Issuu on Google+

Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

KALMARSUNDSLEDEN – Section 1 Fulvik–Påboda 9 km 1

The Kalmarsundsleden hiking trail runs along the coast in Torsås Municipality. It starts in Fulvik, from where you can take a detour out to Örarevet Nature Reserve. A 2 km gravel ridge (esker) that juts out into Kalmarsund, Örarevet has short grasslands and juniper bushes, rare plants and abundant birdlife. Svartö and Norra and Södra Sandholmarna next to Fulvik beach are one of the Nordic region’s few breeding grounds for the great cormorant.

2

From the car park, the hiking trail heads south along the little village street and turns off into the fields of Gunnarstorp. On the coast lies “Båtastan”, which is “an enclosed area that also has boathouses and net drying areas and whose jagged coastal contours create over twenty moorings. They form an impressive collection and are one of the best preserved sites of their kind.”*

3 The trail then follows the coast for a while, before joining the paved road to Djursvik at Åd’s former local school. Before centralisation and school buses, there were similar small- scale schools all over the municipality. 4

About 4 km from the starting point, you cross the Bruatorpsån river to reach Djursvik, an old port and once the biggest shipyard on the south-east coast. Skilled shipbuilders built and repaired commercial sailboats up until 1949. The attractive houses were occupied by timber barons, skippers and other maritime folk. Djursvik remains popular, both with locals and summer visitors. There is also a small beach.

5

From Djursvik the trail goes through varied woods and fields. As you approach Påbonäs, there is a rest stop with a shelter, fire pit and basic toilet. Right on the water lies a round mound with a moat to the north, the last visible remains of Påbonäs Castle, dating from the Viking or early Middle Ages. Immediately east of the castle the trail passes a rock. Legend has it that the farmers wanted to move it, but were warned in a dream that if they did the farm would burn down, so the rock has stayed put. Another local tale is of a golden hen and her chicks spotted in the moat.

(*Kalmar County archeological association memo 1938)


1 2 3

4 5


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

KALMARSUNDSLEDEN – Section 2 Påboda–Skeppevik 8 km 1 From Påboda the trail continues towards Ragnabo. It turns off towards Lerhamn, where it follows the bird-rich inlets. Just south of Ragnabo, if you choose to keep to the coast, there is a little beach called Ekkläppen, which also has portaloos and bins. 2 In Bergkvara you first come to Enebacken summer cottages and Dalskär campsite. Where Saltskärsvägen ends in the north there is a former shipyard and a small fishing harbour. 3

Dalskär campsite offers a kiosk, restaurant, cottages, toilets, sauna, phone, boat and bike hire, etc., as well as basic cabins. Dalskär itself has an old ship’s forge from early last century, where the almost legendary blacksmith Edvin Branting worked up until the 1970s.

4

Further on is Bergkvara guest harbour. The Bergkvara community is known for its long- standing seafaring tradition. There is still a vibrant commercial port, mainly exporting timber, but the 19th century was Bergkvara’s age of greatness, with one of Sweden’s largest fleets of sailboats. Attractive buildings from that time (the old merchants’ villas and skippers’ houses) line Storgatan and there is a maritime museum for those who want to know more.

5

The trail follows Storgatan and Hamngatan. Where Hamngatan ends at Badudden, you enter Sjöhagen, typical coastal pastureland that is practically untouched by development of any kind. The bird-rich bays in Skällenäs and Kärrabo have an observation tower where you can picnic and enjoy the views of the sound. About 4 km from Bergkvara you come to Skeppevik, with its summer cottages and beach. The site has parking, toilets, a kiosk, a café and so on.


1

2 3 4

5


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

KALMARSUNDSLEDEN – Section 3 Skeppevik–Bröms 8 km 1 The hiking trail continues from Skeppevik through beautiful forest – or along the coast if you prefer – to Järnsida, an area of summer cottages with a beach and basic toilets. In a grove just up from the boathouses lies a Bronze Age cairn that is worth a look. Along the coast lie the remains of 17th-century bunkers and more recent gun place- ments. 2

Rest stop with shelter, fire pit and toilet. Near the boathouses in Grisbäck there are more bunker remains, another sign that this is a border area so often devastated by war between Denmark and Sweden. The eel fishing village, with its typical local boats, boathouses and net drying areas, has retained its old charm. Here you can either follow the marked trail up towards the village of Grisbäck or extend the walk by a couple of kilometres around the Grisbäck peninsula. The marked trail passes through Grisbäck village, where Swedish councillors stayed for the momentous meeting between Christian III of Denmark and Gustav Vasa of Sweden in September 1541. The trail continues up the road towards the E22, but turns off south after about 400 metres.

3

About 200 metres from the marked trail stands Grisbäck windmill, one of only two still remaining in the parish of Söderåkra.

4

Near the now defunct festival site is Södra Kärr, one of the first summer cottage developments in the municipality. Started in the 1930s, its regular buildings have an undeniable charm. Many are now permanent homes. On the eastern edge of the area lies Nötholmen, with a beach, toilets and drinking water.

5

Just before the beach, the trail goes through a narrow passage into Grämkulla. As you walk along the top of the beautiful pasture, consider a detour down to the old harbour and shipyard. There is a small metal plaque marking the spot where St Brigit’s remains landed on their journey home from Rome to Vadstena in 1374.

6

A bridge takes you over Brömsebäcken stream, which until 1658 was the border between Denmark and Sweden but now separates the provinces of Blekinge and Småland. On the Blekinge side – on land that is part of the Danska Bröms estate – lie the remains of Brömsehus Fortress, a mound surrounded by a moat. The land just to the south-east is probably where the famous peace summit between Christian III and Gustav Vasa took place in September 1541. The Swedish camp was located in Grisbäck and up on Stackaskär just outside Gräm- kulla. From Brömsehus a path follows Brömsebäcken up to the peace stone in Bröms, where there is a car park and information board. The peace stone marks the peace between Sweden and Denmark in 1645 and was erected in 1915. About 300 metres away is the rest stop Rastplats Bröms, which was built in 1995. This has an exhibition on the site’s historical significance. The farm next to the peace stone has a farm shop.


1

3 4 6

5

2


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 4 Bröms–Gåsabo 11 km 1

Here Kalmarsundsleden joins up with the Torsåsleden trail. It starts at the peace stone, erected in 1915 in memory of the peace deal signed in Brömsebro in 1645.

2

Öningaryd station was a stop on the narrow-gauge (1.067 m) Östra Blekinge railway, which closed in 1965.

3

Remains of a bosun’s cottage, last inhabited by Anton Apel. The route between points 3 and 5 is an ancient road from the Middle Ages.

4

The windmill in Väghyltan has been here for about 80 years, having previously stood in two other locations. It has remained unused since the 1920s. Torsås’ rural heritage association looks after the mill. The foundations of an old saw can be seen from the road to Gåsabo.

5

Wolf pits in Väghyltan. Wolves were a major problem until the mid-19th century, so people built pits to trap them. A deep pit was dug and covered with twigs, with bait stuck on a spike in the middle. This wolf pit was probably once deeper, but is otherwise well preserved.

6

Water mill in Väghyltan. Initially the mill had two owners, but disagreements led to an other mill being built right next door. You will soon reach Gåsabo and pass lovely farmland with fields and stone walls.


5 6 4 3

2

1


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 5 Gåsabo–Iglasjön 20 km 1

Tunnslätten, a croft with stone barn, unfortunately with a collapsed roof. Empty since the 1950s. The occupant in the 1930s had a tame bull that he drove and rode. When the bull became aggressive, the man booked it in at the abattoir, but the bull gored him to death the day before it was due for slaughter.

2

Ringdal’s croft. An excellent stone wall, about 100 years old and laid by stonemason Ringdal.

3

Jungfrukullagrinden. Look out! The area is said to be haunted…

4

About 200 metres south of the trail lies Kronhallen, a boundary marker since a 19th-century court case between farmers in Fröbbestorp and on the Blekinge side. The rock is marked with five rings.

5

Ulvasjön has a public beach, jetty and fire pits. Take a detour south along the lake for the lovely beech woods.

6

“Birka kille”, an ancient sacrificial spring that has never run dry. Quench your thirst and fill your water bottle.

7

Christian’s stone. Legend has it that Danish king Christian III mounted his horse from this stone. A royal crown, unfortunately damaged, is carved into the stone.

8

Iglasjön. The lake has a public beach and toilet, plus parking, a noticeboard and barbecue spot.


7

5

6

8

4

3

2

1


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 6 Iglasjön–St Hyltan 9 km 1

The hiking trail continues from Iglasjön through lovely forest.

2

You now approach Hallasjö, which will take you back to the 18th century. The village’s old-style buildings are very well preserved. Up on a hill stands Vippestenen, a 35 tonne stone that rocks if you push it gently.

3

The north of the village has the remains of a cholera cemetery. One half of the waste- land was dug away to reveal human bones. A wooden cross has been erected on the undisturbed part of the hill, which is covered in oaks and wild apple trees. Continue west and then you can choose to continue on an alternate route to get to the village of Bränderås.

4

Bränderås has well-preserved and typical old buildings. The traditions of this former border village date back to the Danish-Swedish wars. You can either take the country road or walk into the village. Gun-Britt Robertsson in Bränderås has a model of Bränderås as it looked in the 17th and 18th centuries. You can ask anyone in the village for a viewing.

5

Skjutstenen. A large glacial erratic rock that is said to have been used to defend against a Danish attack. A farmer fired from behind the rock, with his wife on loading duty. This scared the Danes, who fled.

6

Here are two restored and functioning flax ovens. One has a brazier for 2 m firewood. The flax was laid over the arch to dry.

7

Branta Berg, a 10 m precipice appropriately called “Steep Rock”.

8

Now we come to a fork in the road, where you will find an information board with a map of Bränderåsen. This ridge has lots of ancient remains. The map stretches as far as the Blekinge border.

9

Barn foundations. These foundations are incredibly small for a barn.

10 You have now reached Lillråsen, with a water source that never fails, no matter how dry the weather. 11 St Hyltan. Fields and meadows with lots of flowers.


10

11 9 8 7

6 5

4 2

3

1


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 7 St Hyltan–Gullabo 14 km 1

Femstenaröset. This cairn marks the boundary of Simnemåla, Fagerhyltan, Råbäcksmåla and Juansbo.

2 Now dead, Mogranen is one of the largest spruces in Gullabo parish. The trunk is 297 cm in circumference, with a diameter of 94.5 cm. 3

You are now at a former settlement called Bökmerås, with the remains of around 3–4 old houses. Crofter Per Svensson lived here with his wife Elin and their children in the late 18th century. The last inhabitant was Cissa Petersdotter (born 1822, died 1912), who ran a country shop here for years. There is an alternate route from Bökmerås via Hästmahultsmåla that will take you to Brändatall.

4

You are now in Hästmahult, classed as being of national interest for its crafts. From around the 1870s until 1950, there were numerous craftsmen here making a living from handicrafts. They are now all long gone.

5

Here at Brändatall lie the remains of around ten old cottages. The old crofter’s cottage restored by Gullabo Rural Heritage Association was home to Andreas Svensson (born 1818, died 1896) and his wife Gertrud. It is open in the summer so that visitors can see how the poorest people lived over a hundred years ago. There is also a rest stop with tables and seating plus a toilet.

6

Öjebomåla is said to be the second oldest farm in Sweden to still be in the same family. The current owner is from the 24th generation. The village is mentioned in the annals from the time of the Black Death in the 1350s. It is now split into two farms, but owned by the same family.

7

The hiking trail continues from Öjebomåla to Kroksmåla. The old fields and pastures are habitats for blue anemones in early spring, lilies of the valley in early summer and the aromatic lady’s bedstraw in summer.

8

Just past the fork to Ledja lies Boslöjd, which makes and sells handicrafts.

9

We are now at Gullabo Rural Heritage Centre. Numerous old buildings have been moved to this site over decades. As well as beautifully preserved old equipment, tools and textiles, there is also a cobblers, a country shop and plenty of other interesting attractions.


8 9

7 6 4

3

5

2 1


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 8 Gullabo–Degerhyltan 6 km 1

You are now at Blå Källa, documented in the 1350s. Legend states that when the spring dries up, the local families will die out. The villages of Kroksmåla, Blomstermåla, Bin- naretorp and Kyrkebo all meet here.

2

Gullaboby railway station. This original station house and the entire Torsås–Gullaboby railway were inaugurated on 15 September 1917, but closed in the late 1940s. The station house now provides classrooms for Gullabo school.

3

Here lie the remains of an old mill dam. Binnaretorp was using the water mill here until the late 19th century.

4

Rövareflyet. A band of thieves lived here in the late 18th century, led by the notorious “Robber-Kalle”. The story goes that they held a girl from Degerhyltan captive for five or six years. However, she eventually made contact with local villagers, who decided to attack the feared band of robbers and free the poor girl. She helped them by pouring water onto the robbers’ firearms, rendering them useless. The attack was a success. One of the robbers was shot and the others were arrested. Today the only sign left of their camp is a pit in the ground.

5

Bodhyltan. On either side of the trail, the village has interesting remains of crofter’s cottages thought to have been occupied in the 18th century. The village also has the oldest school house in the parish and a flax drying house.

6

Mogrinden. There is a rest stop here and an information board with notes left by passers-by. Feel free to write a few words.

7

We now come to the foundations of the old Törnemåla school. South of the trail lie the foundation walls of a crofter’s cottage, home to three brothers: Erik, Karl and Gustav Jonsson. Erik lived the longest, dying in around 1915. The brothers made scythe handles, rakes and clogs. The fish in the nearby stream were important in supple- menting their existence.

8

Foundations. Peter Brännman ran his business on this site until around 1900, when he went bankrupt. In around 1910 a new house was built, only to be moved to Petamåla in 1932. Unusually, the foundations show that the house had three cellars.

9

About 300 metres from the trail lies Blommastugan in Törne- måla, where bosun Blomma lived in the late 19th century. The cottage was renovated in 1991 by Gullabo Rural Heritage Association, and now provides tourist accommodation. Well and outside toilet in the garden. Take your own portable stove (no electricity).


9 8

3 1

2

7

6

4 5


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 9 Degerhyltan–Östergården 1

Karsjön. This lake offers all sorts of seabirds, flora and fauna.

2

Flax drying oven. Remains of a mill.

3

Site of cottage for the poor. Flax drying oven.

4

Karls Kammare, a cave where a 17th century soldier called Karl is said to have hidden out the war. Around the cave lie ancient Iron Age slag heaps.

5

East of the trail is Strömby Nature Reserve, with its ancient natural pine forest. Forest of this type and size is uncommon locally, which is what makes it so important. The average age of the forest is around a hundred years, but with a great deal of variety. Some of the really large pines are several hundred years old.

6

The foundations of a windmill that is now in Grisbäck.

7

Milestone. It is supposedly one Swedish mile (10 km) as the crow flies between the churches in Påryd, Torsås, Gullabo and Söderåkra.


1 2

34

5

6

7


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 10 Östergården–Fastlycke 20 km 1 Peat bog. Wilderness area. 2 Madhuset*. Overnight shelter. 3 Bönehall. When Söderåkra church burned down in the 17th century, services were moved here. 4 Along the road through Hulebäck lie many signed attractions: charcoal stacks, toilets and hay barns. 5 Såghultet was a horticultural centre in the early 20th century, with greenhouses and apple cellars. 1 km further out there were three houses. 6 Here there are ancient rock piles from cleared fields, a tannery and the foundations of a house. Beyond the house stood the poorhouse for Hulebäck and Norra Gullabo. A stone has been raised in the wall at the boundary between the villages. 7 The water mill in Norra Gullabo is well preserved and fully functional. Built in 1882, it was in use until the 1920s. You might spot a dipper here. 8 Gisemåla school has accommodation with kitchen and toilets. Take a sleeping bag. For the key, call Gudrun Österlund on tel: 0486-250 02. Also shelter and barbecue spot. 9 Kalmar County’s best preserved wolf pit is just outside the woods (follow the signs). Particularly interesting because it is made of stone

(*Madhus: “Special barns, called ‘madhus’ were built near large hay fields far removed from the farms to store the hay after the harvest. The barns that remain next to wetlands suggest the former importance of such land for haymaking.”)


2 3

1

4

7 5 6

8

9


Vandringsleder i Torsås kommun

TORSÅSLEDEN – Section 11 Fastlycke–Fulvik 14 km 1

Skarptorpet. The croft was built in the 1850s, and occupied by widow Anna Sunesson until 1941.

2

Stone circle in Wärnanäs forest. Seven large sandstone blocks stand in a wide ring, probably from the Bronze Age. A little further up pure ocean sand sits in the valleys. “The whalebone” in the cellar of Halltorp church was found here in the 19th century. It turns out to be the fifth rib of a sperm whale.

3

Glasholm station and guard’s cottage was on the Kalmar–Torsås rail line, which opened in 1899 and closed in 1965.

4

Grave field with several stone formations and originally 32 standing stones.

5

The trail now heads due south. A walk of around 2 km takes in prehistoric remains and cairns on both sides of the trail, as well as Stufvenäs spring.

6

Stufvenäs Gästgifveri. Inn offering gourmet dining and first-class accommodation. To book, call 0486-219 00.

7

Blårör. Bronze Age cairn of impressive size.

8

From the coast you can see the cormorant islands. The colony of great cormorants on Svartö dates from the mid-1930s and is the largest in Sweden. There is also a seal protection area off the Wärnanäs and Stufvenäs coast.


1

2 3

4

7

6

5

8


Torsås Walking / Rambling