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Brandon Ro

architecture + design | portfolio samples


MOD 5

A Symbiotic Living System Promoting Biophilia

RECOGNITIONS + AWARDS:

Winning Design, Pamo Valley Project, 2011 CPP Architecture Interim Exhibition, 2011 BESS- Sustainability Symposium Student Poster Exhibition, 2011 Published in P. LaRoche, Carbon-Neutral Architectural Design (CRC Press), 2012

Pamo Valley, San Diego, CA

DESCRIPTION: The MOD 5 House is a new prototype for the San Diego single-family residence. The design is user-friendly, sustainable, and modular. Aimed at integrating itself into the beautiful, verdant landscape of Pamo valley, MOD 5 uses several passive sustainable strategies to achieve thermal comfort and become a zero energy home. One of the key components of the house is the “Flexwall� system which consists of moveable insulating panels, shading louvers, and floor to ceiling glass doors. Designed as a flexible configuration, the large sliding glass doors not only offer views to the valley but completely open the central core of the house to provide a

natural breezeway. These large openings are strategically placed to optimize heating, cooling, and lighting needs. In terms of flexibility, the house offers built-in furniture walls comprising shelving, beds, and desks. All furniture elements tuck away into the walls to create a large, flexible, and open floor plan. Paving the way of life for the inhabitants of the beautiful Pamo valley, the MOD 5 House is a symbiotic living system promoting biophilia. Thus, each resident is able to more fully appreciate life and their surroundings through a home that is low-cost, sustainable, modular, and flexible.


NORTH EAST

LC

LS

PV

SW

DW

NP

MS

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RE

AS

PS

OC

OI

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RO

OC

DG

GW

PS

WR

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LF

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TC

DG

CM

PS

WC

Reduction Strategies

NP Native Plants

OC

Outdoor Water Conservation

WR

Water Reuse

RC Recycled Content RM Reclaimed Materials

MS

E

CM Compost

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OI Operable Insulation

GW Grey Water

Reduction Strategies

FP Fireplace

Active Solar PS Passive Solar Heating/Cooling AS DD Design with Daylight RE Renewable Energy  Reduce Overheat/Overcool Food Production FP  RO  Comfort   FR Footprint Reduction TC Thermal

E

SW Solar Hot Water

LS Light Shelves

A T

LF Local Fuel

FG Food Garden

Reduction Strategies

DW Design for Wind

MS

FR LC Low Carbon Materials

S

RO

DI Drip Irrigation

Material Selection

WC

Waste Control

A

MS

PV PV-Design

RM

Reduction Strategies

RO

FS Flexible Spaces

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O P E R AT I O N

FP DG Direct Gain

FS

W

RF

CONSTRUCTION

RC

R

FP

FG

INTERIOR



 





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B  MODULARITY Space Usage

Solar Path Studies B tu 8000+ 7200

Outdoor Dining

6400

Kitchen

Bath

5600 4800 4000 3200 2400

A

1 600 800 0

Recreation Area

Winter Luminance - Living

Patio

Bedroom 2

Dining

Living

Bedroom 1

Car Port

Winter Avg. Daily Btu: 2,318 Insolation (btu) Analysis Thermal Mass Potential in Living Area: 6,000 Btu/day

Passive Cooling - Night Flush VentilationLocke, PassiveBrandon Heating - DirectGarden Gain Thermal Mass Floors Aaron Ro

MOD 5 House


c o n f r o n t i n g

Mortem Obire

d e a t h

:

a funerary chapel Mt. Vernon Square, Washington, DC

video presentation: http://youtu.be/h2oFC2Ce19U

Funeral Procession

Pilgrimage from Sorrow to Transcendence

The Dead

Journey to a Final Resting Place

Columbarium Visitor

Memorializing + Remembering the Dead

Architectural Poetics of Silence, Light + Healing

upwards view in axis mundi from mourning room

Mortem Obire—the Latin phrase for “meet death”— is a non-denominational funerary chapel that seeks to address the poetics of emotion, healing, serenity, and existential transcendence. The design uses the metaphor of axis-mundi as a central organizing node that forms a primordial center connecting heaven, earth, and the afterlife. It is experienced through the various processes of mourning, melancholy, healing, and transcendence. The ziggurat ramp envelopes the buildings and allows the patron to circumambulate around the central axismundi in a ritual ascent and sacred pilgrimage. This design feature is meant to mirror the moment in our lives when death claims someone we love. The intense emotions that come with such an experience are identified as sacred and are respectfully expressed through the architecture. The aim of the project seeks to create an oasis of silence and healing through materiality. Likewise, the architecture evokes contemplation and repose within the bustling, noisy urban context of Mt. Vernon Square in Washington, DC.


private mourning room

chapel of healing + reconciliation

ziggurat ritual ascension

Exploded Structural Axonometric Sequence multiple layers of transparency to create an immaterial experience 1

internal structure

2

ramps + skin

3

program volumes

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louvers + panels

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3

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16

1

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PROGRAM 1. Lobby 2. Reception Desk 3. Flower Room 4. Restroom 5. Waiting Area 5. Mourning Room 6. Columbarium 7. Storage 8. Offices 9. Priest Room 10. Chapel 11. Narthex 12. Ambulatory 13. Sanctuary 14. Kitchen 15. Eating Area 16. Cold Room 17. Prep Room 18. Garden of Remembrance 19. Meditation Area

Ground Floorplan

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Recognitions + Awards: Mårgenes Arquitectura magazine (Spain), 2012 Beaux Arts Ball – Reception Exhibit, AIAS, 2012


LIVING CYCLES

R e s t o r i n g e c o l o g y a n d h u m a n i t y

Ephemeral Cit y Port of Los Angeles, San Pedro, CA

Scale: 1” = 800’ 800’

0’

Duane McLeod Jury Prize, Walt Disney Imagineering, 2010 ECO Innovator’s Showcase, Spring Green Expo, 2010 CPP College of Environmental Design Gallery Exhibition, 2010

400’

Recognitions + Awards:

N


Come away on an adventure and find a breath of freedom in the heart of Ephemeral City. Focused on bioremediation and healthy living, the heart of Ephemeral City is called Living Cycles. It blends multiple vertical layers of ecologies and human living. PURIFICATION of air, water, and land is performed on the ground plane through a rejuvenating marshland and carbon sequestering forest. Visitors and residents traverse along floating paths which open up the mind for new DISCOVERY. Temples of living are a new type of vertical housing unit which instills

SYNERGY SUBSISTENCE SOCIALITY

feelings of physical ACHIEVEMENT through exercise. Bathrooms and living spaces offer calming views to natural ecologies. A social JOURNEY commences as individuals traverse the highways to greenways. These elevated walkways are planted with

native costal vegetation and inspire friendly conversation and exercise. At the connecting pathway nodes, temples of learning provide areas to learn about and grow vertical agriculture. Each vertical garden helps promote familial and communal SYNERGY for subsistence. Each layer of Ephemeral City’s Living Cycles not only merges natural ecologies and urban infrastructure in a symbiotic fashion but helps to restore life into ecology and humanity. The design gives a sneak peak at the essence of a healthy sustainable lifestyle!

LONGITUDINAL SITE SECTION


ETERNAL RETURN O bser vi ng Cycl es o f Time in Na t u re

Potomac River, NW Washington, DC

video presentation: http://youtu.be/A-pRKRS8wEo

LEVEL 1 - STAIRWAY OF TIDES (+15’)

TIDES

The contemporary aesthetics of speed and consumerism have collapsed, compressed, and fragmented the human experience of time. In some ways, humans have lost their capacity to dwell in time. Yet nature’s repetitive cycles and processes help to slow down, silence, and suspend time. In other words, nature reveals the sacred character of time. In order to regain the experiential space of time, its depth and plasticity, architecture must provide an environment where humans can once again observe the repetitive cycles of nature’s elements. Eternal Return is a manifesto declaring the need for a new architecture; it is an architectural expression that rekindles the human experience of time to satisfy the existential longing for paradise at the beginning of time, in illo tempore.

LEVEL 1a - HORIZON PLATFORM (+32.5’)

SKY

LEVEL 2 - ROCK + MOSS GARDEN (+27.5’)

MOSS

D


Thus, the project is more than a museum or observatory of time – it is a temple of time. The design incorporates various natural elements to reveal time to the senses. The elements include: 1) the earth’s connection to geological time, 2) trees with seasonal time, 3) light for diurnal time, 4) sky with its astronomical time, 5) wind for meteorological time, 6) moss and evergreens with their biological time, 7) copper for the time of oxidation, and 8) tides as both buoyancy and water time. Each element plays a key role to both reveal and suspend time in different ways. Eternal Return is one step closer towards a new architecture; a building that provides an oasis for humans to escape the chaos of contemporary consumerism and (re)discover time by (re)connecting with nature.

LEVEL 2 - HALL OF DECAY (+22.5’)

DECAY

LEVEL 3 - TREE GARDEN (+32.5’)

Quantifiable, Uniform, Divisible, Directional

Feeling, Experiential Time, Qualitative, Variability

PHYSICISTS TIME

SUBJECTIVE TIME

CYCLICAL TIME Nature, Seasons Celestial Phenomena Life Cycles, Holidays Liturgical Year, Myths

TEMPORALITY

Memory, Historical, Remembering the Past

OBJECTIVE TIME

Widely Shared form of Subjective Time, Felt Time, Understood by Many People

LEVEL 2 - ARRIVAL PLATFORM (+35’)

TREES

STRATA


el e m en tar y s cho o l Korea Town, Los Angeles, CA

L E s s o n s o f b i o p h il i a i n de m o c r a t i c spac e Commu n it y a n d n a t u r e i n th e c l a s s ro o m

circulation SCHOOL SECURITY

urban connectivity COMMUNITY ACCESSIBILITY

emergence

BIOPHILIA IN A DEMOCRATIC SPACE


Recognitions + Awards:

AIA-PF Online Design Awards Exhibition, 2009

DESCRIPTION: Located in Los Angeles’ Koreatown, the K-5 Cahuenga Elementary School will accommodate over 800 students and help alleviate overcrowded classrooms within the district. The architectonic language of the project seeks to give the community and their children a love of life and the living world - a lesson of biophilia. To accomplish this goal, the public is invited to utilize the school as a community center after school hours; meanwhile, the hours that school is in session, the architecture becomes a living laboratory for learning. Communal spaces, atriums, reading gardens, vegetated screen walls, and walkable green roofs collectively contribute to the love of life and the living world of nature. The Cahuenga Elementary School seeks to break down the barriers of inequality and political unrest from this urban setting through a simple diagrammatic design. Passive sustainable design principles enhance each lesson of biophilia which are taught in democratic space. Both community and nature are united in the classroom.


The House of the LO R D

(Re)interpreting the Latter-day Saint Temple | Rome, Italy

The House of the LORD explores how contemporary sacred space can use hermeneutics (i.e., the interpretation of texts, buildings, experience, etc.) to transform human understanding. Just as different people experience and interpret their encounters with buildings in distinct ways, designing to evoke a specific meaning, message, or religious experience can prove a challenge to the architect. The complexity of such a challenge, however, is alleviated through a design process that focuses on the interrelationships between architecture (space + form), religion (ideals), culture (traditions), ritual (function), and the environment (geography). The interrelationships allow designers to anticipate the diverse layers of interpretation and thereafter assist in choreographing transformative human experiences.

PRAYER MARRIAGE

CHRISTUSWORSHIP

GATHER RITUAL DRAMA VEIL

MEDITATION

LEARN RESEARCHADMIN

BAPTISMENTRYSHOPEAT

SACRED VESTMENTS

study + research center

SLEEP LIV E OBSERVESCRIPTURES

SOCIAL HALL

ritual ascension

Recognitions + Awards:

CPP Interim Architecture Exhibition, 2011 AIA-DC Unbuilt Awards Competition Entry, 2012 video presentation: https://vimeo.com/61864803

ACROSS FILTER

THROUGH FILTERED VOLUME

ON STAGGERED FLOOR PLATES

STAGGERED THROUGH FILTERED VOID

ACROSS FILTERED VOID

FROM BELOW IN SECTION

THROUGH ENCLOSED VOLUME AND VOID

THROUGH FILTER FROM ABOVE

DIALOG OF COEXISTENCE

pilgrimage experience

the phenomenology of transparency in architecture

SACRED (initiated)

PUBLIC (non-initiated)


The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (aka. Mormons) serves as the client for this innovative 223,000 square foot mega structure located in the ancient suburbs of Rome, Italy. It combines a temple, chapel (stake center), visitor center, and housing facility to produce one large “House of God.” The architecture acts as an ambassador of the religion by expressing the true essence of its principles in weaving sacred and semi-sacred programs to reinforce the idea of community. In a way to allure reticent onlookers (some members + non-members) into the religious architectural experience, tours are given which follow an ascending pathway around the perimeter of the various programs and offer dramatic views to the interior volumes and voids—a concept derived from ambulatories of pilgrimage churches. The Christus gallery at the central core provides a space to meditate, pray, and experience solar phenomena since the design allows sunlight to penetrate and illuminate the statue on specific inter-religious holidays. The temple program is designed as a building within a building due to the demands for gradations of holiness and a hierarchical order within the rituals (ordinances). Particularly important is the design of the spatial sequence and circulation of the ritual drama which provide an atmosphere for re-experiencing Judeo-Christian episodes of cosmic history. The ritual movements from room to room include descending and ascending, transitioning from dark to light, traversing west to east and east to west, and experiencing spatial compression and decompression. The House of the LORD demonstrates how sacred architecture can become a metaphor of eternal realities, allure visitors into a dialog of coexistence between the sacred and profane, and provide opportunities for transformative religious experience.

contextual site plan

Program Distribution Temple Patron —Ritual Spaces focused on Redeeming the Dead General Visitor—Public Spaces focused on Proclaiming the Gospel Church Member—Public Spaces focused on Perfecting the Saints

10’ x 10’ grid

ribbon structure

vertical planes

layered transparency

stacked program

7

layers of transparency 6

5

4

3

2

1

UP


3700 sunset a

l i v a b l e

c o mmunity

Silver Lake, Los Angeles, CA

Recognitions + Awards: AIAIC Sustainable Design Exhibit at Dos Lagos, 2009 AIAS/AARP Livable Communities Design Competition Entry, 2009


Connectivity, flexibility, and sustainability are essential design principles for the architecture of the future. Located near Silver Lake in Los Angeles, 3700 Sunset is a 60,000 square foot mixed-use development seeking to create a livable community. The development consists of 42,000 square feet of residential units, 11,000 square feet of retail space, and 7,000 square feet of community amenities. The mixed-use development respects the community master plan of the Silver Lake neighborhood to help maintain the current demographics for the area and prevent gentrification. The project is preparing for the design needs of the 21st Century by incorporating universal design principles, sustainable strategies, and methods of fostering community connectivity. Each housing unit has a flexible floorplan catering to single adults, families, professionals (live-work), and the elderly (assisted living). 3700 Sunset is a model for the livable communities of the future.

Apartment views to Hollywood

Apartment views to downtown Los Angeles

Vegetated Courtyard

Pool + Exercise room


David’s Tower Potomac River, Washington, DC

Chapel RECOGNITIONS + AWARDS: Wesley Theological Seminary Exhibit, “Box of Miracles,” 2013 CUA Architecture Exhibit, 2012

King David once aspired to build a temple connecting heaven and earth. Building upon this tradition, David’s Tower is a monastery for the third millennium that explores architectural simplicity and symbolic ascent. Located in the rural outskirts of Washington, DC along the heavily vegetated Potomac River, the heavy concrete walls emerge from the earth as a silent rippling reflection. Body, mind, and spirit are engaged throughout the vertical sanctuary with views oriented to the river and dense horizon of treetops. Place + stillness, light + time, composition + gravity are guiding principles for the transcendental atmosphere of David’s Tower.


Exploded axon 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

entry pilgrimage chapel living cells refectory kitchen prayer room library study chapel sanctuary sacristy choir loft sky observatory

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Prayer Room

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Looking upwards into Choir Loft


B R ANDO N RI C H ARD RO

CELL: (760) 331.3813 • E-MAIL: brro.sonrisas@gmail.com PROFILE: www.linkedin.com/pub/brandon-ro/22/89b/47 EXPANDED PORTFOLIO: issuu.com/brro/docs/brro_portfolio-2012

SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS

Brandon Ro is an award-winning designer with a proven record of cutting-edge projects that have been published, presented, and exhibited regionally, nationally, and abroad. In addition, he is a results-driven leader who promotes enthusiasm and collaborative synergy on team projects. Having studied under internationally recognized architects, such as Juhani Pallasmaa and Alberto Campo Baeza, Brandon is committed to design and research that explores the ways to improve the interconnectivity between architecture, culture, ecology, and human experience.

EDUCATION

The Catholic University of America Master of Architectural Studies California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Bachelor of Architecture

EXPERIENCE (selected)

Smith Group | JJR Intern Architect - Healthcare Studio Lemay, Erickson, Willcox Architects Intern Architect Alliance to Save Energy Green Campus Project Coordinator, Team Manager Comstock and Kaufman Architecture and Planning Intern Architect

Expected May 2013 G.P.A. 3.87 June 2011 G.P.A. 3.77 Washington, DC Dec 2012–Mar 2013 Reston, VA May–Aug 2012 Pomona, CA July 2008 - Feb 2011 Del Mar, CA April 2005 – May 2007

HONORS + AWARDS Awards:

16 design + 7 professional awards (organizations include: U.S. Green Building Council, Walt Disney Imagineering, Environmental Design in University Curricula and Architectural Training in Europe, North China University of Technology, Alliance to Save Energy, American Planning Association, Designers Lighting Forum, California State University Chancellor’s Office, etc.)

Exhibitions:

various design projects have been displayed over 30 times (events include: Greenbuild, California Higher Education Sustainability Conference, Alt-Build, BESS: Sustainability Symposium, EE Global, American Institute of Architects, Cal Poly Pomona, etc.)

Honors:

32 academic honors + scholarships (includes: President’s List, Dean’s Lists, Certificate of Achievements, Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society in Architecture and Allied Arts, Golden Key International Honour Society, Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society, Magi Endowment for the Liturgical Arts)

Publications:

8 design projects have been published in books, conference proceedings, and magazines (includes: CarbonNeutral Architectural Design [CRC Press, 2012]; Port of L.A. Visions [Cal Poly Pomona, 2010]; BESS: High Performance Building Enclosures - Practical Sustainability Symposium; Márgenes Arquitectura, etc.)


Brandon Ro | Portfolio Samples