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FE BRUA RY 2020

T H E M A G A Z I N E T H A T B A T O N R O U G E FA M I L I E S L I V E B Y

BE COLOR BRAVE

TALK ABOUT

RACE

GO PLAY

IN THE

DIRT!

2020 SCHOOL LISTING CHARTER & MAGNET


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CONTENTS FEBRUARY 2020 ▪ ISSUE 355

FEATURES 36

ON THE COVER 2019-20 Cover Kid Rosie M. enjoyed being the star of the moment during her cover shoot. At four years old, Rosie likes using big words, coloring, playing with Play-Doh and her dollhouse, and feeding her chickens. She’s also learning how to play piano. Rosie’s very smart, creative, and loving, and she’s always smiling.

GARDENING WITH KIDS Playing in dirt isn’t just fun–it’s healthy, too

FROM COLOR-BLIND TO COLOR-BRAVE Talking with kids about race

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2020 MAGNET AND CHARTER SCHOOL LISTINGS & PROFILES

Discover charter and magnet school options in our area

MAGNET OR CHARTER?

Making the decision for your family

30 DAD NEXT DOOR Photo Credit: Kleinpeter Photography

IN EVERY ISSUE

12 A MOTHER’S VOICE 14 LAGNIAPPE 64 CALENDAR 75 MARKETPLACE 76 THE LAST WORD 78 SNAPSHOTS

CONNECT

16 COMMUNITY 22 EDUCATION 23 ONE AMAZING KID 26 PATHWAYS TO PARENTING

LIVE

28 LOCAL PROFILE 30 DAD NEXT DOOR 32 EXCEPTIONAL LIVES 34 FAITH

PLAY

56 58 60 62

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF DAD GET OUT OF TOWN THINGS WE LOVE OUT AND ABOUT

52 MAGNET OR CHARTER? 2019-20 Cover Kid Isla M. Photo Credit: Lauren Ashton Lights Design & Photography

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IN EVERY ISSUE FREEBIES T H E M A G A Z I N E T H AT B AT O N R O U G E F A M I L I E S L I V E B Y

Win Freebies!

P U B L I S H E R / E D I TO R I N C H I E F A MY F O R E M A N-P L A I S A N C E A S S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R BRANDON FOREM AN

Visit brparents.com and click “Register for Freebies.” Deadline to enter is February 20, 2020.

D I R E C TO R O F O P E R AT I O N S A MY L . F O R E M A N E D I TO R I A L M A N A G I N G E D I TO R A M ANDA MILLER

Your kiddo can munch on his cereal while on the way to school with TheCrunchCup. This dual-chamber, reusable, dishwasher-safe cup is designed for cereal on the go. Add cereal to the inner cup and milk in the outer cup, twist on the lid, and you’re ready to eat! ■ thecrunchcup.com

S E C T I O N E D I TO R M A R I WA L K E R C A L E N D A R E D I TO R NANC Y LEBL ANC A R T/ P R O D U C T I O N SENIOR GR APHIC DESIGNER M E LO DY TA U Z I N GR APHIC DESIGNER DES TIN Y ALE X ANDER GR APHIC INTERN C ANDACE NALL C O V E R P H OTO G R A P H E R K L E I N P E T E R P H OTO G R A P H Y A DV E R T I S I N G /M A R K E T I N G ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TERI HODGES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE S AVA N N A H L E D E T ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE G A B R I E L L E T H E R I OT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE RYN WHITESIDE COMMUNIT Y E VENTS M ANAGER L A U R I E A CO S TA

Let your crew satisfy their tinkering needs with Tinkering Labs’s Electric Motors Catalyst. Kids can build a countless number of projects that utilize the power of electric motors, and the kit even comes with a set of Challenge Cards. ■ tinkeringlabs.com

COMMUNIT Y OUTRE ACH ROX ANE VOORHIES

C O N TAC T B R PA R E N T S .CO M E D I TO R I A L @ B R PA R E N T S .CO M C A L E N D A R @ B R PA R E N T S .CO M O F F I C E 2 25-2 92-0 032 11 8 3 1 W E N T L I N G AV EN U E B ATO N R O U G E , L A 70 8 1 6-6 055

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Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved. ISSN # 1050-8708

Last Month’s WINNERS

Look who won January’s Freebies: Courtney Efferson won the Minipresso GR and Lauren Andrews won Codi, the Storytelling Robot.

Reproduction prohibited without permission. The opinions expressed in Baton Rouge Parents Magazine are those of the authors or advertisers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products or services herein. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any paid advertisement.

Baton Rouge Parents Magazine is a division of Family Resource Group Inc.

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IN EVERY ISSUE A MOTHER’S VOICE

Causality of Affection

C

ause and effect. Those two concepts tend to keep the world going around and have been doing so since the dawn of time. Causality is the relation between a cause (a reason for an action or current condition) and its effect, something that inevitably follows the cause. Affectionate means having affection or warm regard. But what causes affection? What is the reason behind the love that we are feeling? Could it be an inescapable, inevitable feeling that Cupid shoots into our hearts regardless of whether we want the feeling or not? Could it be that mysterious “chemistry” that only happens when the right person comes along? Do you believe that God has preordained the perfect mate for each of us? Could the affection that we feel for those close in our lives come straight through us from Him? It’s February, and if you’re like me, cute cherubs, candy hearts, roses, boxes of chocolates, and Valentine cards come to mind. For children in school, it’s the excitement of giving and receiving Frozen and Star Wars Valentine cards. However, the reason behind the giving is what really means the most. Valentine’s Day is a day where people use these items to show affection, kindness, and love. And that is what we all need in our lives. As Valentine’s Day nears, I encourage all of you to examine why you feel the way you do. Giving someone you love a box of chocolate might mean nothing if it’s just because you’re supposed to. The causality is what we live every day in order for us to be well adjusted; we need to have a good bit of balance going on in our lives. There are many questions listed above. Sometime in your life, these types of questions need to be answered. Only when you have these answers will you begin to be comfortable with yourselves and live in the causality of affection and finally be at peace. Relations with others sculpt how we live our lives. It’s what keeps me going, a reason to exist. Happy Valentine’s Day! Amy Foreman-Plaisance Publisher/Editor in Chief

Have ideas? I’d like to hear from you.

By mail: Amy P., 11831 Wentling Ave., Baton Rouge, LA 70816 Email: editorial@brparents.com. Be sure to include your name, address, and daytime phone number.

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IN EVERY ISSUE LAGNIAPPE MIXTAPE MEMORIES

Remember recording your favorite songs from the radio? You would spend hours curating the perfect mixtape for yourself or your special someone. Take a look back this month! What’s your favorite song you’ve ever recorded? What’s your favorite song you’ve ever recorded on a mixtape? Results

ix Tape

Save the Date Baton Rouge Parents Magazine’s annual Camp Fair and Summer Fun Expo has joined forces with the Junior League of Baton Rouge’s Touch-a-Truck event this year. Come join in on all the fun happenings at this grand event on Saturday, March 21 at BREC’s State Fairgrounds from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Quiet hours will be from 9-11 a.m. ■ brparents.com

rM e p u S

“Maybe Rick Springfield’s ‘Jessie’s Girl.’ Yes, I am old.” —Karla B. “I remember waiting by the radio for Eiffel 65’s ‘Blue’ when it first came out. It’s not my favorite now, but I really loved it then.” —Amanda M. “Bennie and The Jets’ and ‘Me & Bobby McGee’.” —Teri H. “Lynyrd Skynyrd’s ‘Free Bird.’” —Rickey M. “One More Try’ by Timmy T.” —Melody T.

‘‘

“‘Faithfully’ by Journey.” —Jeff M. BE MINE

XOXO

BFF

OH BABY

BABY TRUE LOVEXOXO BE MINE

TRUE

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BF OH

BFF LOVE BABY “I have so many, but my faves I U I U I U BE MINETRUE NE MI BE were ‘Push It’ by Salt-NI U LOVE XOXO OH BFF FF XO Pepa and pretty much Bany BABY XO OH I U BFF XOXO BABY TRU song by Stevie B.!” BE MINE LO TRUE OH LOVE XOXO TRUE —Laurie A. BABY XOXO VE LO

I

U BE MINE TRUE

“Mostly Jazz because every Sunday, that’s usually when IOHBY XO BA run through blank cassettes.” —James O. “‘Feel Like Making Love’ by Bad Company.” —Joyce M. “‘Anything *NSYNC!” —Kayla V. “‘Peg’ by Steely Dan.” —Lisa M.

LOVE

XOXO

OH BABY

BFF TRUE

I

U

BFF

BE MINE

OH BABY

I

U

BF

BE MINE TRUE LOVE

Happy Valentine’s Day Will you BEE mine, Valentine? Don’t bother spending money on Valentine’s Day cards for your crew this year! You can download these adorable cards right from our website for free. Gift them to your sweethearts this year to let them know you’re thinking of them. ■ brparents.com

I always have a note in my pocket that says ‘John did it’ just in case I’m murdered because I don’t want him to remarry.” —Chrissy Teigen 14

XOXO


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CONNECT COMMUNITY BUYER BEWARE WHEN SHOPPING FOR CAR SEATS

Bargain hunting may be a full-contact sport in some stores, but online shopping can make finding deals so much easier. When it comes to car seats, shopping sight unseen may not be the best deal even if the price is low. The federal government regulates car seats to ensure safety standards, but sometimes seats sold by third-party sellers on sites such as eBay, Amazon or Walmart may be knockoff brands. A deal that seems too good to be true very well could be. Check the American Academy of Pediatrics website with its list of seats approved for use in the United States. To check that your current seat is genuine, simply call the manufacturer to verify authenticity.

BREC ZOO WELCOMES BABY GIRAFFE

Knock-kneed and wobbly, a male reticulated giraffe was welcomed at BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo. He was born December 26 to a six-year-old, first-time mother, Rosie, and a 13-yearold father, Rowan. The baby is the 20th giraffe ever born at the Baton Rouge Zoo and the first since 2001. Giraffes younger than six months are vulnerable, and their mortality rate is nearly 50 percent. “Our keeper, curator and veterinary staff are incredibly skilled and are monitoring the mother and calf closely,” says Phil Frost, Zoo Director. “This expert care and supervision will hopefully lead to good outcomes.” ■ brzoo.org

NEW LIBRARY PROGRAM AIMS TO GET KIDS READING

Photo Credit: Kleinpeter Photography 2018-19 Cover Kid. Antonio C.

Calling all elementary-aged bookworms! The East Baton Rouge Parish Library is offering a new incentive program called “1,000 Books Beyond Kindergarten: Reading Is Elementary,” building on the success of its “1,000 Books Before Kindergarten” program for younger readers. Students from Kindergarten through fifth grade are invited to sign up and get a reading log from the children’s room at any of theEast Baton Rouge Parish Library’s 14 branches. Then, they can track books they have read in any format–hard copy, audiobook, ebook or graphic novel. For every five books read up to 50, readers will receive a stamp and reading patch. After 50 books have been logged, for every five read, the student’s name is entered into a yearly drawing for a chance to win a $100 Walmart gift card. ■ ebrpl.com/kids/literacy.html

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE LINKED TO HIGHER GRADES

Academic success isn’t all about hitting the books and good study habits. A new study published by the American Psychological Association finds students with higher emotional intelligence tend to achieve higher grades and test scores. The data spanned 1998 to 2019 from more than 160 studies conducted across 27 countries with more than 42,000 students from elementary school to college. The researchers’ findings held true even when controlling for intelligence and personality factors. “It’s not enough to be smart and hardworking. Students must also be able to understand and manage their emotions to succeed at school,” says Carolyn MacCann, PhD, of the University of Sydney and lead author of the study. ■ apa.org 16

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NATIONAL IVF DRUG TRIAL HAPPENING LOCALLY

A new drug is being tested for use in in vitro fertilization, and Fertility Answers has been chosen to participate in its national clinical research trial. As one of 22 clinical sites in the United States, Fertility Answers will recruit 20-25 Louisiana couples to undergo in vitro using the new medication delivery system. Qualified patients will receive one IVF cycle with a fresh embryo transfer at no cost. “For young couples struggling to pay for infertility, our selection and participation in this national study is huge for them,” says Neil Chappell, MD, reproductive endocrinologist at Fertility Answers. ■ fertilityanswers.com


CELEBRATE MARDI GRAS WITH CLEAN EATING

One of the best parts of Mardi Gras is the king cake, but if you’re eating healthy, it may seem like you have to miss out on this delicious Louisiana favorite. Enter Eat Fit King Cake. Made with almond flour and coconut flour, the cake is gluten free, grain free, low carb, sugar-free and dairy-free. There are no artificial sweeteners or colors, and the cake is sweetened with locally made Swerve, which is natural and plant-based. Each slice of cake has two grams of net carbs and zero sugar. The cake is an offering from Eat Fit, a nonprofit initiative of Ochsner Health System. Available at several retailers in our area, the cake can also be ordered online. ■ eatfitkingcake.com

EVIE’S LAW PROTECTS AGAINST ORGAN TRANSPLANT DISCRIMINATION

When Wayne Pearl learned about children with special needs being denied organ transplants because of their disabilities in other states, he knew he had to do something. “As a lawyer, I decided to make sure that would never happen in Louisiana,” Pearl says. “I wrote a bill to not only make organ transplant discrimination illegal, but also to prevent insurance companies from denying coverage for an organ transplant for someone with a disability.” Named “Evie’s Law” in honor of Pearl’s daughter, Evangeline, who has Down syndrome, the legislation passed unanimously in both chambers of the state legislature. The Pearls were guests of Gov. John Bel Edwards when he signed the law. FEB RUA RY 2020 | B R PA R EN T S .COM

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CONNECT COMMUNITY REMEMBER THE BABY: CAR SEAT ALARMS REQUIRED IN ITALY

Sad and terrifying stories of young children being inadvertently left in car seats coming to bad ends surface in the news regularly, especially during the warmer months of the year. Devices that are built to help drivers remember their youngest passengers when they get out of the car, however, may be a solution to helping to prevent these tragedies. A new law in Italy is requiring parents of young children to equip car seats with these alarms. The new devices emit audio and visual signals that can be seen and heard inside and outside the vehicle. The alarms will be triggered if the child in the car seat is left behind. Although there are no plans for such laws here, you can buy something similar for peace of mind.

GRANT MAKES PLAY ACCESSIBLE FOR ALL

A trip to Knock Knock Children’s Museum is a go-to way for families in Baton Rouge to spend time, but getting the most out of the museum wasn’t always possible for children with disabilities. McMains Children’s Developmental Center has adapted 10 of the museum’s 18 learning zones to make them more accessible for children with diverse abilities. A nonprofit pediatric therapy clinic, McMains used grant funding to develop ability bags and kits that provide modifications, enabling all children to play alongside siblings and friends. “The Center is excited to bring elements from our Capable Play Program, which teaches families to adapt their home for children with disabilities, into the community in such a fun way,” says Anne Hindrichs, the center’s executive director. ■ kkcm.com

LIVINGSTON PARISH LIBRARY FINES FORGIVEN

Overdue books happen to the best of us, and as fines add up, we may slow down our regular library visits. Livingston Parish Library has announced a new policy that eliminates overdue fines and forgives outstanding debt. LPL has become one of the first public library systems with this policy. “We hope that the removal of fines will offer a fresh start for all patrons to rediscover the Library and the many services we offer,” says Giovanni Tairov, library director. Items not returned 45 days after their date will be marked as “lost,” and the cost will appear on the patron’s account. Returning the item will reverse any charges. ■ mylpl.info

TEEN TOBACCO USE RATES

LIGHTS ON AT LASM THROUGH MARCH

Thousands of twinkling lights may make you think of the holidays, but the warm glow is quite welcome throughout winter at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum. In partnership with Visit Baton Rouge, the museum will remain lit up through March. And, the sparkling lights have already made a difference for the Louisiana Art & Science Museum’s foot traffic. “Our building is very dark at night and appears closed, even when we’re open for after-hours events and programs,” says Serena Pandos, LASM president and executive director. With the lights on for the first time, the museum experienced a 200 percent increase in its attendance during the Festival of Lights celebration. The museum is looking into adding permanent façade lighting to help amplify its impact on downtown Baton Rouge in the months and years to come. ■ lasm.org

It seems that vaping is starting to become a term that we, as parents, are becoming more and more familiar with. About 6.2 million middle school and high school students in the U.S. are current tobacco product users, according to new National Youth Tobacco Survey data that was recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About one in three high school students and one in eight middle school students have used some tobacco product in the last 30 days, and e-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product for both groups. “Youth use of any tobacco product, including e-cigarettes, is unsafe,” says Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert R. Redfield, MD. A new law has since raised the federal minimum age of sale of tobacco products from 18 to 21 years. ■ betobaccofree.hhs.gov 18

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SPEND LEAP DAY AMONG THE HERBS

As a Leap Year, 2020 gives us an extra day of exploration. And because it falls on a Saturday, we can use that day for even more extra fun. One great option for you and your family is to check out Herb Day 2020 at the LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Sponsored by the American Herb Society Baton Rouge Unit, the free educational outdoor and gardening event will include plant sales, an herb “petting zoo,” and other children’s activities to provide fun for all ages. Herb classes will also be available, and they will begin at 9:30 a.m. and continue every hour on Saturday, February 29. Add some greenery to your home with this educational experience. ■ lsu.edu/botanic-gardens/events

SCURVY MAKING A COME BACK?

Argh, matey! Do you know if your little pirates are getting enough vitamin C in their diets? Cases of scurvy have increased over the last decade in the United Kingdom, and not for pirates who are at sea and away from fresh fruits and vegetables. Rather, picky eating and limited diets may be the cause, according to hospital admissions data released from the National Health Service. Although scurvy is highly unlikely, cases have been reported in rcent months, including a four-year-old American boy featured in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Time to pick up some Cuties for your cuties, just in case. FEB RUA RY 2020 | B R PA R EN T S .COM

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CONNECT COMMUNITY WOMAN’S JOINS FETAL THERAPY NETWORK

When babies need special care, before or after birth, access to expert professionals is key. Woman’s Hospital has become the first in Louisiana to join the North American Fetal Therapy Network, a voluntary association of medical centers in the United States and Canada with established expertise in fetal intervention and complex care. “Being part of this organization will allow us to better collaborate with other leaders in fetal therapy across North America and provide the best outcomes for our patients using evidence-based practices and leading-edge technologies,” says R. Clifton Moore, MD, maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Woman’s. ■ womans.org/fetaltherapy

TOP NICKNAMES FOR GRANDPARENTS

Granny? Grams? Perhaps Grand-mère and Grand-père? What do your little love bugs call their grandparents? A new survey from life insurance marketing company Coventry Direct found the top nicknames for grandparents in Louisiana are Mawmaw and Pawpaw, and these two are popular throughout the South along with alternate spellings Mamaw and Papaw. The company surveyed more than 5,000 Americans, and the top nicknames nationally are the classics Nana and Papa. Whatever they’re called, grandparents have a special place in our little ones’ hearts and encouraging those special relationships makes love grand. ■ coventrydirect.com

BURN CALORIES JUST BY PARENTING

Being a parent can be exhausting, so it only makes sense that parenting itself actually burns calories. A new study has done the calculations of the energy we expend taking care of our little ones. Parenting can burn up to 50,000 calories per month. The survey from retailer Wren Kitchens compared parents’ typical activities to data from calorielab.com, finding that parents burn 1,478 calories on daily activities and 2,374 calories on weekly activities. The top calorie burners were carrying small children, childcare, and moving household items. Of course, parenting can’t take the place of regular exercise to keep us healthy, but maybe it can at least cover the extra chocolate we are hiding from our kiddos and the extra slices of king cake we are planning to eat this month.

GOLDFISH CRACKERS GET VEGGIE MAKEOVER

Sneaking spinach into a casserole or shredded carrots in a meatball is one way to get more veggies into our little sweethearts. The Campbell Soup Company’s Pepperidge Farm is giving us a possibly foolproof way to do that by adding vegetables to their iconic Goldfish crackers. Goldfish Veggie crackers come in two kid-friendly flavors, cheesy tomato and sweet carrot, and provide a one-third serving of vegetables. “We’re excited to expand the Goldfish portfolio with a plant-based offering, baked to our standards with 100 percent real cheese and colors sourced from plants,” says Janda Lukin, chief marketing officer for Campbell’s Snacks.

SHOULD GLITTER BE BANNED? SOME SCIENTISTS SAY YES

Glitter is called the herpes of craft supplies for a reason. The microscopic sparkles are impossible to clean up entirely, and it turns out that is true not only in your daughter’s bedroom but also in the environment. Some scientists are pushing to have glitter banned. Glitter is made of plastic, specifically polyethylene terephthalate or mylar. The microplastics make their way into the oceans and damage marine life and fish who eat the glitter over their typical diets. Rather than live a sparkle-free life, some companies such as BioGlitz and EcoGlitter produce biodegradable glitter that is safer for the environment. ■ bioglitz.co or ecoglitter.com 20

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FREE ONLINE TEST PREP FOR ACT & SAT

If the best things in life are free, then online test prep courses offered by Varsity Tutors are surely the best. The company is aiming to alleviate inequalities in the college admissions process with the free, live online SAT and ACT preparation classes. Using curricula proven to help students improve their test performance, the courses feature interactive discussion, weekly homework, full-length practice tests and teaching assistants to answer questions in real time. Classes meet twice a week for two and a half hours over five weeks. SAT classes begin February 5 and March 30, and the next ACT class begins March 3. ■ varsitytutors.com/free-sat-act-prep-course

SCREENTIME GENIE CAN HELP CURB TECH ADDICTION

Do you wish for less screen time for yourself or your teens and tweens? The ScreenTime Genie may be able to help grant your wish. The clever chat bot from Stanford University’s Behavior Design Lab can help distracted and overwhelmed tech users to refocus by answering a few questions about their goals and motivation levels. The genie will then offer them suggestions and easy steps, and provide them with tools for reaching those goals to help create healthier technology habits for them. The bot is run by a group of researchers led by BJ Fogg, PhD, author of the new book Tiny Habits: The Small Changes that Change Everything. ■ screentime.stanford.edu FEB RUA RY 2020 | B R PA R EN T S .COM

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CONNECT EDUCATION $33 MILLION GRANT TO CREATE 600+ NEW CHILDCARE SEATS Educating young Louisianans became easier thanks to a new federal grant won by the Louisiana Department of Education. Worth more than $11 million each year for three years, the grant allows the state to create 600 new seats at early learning sites for low-income children from birth to age three, improve early childhood education programming quality, and build local communities’ capacity to meet young learners’ needs. The grant is a step toward alleviating the crisis of childcare access, says State Superintendent John White. “However, significant barriers remain for thousands of working families in need of quality care and education for their children. We must continue to work together to find solutions and close this gap.”

EPISCOPAL STUDENTS DONATE CARE PACKAGES TO BREAST CANCER PATIENTS

Warm thoughts and well wishes are always welcome when it comes to patients who are battling breast cancer. Middle school students at the Episcopal School of Baton Rouge recently came together and donated and created more than 100 care packages to do just that for local patients who are fighting the disease. The effort, organized by the middle school cheerleading squad, delivered the good cheer to patients who are at Mary Bird Perkins-Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center and Woman’s Hospital. This is the second annual effort made by the school, which doubled in size from its first year.

HARMONY PARK BRINGS INCLUSIVITY TO PLAY AT DUTCHTOWN MIDDLE

FRESHWATER IS STATE’S MOST IMPROVED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Each year, the Louisiana Department of Education tracks the public schools with accountability scores. Last year, only nine schools in the state improved by at least 10 percentage points, and among the schools who improved, Freshwater Elementary School in Denham Springs was the most improved. Freshwater Elementary School increased its overall mastery rate from 43 percent to 60 percent. Freshwater Elementary School earned an “A” status rating as a Top Gains Honoree. “When they started announcing the numbers, I couldn’t believe it. I knew our students and teachers had given their best, but the numbers were amazing,” says Freshwater Elementary School’s principal, Julie Dugas. “I’m so proud of our teachers and their willingness to do what it takes to make our students successful.”

A new sensory area, Harmony Park, has opened at Dutchtown Middle School. The fully inclusive park and outdoor classroom area was made possible by a $2,500 Ascension Fund Grant funded by EATEL in memory of Anona C. Banker. Yvette Surla, special education teacher, and Aimee Peroddin, gifted teacher, envisioned the green space, which is between the two buildings where their classes meet. “Both groups of students struggle with peer-to-peer interactions and really crave more outside time due to their intense academic programs,” Surla says. “As teachers, we wanted to create developmental connections to benefit both populations.” One of a number of projects sparked by the school’s kindness campaign, Harmony Park is a work in progress, with parent volunteers helping complete it this school year.

KENILWORTH BASKETBALL COURT SPRUCED UP

Even academically oriented schools emphasize physical activity, and being active in well kept spaces is better for students. The outdoor basketball courts at Kenilworth Science and Technology School recently received a major facelift thanks to Keep Louisiana Beautiful. More than 50 volunteers from Entergy Corporation and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana cleaned, painted and repaired the four full-sized basketball courts, which are available for student use as well as people living in the neighborhood. Principal Hazel Regis calls the project “a slam dunk.” She says, “It looks so much nicer, and the students also are excited about the new basketball goals.” The project cost about $5,000 and was paid for by the two companies. 22

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Bella Jay Bickley loves to stay busy. The 10-year-old fourth grader at Parkview Baptist School is an active volunteer, dancer and athlete in addition to keeping up with her academic pursuits. “She loves to volunteer her time to help in the community, and that’s what makes her amazing to me,” says Brooke Bickley, Bella Jay’s mom. Bella Jay is a junior volunteer for the Bella Bowman Foundation, a local nonprofit supporting pediatric brain cancer patients, families and research. “She enjoys that more than anything in the whole world.” Bella Jay helps the foundation in a number of ways, from selling books and lemonade to collecting toys. “She loves doing that throughout the year,” Brooke says. Bella Jay also sets up a box at her dad’s, Doug Bickley’s, office to collect donations for people experiencing homelessness. As a member of the competition squad for Center Stage Performing Arts Academy, Bella Jay competes as a singer and dancer. Bella Jay uses her talents to encourage classmates as part of her school’s elementary cheerleading squad. She participates in other sports too, including swim team in the summer, cross country in the fall and basketball in the winter. Big sister to five-year-old brother Boston, Bella Jay loves to read and started a book club with friends. She’s part of accelerated English and accelerated reader groups at school and qualified for the Duke University Talent Identification Program. Whether reading, competing or volunteering, Bella Jay is definitely one amazing kid. DO YOU HAVE ONE AMAZING KID? Email editorial@brparents.com. FEB RUA RY 2020 | B R PA R EN T S .COM

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CONNECT EDUCATION 16 TEACHERS SURPRISED WITH NEW LAPTOPS

Although every student at Scotlandville PreEngineering Magnet Academy has access to a Google Chromebook, not all teachers did. Louisiana Healthcare Connections partnered with the school to donate 16 Lenovo Chromebooks for SPEMA teachers to help correct that imbalance at the school. The school uses a variety of online learning platforms to support its science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) curriculum. Having quick, reliable and portable computers will help them keep up with their tech-savvy students. “The right community partner came along at just the right time to help us reach our goal of being 1:1 for students and staff,” says principal Shalika Scott.

RUNNELS SCHOOL FIFTH GRADERS LEARN AERODYNAMICS

How do planes fly? The answer lies in aerodynamics, and fifth grade students in John Baird’s science class at Runnels School recently got a hands-on experience using model airplanes to explore the subject. Each student flew his or her glider through a tunnel of hula hoops to see how far they could go while remaining straight and level. “It’s a fun, hands-on way for students to learn about the laws of motion and principles involved in flight,” Baird says. “This STEM project requires students to analyze the performance of their gliders and make adjustments using principles they have learned in class.”

EVERYONE’S A WINNER AT PARKVIEW’S CANNED GOOD OLYMPICS

UNITED WAY GRANT WILL IMPROVE READING SKILLS

Accessing tools to improve reading skills will now be easier for Redemptorist St. Gerard Elementary students. Capital Area United Way awarded the school a $1,000 grant for literacy materials for third and fourth graders. Students have been participating in Vello, an online tutoring program that helps children learn to read. “Vello is the best way to have a direct impact on a child’s life. All of us at United Way are happy to partner with Redemptorist St. Gerard in order to help advance children’s reading skills,” says Melanie Henderson, community impact manager.

A look of pride could be seen on all Early Childhood students’ faces as they participated in the third annual Canned Good Olympics at Parkview Baptist School. Held in the middle school gym, the event combined donations of canned goods for the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank with fun physical activities. Each student was introduced, passed the torch and took the court to show their stuff. The students were also able to tour the food bank and learn the importance of giving back to their community when delivering their donation of 676 pounds, about 100 pounds more than the previous year’s donation.

TRASH BECOMES TREASURE WITH MAYFAIR LABORATORY SCHOOL’S NEW COMPOST PROJECT

Anyone who has eaten at a school cafeteria can be astonished at the amount of food waste produced. Fourth graders at Mayfair Laboratory School are working to turn much of that discarded food into compost for gardening. Callie Snow, an LSU College of the Coast and Environment senior, volunteered more than 30 hours to help the students and their teachers Katelyn Fage and Emily Hand. “We learned about the microbe processes within a compost garden, the anatomy of a successful aerobic composting system, and the ideal ‘ingredients’ for compost,” Hand says. Students analyzed lunch menus and created posters to let everyone know which food items are usable in compost. Parent volunteers helped build the compost areas, and the project will continue in years to come. 24

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ST. GEORGE TEAM TOPS FIRST LEGO LEAGUE COMPETITION

St. George Catholic School’s First LEGO League team advanced to the state championship and received the Core Values Award during its qualifier. Judges recognized the team for excelling across the inspiration, teamwork, and gracious professionalism categories. “This team displayed extraordinary enthusiasm and spirit, knows they can accomplish more together than they can as individuals, and show each other and other teams respect at all times,” says Jenny Bruno, the school’s technology coordinator and mentor, along with Wendy Bridevaux, math teacher. Team members are Coy Bruno, Chloe Clement, Beau Legnon, Quinn Luu, Ethan Noel, Rileigh Rinaudo, Gabriel Serrano, Max Schexnailder, Kenzie Stentiford, and Kaiser Stentiford.

LOCAL STUDENTS EARN PERFECT NATIONAL TEST SCORES

Acing tests comes naturally to many high achieving students in Baton Rouge, but recently, two students have achieved perfect scores on national tests. University Laboratory School senior Andrew Moncada scored a perfect 36 on the ACT test, a college admissions exam that measures what students learn in high school and assesses academic readiness for college. Only one-tenth of one percent of students taking the ACT achieve perfect scores. Runnels School junior Connor Porthouse earned a perfect 1520 on the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test, a standardized test administered by the College Board. The PSAT/ NMSQT is the qualifying test for entry to the 2021 National Merit Scholarship Program. Connor aced the ACT last year as a sophomore. FEB RUA RY 2020 | B R PA R EN T S .COM

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CONNECT PATHWAYS TO PARENTING

Dentophobia

F

rom the whirring of drills to strange new smells and bright lights, the dentist office can provoke anxiety for anyone. Children especially may become anxious. Mild dislike can progress to dentophobia, or general fear of receiving dental care. Research shows 5-8 percent of Americans refuse dental care because of fear, and up to 20 percent will only go to the dentist when necessary due to fear. Parents and dentists can help alleviate the fear for children. Erin Smith Piper, LCSW, a Baton Rouge therapist in private practice, says parents should trust their gut when managing anxiety. “No one knows your child better than you. You have to choose your path and the way that is best for your child and stick with that.” Dentophobia may be avoided by starting regular dental check-ups at an early age so kids get used to them, and Piper says it’s important to choose a pediatric dentist. “They know the safe words to keep kids comfortable and have child-friendly activities in the office such as TVs in the ceilings. Toys and trinkets for prizes can be very helpful.” Bringing your child to your own dental check-ups is a good idea, Piper says. “They see how simple it can be. It’s really just something we do to keep our teeth clean and healthy. If you’re comfortable and relaxed there, they’re going to feed off that.” When your little one needs something more than a cleaning, the fear can build. Piper says again that knowing your child will help determine the strategy to work through any anxiety. “Some children really need to be talked through the process, and for others, the less information, the better.” If the fear becomes more intense, Piper recommends working with your dentist on solutions. There are weighted blankets that can soothe a child in the chair, and experimenting with lighting and background noise can help, as well as medications. Piper says she’s a parent first, therapist second, and she sees no problem in promising a treat for something as intense as a dental visit. “It’s best to use your common sense as a parent and don’t let anyone tell you that you should do this or you shouldn’t do this.” ■

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27


LIVE LOCAL PROFILE

Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence By Melanie Forstall Lemoine

If someone told you that your odds of winning the lottery were 1 in 3, you’d probably play, right? Those do seem like pretty good odds. But what if someone told you that today’s teens are just that likely to be affected by intimate partner or dating violence? Those numbers suddenly take on a totally different perspective.

A

ccording to Mariah Stidham Wineski, Executive Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence, teens and young adults are actually disproportionately affected by abuse. In fact, young women between the ages of 18-24 experience intimate partner violence at a rate almost twice the national average. “One in three high school students experience physical or sexual violence at the hands of a dating partner,” says Wineski. “One in three, in high school; it’s happening to a third of our kids and we are simply not talking about it enough.” Domestic violence against people of all ages is extremely common in Louisiana. In fact, studies report that more than 1.2 million people across all age spans in Louisiana have experienced physical abuse, sexual abuse, or stalking 28

by a partner. Wineski stresses that these statistics are very much related to teen dating violence. Domestic abuse or abuse from an intimate or dating partner often starts during the teen years. Therefore, Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s efforts are often aimed at a younger audience than one might think. February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, and it is important to know the signs of possible teen dating violence or abuse. According to Wineski, “Abuse often starts early, and teens who are navigating new relationships may be particularly vulnerable to experiencing abuse.” Some of the key red flags to look out for include: extreme jealousy or possessiveness, unexplained marks or bruises, partner emails or texts excessively, your child seems depressed or anxious, your child stops participating

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in extracurricular activities or other interests, your child stops spending time with other friends and family, your child’s partner abuses other people or animals, and you notice that your child begins to dress differently. The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence is a network of organizations and individuals across Louisiana working together to end domestic violence. The coalition provides services to over 17,000 victims statewide each year. The network of organizations provides approximately 65,000 shelter beds a night each year. The coalition also provides a free crisis hotline which answers about 43,000 calls annually. Anyone who feels that they need services, or if they know someone who may be in an abusive relationship, can start by calling the hotline at (888) 411-1333. The hotline is available 24/7. The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence incorporated as a nonprofit organization in 1982, however, the community can help support their efforts. Visit them online for additional information about the coalition, resources, and ways to get involved. ■


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LIVE DAD NEXT DOOR

Geno McLaughlin By Amanda Miller

OCCUPATION ▪ Community Engagement Specialist at Build Baton Rouge CHILDREN ▪ Sai, 17; Brooklyn, 14; and Jolie, 8 HOBBIES ▪ photography, poetry, writing, and volunteering Geno McLaughlin’s love for his community is unmatched. His weekends are often spent venturing from one location to another with his children in tow, volunteering his time throughout Baton Rouge. For Geno, he is at his best when he is serving others, working with them to determine their needs and finding ways to fulfill them. His hands-on approach to life is reflected in his parenting, where he can always be found going from one school activity to the next. He’s an attentive father and a self described dream chaser, who encourages his children to do the same each day. How would you describe raising your children?

How has parenthood changed you?

What kind of dad are you?

G: I don’t know that I was prepared. I had to get

G: It made me grow up quicker. When you’re

G: I set high expectations, and I’m fiercely

used to it. Overnight, your life changes, but it’s

younger, you’re very much about yourself,

protective and firm, but I encourage them to

very rewarding. In parenting, there are so many

and becoming a parent means your kids are

chase their dreams. I’m the soccer dad, the band

moments that you live for.

depending on you. I’ve experienced love in a

parent, and the track dad. I am at their school

way I never had before, and I have a deeper

way more than they want me to be!

What do you like to do as a family?

understanding of my parents, too.

G: We love movies and staying home and playing

What’s something you hope to instill in them?

games. They will come to events with me and

What do you love most about your job?

G: A belief in self and that they can accomplish

volunteer. We play board games and Uno. That’s

G: I had a chance to marry my purpose with my

anything. There will be obstacles, but I’ll be there

when we are the most competitive.

job. I started in sales and marketing, but I truly

to help them jump those hurdles. I want them to

found my happiness in helping people. I’m lucky

know they have a duty and responsibility to help

What’s the greatest thing about being a dad?

and blessed to have found a space that allows me

others because not everyone has the same in life.

G: You’re leaving a legacy. You want to work hard

to help people.

so they won’t have to experience hardships. Of

Best parenting advice you have ever received?

course, they will have their own ups and downs,

How do you make time to relax?

G: You don’t have to do it all by yourself. For a

but you want to ensure they’re equipped for

G: I’m still learning. I say yes way too much, so I

while, I didn’t ask for help. I didn’t want to be a

life. Being a dad is hard and expensive, but those

am trying to find a balance. Getting quiet time

burden on anyone. I have learned to ask for help

moments make it worth it.

and allowing myself to recharge is important.

so I can be there for my kids.

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What personality trait of yours do your children also have? G: They’re all good kids and they enjoy helping out. My son is introspective. Brooklyn is thoughtful, and Jolie is loving. What are some things you want to do that are still on your bucket list? G: Travel more. I want to see their hopes and dreams come to fruition. I also want to start checking off my business venture ideas in my phone. I’m an idea person, and I have a backlog of ideas. What did you have as a child that kids today don’t have? G: We were made to communicate more. Without technology, we were able to be more creative. We created what we could not see. Who are your greatest role models? G: Professionally, my father. We’re almost mirror images of each other. He passed away a couple of years ago, and I often think about the conversations we would have today. My social side comes from my mom. It’s a balance. Do you have any advice for other parents? G: Admit when you’re wrong. We, as parents, make mistakes. It’s okay to apologize to your kids. Also, build up your young people because they’re our legacy. ■

Q&A

The parenting item I couldn’t live without…my planner. I would be lost without it. In my fridge, you will always find…juice. Favorite book growing up…Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH. Music I’m loving…Daniel Caesar, Kanye’s Sunday Service, and anything R&B. I feel my best when I…recharge. I am the most productive then. My favorite television shows are...Top Chef, Power, and Black-ish. My favorite ice cream is...Pralines and Cream. FEB RUA RY 2020 | B R PA R EN T S .COM

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LIVE EXCEPTIONAL LIVES

Dishing Up Love While Waiting for a New Heart By Mari Walker

As a heart patient, Hunter Chase Henry is unable to do many of the active things other kids take for granted. But he shines as a chef, perfecting recipes and going by “Uncle Hunter” in the kitchen. The name comes from his nephew, Dustin, and nieces, Emma and Claire, whom he calls “Big Bertha” to aggravate their mother, Kacy. Uncle Hunter started cooking when he was a patient with Pediatric Cardiology Associates in Baton Rouge and his doctors put him on a low-sodium diet due to swelling. “What I did to make food kind of taste better was get a bottle of Tabasco and put it on peanut butter and jelly,” he says. He continues to experiment with spices and flavors to make tasty foods that work for his dietary restrictions. 32

In his 14 years, Hunter has had three open-heart surgeries, the first in Chicago when he was a premature newborn after being airlifted from Louisiana. His parents, Robby and Laura Henry, followed. Closer hospitals in New Orleans and Houston were unavailable after Hurricane Rita. Laura says Hunter’s prematurity and subsequent stay in the NICU turned out to be a blessing, as otherwise he may not have been diagnosed in time. “We did not know about his heart condition until he was five days old,” Laura says. Doctors heard a heart murmur, and testing revealed that Hunter has hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Only half his heart works as it should. Hunter also has ventricular tachycardia, problems with his liver, and bilateral neurosensory hearing loss, a complication from surgeries.

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Now, Hunter needs a new heart and has been on the transplant list for a little more than a year. He must be within an hour of Texas Children’s Hospital when the call comes, so the family waits in Houston rather than at home in Youngsville. A seventh grader, Hunter is able to continue his studies remotely with teachers from his school in the Lafayette Parish School System. A veteran of many medical procedures and heart catheterizations, Hunter receives physical and occupational therapy and sometimes uses a wheelchair and oxygen. Other kids sometimes stare and point, which is upsetting. “It freaks me out, and sometimes I almost cry,” he says. “I wish they’d ask me what’s wrong and if I’m OK.” While he waits for a new-to-him heart, Hunter serves on the advisory board for Texas Children’s. He attends monthly two-hour meetings, speaking up for his peers to make positive changes. When thinking about other patients, Hunter says, “I want to tell other kids no matter how sick they are, don’t let that stop them from achieving their dreams.” Uncle Hunter’s dreams are to own a restaurant, go to Paris and be on the Food Network, specifically to challenge Chef Bobby Flay. “I can cook all kinds of stuff,” he says, listing his favorites: jambalaya, étouffée, enchiladas, gumbo and boudin. Uncle Hunter shares cooking videos on his YouTube channel and is working on a cookbook. February is American Heart Month, and February 14 is Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Day. “Valentine’s Day used to be Valentine’s Day for me until he was born,” Laura says. “This changed my whole outlook. It’s become my time when I celebrate not just my son but other kids.” Stubbornness may not seem like a quality worth cultivating, but for Hunter that innate character trait has been key to his survival. “Hunter is a miracle, and he is going to eventually be able one day to have a life that he’s never ever had,” Laura says. ■


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LIVE FAITH

Time To Be Real

By Pastor Fernie Rivera, Pastor of Mid City Church, a campus of First UMC

I

am amazed that I did not leave the church as a young adult. My family was never a “church” family. Yet somehow, I am a 30-year-old millennial who not only attends church, I am about to launch one. I did almost leave the church when I was 22, though. I struggled with depression and dealt with anger, my anxiety would rise at any moment, and I felt like my life was falling apart. And while I was involved in the church, I felt completely alone because I felt like the only one who didn’t have his life put together. Perhaps that is the reason young adults are leaving the church in droves. Depression and anxiety are at an all-time high. The opioid crisis is getting worse and worse. And for the first time in American history, millennials are on track to be worse off financially than their parents. Young adults are struggling with many real life issues. Yet, when they walk into our churches, they feel like they have to hide their struggles in order to fit in. It is as if “church people” are afraid to be real and honest about their struggles. We know that grace has forgiven our past, but we are still afraid of what people would think of us if we were honest about our struggles. So, we hide them from the world and in particular from other Christians. That was enough to make me want to leave the church. Like I said, I almost did. Then I met Christians who were real and honest about their struggles, and in doing so, I realized I didn’t have to leave. Maybe it’s time to be real. Maybe it’s time we start talking about how many of us struggle with depression; about the fact that marriage is hard; about how we don’t all have it all figured out. Maybe, just maybe, young adults would come back to our churches if we were willing to be honest about our daily struggles. After all, none of us are immune to the struggles of life. When I found people willing to be honest about their struggles, I found a home in the church. And maybe if we all create that kind of space, more and more young adults will continue to stick around. ■ 34

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Gardening with Kids Playing in Dirt isn’t Just Fun– It’s Healthy, Too! By Kimberly Blaker

2019-20 Cover Kid Rosie M. Photo Credit: Kleinpeter Photography

There’s no question, playing in the dirt tops the list of fun for kids, particularly young children, despite the protests of many well-intended parents. If you happen to be one of those worried parents, you can put your fears aside. As it turns out, dirt is actually beneficial to the long-term health of kids, according to a Northwestern University article by Clare Milliken, Germs at four, less inflammation at forty. Studies have found that early exposure to certain 36

germs, like those found in dirt, actually helps kids’ immune systems learn to regulate inflammation better. In turn, this exposure reduces kids’ risk for many diseases throughout their lives. For that reason, a family garden is a perfect opportunity to help build your kids’ immune systems. Better still, gardening offers lots of other benefits to kids and families. Through gardening, kids learn to be responsible by caring for their own plants. It’s also a great way to help kids

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learn about and develop an appreciation for science. Another health benefit is that gardening encourages healthier eating. Not to mention, it’s an excellent activity for family bonding. So, gather up your kids and gardening supplies, head outdoors, and get ready for some dirt-filled fun. Getting Started First, decide where to plant your garden. Then, allow a small space for your child to have his or her own garden, too. This


will help build your child’s enthusiasm for the garden and encourage him or her to take ownership and responsibility for it. Having their own garden can be exciting and rewarding for kids because they know that they alone (or with minimal help) grew those little seeds into a marvelous plant. Next, decide what to plant. For young children, consider fast-growing plants they are familiar with. Little kids really love plants that are colorful or have really strong scents. If your kids are older, let them choose what they want to grow. But, keep in mind your child’s personality. If he tends to be impatient, suggest plants that are easy to care for and grow quickly. As you proceed in planning and preparation, include your child in it as much as possible. Remember, this stage is as much fun for kids as it is for parents and helps build kids’ enthusiasm. Also, let your kids help you draw up the garden plan. If they’re old enough, they can also create their own shopping list.

When you go shopping for the supplies, take your kids along and let them pick out their own seeds and gardening tools. For the safety of young children, look for kids’ gardening tools made of durable plastic. Planting Your Garden When you begin planting, show your child how to plant the seeds and how to space them apart correctly. Then, have your child water the seeds as directed. To help your child take responsibility for his or her own garden, put a daily gardening task list on the refrigerator. Also, to help your child maintain enthusiasm, suggest keeping a garden log. Kids can have fun recording the date of plantings, each day’s gardening activities, when each plant sprouts, the amount of growth of plants, and the harvesting. Finally, after harvesting, have your child help you prepare the vegetables. Try different ways of preparing or cooking them to help your kids develop a life-long love for fresh, healthy veggies.

Scheduling Your Planting Knowing when foods are in season will help make your gardening experience exciting. According to the LSU AgCenter, vegetables can be planted year-round, and when it comes to planting fruits, success will depend largely on selection, soil, pruning, fertilization, irrigation, and pest control. Download LSU AgCenter’s guide on when to plant fruits and vegetables in Louisiana by visiting us online. ■ Books on Gardening with Kids Get your family’s gardening project off on the right foot with these books. The Little Gardener by Jan Gerardi Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner Roots, Shoots, Buckets & Boots: Gardening Together with Children by Sharon Lovejoy Gardening Lab for Kids: 52 Fun Experiments to Learn, Grow, Harvest, Make, Play, and Enjoy Your Garden by Renata Brown

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FROM -BLIND R O L O C TO

o l o C

e v a r B r

By Malia Jacobson

Growing up in a mostly white region, I don’t remember a lot of family conversations about race. But my lawyer parents, both public defenders, shared a law practice in a racially diverse neighborhood. I saw how their clients with black and brown skin fared differently in the criminal justice system than those with white skin, even if I didn’t understand why. Thirty years later, I know more about how racial identities impact our lives. My daughter attends middle school in the same neighborhood where I started thinking about racial equity. Her school is inclusive, and her teachers are great guides. But that doesn’t mean I get to skip important conversations about race. Talking About Race Before they can talk, kids are forming ideas about race. Studies, including 38

Kenneth and Mamie Clark’s “Doll Study,” show that children can identify racial characteristics in early childhood, associate positive characteristics to white skin, and show a preference for their own race from infancy. Education and systems consultant Erin Jones uses the doll study in her workshops on racial equity. “We’re making decisions about skin color really early in life,” says Jones. “We’re getting messages from the world about what’s good and what’s bad and who’s smart and who’s not, and we have to disrupt those messages that kids are getting.” Creating a Safe Space So, how can parents start talking? Start by establishing a safe space where kids know it’s okay to say the “wrong” thing, because you’re all learning together. Kids should know that if they use the wrong word, adults won’t flip, says Hope Teague-Bowling, Interchangeable White Ladies podcast co-host. Focus on a kid’s intent, not on terms that might be outdated, she says. “Adults

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TH K

G WI TALKIN

ACE

UT R O B A S ID

need to be understanding but also use a teachable moment to build language to talk about tough topics. In the classroom, I hear all sorts of terms, and I usually ask students to explain their thinking or choice of words. Then, we discuss their impact or how it comes across.” When people are afraid of messing up, they stop talking about race, says Jones. “I approach this topic with grace and mercy–I assume the best intent. We have to create a dynamic where we let people make mistakes.” Having a Vocabulary Lesson In episode two of the podcast, TeagueBowling notes that students are seeing and experiencing different things around racial equity but don’t always have the language to talk about it. Parents can help here by giving kids the most basic building block for communicating about race–language. Jones starts workshops this way, because talking about race gets easier once people learn common language. “We talk about the difference between


race, which is kind of a created thing but still something we need to talk about, and ethnicity and culture, why it’s important for multiethnic and biracial students to have the power to identify themselves as they choose, and why we might say ‘black and brown people,’ which I tend to use more than ‘people of color.’” Going From Color-Blind to Color Brave Well-intentioned white parents might be squeamish about race conversations because they embrace a “color-blind” ideal–an “I don’t see color” world in which racial identities don’t matter. Though color-blindness comes from a well-intentioned place, it’s problematic. “As white people, we tend to promote color blindness because we think that’s the best way to make the world fair and equal,” says Teague-Bowling. “But the reality is that our racial divide is our history. Whether it’s slavery or Japanese interment, we need to see all these pieces as part of our history–we aren’t removed from it.” Jones adds, “When you say you’re color blind, what I hear is that you don’t see me. Instead of color blind, be color brave.” That means acknowledging the role that race plays in our history and how racial identities impact people. And while this does involve broaching difficult topics, it also involves conversations about the people in your child’s world. “We can talk about black excellence, for example, and talk about someone’s race as another positive attribute and part of who they are,” says Teague-Bowling. For today’s kids are growing up amid deep political, social, and economic divides, conversations about race can build critical thinking skills and empathy, tools they need to understand their world. And for white people, like me, who are wanting to do a better job at communicating with others about race, listening to one another is just as important as talking. “This is a process for all of us, and you’ve just got to arrive knowing that you’re not going to get it all fixed,” explains Jones. “Keep talking and be willing to grow.” ■

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Transportation Service

IEP Assistance

Overall Performance

Principal Address Phone Number • Website

Grades Taught

School

Program Theme

The Charter and Magnet School Profiles provide even more information, including the school’s history and achievements, educational and athletic programs offered, and what to expect when it comes to your child’s development at the school.

Types of Charter Schools Type 1: New school • Local school board authorized Type 2: New or conversion school • BESE authorized Type 3: Conversion school • Local school board authorized Type 3B: Former Type 5 charter school transferred from RSD back to local school system Type 4: New or conversion school • Local school board & BESE authorized Type 5: Recovery School District schools • BESE-authorized louisianabelieves.com

Total Enrollment

Get an inside look at our local charter and magnet schools before you make the important decision of which school is best for your child. This Magnet and Charter School Listing is an easy-to-navigate directory of magnet and charter schools featuring key information and services.

Baton Rouge Center for Visual and Performing Arts Candice Hartley 2040 South Acadian Thwy. (225) 344-0084 | brcvpa.com

K-5

475

Visual & Performing Arts

A

Baton Rouge Foreign Language Academic Immersion Magnet Cheryl Miller 4510 Bawell St. (225) 343-6630 | brflaim.org

K-5

449

Foreign Language Immersion

A

Baton Rouge Magnet High School Nanette McCann 2825 Government St. (225) 383-0520 | brmhs.com

9-12

1,469

Academic

A

Belaire High School Angela Jones 12121 Tams Dr. (225) 272-1860 ebrschools.org/ebrschools/belaire-magnet-high-school

9-12

721

Engineering, Entertainment Technology, Animation, Coding

D*

PK3-8

296

Montessori

C

6-8

494

Digital Arts/Communication

F*

Belfair Montessori Magnet School Jamar Jackson 4451 Fairfields Ave. (225) 356-6191 | schools.ebrschools.org/belfair Capitol Middle School Viola Jackson 5100 Greenwell Springs Rd. (225) 231-9292 | schools.ebrschools.org/capitolmiddle 42

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* This school has a magnet program within the school, and because of this, the magnet program’s performance score is averaged in with the traditional public school’s performance score.

Magnet School LISTING


Overall Performance

IEP Assistance

Transportation Service

Academic Magnet, Montessori, MicroSociety School

C*

K-5

400

Academic and Visual Performing Arts

B

6-12

505

Medical/Biomedical Science

D*

Istrouma High School Michael Bester 3730 Winbourne Ave. (225) 636-2686 | istroumahigh.org

9-12

800

Honors Academy, Broadcasting Communications

D*

Istrouma Middle Magnet School Pamela Talbert 3730 Winbourne Ave. (225) 831-9997 | istroumamiddlemagnet.org

6-8

150

Honors Academy, Broadcasting Communications

C

9-12

1,150

A

Mayfair Laboratory School Jessica Mitchell 9880 Hyacinth Ave. (225) 761-7849 | mayfairlabschool.com

K-8

436

A

McKinley Middle Academic Magnet School of Visual and Performing Arts Dr. Tongelia Rowan 1550 Eddie Robinson Senior Dr. (225) 388-0089 | mckinleymiddlemagnet.com

6-8

750

Academic/Visual & Performing Arts

A

PK-5

393

Creative Sciences and Arts

C*

6-8

618

F*

Dufrocq School, The Mary Robvais 330 South 19th St. (225) 334-7653 | thedufrocqschool.com Forest Heights Academy of Excellence LaDarrion Jackson 7447 Sumrall Dr. (225) 355-5681 | fhaevpa.com

Glen Oaks Senior High School Delwyn Daigre 6650 Cedar Grove Dr. (225) 356-4306 | schools.ebrschools.org/glenoakshigh

Lee Magnet High School Robert Howle 1105 Lee Dr. (225) 924-9406 | leemagnet.com

Park Forest Elementary School Rosalind Wright 10717 Elain Dr. (225) 272-0814 | parkforestmagnet.org

Park Forest Middle School Curtis M. Walker 3760 Altha Dr. (225) 275-6650 | parkforestmiddle.com

Grades Taught

Program Theme

606

Principal Address Phone Number • Website

Total Enrollment

PreK3-5

School

Digital Arts, Engineering, Biomedical, Cyber Security, Computer Science

Academic with Environmental Focus

Animation, Robotics, Coding, Entertainment Technology, Renewable Energy

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IEP Assistance

Transportation Service

Academic, Business Entrepreneurship, Government Affairs/Law, Engineering

C*

Scotlandville Pre-Engineering Magnet Academy Shalika Scott 9147 Elm Grove Dr. (225) 775-0776 | gospema.org

6-8

421

STEAM

C

Sherwood Middle Academic Magnet School Jamie Noel 1020 Marlbrook Dr. (225) 272-3090 | sherwoodmiddlemagnet.org

6-8

775

High School Preparatory & College/Career Readiness

A

Southeast Middle Magnet School Amber Boyd 15000 South Harrell’s Ferry Rd. (225) 753-5930 | smsdataschool.com

6-8

722

Digital Arts

A*

Tara High School Karen Triche 9002 Whitehall Ave. (225) 456-6638 | taratrojans.org

9-12

897

STEM, Cyber Technology

F*

Villa Del Rey Creative Sciences and Arts Magnet Dr. Joy Abernathy-Dyer 9765 Cuyhanga Pkwy. (225) 924-1606 | vdrcsams.weebly.com

K-5

380

Robotics, Coding, and Engineering

D*

6-8

890

World Language Immersion

C*

PK-5

440

Academic with Environmental Focus/STEM Focus

A

9-12

1,350+

Academics

C*

6-8

1,050

Academic with STEM Focus

C*

Westdale Middle School Hillary Greer 5650 Claycut Rd. (225) 924-1308 | westdalemiddleschool.com Westdale Heights Academic Magnet School Catasha Edwards 2000 College Dr. (225) 926-5421 | westdaleheights.weebly.com Woodlawn High School Scott Stevens 15755 Jefferson Hwy. (225) 753-1200 | woodlawnhighbr.org Woodlawn Middle School Raquel Brown 14939 Tiger Bend Rd. (225) 751-0436 | woodlawnmiddlebr.org 44

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* This school has a magnet program within the school, and because of this, the magnet program’s performance score is averaged in with the traditional public school’s performance score.

Overall Performance

999

Grades Taught

Program Theme

9-12

Principal Address Phone Number • Website

Total Enrollment

Scotlandville Magnet High School Tiffany Quiett 9870 Scotland Ave. (225) 775-3715 | scotlandvillemagnethigh.org

School


BASIS Baton Rouge Roberto Ramirez 7550 McCall Dr. (225) 308-7450 | BASISbatonrouge.com

2018

BASIS.ed

K-5

528

34

Baton Rouge University Preparatory Elementary Brytanni Blanchard 7802 Howell Blvd. (225) 364-9805 | upelementary.org

2014

Baton Rouge University Prep Elementary

K-2

370

35

Children’s Charter School Latasha Skidmore 1143 North St. (225) 387-9273 | ccesbr.org

1997

N/A

K-5

181

Collegiate Baton Rouge Kelsey Lambrecht 282 Lobdell Blvd. (225) 892-6962 | collegiatebr.org

2017

Collegiate Academies

9-11

CSAL Elementary Andrea Mathis 1705 Madison Ave. (225) 412-9900 | csalcharterschools.org

2020

CSAL, Inc.

CSAL Middle School Darcy Franklin 1555 Madison Ave. (225) 336-1410 | csalcharterschools.org

1997

CSAL, Inc.

Dalton Elementary Christina Faulk 3605 Ontario St. (225) 357-0244 | rsl.org

2014

Democracy Prep Baton Rouge Ashley Livingston 4055 Prescott Rd. (225) 372-2037 | democracyprep.org

2015

Charter Type

61

School Performance Score Student Progress Rating

488

Cafeteria B/L/S/D

K-8

Transportation Service

National Heritage Academies

Total Faculty

Total Enrollment

2014

Phone Number • Website

Managing Organization

Advantage Charter Academy Ashley Chavis 14740 Plank Rd. (225) 774-3111 | advantagecharteracademy.org

School Principal Address

Year Established

Grades Taught

Charter School LISTING B/L/S

D

C

2

B/L

B

A

1

B/L/S

N/A

N/A

2

22

B/L/S

F

C

1

420

55

B/L/S/D

C

A

2

K-2

75

10

B/L/S

N/A

N/A

1

6-8

300

26

B/L

C

B

1

Redesign Schools PreK-5 Louisiana

300

30

B/L

F

B

5

Democracy Prep Public Schools

540

49

B/L/S

D

B

3

K-8

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Total Faculty 12

2019

GEO Foundation

9-10

200

20

2017

GEO Foundation

K-8

730

GEO Prep Academy of Greater Baton Rouge Samantha Carter 2311 North Sherwood Forest Dr. (225) 927-1500 | geoprep.org

2015

GEO Foundation

3-8

GEO Prep Academy of Greater Baton Rouge Shirion Clay 4006 Platt Dr. (225) 927-1500 | geoprep.org

2015

GEO Foundation

2019

GEO Next Generation High School Aleshia Taylor 2121 North Sherwood Forest Dr. (225) 314-2044 | geonextgenerationhighschool.org GEO Prep Academy Mid City Thelemese Porter 1900 Lobdell Blvd. (225) 236-9333 | geoprepmc.org

Glen Oaks Middle School Juaquita Sims 5300 Monarch Ave. (225) 771-8128 | rsl.org Iberville Charter Academy John McCrary 24360 Enterprise Blvd. (225) 238-7346 | ibervillecharter.org IDEA Bridge Curtis Lawrence 1500 North Airway Dr. (225) 953-5910 | ideapublicschools.org IDEA Innovation Jeremy Roussel 7800 Innovation Park Dr. (225) 249-2622 | ideapublicschools.org Impact Charter School Eric Scott 4815 Lavey Ln. (225) 308-9565 | impactcharter.org 46

Charter Type

Total Enrollment 32

School Performance Score Student Progress Rating

Grades Taught K-1

Emerge School for Autism, The Leigh Bozard 7784 Innovation Park Dr. (225) 343-4232 | emergeschool.org

Cafeteria B/L/S/D

Managing Organization The Emerge Center

Phone Number • Website

Transportation Service

Year Established 2017

School Principal Address

N/A

N/A

N/A

1

B/L/S/D

N/A

N/A

2

120

B/L/S/D

T

N/A

2

650

110

B/L/S/D

C

N/A

2

K-2

650

110

B/L/S/D

C

N/A

2

Redesign Schools Louisiana

6-8

300

30

B/L

N/A

N/A

5

N/A

Charter Schools USA

PreK8

300

25

B/L/S

C

B

1

2018

IDEA Public Schools

K-4, 6-7

798

90

B/L/S/D

D

A

1

2018

IDEA Public Schools

K-3, 6-7

598

80

B/L/S/D

C

A

1

2014

Education Explosion, Inc.

PK-8

420

45

B/L/S

D

B

2

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J.K. Haynes Charter School Mary Ricks Mason 8600 Elm Grove Garden Dr. (225) 774-1311 | jkhaynesschools.org Kenilworth Science and Technology School Hazel Regis 7600 Boone Ave. (225) 766-8111 | kenilworthschool.org Lanier Charter School Andrea Johnson 4705 Lanier Dr. (225) 308-3273 | rsl.org Louisiana Key Academy Heather Bourgeois 3172 Government St. (225) 298-1223 | lakeyacademy.com Louisiana Virtual Charter Academy Danielle Scott-Johnson 4962 Florida Blvd. (504) 322-7543 | csalcharterschools.org Madison Preparatory Academy Alisa Welsh 1550 Choctaw Dr. (225) 636-5863 | csalcharterschools.org Mentorship STEAM Academy Casey R. Smith 339 Florida St. (225) 346-5180 | mentorshipbr.org South Baton Rouge Charter Academy Yolanda Burnette-Lankford 9211 Parkway Dr. (225) 349-7489 | sbrcharter.org University View Academy Michelle Clayton 3113 Valley Creek Dr. (225) 421-2900 | universityview.academy

632

65

1997

J.K. Haynes Charter School Board

PreK-6 229

14

Charter Type

K-8

School Performance Score Student Progress Rating

Total Faculty

Inspire Charter Academy

Cafeteria B/L/S/D

Total Enrollment

2010

Transportation Service

Grades Taught

Inspire Charter Academy Kimberly Boudreaux 5454 North Foster Dr. (225) 356-3936 | inspirecharteracademy.org

Managing Organization

Phone Number • Website

Year Established

School Principal Address

B/L

C

B

1

B/L/S

D

B

1

2009

Pelican Educational Foundation, Inc

6-8

402

40

B/L/S

D

B

5

2014

Redesign Schools Louisiana

PK-5

300

30

B/L

C

A

5

2012

Louisiana Key Academy

1-8

391

48

B/L/S

N/A

B

2

2011

CSAL, Inc.

K-12

1,920

100

N/A

D

C

2

2009

CSAL, Inc.

9-12

576

45

B/L

B

B

2

2010

Helix Network of Educational Choices

9-12

540

40

B/L/S

C

C

2

2015 Charter Schools USA

K-8

500

690

B/L/S

C

A

1

K-12

3,200

175

N/A

D

C

2

2011

Foundation for Louisiana Students

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Profiles Magnet & Charter Schools

BASIS Baton Rouge 7550 McCall Drive Baton Rouge, Louisiana (225) 308-7450 BASISbatonrouge.org

2019-20 Cover Kid Courtnee E. Photo Credit: Lauren Ashton Lights Design & Photography

BASIS Baton Rouge currently serves students in grades K-5, but will be expanding to include grade 6 in fall 2020, and ultimately grow to serve grades K-12. As part of the acclaimed BASIS Charter Schools network, BASIS Baton Rouge educates students at the highest international levels. Our rigorous and accelerated curriculum engages students in hands-on, dynamic lessons across a well-balanced variety of courses in literacy, humanities, math, science, engineering, Mandarin, PE, visual arts, drama, and music. Our supportive, knowledgeable teachers also inspire students to work hard, persevere, and love learning.

GEO Foundation Baton Rouge, Louisiana geoprep.org

GEO Foundation is a non-profit organization with the mission of breaking the cycle of poverty by providing students and families with access to quality educational options. GEO Prep Schools are free, public charter schools, which are committed to ensuring that all students show growth in character, academics, life-skills, the arts, and wellness using teaching skills tailored to meet the needs of each student. GEO Prep Schools Baton Rouge offers three great schools with one standard of excellence. GEO Prep Academy of Greater Baton Rouge offers grades K-7, GEO Prep Mid-City offers grades K-8, and GEO Next Generation High School is currently enrolling ninth and tenth grade students. All our campuses have certified teachers leading small classes to give the added individual attention needed for students to thrive socially and academically. GEO Academies regularly send staff to Teach Like A Champion trainings to learn and implement strategies to benefit students, and we also use the TAP System to build effective teaching in classrooms. GEO Academies use a rigorous curriculum that encompasses Core Knowledge, CKLA, Blended Learning, and Eureka Math to provide a quality education that beats poverty and makes college a viable option after high school graduation.

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Iberville Charter Academy 24360 Enterprise Boulevard Plaquemine, LA 70764 (225) 238-7346 South Baton Rouge Charter Academy 9211 Parkway Drive Baton Rouge, LA 70810 (225) 349-7489 Iberville Charter Academy (ICA) is a tuition-free public charter school educating students in grades Pre-K-8 in Plaquemine and surrounding areas. We offer small classes with one-on-one learning experiences as well as a blended learning program with online education opportunities. ICA is committed to developing the whole student and empowering each with skills to succeed in a dynamic and ever-changing world. Every student matters and every moment counts. South Baton Rouge Charter Academy (SOBA) is a tuition-free public charter school educating students in grades PreK-8 who reside in East Baton Rouge Parish. SOBA is a positive and student-focused environment, which provides a high-quality education that meets the needs of the whole child. We are now accepting applications for the 2020-2021 school year.


Impact Charter School 4815 Lavey Lane Baker, Louisiana (225) 308-9565 impactcharter.org

Inspire Charter Academy 5454 N. Foster Drive Baton Rouge, Louisiana (225) 356-3936 inspirecharteracademy.org

Impact Charter School is a free public school that offers a first-class education for children in grades PreK-8. Free transportation is offered to students. The mission of Impact Charter School is to provide a rigorous 21st Century educational experience for all students in a safe, supportive, and challenging learning environment. Our positive and unique school culture empowers students to achieve excellence and reach their full potential in order to close the achievement gaps, while students are growing into productive citizens. Impact Charter School has been honored by the Louisiana Department of Education for two distinct years as a Top Gains School.

Believing in Your Child.

Lee Magnet High School 1105 Lee Drive (225) 924-9406 leemagnet.com

Lee Magnet High School offers a rigorous college preparatory curriculum utilizing STEM-focused electives in Engineering, Biomedical Science, Digital Arts, Computer Science, and Cyber Security. One of the many unique aspects of Lee’s curriculum is the opportunity for our diverse scholars to take any of our 26 Advanced Placement or 16 Dual Enrollment courses and earn credits towards their post-secondary major. In addition to our college-focused courses, Lee Magnet also offers a true high school experience, which includes over 50 student-led clubs, all traditional sports programs, and a nationally ranked JROTC program. The LEE experience prepares students for the future. A visit to our distinct campus easily shows why we say Lee Magnet is “A SCHOOL LIKE NO OTHER.”

Success means something different to everybody. Here at Inspire Charter Academy, it means creating endless opportunities for your child to become his or her best. We shape instruction to build on the strengths and abilities of each child. Our moral focus program teaches the importance of making wise choices and motivates children to be better people. As a result, our students thrive. Inspire Charter Academy, managed by National Heritage Academies, is a tuition-free, public charter school serving students in kindergarten through eighth grade. For more information, visit inspirecharteracademy.org.

Woodlawn High School 15755 Jefferson Highway (225) 753-1200 woodlawnhighbr.org

Established in 1949, Woodlawn High School (WHS) serves the southeast Baton Rouge community. The school offers multiple college-preparatory classes through the MAGNET, Gifted, and Great Scholars programs. Woodlawn also provides specialized instruction through Talented Music, Talented Theater, and Talented Visual Arts, in addition to AP classes and Dual Enrollment courses. Students can choose from extra-curricular activities such as Quiz Bowl, Beta, NHS, Orchestra, or embrace the high school experience by joining the Marching Band on Friday nights. Cheerleading, Pantherettes, and Flags offer a chance for students to show their school spirit, while others may have an interest in the wide range of both men’s and women’s sports offered. Volleyball, football, soccer, cross country track, bowling, tennis, baseball, and golf are just a few of the athletic teams found at WHS.

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What Are the Benefits? By Joy Holden

Colorful billboards for different schools line the interstate. Parents drive through the city and see school signs boasting the best qualities through branding and marketing. But, what are the real benefits of them? When parents are toggling between websites on their phones or laptops and considering the ideal school, what is the right move? Magnets and charters are two options that Baton Rouge families are exploring. Often, these types of schools are either misunderstood or unfamiliar to parents. Though they are both outside of the traditional public school format, they each offer benefits to students and the community.

The Benefits of Charter Schools Charter schools are public schools that are run by nonprofit organizations. At their core, every charter school is created to serve as an independent and innovative public school, which means free of tuition. In fact, the innovation in curriculum is one of the benefits of charter schools, says Chris Meyer, the CEO of New Schools for Baton Rouge. He explains, “Charters increase 52

the diversity of options, and different curriculum models inject new innovations into our education marketplace.” Charters can develop curriculum to meet specific needs, like rigor at BASIS Baton Rouge or catching students up at Collegiate Baton Rouge. One parent who has chosen charter schools appreciates the innovative approach. Tiffany Dunn selected Louisiana Key Academy (LKA) for

B R PA R EN T S .COM | FEB RUA RY 2020

2019- 2020 Cover Kid: Isla M. Photo Credit: Lauren Ashton Lights Design & Photography

Magnet or Charter?

her daughter Keilyn due to a dyslexia diagnosis and the lack of specialized education in public schools. Louisiana Key Academy, as a charter, is free to create its own unique curriculum for children who are living with dyslexia who are attending the school. Dunn explains how LKA has impacted her daughter. “Since starting at LKA, Keilyn has blossomed in a way that is only possible by being taught by teachers


“Magnets and charters are all created differently, so explore them, and you will discover the right school for your family.’”

who are language specialists and trained to work with dyslexic children. Her self esteem has grown exponentially because she has confidence again. She’s now reading regularly whereas when she started, she struggled to even recognize letters. Finding a charter school with a specialization that we needed benefited us by providing the education that our daughter needed.” In addition to providing innovative

“The language component was huge because we are bilingual. She’s only been in immersion for two and a half years, and she is almost fluent...” approaches to education, charter schools offer options in which the schools have authority over how resources are spent. Meyer elaborates, “The nature of charter schools forces resources closer to the kids. A public school district board and superintendent have to think of 40,000 students instead of 400 students in one school. Charters allow for a more personal focus on their kids.” Each charter has its own governing board that makes such decisions for its respective school, faculty, and students. The Benefits of Magnet Schools Magnet schools, on the other hand, are specialized schools that are public and managed by the East Baton Rouge Parish School System (EBRPSS). Magnet schools also provide diverse choices for Baton Rouge families. “Magnet Schools were developed to

create exciting learning experiences that promote academic achievement for students with specific educational needs,” says Theresa Porter, the East Baton Rouge Parish Magnet School Director. “These specialized programs offer students a quality education based on their learning styles, skills, and interests. The district offers dynamic, specialized programs, such as foreign language immersion, Montessori, visual, performing arts, digital arts and preengineering themes.” Baton Rouge Foreign Language Academic Immersion Magnet (FLAIM) is one of those Magnet programs that meets a specific need. Danielle Porche and her husband were looking for an immersion program for their daughter, and FLAIM was the right choice. “The language component was huge because we are bilingual. She’s only been in immersion for two and a half years, and she is almost fluent. Her accent is out of this world. At FLAIM, the person teaching in the immersion language has to be a native speaker.” Magnet schools can also focus on other academic specialties. Mayfair Lab specializes in Green STEM programs. Min-Joung Kim chose Mayfair Lab for her two sons because of the dual teacher approach through third grade, which includes a master teacher. She has been pleased with the “the stable environment and the positive attitude towards schooling.” Magnet schools are also a “proven model to increase diversity in the district,” states Porter. Diversity of ethnicity and class is often a priority for parents who choose

magnet schools. Both Porche and Kim agree that the diversity of the student population was a motivating factor in selecting East Baton Rouge Parish School System magnet schools. “My daughter has benefited from the diversity,” Porche shares. “I feel like she has a better contextual understanding of her community. I think that’s a beautiful thing to give her some awareness about her city.” Kim also believes that diversity is a strength. She says, “I don’t see just one culture represented. I love to see all the different cultures when we go see music performances and go to school activities.” Both mothers also stress that they have been impressed with their children’s academic success both in standardized test scores and on report cards.

“The nature of charter schools forces resources closer to the kids.” The Right Choice To choose the best course of education for their child, parents need to research all the options and analyze what specific interests and needs their child has. Only the parent knows what environment will best fit their child. The only way to know for sure, though, is to go and see the schools personally. One key to remember while making your decision is that no charter or magnet is the same. Magnets and charters are all created differently, so explore them, and you will discover the right school for your entire family. ■

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PLAY A DAY IN THE LIFE OF DAD STAY CONNECTED If you would like to read more of Brandon’s adventures from A Day in the Life of Dad, visit us online at brparents.com.

GEAR UP Keep the simmer and sizzle contained with the Frywall Silicone Splatter Guard. This guard lets you sauté, fry, and marinate at high temperatures without splattering your counters and walls and yourself. ■ thegrommet.com

Teach Them By Brandon Foreman

H

ave you sat with your children, mainly the ones getting older, and talked about what is right and wrong and what you believe? Or, are you letting someone else do it? In an age where everything is “ok” and “it’s a free country,” I think we need to make sure we don’t get caught up in the crowd and assume that our family values and morals get passed along with our genetics. And if we aren’t talking about them and making sure our children learn them, then something else is going to fill that space in our children’s heads. I’m not here today to get into the specifics–but more to point out that–if you’re not teaching and explaining to your children what you believe and why, someone else might be. I had a conversation the other day about something one of my children wanted to buy from a “YouTuber,” and it caused me to look a little deeper. After much research, I found out that this “YouTuber” was not who I wanted my children looking up to. After talking with my child about this, she was telling me, “Well, it’s a free country; they can do what they want,” and she still wanted the product. It made me take a moment to explain that when we support people and businesses that are not aligned with what we believe, then we are still supporting them, and we need to make these decisions consistently, not just by chance or thinking it does not matter. After this talk with my child, it made me sit back and wonder if we should sit down and talk about what we believe and what we stand for. Or am I assuming that they will just inherit it? Well, I know that’s not going to happen. I have learned that seldom do we all not know something and leave it at that. “We just don’t know” tends to get filled in with what we assume or “find on the Internet.” Most of the time, this is not true or accurate. Meaning, is this normal or moral? Right? Wrong? And if we cannot instill in our children what is, then someone else will, or worse, there will not be that voice in the back of their heads, and you end up with everything being “ok” and “nothing really matters.” This goes back to the common sense things, but common sense is not just something you’re born with; you have to have the borders/frames taught to you by the ones you love, and then, and only then, can you make decisions using “common sense.” After all, as they say, common sense is not so common these days.■ 56

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FROM THE MOUTHS OF DADS “I would like a spell cast to be able to sleep through the night–that would be perfect…just that!” –Eddie Redmayne PIC OF THE MONTH

Edward V. and newborn Annalee are already doing a great job at daddy daughter photos.


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PLAY GET OUT OF TOWN

VISTA VERDE RANCH STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLORADO By Julie Engelhardt Coordinates: 40.48785° N, -106.83639° E Baton Rouge to Vista Verde Ranch: 1,377 miles Driving Time: 21 hours, 38 minutes Flight Time: 2 hours, 26 minutes Why Vista Verde Ranch? This lovely piece of heaven on Earth started out as a hay and cattle operation during the early 20th century, and was dubbed “Vista Verde” in the 1930s by the owner’s sister, a Spanish teacher from Grand Junction. The property became a dedicated dude ranch in the 1970s, a rather rustic operation, until new owners took over the place in the 1990s. The property has been updated and refurbished, offering activities that make you feel as if you’ve stepped back into the Old West. Let’s saddle up and round up some fun! WHERE TO STAY There are so many lovely lodging choices on the property that it might be a tad difficult to decide where you want to hang your hat at the end of the day. Vista Verde Ranch (VVR) has a choice of one, two, three and four bedroom cabins, ranging from the cozy “Dome” which is deemed as the “honeymoon” cabin, to the largest of all, “The Ranger,” a two-story dwelling with four bedrooms, three bathrooms, and a relaxing hot tub that is great for large groups or families. The ranch also offers Lodge Rooms located above the Main Lodge. Amenities include in-room goodies such as a snack bar and a refrigerator with complimentary beverages; a fitness center, swimming pool, The Coyote Corral for kids, and an indoor riding arena. WHERE TO EAT Vista Verde Ranch Main Dining Room Delightful breakfast, lunch and dinner options are served primarily in the ranch’s Main Dining Room. For breakfast, choose from hearty choices including house-made pastries, buttermilk pancakes with Vermont maple syrup, or carrot cake waffles with walnut syrup. Lunch options include a choice of salad bar, Cuban sandwiches, and pasta dishes. Your dinner options include yummy entrees such as potato gnocchi with short rib ragu or chicken breast with a squash puree. Culinary Adventures If you believe your cooking skills are lacking, fear not, for the ranch offers their on-site Culinary Adventures led by Chef Cholly McGlynn. Learn everything from how to bake naturally-leavened artisan bread to creating a main dish for the evening’s formal dinner. Dine and Dash If parents would like to have a peaceful evening meal alone, the ranch offers the Dine and Dash where children can enjoy kid-pleasing fair then head off for a treasure hunt or hayride. This is the perfect way for all parties to wrap up the day. 58

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WHAT TO DO Family vacation options offer everyone, from the small to the tall, with a vast array of fun at the ranch all year long. In winter, there are sleigh rides, horsemanship clinics, backcountry ski tours, and snow tubing. In the summer, take on a trail ride, hike Mt. Zirkel, go fly fishing or participate in a horsemanship clinic, which includes cattle work. If you want time alone with your sweetie, head to the ranch during the Autumn Romance or Winter Romance time of year for their adultsonly vacation weeks. Cozy up in one of their rustic cabins, take a dip in a bubbling hot tub, or take a walk outside. This is a great way to unwind before the holiday season. If you enjoy traveling alone, VVR is the perfect place to have a safe, relaxing vacation. Their Solo Escape in Winter happens in January and early February, offering for adults-only retreats. Stay in one of their comfortable lodge rooms, then head downstairs to the Great Room where you can cozy up next to the fireplace. Grab your camera and explore your artistic side by participating in a Photography Workshop led by Carla Jones. This is the opportune time to learn tips for taking perfect pictures offered by this amazing professional photographer. The Kids, Tweens and Teens Program offers fun experiences designed for each age group. The young campers can participate in riding orientation classes, head to the Clark Store on an antique fire engine to get ice cream, race through the low ropes course, and pan for gold. If you’re looking for a way to connect with your work family, the ranch offers Corporate Retreats that bring fun to your group. They have Western Team Building activities, skiing adventures, and accommodations that allow you to have a productive weekend. Experience a traditional dude ranch stay during the summer, complete with horses, cookouts, and barn dances. They will make your week one that will be looked back on for years to come. ■


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PLAY THINGS WE L

VE

Be mine, Valentine with this festive Valentine’s Day Shirt from Etsy. The shirt makes for a great gift for a friend, and it comes in white, pink, or black vinyl pressed onto a Heather Cardinal red. ■ etsy.com

Wear this glittering stone on your Valentine’s Day date night. The Kendra Scott Elisa Pendant Necklace sparkles and shines, and adds a little love to your outfit. ■ kendrascott.com Answer the infamous, “What should we do for date night?,” question with The Official Date Bucket List for Couples Kit. Printed on birch wood sticks, the date night prompts run the gamut from romantic dates to intellectual stimulation. ■ uncommongoods.com

Share this soapy treat with your littlest sweetheart. These sweet Handmade Conversation Heart Soaps come ready to gift, and they smell just like the real sweetheart candies. ■ etsy.com

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Deliver some sweets to your sweetie with the Personalized M&M’s Occasion Bottle in Romance Gift Box. This bottle of personalized M&M’S delivers the message and image of your choice. ■ mms.com


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How to Pick Your Date Night What type of couple are you? By Jami & Katrina

Cupid’s favorite day of the year can pose a lot of pressure to come up with original date ideas. If you are completely drawing a blank when it comes to Valentine’s Day, we have put together a short and fun little quiz. This is just a fun way to help you figure out what type of couple you are. Who knows, you may just be a combination of them all!

Do You Want to Dress Up?

Yes

Did You Forget to Make a Reservation?

Yes

No

Social

Wine and dine some place more upscale. We suggest 18 steaks at L’auberge, followed by unique wines at Blend. You can finish the evening with a nightcap at Churchills.

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No

At Home

Netflix and chill at home. You can order in or cook together with a mealkit like Hello Fresh. Pick out your favorite movie snacks and candy and just relax. If there are kids at home, we also suggest the new Disney+ app as a family.

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Do You Like the Outdoors?

Yes

No

Outdoorsy

We love the idea of hiking to a romantic dinner. Tunica Hills is a wonderful option, or doing a picnic by the lakes at LSU. Also, it is actually crawfish season. So, you could come together with other couples and have a crawfish boil. Gotham Academy just opened as well! Who’s up for ax throwing?


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IN EVERY ISSUE CALENDAR

February I HEART MY ZOO DAY

BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday, February 8. This action-packed day includes Safari Amphitheater programs and crafts. You can even make a valentine for your favorite person or animal. Regular admission applies. ■ brzoo.org

1 SATURDAY BUBBLE GUM DAY ACT PRACTICE TEST. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 9:30 a.m. Students can take a practice ACT for free. (225) 686-4140 AMATEUR ASTRONOMY COURSE: LEARN YOUR BINOCULAR. BREC’s Highland Road Observatory from 3:307:30 p.m. Sessions are $1518 each. (225) 768-9948 BATON ROUGE ARTS MARKET. Farmers Market downtown from 8 a.m.noon. The event will feature special art activities for kids. artsbr.org BMX INTERMEDIATE DIRT TRACK CLINIC. BREC’s Perkins Road Extreme Sports Park from 9-10 a.m. Clinic 64

for beginners who have minimal riding experience to intermediate riders who have already established the basics of bike control and are looking to make it to the next level. brec.org BODY BASICS FOR GIRLS. Woman’s Hospital from 9:30-11 a.m. Preteen girls ages 9-12 will learn how their bodies grow, what changes to expect during puberty. (225) 231-5475 CLINTON MARKET DAY. Downtown Clinton in front of Courthouse from 8 a.m.1 p.m. (225) 683-5531 CYT’S CHARACTER MEET ‘N GREET. The Warehouse at Bethany at 9 and 11 a.m. Photo ops, autographs and treats. Sponsored by Christian Youth Theater in anticipation of Cinderella. cytbatonrouge.org

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EXPLORING THE HIDDEN MUSIC. LASM at 7 p.m. Composer and artist Christopher Janney’s concert. lasm.org FIRST SATURDAY OF THE MONTH HIKE. Port Hudson State Historic Site. Join a park ranger on a guided hike. (888) 677-3400 FORGOTTEN LIVES. Audubon State Historic Site from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Annual program that explores early Louisiana slavery and African American history. (888) 677-2838 GUMBO RUN 5K. Scotlandville Magnet High School from 8-11 a.m. Gumbo served following the Awards ceremony. facebook.com GUYS AND DOLLS. Theatre Baton Rouge at 7:30 p.m. Young Actors Pro-

duction of the Broadway show that opened in 1950. theatrebr.org HEROES OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY: LOUISIANA’S FIRST BLACK ELECTED OFFICIALS. Baker Library at 10 a.m. To celebrate African-American History Month, Southern University history professor and Director of the Mwalimu Institute Dr. Charles Vincent will present a discussion on the first black elected officials in Louisiana. ebrpl.com LAMAZE: LABOR OF LOVE. Woman’s Hospital from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. for couples wanting to learn how Lamaze techniques assist in labor and birth. Registration required. womans.org LOUISIANA YOUTH ORCHESTRA I. Broad-

moor Baptist Church from 5-6:30 p.m. The LA Youth Orchestras showcase students ages 5-21 in four different ensembles: The LA Junior String Ensemble, LA Junior Youth Orchestra, LYO Percussion Ensemble, and LA Youth Orchestra. brso.org MARDI GRAS KIDDIE PARADE. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 2 p.m. Children up to age 11 are invited to dress up, bring a decorated float and parade around the library. Float registration required. (225) 686-4140 OLD SOUTH JAMBOREE. 9554 Florida Boulevard, Walker, at 7 p.m. featuring Carlton Jones and His Red Hot Country Band. livingstontourism.com OSCAR SHORTS 2020: ANIMATION. Manship


CALENDAR IN EVERY ISSUE Theatre at 1:30 p.m. manshiptheatre.org ROUX RALLY GUMBO COOK-OFF. Downtown from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Amateur cooking teams, live music and entertainment. facebook.com SNOOPY AND THE RED BARON. USS Kidd. Traveling exhibit illustrating the history of Snoopy and the Red Baron and highlights how Charles Schulz brought WWI to the comic strip. usskidd.com SPECIAL SATURDAYS. LSU Museum of Natural Science, Foster Hall, from 10-11 a.m. with the exhibit area open from 11 a.m.noon. A STEM program that focuses on introducing children ages 5-12 and their parents to the world of natural science. lsu.edu SWAMP BIRD WALK. BREC’s Bluebonnet Swamp from 7-9 a.m. Hike led by a volunteer of the Baton Rouge Audubon Society. (225) 757-8905 VALENTINE CHALK PASTELS. Arts Council of Livingston Parish from 10:30 a.m.-noon. Children will create a bright and colorful heart picture using chalk pastels with instructor Dena Olinde. artslivingston.org WINTER READING CHALLENGE GRAND PRIZE DRAWING. Ascension Parish Libraries. Each book logged on their Beanstack page in January will equal one chance in the drawing up to 31 times. myapl.beanstack.org

2 SUNDAY

GROUNDHOG DAY CAJUN GROUNDHOG DAY. Bouligny Plaza, New Iberia, from 7-8 a.m. See if Pierre C. Shadeaux, Iberia’s

Cajun Groundhog, emerges to predict the weather with a longer spring or an early return of summer’s heat and humidity. iberiatravel.com FREE FIRST SUNDAY. Free admission to the LSU Museum of Art, LASM, the Old State Capitol, USS Kidd, Capitol Park Museum and BREC’s Magnolia Mound Plantation. visitbatonrouge.com GIRL TALK. Baton Rouge General Hospital, Bluebonnet, at 2 p.m. One-day class led by Baton Rouge General OB/GYNs for girls ages 9-11 and a parent or trusted adult. Focuses on what girls experience during puberty. brgeneral.org GUYS AND DOLLS. Theatre Baton Rouge at 2 p.m. Young Actors Production of the Broadway show that opened in 1950. theatrebr.org MAGIC HAPPENS RABBIT RESCUE ADOPTION DAY. Millerville PetsMart from 2-4 p.m. Includes rabbits and guinea pigs looking for forever homes. magichappensrescue.com MAKE IT, TAKE IT: CLOTH DOLL WORKSHOP. West Baton Rouge Museum. Free workshop for children ages 6-12 by folk artist, Barbara Franklin. (225) 336-2422 SENSORY SENSITIVE SUNDAY. Chuck E. Cheese’s at 9 a.m. Opens two hours with reduced lighting and games for children with autism and other special needs. chuckecheese.com SUPER BOWL LIV. Hard Rock Stadium, Miami, at 5:30 p.m. Central time. Shown on CBS. cbssports.com

3 MONDAY

BOOK A LIBRARIAN COMPUTER HELP. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 6 p.m. Teens and adults can make an appointment with a librarian to help with basic computer and internet skills. (225) 686-4140 LINE FOR LINE. O’Neils Barber and Beauty Salon. Free haircuts once a month to boys ages 2-16 who read to the barbers. (225) 389-7207 MOMMY AND ME. Baton Rouge General Hospital, Bluebonnet, from 11 a.m.noon. A breastfeeding support and education group designed to help mothers and babies learn about successes and challenges with breastfeeding. brgeneral.org PARENTS NIGHT OUT FOR SPECIAL NEEDS REGISTRATION DEADLINE. St. Jean Vianney Church on February 7 from 6:30-9 p.m. for children with special needs ages 2-12 and their siblings. $5 donation requested. parentsnightout@stjeanvianney.org TABLETOP GAMING NIGHT. Denham Springs/ Walker Library at 5 p.m. Ages 12 and up can play roleplaying, adventure, strategy, or board games. (225) 686-4140 THE COMPOSER FORUM SERIES. LSU School of Music Recital Hall at 7:30 p.m. Free performance by the Louisiana Sinfonietta featuring Esther Waite and Nathan Carterette. louisianasinfonietta.org

4 TUESDAY

BREASTFEEDING BASICS. Baton Rouge General Hospital, Bluebonnet, from 6-9 p.m. Course on the advantages of breastfeeding, how to care for

yourself while breastfeeding and proper breastfeeding techniques. brgeneral.org BRYAN SMITH: CAPTURING THE IMPOSSIBLE. Manship Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Presented by National Geographic Live which is a highly-acclaimed speaker series creating emotional connections with local communities. manshiptheatre.org HANKIES2HOPE SUPPORT GROUP. Bistro Byronz, Zachary, at 6 p.m. Monthly ministry held on the first Tuesday for moms who have lost a child to help with encouragement. facebook.com HOPE CHESTS BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP. Ochsner Hospital, High Grove, from 6-7 p.m. Support group with speakers and refreshments. ochsner.org MARDI GRAS POUR PAINTING. Watson Library at 6 p.m. Adults can celebrate Mardi Gras through the art form of acrylic pour painting. (225) 686-4180 MICROSOFT WORD BASICS. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 2 p.m. For students ages 12+. (225) 686-4140 PARENTS/CAREGIVERS BEHAVIORAL HEALTH NETWORKING. Conference call at 10 a.m. Meetings provide an opportunity to gather and share information and resources related to behavioral health services. (605) 313-4819 / Access Number: 546755# SIDEWALK ASTRONOMY. Perkins Rowe Town Square at 6:30 p.m. Join the Baton Rouge Astronomical Society and get a glimpse of the sky. facebook.com TEEN HANGOUT.

Denham Springs/Walker Library at 5 p.m. Teens can enjoy video games, crafts, activities and snacks. (225) 686-4140

5 WEDNESDAY

GOING GLUTEN FREE. Our Lady of the Lake Ascension, Gonzales, from 6-7 p.m. Free workshop by Dr. Elizabeth Bollinger who will discuss gluten-free living for patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. (225) 621-2906 I CARE LIVE. Webinar series by the I CARE program at noon with various guest speakers who promote personal safety, drug prevention and selfhelp educational resources. icare.ebrschools.org OSCAR SHORTS 2020: DOCUMENTARY. Manship Theatre at 7 p.m. Unrated film. Tickets are $9.50. manshiptheatre.org TOUR FOR TWO (OR MORE). Baton Rouge General Hospital, Bluebonnet, from 6-7 p.m. Free tour of the Birth Center. brgeneral.org

6 THURSDAY

BYOC (BRING YOUR OWN CRAFT). Galvez Library at 6 p.m. Adults can bring their own project to work on at the library and socialize with others. The library will have access to thousands of arts and crafts video classes through Creativebug. (225) 622-3339 MARDI GRAS BEAD ART. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 6 p.m. Adults will learn how to make a mosaic using a few simple materials and Mardi Gras beads. (225) 686-4140

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IN EVERY ISSUE CALENDAR

7 FRIDAY

BOOK BABIES. Watson Library at 10:30 a.m. Activity held on the first Friday of every month for infants through age five with stories, music and games. (225) 686-4180 BREASTFEEDING EX-

PRESS. Woman’s Hospital from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Small group class for women only and is recommended as a refresher class or for women who prefer a fast-paced class. (225) 231-5475 BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP. Woman’s Hospital from 9:30-11 a.m. Learn from a certified lactation nurse and other moms about their own successes and challenges with breastfeeding. (225) 231-5475 FAMILY FRIENDLY CONCERT. New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park at 11 a.m. Children’s storyteller and musician, Johnette Downing, performs. johnettedowning.com FAMILY FRIDAY. Tin Roof Brewing Company at 5 p.m. Entertainment for kids, including inflatable bounce houses, face painting, sweet treats, live music and balloons. facebook.com NIGHT TO SHINE. Lamar Dixon Expo Center. Evening for adults with disabilities with dancing, dinner, music and photo

opportunities sponsored by the Tim Tebow Foundation. fellowshipchurch.cc PARENTS NIGHT OUT FOR SPECIAL NEEDS. St. Jean Vianney Church from 6:30-9 p.m. for children with special needs ages 2-12 and their siblings. $5 donation requested. parentsnightout@stjeanvianney.org SWAMP FLASHLIGHT NIGHT. BREC’s Bluebonnet Swamp from 5-9 p.m. Visitors are able to explore the trails and enjoy live animal encounters. (225) 757-8905 TIGERS FOR AUTISM AWARENESS FRIDAY NIGHT OUT. LSU Women’s Center from 6-9 p.m. Gathering between LSU students and teens and adults with special needs. autismawarenesslsu@gmail. com

8 SATURDAY

BASF KIDS’ LAB: THE RAINBOW CONNECTION. LASM at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Young sci-

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SIDEWALK ASTRONOMY. Perkins Rowe Town Square at 6:30 p.m. Join the Baton Rouge Astronomical Society and get a glimpse of the sky. Free. ■ facebook.com

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2 Happy Birthday Hendrix R.

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM. LSU Museum of Natural Science, Foster Hall, from 6-7:30 p.m. Program focusing on a specific LSUMNS research collection each month. Scientists will give engaging talks about their research and then take guests on a tour of their focus collection. lsu.edu STEVE RILEY AND GENO DELAFOSE WITH THE LOS TEX MANIACS. Manship Theatre at 7:30 p.m. International accordion kings. manshiptheatre.org TEEN ADVISORY BOARD. Watson Library at 5:30 p.m. Teens can suggest programs, volunteer at the branch, and help choose books. (225) 686-4180

entists and their accompanying adults will grab some markers and filter paper to explore the magic behind a colorful chemical process. Each child also receives a cool backpack with surprises inside. kidslab@lasm.org BODY BASICS FOR GIRLS. Woman’s Hospital from 9:30-11 a.m. Preteen girls ages 9-12 will learn how their bodies grow and what changes to expect during puberty. womans.org BREASTFEEDING BASICS. Woman’s Hospital from 1:30-5 p.m. Learn the benefits of breastfeeding, how to prepare for breastfeeding, how to get the baby on the breast properly, the father’s role, and how to avoid common problems. (225) 231-5475 CAMELLIA SHOW. LSU Rural Life Museum from 1-4:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Baton Rouge Camellia Society with plants available for sale. lsu.edu CASA ORIENTATION. CASA office at 10 a.m. Capital Area Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Association holds orientation. casabr.org CHILDBIRTH CLASS. Ochsner Medical Center from 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Free class covers pregnancy, pain theories, pre-labor signs, postpartum/newborn procedures and basic breastfeeding. (225) 755-4854 COMMUNITY CPR CERTIFICATION COURSE. Our Lady of the Lake Ascension Education

Building, Gonzales, from 8 a.m.-noon. This course is ideal for community groups, new parents, grandparents, babysitters or anyone interested in learning how to save a life. (225) 621-2906 CW AUSTIN LEARNING DISABILITIES CONFERENCE. Catholic Life Center from 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m with workshops for parents, educators and professionals. Information on learning disabilities and the mental health issues that might accompany them. eventbrite.com DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS GAME DAY. EBR Main Library at 4 p.m. Teens can play the popular fantasy tabletop roleplaying game. ebrpl.com FIRST VALENTINE STORY/CRAFT. Jones Creek Library at 2:30 p.m. Children ages 3-11 will listen to Amelia Bedelia’s First Valentine and make a valentine card. (225) 756-1160 GARDEN DISCOVERIES SERIES. EBR Main Library at 10 a.m. Certified Master Naturalist Art Scarbrough will demonstrate the delights and challenges of growing herbs in south Louisiana, and will focus on native plants and pollinators. ebrpl.com GEAUX RED GALA. BREC’s Jefferson Highway Park from 7-10 p.m. High school students can enjoy dining, music and dancing. Come dressed in your best red, pink, or purple attire and to win a prize for Best Dressed. brec.org I HEART MY ZOO DAY. BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. A Valentine’s extravaganza with special programs and crafts. Regular admission applies. brzoo.org MARDI GRAS MAMBO.


WEEKLY EVENTS AFRICAN-AMERICAN READ-IN 2020. EBR Libraries from February 3-26. Citizens are urged to make literacy a part of Black History Month by hosting an African-American Read-In. ■ ebrpl.com BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM. BREC’s Magnolia Mound Plantation from February 2-23. Includes readings, lectures, and music. ■ (225) 343-4955 CINDERELLA. LSU Shaver Theatre from February 20-23. Performed by Christian Youth Theater. ■ cytbatonrouge.org FREE FRIDAY NIGHTS. LSU Museum of Art from 5-8 p.m. Free admission to the museum. ■ lsumoa.org LHSRA SOUTHEAST LA JUNIOR AND HIGH SCHOOL RODEO. Lamar Dixon Expo Center from February 28-March 1. ■ tourascension.com MIRACLE LEAGUE AT CYPRESS MOUNDS SPRING BASEBALL REGISTRATION. Deadline is February 7 for players and volunteers. Miracle League is a non-competitive offering for children with disabilities. ■ facebook.com OIL. LSU Shaver Theatre from February 6-16. A play about the global implications of our dependency on oil. ■ swinepalace.org PLANETARIUM FAMILY HOUR AND STARGAZING. LASM on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Gather around the campfire to learn about stars and constellations before enjoying a planetarium show. ■ lasm.org RED STICK FARMERS MARKET. Saturdays on 5th Street between Main and North Street, Tuesdays at the Main Library, and Thursdays in the Pennington Biomedical Conference Center parking lot from 8 a.m.-noon. ■ (225) 267-5060 SHOW US YOUR BOOK FACE CONTEST. Ascension Parish Libraries. Book Faces are photos where the photographer lines up a model’s face or other body part with a book cover to make the two blend into one. ■ myaplbookface@gmail.com THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY. Theatre Baton Rouge from February 28-March 15. A tribute to the great English farces of the 1930s and 1940s. ■ theatrebr.org THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST. Ascension Community Theatre from February 13-23. Play about mistaken identity carried to the extreme. ■ actgonzales.org

CALENDAR IN EVERY ISSUE North Boulevard Town Square at 8 a.m. and with a post-race fête. Includes a 10K, 15K and a one-mile fun run. runmambo.com MID CITY MAKERS MARKET: VALENTINE’S EDITION. 541 South Eugene Street from 4-8 p.m. Makers’ booths, food, a bar, a kids’ area and music. midcitymakers.market MODEL TRAINS. Republic of West Florida Historical Museum from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free indoor and outdoor model train displays by the Greater Baton Rouge Model Railroaders. (225) 634-3473 PET ADOPTIONS. The Pub on Sherwood from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sponsored by Rescue, Rehome, Repeat. rrrofsouthla.com RESOURCES FOR AFRICAN-AMERICAN GENEALOGY. EBR Main Library at 10:30 a.m. Adults are invited to a class designed to help in researching African-American ancestors. (225) 231-3750 SCRAPBOOKING SATURDAY. Delmont Gardens Library at 10 a.m. Adults are invited to bring old and new photos, mementos from vacation and travel, bits of fabric and other special memory items to learn how to arrange them in a memory book. (225) 354-7050 STORIES IN ART. LSU Museum of Art at 10:30 a.m. Free program for children from birth to age six and their caregivers with a Spanish and English reading of a children’s book and an art activity. (225) 389-7207 STORY TIME IN THE GARDEN.Burden Center from 9-11:30 a.m with readings and imagination-themed activities every

30 minutes for ages three to eight. lsuagcenter.com VALENTINES BREAKOUT ROOM. Jones Creek Library at 3 p.m. Teens will find and solve a series of clues in a time limit to find Valentino Cupid. (225) 756-1170 V. WATTS TRADE MART TRADE DAY. V. Watts Trade Mart, Livingston, from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. outdoors and 8 a.m.-6 p.m. indoors. facebook.com WAR OF 1812 LIVING HISTORY ENCAMPMENT. Audubon State Historic Site from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Visitors will see the time period come to life though volunteers in reproduction uniforms, demonstrations and clothing of the War of 1812. (888) 677-2838 WOODS WALKING HIKING SERIES. BREC’s Manchac Parish Park from 9-11 a.m. Enjoy a hike with a BREC naturalist. Children ages six and above allowed, but with an adult. conservation@brec.org

9 SUNDAY

NATIONAL PIZZA DAY BASF KIDS’ LAB: THE RAINBOW CONNECTION. LASM at 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Young scientists and their accompanying adults will grab some markers and filter paper to explore the magic behind a colorful chemical process. Each child also receives a cool backpack with surprises inside. kidslab@lasm.org CAAWS MYSTIC KREWE OF MUTTS PARADE: FAIRY TALES. Downtown from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. with Bark in the Park followed by the parade at 2 p.m. Includes a costume contest at noon. caaws.org

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IN EVERY ISSUE CALENDAR CAMELLIA SHOW. LSU Rural Life Museum from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sponsored by the Baton Rouge Camellia Society with plants available for sale. lsu.edu FATHER-DAUGHTER DANCE. Raising Cane’s River Center from 3-5 p.m. Sponsored by the Baton Rouge General Foundation. brgeneral.org GRANDPARENTING 101. Woman’s Hospital from 3-5 p.m. Grandparents can brush up on baby skills. womans.org OLD TIME COUNTRY JAM. West Baton Rouge Museum, Port Allen, every second Sunday from 3-5 p.m. Anyone with an acoustic instrument is welcome to join and music lovers are welcome to sit back, relax and enjoy. westbatonrougemuseum.org SPECIAL FRIENDS MARDI GRAS DANCE. UCT Hall from 4-7 p.m. Dance for those with developmental disabilities and their parents/caregivers. (225) 939-2923

10 MONDAY

BLACK WOMEN AS LEADERS: CHALLENGING AND TRANSFORMING SOCIETY. Gonzales Library at 6 p.m. Presentation by Dr. Lori L. Martin, LSU Professor of Sociology and African and African American Studies and author of Big Box Schools, Black Asset Poverty and the Enduring Racial Divide, and White Sports/Black Sports. (225) 647-3955 MICROSOFT EXCEL BASICS. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 2 p.m. Students ages 12+ will learn the basic features of Excel along with entering, sorting, and computing 68

data. (225) 686-4140 PREGNANCY 101. Woman’s Hospital from 6:30-9 p.m. Learn how to provide your baby with the best possible environment for growth and development. (225) 231-5475

11 TUESDAY

AFTER BABY COMES (ABC): BABY CARE AND PARENT CARE. Woman’s Hospital from 6:30-9 p.m. For new parents, grandparents, adoptive parents or other caregivers. (225) 231-5475 ASTRONOMY ON TAP. Varsity Theatre at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. There will be an astronaut speaking at the event. facebook.com BOTTLE NECKLACE CRAFT. Fairwood Library at 3:30 p.m. Teens can make a mystical bottle necklace using beads and glitter. (225) 924-9385 HANKIES2HOPE SUPPORT GROUP. New Life Church, New Roads, at 6 p.m. Monthly ministry for moms who have lost a child to help with encouragement. facebook.com HIDDEN FIGURES CODING ACTIVITY. Eden Park Library at 4 p.m. Children ages 7-11 will listen to Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race and enjoy a race to the moon paper coding activity. (225) 231-3250 LOVE IS IN BLOOM MOVIE NIGHT. Watson Library at 5:30p.m. Adults can celebrate springtime love with the romcom movie, Leap Year. (225) 686-4180 LSU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. LSU Student Union Theater at 7:30 p.m. The LSU Symphony will

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perform symphonic pieces at their concert. cmda.lsu.edu TEEN SHARPIE SHOES. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 5 p.m. Teens will bring a pair of canvas shoes and using library supplied materials, make fancy shoes. (225) 686-4140 ZOO AND ME MORNING: LOVE YOU FOREVER. BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo from 9:30-11:30 a.m. Children’s program for ages three to six. (225) 775-3877

12 WEDNESDAY

AFTER BABY COMES (ABC): BABY CARE AND PARENT CARE. Woman’s Hospital from 6:30-9 p.m. Plan to take this class in the sixth month of pregnancy. For new parents, grandparents, adoptive parents or other caregivers. (225) 231-5475 CHINESE STORYTIME SERIES WITH GEAUX MANDARIN. EBR Main Library at 10:30 a.m. A series of immersive, interactive story times led by Maggie Yuan from Geaux Mandarin for children ages two to eight. ebrpl.com GROCERY STORE TOUR. Rouses, Bluebonnet, from 10-11 a.m. Join Baton Rouge General’s dietitians for a grocery tour to learn how to choose fresh and healthy foods. brgeneral.org

13 THURSDAY

AQUILA THEATRE PRESENTS: 1984. Manship Theatre at 7:30 p.m. George Orwell’s cautionary novel is brought to the stage. Tickets run $28-48. manshiptheatre.org BABY CARE BASICS.

Date Night

ROMANCE IN THE STARS Snack on desserts, sip wine, and explore the Louisiana Art & Science Museum on Thursday, February 13 from 5:30-8 p.m. Enjoy special showings with your sweetie of Romance in the Stars, a Valentine’s Day featurette that explores three mythical tales of romance in the night sky. Tickets are $12 for nonmembers. ■ lasm.org

JUSTIN MOORE AND TRACY LAWRENCE Make sure you snag your tickets to this one-nightonly performance at the Raising Cane’s River Center. Put on your best cowboy boots and hat because Justin Moore and Tracy Lawrence will take the stage on Thursday, February 20. Lainey Wilson will open the show, and it’s going to be one night of music you don’t want to miss. ■ raisingcanesrivercenter.com

NATIONAL THEATRE ENCORE: PRESENT LAUGHTER Make it a movie night with your sweetie (and don’t forget the popcorn) to see this incredible production on film at Manship Theatre at 7 p.m. on Thursday, February 27. As he prepares to embark on an overseas tour, star actor Garry Essendine’s colorful life is in danger of spiraling out of control. Tickets are $12. ■ manshiptheatre.org


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IN EVERY ISSUE CALENDAR Baton Rouge General Hospital, Bluebonnet, from 6-9 p.m. Learn how to prepare for your baby’s arrival, what to expect on the big day and how to survive the first two weeks. brgeneral.org BODY BASICS FOR GIRLS. Woman’s Hospital from 6:30-8 p.m. Preteen girls ages 9-12 will learn how their bodies grow, what changes to expect during puberty, and how to take care of themselves. (225) 231-5475 BRSO CHAMBER PLAYERS. First Presbyterian Church at 7:30 p.m. Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra performs. brso.org CASA ORIENTATION. CASA office at 5 p.m. Capital Area Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Association holds orientation. casabr.org EAGLE EXPO. Morgan City. Speakers, raptors, and boat tours. cajuncoast.com GORDON LIGHTFOOT. Raising Cane’s River Center at 8 p.m. raisingcanesrivercenter.com HERITAGE LECTURE

AND EXHIBITION OPENING. Old Governor’s Mansion from 6-8 p.m. Celebrate the Centennial Women’s Suffrage Project and The First Ladies of the Old Governor’s Mansion exhibition with a lecture, appetizers and wine. preserve-louisiana.org JEOPARDY AT THE LIBRARY. Jones Creek Library at 7 p.m. Teams will play Jeopardy and win prizes. Registration required. (225) 756-1160 ROMANCE IN THE STARS. LASM from 5:308 p.m. Snack on desserts, sip wine and explore the Museum after-hours between special showings of Romance in the Stars, a Valentine’s Day featurette exploring three mythical tales of romance in the night sky. Tickets are $12 for nonmembers. lasm.org YOU STOLE A PIZZA MY HEART STORY/CRAFT. Carver Library at 4:30 p.m. Children ages four to seven will listen to Pete the Cat’s Groovy Guide to Love and make a pizza-shaped

Valentine out of a paper plate. (225) 389-7450

14 FRIDAY

VALENTINE’S DAY COLUMBIA ARTISTS PRESENTS: A CAPPELLA LIVE. Manship Theatre at 7:30 p.m. A Nashville-based award winning musical group comprised of five talented young men. manshiptheatre.org EAGLE EXPO. Morgan City. Speakers, live raptors, photography workshop and boat tours. cajuncoast.com FAMILY GRAS. Clearview Center, Metairie. Authentic local cuisine, art, a Kids’ Court and concerts by both national artists and Louisiana favorites. visitjeffersonparish.com KREWE OF ARTEMIS PARADE. Downtown at 7 p.m. Baton Rouge’s only all-female parade. kreweofartemis.net THE SOUND OF MUSIC. The Gladys Hague Runnels Theatre at 7 p.m. runnels.org WIGGLE WORMS. Den-

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DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS GAME DAY. EBR Main Library at 4 p.m. Teens can play the popular fantasy tabletop roleplaying game. ■ ebrpl.com

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ham Springs-Walker Library at 10:30 a.m. Children up to age five and their caregivers will participate in music and dance activities that enhance life-long learning and neural development. (225) 686-4140

15 SATURDAY

A BABY IS COMING. Woman’s Hospital from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. for children ages four to eight. Class designed to help big brother and sister learn about their new sibling’s arrival by talking about what babies are like. womans.org ACT PRACTICE TEST. Jones Creek Library at 9:30 a.m. Students can take a practice ACT for free. (225) 756-1170 A WISCONSIN YANKEE IN CONFEDERATE BAYOU COUNTRY. Port Hudson State Historic Site, Jackson, from noon-1 p.m. History professor Dr. Sam C. Hyde of Southeastern Louisiana University will present an educational and informative talk on General Halbert E. Paine of Wisconsin. (888) 677-3400 BATON ROUGE ARTS MARKET: JEFFERSON HIGHWAY. ARC Baton Rouge, 12616 Jefferson Highway, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. artsbr.org BMX INTERMEDIATE SKATEPARK CLINIC. BREC’s Perkins Road Extreme Sports Park from 9-10 a.m. Clinic for beginners who have no to minimal riding experience to intermediate riders who have already established the basics of bike control and are looking to make it to the next level. brec.org BODY BASICS FOR BOYS. Woman’s Hospital from 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Preteen boys ages 10-13 and their dads/moms will learn how their bodies grow and what changes to expect during puberty. (225) 231-5475 CAJUN DANCE. UCT Hall at 7:15 p.m. with free dance lessons and the band at 8 p.m. Mardi Gras dance with the band, La Recolte. batonrougecajundance.com COMIC CON. Denham Springs/Walker Library from 1-4 p.m. Annual event with various activities, including a costume contest, games, photo ops, crafts and a local graphic artist. (225) 686-4140 EAGLE EXPO. Morgan City. Speakers, raptors, and boat tours. cajuncoast.com FAMILY GRAS. Clearview Center, Metairie. Authentic local cuisine, art, a Kids’ Court and concerts by both national artists and Louisiana favorites. visitjeffersonparish.com FELICIANA TRADE DAYS. Graceland Portable Buildings at the corner of Hwy. 10 and Line Road, Jackson, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Crafts, pottery, clothes, yard sale items, a farmer’s market and food. (225) 719-2199 INVISIBLE WRITING. Jones Creek Library at 2:30 p.m. Children ages 8-11 will listen to an excerpt from The Zack Files: Now You See Me, Now You Don’t and experiment with different ways to send invisible messages. (225) 756-1160 KREWE OF DENHAM SPRINGS MARDI GRAS PARADE. Range Avenue from Denham Springs High School campus to Veteran’s Boulevard, Denham Springs, at 3 p.m. The signature throw is a mini king cake. facebook.com KREWE OF MYSTIQUE


CALENDAR IN EVERY ISSUE ASTRONOMICAL ART. LASM at 2 p.m. Artist-led workshop for children ages 6-14. lasm.org THE SOUND OF MUSIC. The Gladys Hague Runnels Theatre at 7 p.m. Runnels High School musical. Tickets run $10-15. runnels.org TYKE HYKE. Woman’s Hospital from 9-10:15 a.m. Prepare your three year old for your hospital stay by taking a brief tour of the hospital and through practice with baby dolls. womans.org WELLNESS DAY FOR WOMEN. Pennington Biomedical Research Center from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Free health screenings, exhibits, fitness demonstrations and educational sessions for women ages 18 and older. pbrc.edu WHEN THE CHILDREN MARCHED. East Iberville Library from 10 a.m.-noon. Discover how children changed the views of Americans when children of color marched for their rights and the rights of their parents. myipl.org WRITERS AND READERS SYMPOSIUM. Hemingbough Convention Center, starting at 9 a.m. Annual celebration bringing together authors and readers. literaturelouisiana.org

16 SUNDAY

ADDIS VOLUNTEER FIREMEN’S PARADE. Highway 1, Addis, at 1 p.m. westbatonrouge.net AFTER BABY COMES (ABC): BABY CARE AND PARENT CARE. Woman’s Hospital from 12:30-5:30 p.m. For new parents, grandparents, adoptive parents or other caregivers. (225) 231-5475 BREASTFEEDING SUP-

PORT GROUP. Ochsner Medical Center from 2-4 p.m. Share stories and tips on what works and what doesn’t. (225) 755-4854 CALL OF THE WILD PRESENTED BY THEATRE HEROES. Manship Theatre at 2 p.m. Jack London’s classic tale comes to life on stage. manshiptheatre.org DIGITAL DANCE. Knock Knock Children’s Museum at 10, 10:30 and 11 a.m. and noon. Shamira Arita leads the children in exploring the circular movement of gears through dance. knockknockmuseum.org FAMILY GRAS. Clearview Center. Local cuisine, art, a Kids’ Court and concerts by both national artists and Louisiana favorites. visitjeffersonparish.com LE JAM. West Baton Rouge Museum Barn from 3-5 p.m. with live music, singing and dancing. Anyone is welcome to join. westbatonrougemuseum.org LET’S PARTY HEART-Y. Java Mama from 1:15-3 p.m. Join Anna and Kristoff from Petite Princess-

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Company for a special Valentine’s Day celebration. facebook.com LSU WIND ENSEMBLE. LSU Student Union Theater at 4 p.m. cmda.lsu.edu MID CITY MARDI GRAS PARADE. North Boulevard and 19th Street at 1 p.m., ending at Foster Drive. midcitygras.org PREPARING FOR DELIVERY. Woman’s Hospital from 1-5 p.m. Learn basic information so you can recognize signs of labor and comfort measures. (225) 231-5475

17 MONDAY 5 Happy Birthday Samuel H.

PARADE. Downtown at 2 p.m. A special float is the Veteran’s Float. krewemystique.com KREWE OF ORION PARADE. Downtown at 6:30 p.m. kreweoforion.com KREWE OF TICKFAW MARDI GRAS BOAT PARADE. Springfield on the Tickfaw River at 2 p.m. Annual boat parade. facebook.com LIGO SCIENCE SATURDAY. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, Livingston, is open to the public for free from 1-5 p.m. Tour the facility, talk to a LIGO Scientist or science specialist and explore and interact with over 40 LIGO Science Concept exhibits. ligo.caltech.edu/LA LOUISIANA SATURDAY NIGHT VARIETY SHOW. Suma Crossing Theatre, Satsuma. Grand Country Junction show. grandcountryjunction.com MARDI GRAS MADNESS STORY/CRAFT. Bluebonnet Library at 10:30 a.m. Children ages four to eight will listen to The Greentail Mouse and make a jester hat using construction paper. (225) 763-2250 MARDI GRAS MASK CRAFT. Pride-Chaneyville Library at 11 a.m. Teens can get carnival crafty. (225) 658-1550 SOLAR VIEWING. BREC’s Highland Road Park Observatory from noon-2 p.m. Staff shows the sun in three manners. hrpo.lsu.edu SPECIAL SATURDAYS. LSU Museum of Natural Science, Foster Hall, from 10-11 a.m. with the exhibit area open from 11 a.m.noon. lsu.edu STUDIO SATURDAY:

PRESIDENT’S DAY HOSPITAL ORIENTATION. Woman’s Hospital

from 6:30-7:45 or 8-9:15 p.m. Tour the labor birth suites, family waiting areas and Transition Nursery while learning what to expect. (225) 231-5475 LEARN HOW TO PERFORM CPR AND AED EMERGENCY PROCEDURES. Jones Creek Library at 6 p.m. Adults can learn how to respond effectively to cardiac and breathing emergencies. (225) 756-1150

18 TUESDAY

BODY BASICS FOR GIRLS. Woman’s Hospital from 6:30-8 p.m. Preteen girls ages 9-12 will learn how their bodies grow, what changes to expect during puberty, and how to take care of themselves. (225) 231-5475 BUILDING BRAVE BITES. Baton Rouge General Hospital from noon-1 p.m. Free class for caregivers of children of all ages led by speech language pathologists/feeding specialists and registered

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CAAWS MYSTIC KREWE OF MUTTS PARADE: FAIRY TALES. Downtown from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. with Bark in the Park followed by the parade at 2 p.m. Includes a costume contest at noon. ■ caaws.org FEB RUA RY 2020 | B R PA R EN T S .COM

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IN EVERY ISSUE CALENDAR

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Springs-Walker Library at 5 p.m. Teens can suggest programs, volunteer at the branch and help choose books. (225) 686-4140

19 WEDNESDAY I CARE LIVE. Spanish version webinar series at noon by the I CARE program with various guest speakers who promote personal safety, drug prevention and self-help educational resources. icare.ebrschools.org MOVIE DAY: THE LION KING. River Center Library at 4 p.m. Free screening of the new live action film. ebrpl.com WORLD LEPROSY DAY LECTURE. EBR Main Library at 7 p.m. World Leprosy Day is observed annually and was initiated to raise awareness of leprosy, also known as Hansen’s Disease. ebrpl.com

20 THURSDAY

BATON ROUGE MARDI GRAS FESTIVAL PRE-PARTY. Henry J. Turner’s Listening Room from 8 p.m.-midnight. Includes a soul food buffet. batonrougemardigrasfestival.com DR. SEUSS DAY. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 5:30 p.m. In honor of Read Across America Day, children ages three to seven will celebrate with stories, games and crafts. (225) 686-4140 FEEDING YOUNG MINDS. Denham Springs/ Walker Library at 5 p.m. (225) 686-4140 JUSTIN MOORE AND TRACY LAWRENCE: THE LATE NIGHTS AND LONGNECKS TOUR. Raising Cane’s River Center at

B R PA R EN T S .COM | FEB RUA RY 2020

7:30 p.m. raisingcanesrivercenter.com PFLAG SUPPORT GROUP. Unitarian Universalist Church at 6:30 p.m. Support group for LGBT people. unitarianchurchbr. com SUPER SMASH BROS TOURNAMENT. Watson Library at 5:30 p.m. Teens can battle it out on the Wii U. (225) 686-4180

21 FRIDAY

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP. Woman’s Hospital from 9:30-11 a.m. Learn from a certified lactation nurse and other moms about their own successes and challenges. (225) 231-5475 FAMILY DINNER IMPROV COMEDY SHOW. Manship Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Rated R-ish. Tickets are $6. manshiptheatre.org KREWE OF SOUTHDOWNS FLAMBEAUX PARADE: SOUTHDOWNS RETURNS TO THE ROARING TWENTIES. Southdowns subdivision at 7 p.m. southdowns.org SUNSHINE SOCIAL: MAD HATTERS TEA PARTY. BREC’s Womack Ballroom from 6-9 p.m. Dance for ages 16 and up with special needs. (225) 216-7474

22 SATURDAY

BASF KIDS’ LAB: THE RAINBOW CONNECTION. LASM at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Young scientists will use markers and filter paper to explore the magic behind a colorful chemical process. kidslab@lasm.org BATON ROUGE MARDI GRAS FESTIVAL. North

Boulevard Town Square from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free festival with music, a Vendors’ Village and a Food Court. batonrougemardigrasfestival.com CHILDBIRTH PREPARATION. Baton Rouge General Hospital, Bluebonnet, from 8 a.m.-noon. Learn the basics of labor and birth. brgeneral.org LEAP FROG. Jones Creek Library at 2:30 p.m. Children ages five to eight can celebrate Leap Year by listening to Too Many Frogs and play a frog relay race game. (225) 756-1160 MODEL TRAINS. Republic of West Florida Historical Museum, Jackson, from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Model train displays. (225) 634-3473 O’REILLY’S CAJUN MONSTER TRUCK NATIONALS. Lamar Dixon Expo Center, Gonzales at 2 and 7 p.m. Watch competitions in different events. nolimitsmonstertrucks.com SPANISH TOWN PARADE: HINEY SIGHT. Downtown at noon. spanishtownmardigras.com SPANISH TOWN PARADE PARTY. Capitol Park Museum from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Includes street viewing of the parade, food and beverage, crafts for kids, king cakes, a photo area and face painting. louisianastatemuseum.org

23 SUNDAY 14 Happy Birthday Samuel H. III

dietitians. brgeneral.org CASA ORIENTATION. CASA office at 3 p.m. Capital Area Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Association holds orientation. casabr.org HANKIES2HOPE SUPPORT GROUP. La Madelines, Perkins Rowe, at 5:30 p.m. Monthly ministry for moms who have lost a child to help with encouragement. facebook.com HELPING HANDS SUPPORT GROUP. Families Helping Families of Greater Baton Rouge office from 6-7:30 p.m. A support group for parents, caregivers, self-advocates and family members of those with autism and related disorders. fhfgbr.org LSU JAZZ SHOWCASE. LSU Student Union Theater at 7:30 p.m. cmda.lsu.edu LSU SCIENCE CAFE. Varsity Theatre from 5-7 p.m. Free lecture on various topics. This month’s topic is “Map Panic-Cartographic Anxiety in the Renaissance and Today.” Light refreshments. eventbrite.com MARDI GRAS BEAD ART. Watson Library at 10:30 a.m. Adults will learn how to make a mosaic using Mardi Gras beads. (225) 686-4180 RESEARCHING YOUR AFRICAN AMERICAN ROOTS THROUGH THE CATHOLIC CHURCH RECORDS. Dutchtown Library at 6:30 p.m. Renee Richard, assistant archivist and genealogy researcher will present a workshop. (225) 673-8699 SHOVELS AND ROPE. Manship Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Musical duo of Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst. manshiptheatre.org TEEN ADVISORY BOARD. Denham

BASF KIDS’ LAB: THE

RAINBOW CONNECTION. LASM at 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Young scientists and their accompanying adults will grab some markers and filter paper to explore the magic behind a colorful chemical process. kidslab@lasm.org HOSPITAL ORIENTATION. Woman’s Hospital from 1:30-2:45 or 3-4:15 p.m. Tour the labor birth suites, family waiting areas and Transition Nursery while learning what you can expect. (225) 231-5475 KREWE OF COMOGO PARADE. Highway 1, South Plaquemine, at 7 p.m. Westside’s only nighttime parade with lighted throws and parties. kreweofcomogo.org KREWE OF GOOD FRIENDS PARADE. Port Allen at 1 p.m. kreweofgoodfriendsoftheoaks.com

24 MONDAY

TEEN GAMING CLUB. Eden Park Library at 2:30 p.m. Teens can play Tekken 6 on the Xbox 360. ebrpl.com

25 TUESDAY MARDI GRAS

MARDI GRAS PARADES. Held throughout Louisiana and the Gulf Coast. louisianatravel.com

26 WEDNESDAY ASH WEDNESDAY

BEYOND BODY BASICS FOR GIRLS. Woman’s Hospital from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Staff will help ages 1317 with the transition into adulthood. womans.org CHINESE STORYTIME SERIES WITH GEAUX MANDARIN. EBR Main Library at 10:30 a.m. A


CALENDAR IN EVERY ISSUE series of interactive story times led by Maggie Yuan from Geaux Mandarin. ebrpl.com HISTORICAL HAPPY HOUR. West Baton Rouge Museum from 6-8 p.m. Enjoy the museum after hours. westbatonrougemuseum.org

27 THURSDAY

BEYOND BODY BASICS FOR BOYS. Woman’s Hospital from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Staff will help ages 1317 with the transition into adulthood. womans.org GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN. Family Roads of Greater Baton Rouge at 9 a.m. lagrg.org I SURVIVED THE LIBRARY. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 5:30 p.m. Children ages

8-11 will review books from the I Survived series, explore discovery stations and enjoy refreshments. (225) 686-4140 NATIONAL THEATRE ENCORE: PRESENT LAUGHTER. Manship Theatre at 7 p.m. manshiptheatre.org

28 FRIDAY

CASA ORIENTATION. CASA office at 2:30 p.m. CASA orientation. casabr. org THE AMERICAN AUDIT. Manship Theatre at 7:30 p.m. manshiptheatre.org

29 SATURDAY LEAP DAY

COMITE CLASSIC. BREC’s Comite River Park from 8 a.m.-noon. Ages 16+ can test their mountain bike skills. brec.org

GEAUX FISH CATFISH RODEO. BREC Park from 8-11:30 a.m. The pond will be stocked with adult channel catfish. brec.org/ geauxfish HERB DAY. LSU AGCenter Botanic Gardens from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Herb plants for sale, classes, activities, culinary demonstrations, and vendors. lsu.edu LEAP YEAR AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE SLAM. School for the Deaf at 7 p.m. Douglas Ridloff is a poet and visual storyteller creating original works in Sign Language. eventbrite.com NATIONAL THEATRE ENCORE: PRESENT LAUGHTER. Manship Theatre at 2 p.m. manshiptheatre.org PLAYING WITH FOOD. Denham Springs-Walker Library at 2 p.m. Children ages eight and above will

enjoy a demonstration by Angela and Fran from Tripp’s Tasty Temptations and then decorate and eat some cookies. (225) 686-4140

EDITOR’S NOTE

Occasionally the date or location of an event may change after publication. Always phone ahead or check website to confirm important information.

SUBMISSIONS

Baton Rouge Parents Magazine welcomes submissions of events of interest to families. Send all calendar submissions to: calendar@brparents.com. Include: dates, times, location with address, recommended age, cost, public telephone number, website address, and photos. Submit information for the March calendar by February 5, 2020.

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MARKETPLACE IN EVERY ISSUE

Make it your business to know their business

Call 225-292-0032

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IN EVERY ISSUE THE LAST WORD

100 Years Old By Cheryl Maguire

In first grade at my children’s school, they celebrate the 100th day as if it were a momentous occasion. In some respects, it is, since they actually go for a full day (there are probably about 15 days off or half days before this day). This celebration involves me “assisting” them to find 100 items of something to bring into their class. However, any suggestions I make are rejected for one reason or another. “How about 100 pennies?” “No, that is what Katie is bringing in,” said my daughter. “Why can’t two people bring the same item?” I asked.“Because I don’t want to.” My daughter quickly retorted. Well, that sounds like a good reason. “How about 100 pencils?” I am not even

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sure if we own 100 pencils, but when your ideas are constantly being shot down, you just start spewing anything that pops into your head. “No, that is what Tom is bringing in,” my son claimed. Since I’m the proud mother of twins, I have two children that need to complete this project and both of them seem to be relying solely on me, without contributing any ideas on their own. After about an hour of this insanity, they finally settle on crayons and Cheerios. When they came home from school that day, both of my kids had a sheet of paper stating, “When I’m 100,” and they had to write a sentence and draw a picture of what they envisioned their life to be like at 100 years old.

B R PA R EN T S .COM | FEB RUA RY 2020

My daughter wrote, “When I’m 100, I’ll still be alive, I hope.” She drew a picture of a woman with white hair and a cane. It seems like a reasonable expectation. My son wrote, “When I’m 100, I will be lying in a bed. I would be in a nursing home. And I would need a wheelchair.” His pictures displayed the wheelchair, him lying on the bed and it looked like a heart rate monitor by the bed so apparently, he may also have some sort of medical condition. It appears he is not much of an optimist. I laughed at his bleak outlook (normally my kids bring home pictures of sunshine, rainbows, and flowers), it almost made up for the 100 item project. ■


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