ANDREW MCLEISH, PAUL DYER

WHAT PLANTS WORK BEST? Mix spillers, thrillers and fillers. Spillers, such as creeping figs, will conceal roots; brightly coloured thrillers, such as geraniums or crocuses, catch the eye; and fillers, such as ferns, hide any gaps in the verdant foliage.

HOW DO I START? To make a simple, cost-effective vertical garden, use wallmounted planters filled with soil. The Woolly Pocket ‘Wally One’ (from £31; woollypocket.co.uk) has a military-grade moisture barrier which will protect your wall from the damp of watering. WHAT IF I WANT SOMETHING MORE IMPRESSIVE? To create a large, biodiverse wall, you’ll need to invest in an irrigated hydroponic (soil-free) system. Try the Easiwall Pro (from £1,000; easiwallpro.com), or commission a bespoke installation from I Want Plants (iwantplants.co.uk) or Biotecture (biotecture.uk.com). NOT GREEN-FINGERED? Artificial living walls are the ideal solution for reluctant gardeners. They can be made from preserved moss, which is soft and requires almost no maintenance (from £326 per square metre, Bright Green; brightgreen.co.uk). From top A private bathroom in San Francisco. Anthropologie’s flagship London store. Exterior of the Musée du Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac, Paris. New York meditation studio MNDFL’s greenery-dotted interior

JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 151


STOCKISTS &Ratio (andratio.co.uk)

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JANUARY 2018 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 153


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JANEY BUTLER INTERIORS Janey Butler Interiors is a Cheshire based architecture interior design practice and is the interior arm of the Llama Group. Offering a complete holistic approach from their RIBA architects, construction division and interior designers for their international discerning clientele. They endeavour for perfection in order to achieve extra-ordinary results and engage with people who reflect the same ethos as themselves. janeybutler.co.uk

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DAVID STUDWELL David Studwell often uses figures that are synonymous with certain eras, in particular the swinging sixties. Marilyn Monroe, Steve McQueen and Elizabeth Taylor all feature in his work evoking a strong sense of nostalgia and bringing elements of the past into the present. He has exhibited in London and also the USA, and been published. Featured here is David Bowie, a limited edition silk screen (56 x 45cm, £300). Visit www.davidstudwellgallery.co.uk or email davidstudwell@gmail.com


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LEIVARS

WOOLLY MAMMOTH FABRICS The new collection by Woolly Mammoth Fabrics is now available online. Our innovative soft furnishings use the finest quality wool yarns to ensure textile longevity, creating the perfect finishing touch to your home! Designs are woven by hand and in mills local to our Cardiff, UK base. Visit www.woollymammothfabrics.com or email emma@woollymammothfabrics.com for more information.

LEIVARS is a high end interior design studio with a fundamental passion for creating beautiful interiors. Working on contemporary coastal projects from Sandbanks to elegant Georgian townhouses, our strength lies in our ability to listen to the needs of our clients and offer the utmost discretion. We thrive on client referrals and repeat business as our clients expand their property portfolios. Contact: studio@leivars.com Mobile: +44 (0)7929 934511 Website: www.leivars.com


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The finest new, antique and reclaimed wood floors

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INTERIOR DESIGN COURSES

Launching colourful careers in interior design for over 55 years A history of putting interior design graduates on the road to success

Graduate, part-time or online courses all benefit from the same high quality tutors and disciplined management. So whether you are aiming for a successful career in

Full time, part time and online design courses available.

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CAREERS

interior design or simply looking to develop your own project, you won’t find a better established or more renowned school than Inchbald.

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A high standard of teaching is central to our interior design school’s success and on which our reputation has been built over more than 55 years.

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HANDMADE FURNITURE

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furniture design handmade in Hay-on-Wye.

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view the range at: www.barnbydesign.co.uk

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Unique, organic, ceramic sculptures. Bespoke commissions www.kiramics.com

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STORY OF THE CHAMPAGNE GLASS We uncork the history of society’s love affair with the sparkling stuff

1734 CRYSTAL GLASS, France A 1735 painting, Le Déjeuner d’Huîtres, contains one of the first depictions of Champagne bottles and glasses as we know them. Bulbous, dark-glass bottles are on ice and the drinkers hold fine, crystal-stemmed glasses.

1750 HAND-BLOWN FLUTE, England The V&A collections include a slim, tall, V-shaped glass used by Georgians for strong ale and French Champagne. The stem helped fizz stay cold when held in a warm hand, and the tall bowl preserved the bubbles. 1770s COUPE, France In Versailles, Marie Antoinette’s ‘Let them eat cake’ lifestyle led to the anecdote that the shape of the era’s most fashionable glass – the shallow coupe – was modelled on her left breast. Other rumours claim it was Madame de Pompadour’s or Helen of Troy’s, but none has been proven. 1800s POMPONNE, France This bell-shaped flute without a base is believed to have been used by sommeliers for tasting wines. It resurfaced in Ibizan nightclubs in the Noughties, favoured for the high speed at which a drinker is required to down their bubbly, as the glass cannot be rested on a table.

1880s FLUTE, Venice Murano glassmaker Salviati created delicate and colourful goblets with frilled edges and ribbed stems, often decorated with fish, seahorses or swans. 1920s CHAMPAGNE TOWER, USA The French coupe surfaced in America between the 1920s and 50s, leading to the decadent vogue for ‘Champagne towers’ – a pyramid of glasses over which the fizz flowed in a cascade of bubbles. 1950 SILVER GOBLET, London Pewter and silver have been used for vessels since Medieval times. This design from the V&A collections echoes the fashion for a silver-gilt interior – both extravagant and practical, as gold lasts longer. Its shape is a cross between a stemmed glass and 19th century-style footed tumbler. 2004 GLASS ‘COUPE’, London In a modern twist on the Marie Antoinette mythology, restaurant 34 Mayfair worked with sculptor Jane McAdam Freud to create a coupe from a mould of supermodel Kate Moss’s left breast in honour of her 40th birthday. 2017 TULIP GLASS, Austria Discerning drinkers prefer this design with a flute-height glass that retains effervescence and a wider brim to release more of the bouquet. ‘Wineware’ brand Riedel offers this dishwasher-safe version (£55; riedel.co.uk).

Top, from left ‘Mami XL’ flute by Stefano Giovannoni, £17 for two, Alessi (alessi.com). ‘Harcourt 1841’ coupe, £180, Baccarat (uk.baccarat.com). ‘Lismore Essence’ flute by Waterford, £100 for two, Harrods (harrods.com). ‘Wine’ Champagne saucer, £40 for four, LSA International (lsa-international.com). ‘Bentley’ flute, £95, Ralph Lauren Home (ralphlauren.co.uk). ‘Half Cut’ coupe, £75, Lee Broom (leebroomstore.com). ‘NasonMoretti’ flute, £60, William & Son (williamandson.com). ‘Barwell’ cut crystal coupe, £32, Soho Home (sohohome.com). ‘Nude’ flute by Ron Arad for Nude, £75.95 for two, Harrods (harrods.com)

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WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY, 1STDIBS.COM, MARY EVANS PICTURE LIBRARY © MAURICE COLLINS IMAGES COLLECTION, V&A IMAGES

530 BC MASTOS CUP, Ancient Greece The terracotta chalice, shaped like a woman’s breast and usually decorated with mythological narratives, is thought to have inspired the glass Champagne coupe nearly 1,800 years later.


Profile for Bruna Heckmann

Elle Decoration - UK (January 2018)  

Elle Decoration - UK (January 2018)  

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