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My

Baby!

A Gatehouse Media / Stephenville Empire Tribune Publication

2019

From Baby Bump to Baby’s First Birthday

The

Everything Planner My BABY! | 1


M Oyh

Baby!

4 43 71 Getting Ready for Popular Baby Names for Bonding with Baby 4 3872 26 Pregnancy 2019 Finding an Obstetrician Vaccine Tracker Baby Nursery 6 45Designs Baby’s Early Education 7 Obstettician 3974 in 12 Easy Finding an Choosing theSteps Right Child What is a 10 Doula? Baby’s Tooth 28 Care Introducing theChart Fur Babies Choosing a Pediatrician 8 Physician 4075 Your Family 46 Cover Cover photo photo byby 29 Nutrition: Eating 1&2 Month Checkup 12 for the Baby Nursery Designs Getting Your Body Back Brooke Brooke Mendenhall Mendenhall Photography Photography to Ask Health of Your Family 4176 Nutrition: Eating for the Common in Questions 12 Easy Steps Your Pediatrician 4&6 Month Checkup Health of11 Your Family 48 Dressing Your Little One 30 on a Budget Your Pregnancy4278 15 Baby Rooms CPR50 Month by /Month 9&12 Month Checkup Ultrasound Sonograms Parenting 12 16 4379 Choosing31a Pediatrician Safety and RiskPreparing Factors inChildren Pregnancy Tracking Your Every Baby Day For 51 Baby Read Aloud ProofingQuestions Your Hometo Ask Developmental80Milestones 13 Pregnancy Common EDITOR: EDITOR: Warning 17Signs Your 32 Pediatrician When to 45 Take Your Child Robin Good Robin Good Essentials 52 of Baby 14 that bump! When to Take YourERChild to Showing off to the Shower Etiquette Pregnancy Milestones the 82 ER 18 Pediatrician Interviews DESIGNER: DESIGNER: 3354 15 in Pregnancy Risk Factors Baby’s46First Tooth Staci Woods Staci Woods Your Baby Registry Ultrasound / 19 Sonogram Baby’s First84 Birthday Essentials of Baby 34Etiquette 16 Signs Warning Shower Baby’s47 Tooth Chart DIRECTOR OPERATIONS DIRECTOR OFOF OPERATIONS Planning Baby’s Pregnancy What Do My Parent’s Think 21 Visits 56 Birth 85 ADVERTISING: && ADVERTISING: 35 Registry 23 Today?Tracker Your Pregnancy Your Baby Vaccine Melissa Horton Melissa Horton Hospital Bag57Checklist Budgeting forMonth Baby Month by 86 36 Products 2423 Goat Milk Your Baby’s Vision ACCOUNT ACCOUNT Safe Sleep Your Baby Showing off that Bump! Pregnancy Milestones andFor Your Baby 87 REPRESENTATIVES: REPRESENTATIVES: 3758 2524 Know the Signs of a Speech Chris Wood Chris Wood Babys Nutrition: Learning Popular Baby Names Pregnancy Visitsfor Planning Baby’s Birth or Language Disorder Josh Warnken Josh Warnken the Dance of Breastfeeding 2019 31 59 88 Prenatal Massage Hospital Bag Checklist 1 Month Checkup 32 60 89 Emotional Support During What to Expect at the Hos2 Month Checkup more information ForFor more information or or Photo by: Pregnancy and Postpartum pital 90 a copy Baby! to to getget a copy of of OhOh Baby! Brooke Mendenhall Photography 33 62 4 Month Checkup contact Stephenville contact thethe Stephenville Budgeting for Baby How will I know when 91 Empire Tribune Empire Tribune at at 34 I’m in labor? 6 Month Checkup 254.965.3124. 254.965.3124. Exercising During 64 92 Pregnancy Labor Memories 9 Month Checkup 35 65 93 Yoga for Pregnancy Your Baby’s Birth Story 12 Month Checkup 36 66 94 Skin and Pregnancy Babys Nutrition: Learning Tracking Your Baby 37 the Dance of Breastfeeding Developmental Milestones Essential Oils 67 96 *This *This book book is not is not intended intended as as a a Which are Best for Baby Infant Reflux Baby’s First Birthday substitute substitute forfor thethe medical medical advice advice of of physicians. physicians. TheThe reader reader should should 39 68 97 regularly regularly consult consult a physician a physician in in Safety and BabySafe Sleep for Your Baby What Do My Parent’s Think matters relating health matters relating to to health andand Proofing Your Home 69 Today? particularly with respect particularly with respect to to anyany 41 These Tine Feet and Hands 98 symptoms symptoms thatthat may may require require diagnosis diagnosis or or medical medical attention. attention. Car Seat Safety Tiptoe and Crawl Into Your Baby Milestones 42 Heart and Stay Forever Finding the Perfect Name

Staff Staff

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Finding an

Obstetrician How can I find an obstetrician to care for me during my pregnancy? If you’re seeing a gynecologist you like who practices obstetrics as well, you may want to ask him or her to care for you during your pregnancy – particularly if you like the hospital where the doctor attends births. If you need to find an obstetrician, ask one of your health care providers to recommend someone or talk to your friends or relatives who have recently had a baby or who work in health care in your area. Childbirth educators are also a good source for referrals and friends. If you don’t come up with any recommendations on your own, try calling the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, in Washington, D.C., at (202) 638-5577. They can give you names of boardcertified OB/GYNs in your area. You can also visit the ACOG website (www.acog.org) to find a doctor in your zip code.

What criteria should I use to choose my obstetrician? Only you can decide which are the most important considerations for you – it’s a very personal decision. Keep in mind that you may be able to narrow your list of choices with a simple phone call. There’s no need to meet with a doctor who isn’t in your network of providers if that’s a requirement for your insurance coverage.

Here are some other things to consider: Your Health History

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physician with whom you are comfortable is very important. The ability to relax and ask questions with your obstetrician is vital to maintaining a positive relationship and pregnancy. Remember – if you suspect you may be pregnant or if you have taken a positive pregnancy test, make an appointment with your doctor to ensure that you will have a happy and healthy nine months!

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Do you have any chronic illnesses – such as high blood pressure, epilepsy, heart disease, or diabetes – or previous complications that may require special care? If so, ask the doctors you’re considering what experience they have caring for patients with your circumstances, and consider whether you should be cared for by a perinatologist (a doctor who specializes in high-risk births). If you’ve previously had a C-section, would you like to try to have a vaginal birth this time? In that case, you’ll want to make sure that both the provider and the hospital are supportive of vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC).


The Doctor’s Outlook

Find out the doctor’s attitude about issues that may be important to you, such as the routine use of interventions like IVs, continuous electronic fetal monitoring, and episiotomy. You can’t predict what your individual situation will require, but you can get an idea of the general approach your doctor has to your care, not to mention his or her practice patterns. You may also want to determine the doctor’s feelings about having a doula or other support person/people present at the birth besides – or in addition to – your partner. Is the doctor supportive of natural childbirth, if that is what you’re interested in? Is breastfeeding encouraged?

Compatibility

Pregnancy and childbirth are exciting, but they can also be stressful. So the best health care partner is one you feel comfortable with and whom you can communicate with easily.

The Anatomy of Prenatal Visits

You will probably need to free up your schedule to allot ample time to clear your doubts and apprehensions during the initial stages of your pregnancy, as well as what to expect over the next few months. If possible, it would also be advisable to invite your partner to the doctor’s consultation. During the first meeting, the doctor will be able to give you the expected delivery date of the baby. This estimation of the date is also important for careful evaluation of the monthly growth of the fetus. For women with irregular menstrual cycles, doctors usually recommend ultrasound scans to get a clearer picture of your

Ask Yourself... How comfortable do you feel with your doctor? Do you find it easy to ask your doctor questions? Does the doctor explain things clearly and completely? Does the doctor seem like someone who will respect your wishes?

Before you move on to someone else, you might want to talk to the doctor about your concerns. If the problem can’t be resolved, or your worries aren’t addressed, don’t hesitate to change obstetricians or consider whether a midwife might be a better fit for you.

Questions for your Doctor... How many doctors are in the practice – will I have a primary and what are the chances that doctor will deliver my baby? What is the hospital affiliation? What is the cesarean rate? Does the doctor or the group practice perform episiotimies as a matter of course? What is the doctor’s attitude about patients having a birth plan with personal preferences? How does the doctor feel about pain medication during birth? If I happen to be a high-risk pregnancy, what is the doctor’s experience? How many babies do you deliver each year?

delivery due date. Mothers-to-be will be asked to record their height, weight and blood pressure to have a reliable assessment of health. In some cases, PAP tests may be required to screen for cervical cancer. On prenatal visits, blood tests are also conducted to screen for certain diseases such as: • Mumps • HIV • Measles • Kidney Disorders • Rubella • Diabetes • Syphilis Apart from these tests, the doctor will ask you about your lifestyle and eating habits and may ask you to make the appropriate changes to accommodate your pregnancy.

What to Expect in Future Visits

After your first prenatal visit, you may need to see your doctor every four weeks or so until the 28th week of pregnancy, after which you will need to see each other more often. In addition to these checkups, you may also want to take advantage of other screening methods to ensure normal development of the baby. The important key here is to discuss these options with your doctor – seek his advice and expertise. A sonogram or ultrasound will also be conducted. You will be advised to take multivitamins that contain iron and folate to ensure you are getting enough nutrients in your diet. If you have questions, be sure to list them so you can discuss with your doctor. You’ll both feel better when you understand each other – relax – it’s key.

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Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

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Doulas:

What is a Doula?

The word doula is a Greek word meaning women’s servant. Women have been serving others in childbirth for many centuries and have proven that support from another woman has a positive impact on the labor process.

What is a doula? A doula is a trained and experienced labor partner who provides informational, emotional, and physical support to expectant families, during, and just after childbirth; or who provides emotional and practical support during the postpartum period.

How does a doula help me through my pregnancy? A doula meets with you during pregnancy to go over your birth goals and expectations. She provides prenatal support and both answers and guides you through any concerns or questions you have during pregnancy. In addition, she provides much needed emotional support and information so that you can make informed decisions about your baby’s birth. A doula can bring calm to a pregnancy by providing experience, encouragement, and information. Doulas often use the power of touch and massage to reduce stress and anxiety during labor.

How does a doula help me after I’ve had my baby? Postpartum is a crucial time for healing, bonding, and adjusting to life with a new baby. A postpartum doula helps to establish a smooth transition to life with the new baby. She may assist with emotional support, newborn care, breastfeeding support, family bonding, meal prep – all things that make for an easier recovery for the new mom and helps the family adapt better to their new dynamics.

Questions to ask your potential doula: • What training have you had? • What services do you provide? • What are your fees? • Are you available for my due date? • What made you decide to become a doula? • What is your philosophy regarding childbirth? • Would you be available to meet with me before the birth to discuss my birth plan? • What happens if for some reason you are not available at the time I give birth?

What does a doula ‘not’ do? A doula does not provide medical care or advice. She doesn’t replace your partner or your doctor. She does not make decisions for you or speak to medical staff on your behalf. She is a guide who provides non-judgmental support and encouragement throughout the birthing process.

Are there different types of doulas? Yes – there are Labor and Birth Doulas – they assist expectant families throughout pregnancy and childbirth; Antepartum Doulas – they assist families in which the mother has been put on bed rest during their pregnancy; and Postpartum Doulas – they assist families in the adjustment period after childbirth.

The Fourth Trimester Sarah Ste-Marie

Certified Postpartum Doula

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

940-632-7047

Serving Stephenville and Surrounding Areas.

SV-00104791

http://www.facebook.com/tftdoula

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Eating for the Health of Your Family

Nutrition:

eat in the first trimester because of nausea. Focus on small and frequent snacks/meals that are protein rich (nuts and seeds, legumes, dairy and lean animal) and always pair a carbohydrate with a healthy fat or lean protein. It is easy to mistake nausea with hunger and thirst. Try adding lemon, lime, mint or ginger to your water or hot tea. These are natural ways to manage nausea. Adding magnesium-rich foods can help as well: pumpkin seeds, spinach, Swiss chard, and chocolate.

Second Trimester In the second trimester your baby is laying down new bone. Bone-building nutrients are a focus in the second trimester. Most of us know the role that calcium plays in strong bones, but did you also know that bones rely on vitamins A, D and K, as well as the minerals boron, molybdenum, manganese, and magnesium? Focus on colorful fruits and vegetables daily to consume all of these vitamins and minerals. The goal is at least one food from each color daily: blue/purple, red, orange, yellow, white/tan, and green. The easiest way to achieve this goal is to make a daily smoothie loaded with fruits and veggies. Spinach is the mildest green vegetable to hide in a smoothie. Try a couple big handfuls; you’ll never know it is there!

Third Trimester

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ou’re pregnant! You’ve never had a better reason to eat healthy. A developing baby depends solely on the transfer of nutrients from the mother. These nutritional building blocks help maximize brain development, growth of all organs, and develop the integrity of your baby’s immune system The quality and the quantity of nutrition that you eat, the pollutants, drugs and infections that your body is exposed to during fetal development, and the stress level and state of mind that you adopt while pregnant are all factors that shape your baby, your life, the lives of your grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. That’s right, not only can you grow a healthy child, but you can also optimize the health of your family for three generations. Balance in your lifestyle choices can bring vital health to your pregnancy.

First Trimester In the first trimester of pregnancy by week six, your baby has a beating heart, and by the 10th week of pregnancy you will have created all of the organs your child will have for the rest of their lives. During the first 13 weeks, it is common to feel nauseous, fatigued and moody. Don’t worry; all those symptoms are perfectly normal, and you will not have to eat more now than if you weren’t pregnant. It’s often hard to

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Did you know that your baby’s brain grows by 260 percent in the third trimester alone? Now, that’s brain power! Focus on brain-building nutrients in weeks 28 to 40 to help maximize cerebral development: protein, omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, iron, vitamin A, vitamin D and B vitamins. All your healthy eating is starting to pay off. Even if you can’t see your baby eating, they are swallowing amniotic fluid daily and with it comes all the flavors of the foods you have been eating. Recent studies show that you can influence the palate of your child starting in utero. By choosing foods that have strong and complex flavors such as herbs and spices, and colorful fruits and vegetables, you can prime your baby to enjoy diverse flavors before food introduction.

Top Nutrients for Pregnancy and Where to Find Them

Protein: Promotes cell growth and blood production. Protein is a long-lasting fuel source for your body as your energy requirements are in high demand. Found in lean meat, fish, poultry, egg whites, legumes, nuts and seeds, tofu, and tempeh. Carbohydrates: Your body’s No.1 fuel source. Found in whole grains, non-starchy and starchy vegetables, fruits, legumes, and dairy/dairy alternatives. Fat: Promotes healthy hair, skin, eye, nail and membrane development and is a key part of your body’s energy stores. Found in olive oil, olives, avocado, coconut oil, sunflower oil, dark chocolate, nuts and seeds, seafood, and meat.


Vitamin A: An antioxidant and fat-soluble vitamin that helps create skin, eye, brain and bone health, and fights off viral infections. Found in carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, kale, bell peppers, parsley, Swiss chard, and collard greens. Vitamin C: An antioxidant and water-soluble vitamin that works in harmony with iron in your body. Vitamin C is also a co-factor in the production of L-carnitine. Vitamin C helps with muscle cramps, constipation, and is the key in collagen – daily Vitamin C helps your stretching skin and decreases the risk of perineum tears at delivery. Found in red bell peppers, kiwi, strawberries, parsley, broccoli and citrus. Vitamin D3: Promotes a strong immune system, regulates insulin and blood sugar, lowers the risk of high blood pressure during pregnancy, reduces the risk of asthma and wheezing in your baby, increases the birth weight of your baby, and decreases the risk of postpartum depression. Found from the SUN! Twenty minutes of a pinking dose of sunshine daily yields 20,000 IUs of vitamin D. Food sources include: egg yolks, sardines, cod, shrimp, and dairy products. B Vitamins: B6, B12 and folate – these water-soluble vitamins play their biggest role in cerebral development and decreasing the risk of neural tube defects. The neural tube opens and closes in the first four weeks of pregnancy. Taking B vitamins prior to conception is the best way to optimize cerebral health. B vitamins are energy producers, red blood cell formers, nervous system health regulators, mood improvers, and sleep givers. Found in nutritional yeast, bananas, pork, green leafy veggies, legumes, yellow fruits and veggies, whole grains, and nuts and seeds. L-Carnitine: An amino acid that plays a crucial role in

decreasing the risk of gestational diabetes. It is a big energy giver as well. Focus on this nutrient especially in the second and third trimesters. Found in red meat and pork, avocado, artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, garlic, and parsley. Calcium: Atrong bones and teeth, muscle contraction, and nerve function. Take calcium apart from iron, as they bind in the body. Found in dark green leafy vegetables, rosemary, yogurt, kefir, milk, salmon, and sardines. Iron: Crucial for red blood cell production, healthy brain health and myelin sheath (fatty coating on all neurons) formation, and energy production. Found in lean red meat, spinach, pumpkin seeds, kidney beans, tofu, Swiss chard, and edamame. Zinc: A mineral that helps balance blood sugar, is an immune system regulator, supports optimal sense of taste and smell, is crucial in wound healing, and helps you make prolactin – the hormone that helps you produce breastmilk. Found in crimini mushrooms, spinach, beef, lamb, summer squash, and calf’s liver. Probiotics: Friendly bacteria that colonize in your gut to help boost your immune system health. Eighty percent of your immune system comes from your gut lining. Probiotics help protect you and your child from infection, improve digestion and absorption of nutrients, and decrease the risk of allergies in your child. Found in kefir, yogurt, kimchi (fermented vegetables), sauerkraut, tempeh and natto (fermented soy beans), and miso (soy paste).

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

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Your Pregnancy One Month

Your baby is an embryo consisting of two layers of cells from which all her organs and body parts will develop.

Two Months

Your baby is now about the size of a kidney bean and is constantly moving. He has distinct, slightly webbed fingers.

Three Months

By now your baby is about 3 inches long and weighs nearly an ounce. Her tiny, unique fingerprints are now in place.

Four Months

Month by Month

Your baby is now about 5 inches long and weighs 5 ounces. His skeleton is starting to harden from rubbery cartilage to bone.

Five Months

Eyebrows and eyelids are now in place. Your baby would now be more than 10 inches long if you stretched out her legs.

Six Months

Your baby weighs about a 1 1/2 pounds. His wrinkled skin is starting to smooth out as he puts on baby fat.

Seven Months

By now, your baby weighs about 3 pounds and is more than 15 inches long. She can open and close her eyes and follow a light.

Eight Months

Your baby now weighs about 4 3/4 pounds. His layers of fat are filling him out, making him rounder, and his lungs are well developed.

Nine Months

The average baby is more than 19 inches long and weighs nearly 7 pounds now, but babies vary widely in size at this stage.

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

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Risk Factors in

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lthough many pregnancies are considered normal and only need standard prenatal care from an Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) provider, there are certain circumstances that may require you or your baby to have additional testing, monitoring and treatment. Maternal Fetal Medicine specialists have the expertise and services to help manage high-risk pregnancies. Maternal Fetal Medicine specialists have advanced expertise in obstetric complications of pregnancy and their effects on the mother and baby. These providers are fully trained and qualified OB/GYN physicians who, upon completing a threeyear fellowship, are certified as subspecialists by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG). This additional training allows the providers to care for women with issues

Pregnancy

deemed to be high risk to the mother or baby; including, but not limited to: • Heart or kidney disease • Hypertension (high blood pressure) • Gestational diabetes • Multiple-birth pregnancy • Seizure disorders • Blood clotting disorders • Advanced maternal age • Preeclampsia (toxemia) • Infectious diseases • Repetitive pregnancy loss • Suspected abnormal fetal growth In some cases, a pregnancy may be considered high risk if the mother has a family history of the following diseases: • Cardiac disease • Renal disease • Gastrointestinal disease • Cystic fibrosis

Maternal Fetal Medicine providers are experienced in a wide variety of complex high-risk maternal fetal conditions and will partner with you to improve care for mom and baby/babies. By working with your OBGYN provider, the specialist can help co-manage the high-risk pregnancy to ensure that you are closely monitored. Maternal Fetal Medicine Services Include: • Genetic counseling • Pre-conception counseling • First trimester screening • Second trimester screening • Evaluation of fetal anomalies and growth disorders • Non-invasive prenatal testing Some women with high-risk pregnancy symptoms may require a single consultation with a Maternal Fetal Medicine provider before or during pregnancy to help them prepare, and to provide guidance to their obstetrician for managing their high-risk pregnancy. Other women may require ongoing specialist care throughout the pregnancy to help monitor the health of mother and baby by performing comprehensive fetal assessments with ultrasound and/or invasive evaluations. Following delivery, a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist may be consulted to diagnose or manage postpartum symptoms related to the high-risk pregnancy. Ask your OB/GYN provider about the Maternal Fetal Medicine specialists in your area.

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Identifying Warning Signs of

Pregnancy Danger

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or many pregnant women and expectant parents, the whole pregnancy phase is fraught with physical and emotional changes. Pregnancy should be the time for women to be vigilant about their health. Pregnancy complications are not uncommon, and while most problems may be relatively mild and can be immediately treated, in other cases warning signs can carry some significant health risks to the child, mother and possibly both.

Miscarriage

Although it is generally advised for pregnant women to have frequent doctor visits, it is equally important to be aware of the possible danger signs to look for during pregnancy. These include the following signs:

There are some cases in which the fertilized egg may not reach its correct position in the uterus and the embryo grows on the fallopian tube. Since it grows in an abnormal location, it causes tears in the blood vessels and delicate structures. It is known to display the following symptoms: lower back pain, nausea, lower abdominal pain, and cramping. This can require surgery to remove the non-viable embryo.

• Vaginal bleeding • Sudden weight gain • Fever • Chills • Seeing spots • Persistent headache • Burning sensation when urinating • Vomiting • Blurred and/or double vision • Lower abdominal pain • Thigh pain • No baby movement for 12 hours • Premature cramping • Persistent lower back aches • Nausea

Bleeding during the first trimester can be a sign of possible miscarriage. According to statistics, about 20 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage. These incidents usually occur when a woman is not aware that she is pregnant. Clots, bleeding and cramping are among the most common signs of miscarriage.

Ectopic Pregnancy

Premature Labor

One of the most common problems of pregnancy is premature labor and delivery. Babies born prematurely run a high risk of having respiratory problems and underdeveloped lungs.

Hypertension

Elevated blood pressures are a common complication that occurs in 3 percent of pregnancies. It can cause some adverse effects on the placenta as well as the fetus. Severe elevation of blood pressure can cause pain in the abdomen, fluid retention, seeing spots, and headaches.

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Pregnancy

Milestones

Record these important milestones, along with your emotions at the time. They’ll make terrific entries in your little one’s book! First time I heard my baby’s heartbeat: _______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time it really sank in that I was going to be a mom: ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time a stranger asked me if I was pregnant: _______________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I experienced morning sickness: ____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I bought a new-baby outfit: ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I wore a maternity dress: __________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I couldn’t button my pants: ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time my parents found out I was having a baby: ___________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I saw my baby on an ultrasound:____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I could no longer see my feet: _____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I felt my baby hiccup: _____________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ First time I felt the baby kick: _______________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Ultrasound/Sonograms:

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An essential part of Prenatal Care

or many moms-to-be, a first ultrasound is a life-changing experience. As a medical procedure, it is one that patients look forward to. A fetal ultrasound or sonogram is an imaging technique that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of a baby in the uterus. An ultrasound can help your doctor evaluate your baby’s growth and development as well as gauge the progress of your pregnancy. Your first ultrasound will typically be done between 18 and 20 weeks, but you may have one before 12 weeks to confirm your due date. You may also have an earlier ultrasound – or more than one – if yours is a high-risk pregnancy, if you have any pain or bleeding, a history of having children with birth defects, or if another prenatal test or exam shows something abnormal. In addition, you’ll have additional ultrasounds if you have a chronic illness such as diabetes or a history of ovarian cysts or fibroids. A first trimester ultrasound exam is done to evaluate the presence, size and location of your pregnancy. It also helps your doctor to evaluate any problems, screen for abnormalities, or confirm a diagnosis. If your baby’s health needs to be monitored more closely, additional ultrasounds will be recommended. What happens during an ultrasound? After you lay down on the exam table, a small amount of gel is applied to the skin of your abdomen. A device called a transducer is applied to your skin, sending high-frequency sound waves

into your body that reflect off the internal structures. The echoes are received by the transducer and turned into a picture on the screen. All fetuses are approximately the same size in the early weeks of pregnancy, so a sonogram allows your doctor to approximate your due date. If you have your sonogram between seven and 13 weeks, your doctor can set your due date within about three days! A mid-pregnancy ultrasound is done at around 20 weeks. This sonogram is also called the anatomy scan. Your doctor will listen to the baby’s heartbeat, check for physical abnormalities, check the organs, determine if there’s more than one baby (twins!), measure the amount of amniotic fluid, check the location of the placenta, and measure your baby to be sure he or she is the right size for his or her gestational age. And yes – determine the sex of your baby. This is the exam where you can catch a glimpse of your baby – and go home with a picture or two! When properly done, an abdominal ultrasound poses no risk to you or your baby. In fact, there are many benefits to checking on your baby’s development during pregnancy. It is generally advised that an ultrasound be performed only if medically indicated.

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

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Pregnancy

Visits

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

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Pregnancy

Visits

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

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Pregnancy

Visits

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

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Pregnancy

Visits

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

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Pregnancy

Visits

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

20 | My BABY!


Pregnancy

Visits

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

My BABY! | 21


Pregnancy

Visits

Date:____________________________________________________________________________________ The week of my pregnancy:________________________________________________________________ Weight:__________________________________________________________________________________ Weight gained since the start of my pregnancy:________________________________________________ Blood pressure:___________________________________________________________________________ Fundal height:____________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s heart rate:__________________________________________________________________________ Other tests:______________________________________________________________________________ Prescribed medications:____________________________________________________________________ What I can expect before my next prenatal visit:_______________________________________________ Instructions from my doctor:________________________________________________________________ How much weight I should gain:____________________________________________________________ Notes:___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

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DE LEON • BROWNWOOD • STEPHENVILLE

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22 | My BABY!

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Budgeting for Baby

Now and in the Future pregnancy. It will be important for you to contact your insurer to see what additional medical expenses you could incur in case of complications. You’ll need to have your child on a health plan by the time he or she is 30 days old. Talk to the professionals – get the best coverage for your child and your family.

Find Child Care

Child care expenses can easily be the largest monthly expense for your baby. Take time to research your options. Child care facilities offer many options, levels of care, hours, food, classes, and other benefits – things you want to know when considering who cares for your child. Which facility or caretaker best fits your budget and lifestyle? Where do you feel your baby will feel safe and comfortable?

Start Planning for the Future

Once your baby’s social security number is in your hand, look in to special savings accounts for college. Encourage family and friends to make contributions to this fund on special occasions in lieu of toys. Parents do just fine showering their children with toys and love, so make each celebration a time to prepare for the future and contribute to this important fund.

Prepare a Will

A will is a financial responsibility you have to your new family member. If something should happen to you, it is important to decide who will step in as their legal guardian. Who will protect them financially? If for no other reason, taking care of your child or children requires that you have a will. Without a will, you have no say as to how your assets are distributed after your death. Use a professional, ask questions, and execute a will that covers every concern. Should you have life changes – more children, adoption, marriage or remarriage, change of executor, or moving to another state with different laws – update the will.

A

new baby brings big financial changes and budgeting challenges. What does a baby cost? How do I plan financially for the arrival of my baby? What expenses will I incur before and after my child arrives? What plans should I be making to secure the future of my child? So many questions and concerns. And while some expenses are obvious, if you’re budgeting for baby, you have to plan for the unexpected. Government estimates suggest that you’ll spend about $10,000 on child-related expenses in the first two years of life. It is important to break down the one-time expenses – decor, equipment and gear; the monthly expenses – medical, food, clothing, toys, and child care; and important expenses – life insurance and education savings.

Plan for the Unexpected – Life Insurance

You have big plans for your kids and want to see them realize their hopes and dreams. It’s hard enough to make that happen the way it is. But what if you, your spouse, or both of you were to suddenly be out of the picture? From diapers to diplomas, would there be enough income to pay for daycare, education, and everything in between? Your children are your greatest responsibility, and life insurance can help them grow up in an environment where they’re physically and financially secure – even if something should happen to you. In addition to coverage for Mom and Dad, protection for your child is also important. The benefits of children’s coverage include providing a solid financial base early in life, protection, and final expense coverage should the unthinkable happen. Simply put, let life insurance be a part of creating a bright future.

Plan for Medical Expenses

Did you know you’re already financially planning for your little one’s arrival? You are making financial arrangements with your doctor and the hospital as you progress through your

My BABY! | 23


Showing off that

P

regnancy may change your figure, but the pounds you gain give you a different kind of beauty. It’s important to maintain your style – you’re still you – you’re just pregnant. It’s time to show off that baby bump! Yes, show off the bump in style!

The basics

A couple of pair of jeans that fit with your lifestyle – skinny, boyfriend, bootcut, jeggings. Today’s pregnancy jeans are made by designers, and that pregnancy panel comes in many cuts and sizes.

Stretchy lycra dresses

Yes, clinging lycra to show off your baby bump. This type of dress will carry you through any special occasion.

Maxi dresses

These dresses go casual, and can be paired with a cardigan, sandals, boots or flats – they dress up and they dress down.

Workout wear for your growing belly

You’ll find that athleisure-wear goes from day to night with the change of a top, all while keeping you comfortable and in shape. (Yes, you can workout during pregnancy.)

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

24 | My BABY!

Bump!

Jackets and cardigans

These will change your look from casual to dressy and look great with dresses, skirts and leggings (not to mention those jeans).

Regular clothing in a size or two larger than your normal size This way you stay true to your style.

Tanks and tees These will be your lifesavers. Pair with your jeans or leggings and a cardigan and you will look pulled together.

Accessorize

Scarves, jewelry and shoes are important. They can also add a touch of color and style to an outfit.

Whatever your style, stay with it, be comfortable, be YOU!


Popular Baby Names for

2019

Here are the year’s most popular baby names for girls and boys. These baby name lists base popularity ranking on a single spelling of a name (Sophia and Sofia, for example, are considered two different names).

1

Liam

11 Carter

21 Jack

31

David

41

Ryan

2

Noah

12 Jackson

22 Leo

32

Levi

42

Nathan

3

Oliver

13 Sebastian

23 Luke

33

Matthew

43

Samuel

4

Mason

14 Alexander

24 Henry

34

Mateo

44

Isaac

5

Lucas

15 Benjamin

25 Jayden

35

Muhammad

45

Joseph

6

Elijah

16 Jacob

26 Wyatt

36

Asher

46

Caleb

7

Logan

17 Michael

27 Owen

37

Josiah

47

Isaiah

8

Ethan

18 William

28 Julian

38

John

48

Eli

9

James

19 Daniel

29 Gabriel

39

Lincoln

49

Anthony

10 Aiden

20 Grayson

30 Jaxon

40

Adam

50

Hunter

1 Emma

11 Aria

21 Ellie

31 Grace

41

Hazel

2 Olivia

12 Avery

22 Emily

32 Nora

42

Natalie

3 Ava

13 Ella

23 Lily

33 Bella

43

Savannah

4 Isabella

14 Evelyn

24 Chloe

34 Aubrey

44

Paisley

5 Sophie

15 Lina

25 Madison

35 Hannah

45

Nova

6 Amelia

16 Sofia

26 Zoey

36 Aurora

46

Violet

7 Mia

17 Abigail

27 Camila

37 Stella

47

Emilia

8 Charlotte

18 Layla

28 Penelope

38 Addison

48

Elena

9 Harper

19 Riley

29 Elizabeth

39 Skylar

49

Brooklyn

10 Mila

20 Scarlett

30 Victoria

40 Maya

50

Niamey

My BABY! | 25


Baby Nursery Design in

12 Easy Steps D

ecorating a baby nursery can be a daunting prospect – especially for a first-time mom. There are so many decisions to make. Feeling stressed? That’s not good for the baby, so let us give you the basics for creating a haven for your little one, one step at a time.

Step 5: Lighting is essential and must be flexible.

Step 1: Baby safety is your first concern. Be sure to take this

Step 6: If you already have wall-to-wall carpet in the room,

into account as you design your baby’s abode. Use a checklist for baby safety and plan accordingly.

Step 2: Decide on a room style. Modern, traditional,

whimsical, tribal, the choice is yours. This decision will affect your furniture, theme and color choices.

Step 3: Select a crib. The crib will form the focal point or

centerpiece of your baby’s room. Consider a convertible crib, as this will save you money over time and will grow with the child (and everything will continue to match for years to come). When selecting look for shape, style, finish or color, and durability.

Step 4: Find nursery furniture to complement the crib. The

dresser should match or mix well with it. The dresser can do double duty as a changing table (add a pad and safety straps and you’re set). You can also buy a changing table. If you use the dresser as the changing table, find one that is medium height that allows you to lean over comfortably for needed supplies. The top drawer will hold all of your diaper-changing essentials. Make sure the drawer is easy to operate – it should glide/slide easily.

26 | My BABY!

Sometimes you’ll want it bright and sometimes soft. Be sure your nightlight allows you to see in the middle of the night (but not so it stimulates the baby). Consider a dimmer switch for your lighting. that’s fine – you’re not likely to make the change (or go to the expense). Just be aware that you need to keep it vacuumed to avoid allergens (and be prepared to spot clean – it’s inevitable). Other flooring options are hardwood, laminate and concrete. With the addition of a nice area rug or rug tiles. You can decorate a room around a rug – it can anchor your decor.

Step 7: After you’ve gotten the basics decided upon, it’s

time to decorate the room. Do you have a theme? Is it about heirlooms? Colors? Style? Read decorating magazines, check out Pinterest, or go shopping. You’ll see things you like and can build your baby’s room to perfection.

Step 8: The color you choose for the walls will be influenced by your theme. The things you can do with paint are amazing – stripes, murals, stencils or multi-colored walls.

Step 9: Now the accessories are added to your vision –

pictures, art, lamps, bedding, wall hangings, storage, and fabrics. As you go through the process, shop for things that please your eye. But stay with your vision. You may get sidetracked along the way, look for items that go with what you


have, fulfill the look, and are attractive. This is the room your child will grow up in, and it is a room you want to be happy with, too.

Step 10: Curtains, blinds or shades should match your theme.

Also make sure you can block light when needed. Make sure the crib is not near window coverings, as children tend to climb and are attracted to anything within reach (keep any and all cords away from the baby’s reach).

Step 11: Equipment – you’ll need a few extras: a baby

monitor, mobile, safety gates, playpen, white noise machine, humidifier, diaper pail, rocker or glider, shelves and bins for toys, and outlet covers.

Step 12: You’re finished! Now relax, enjoy the fruits of

your labor and wait for your baby to come and change your life forever.

Surround them with beautiful things!

For the perfect nursery, shop the Home Place

1491 W South Loop, Stephenville,TX 76401

(254)965-3818 Hours Monday-Saturday 9:00-6:30 Sunday 12:30-5:30 SV-00104873

My BABY! | 27


Choosing a

I

f you already have a family doctor, you may not think you need a pediatrician. Although a general physician is licensed to care for children, they lack the training of a pediatrician. To become a pediatrician, a doctor has to have four years of medical school and three more years of residency working solely in pediatrics. Some are further specialized in a field like neonatalogy or cardiology. You should start looking for a pediatrician in the seventh month of pregnancy. Start compiling the list by asking family and friends if they have any recommendations. Check with your insurance company for eligible pediatricians and with local hospitals to see if they have referral services. Ask your obstetrician or family doctor if they know of someone. Research. Ask yourself if you want a male or female doctor. There may be a point when your child gets older that they will feel more comfortable with a doctor of the same sex. Do you want an older or younger doctor? An older doctor will have more experience, but could be set in their ways and not open to new technology or methods. They might be thinking about retirement. A younger doctor, on the other hand, may be more open to new technology or methods, but lack the experience of an older doctor. Like choosing an obstetrician, do the work – find out what fits you and your lifestyle.

28 | My BABY!

Pediatrician

You’ve narrowed your list of choices – now comes some investigative work. Before interviewing a pediatrician, check with the state medical board to see if any disciplinary action or professional peer reviews have been made against the pediatrician. Check out the books put out by the Director of Public Citizen’s Health Research Group. These list doctors who have been disciplined by a state or federal government. As you interview the candidates on your list, look for a pediatrician who is open-minded and compassionate to your feelings and thoughts. Make sure the pediatrician is covered by your insurance and will actually be seeing your child. Most pediatricians will do these interviews for free, but some will charge. If they charge, see if the fee can be applied to the first office visit. If a pediatrician won’t do an interview, be wary of them. Once you have made your choice, there are no hard and fast rules that say you have to stick with it. If you ever become concerned with your child’s care, discuss the situation with the pediatrician. If the problem continues, find a new pediatrician. Choosing a pediatrician for your child may be the single-most important decision you make for their young years. Unfortunately, most people don’t spend enough time doing so. Next to parents, a pediatrician is one of the most important people in a child’s life, so choose wisely.


Common Questions to Ask Your

Pediatrician

Before going in for the interview, check out the office. Is it clean and organized?

Can they be reached with questions, either routine or emergency?

Are there separate waiting rooms for sick and healthy kids?

Do they have specific call-in times?

Is the staff courteous? Do they listen to parents’ concerns?

Do they have a website that will allow you to reach them by email?

What are the office hours?

In the event your child becomes ill, when would they refer your child to the emergency room?

Is there a lab on site?

What hospital do they use?

What doctor is recommended for work not done on site?

Who covers when they are away?

Do they do eye and hearing checks in the office?

Are there resident physicians, nurse practitioners, medical students, and nurses on staff?

How easy is it to get through on the telephone?

How involved will they be in caring for your child?

Is the practice large or small?

What kind of time will they spend with your child at a typical visit?

Is there more than one office? How much time is spent at each office? When you interview the pediatrician, ask them about their educational background. How long have they been in practice? Are they board certified? How do they stay current on the latest medical developments?

When do they prescribe medication? What kind of medication do they regularly prescribe? How do they handle a situation where you disagree with their treatment? If your family situation is nontraditional, how will the pediatrician and the office staff treat you?

My BABY! | 29


CPR:

Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation A

s if you’ve got nothing else on your mind with your new baby. Here’s one more thing that is very important to know Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). It’s daunting to think you might have to actually use CPR on your child, but your best chance for success in an emergency is knowing how to correctly perform CPR. There are many injuries that can cause a person to stop breathing. In children, these could include, choking, neardrowning, asthma, head trauma, poisoning, smoke inhalation, electrocution, suffocation, apnea obstruction, and sudden infant death syndrome, among other possibilities. Statistically, children are more prone to accidents than their parents. CPR restores the flow of blood to the brain, heart and other vital organs. Without oxygen-rich blood flowing to these organs, damage and even death can occur. Performing CPR can restore breathing until advanced care and life support can be administered. Ideally, you’ll take the course before you have your child (but if not, do it shortly after). You’ll go to a class with a certified instructor. In an infant CPR class, you’ll learn how to prevent, recognize, and respond to breathing emergencies. Your instructor will use an infant-size mannequin to demonstrate how to perform CPR, and will guide you through the proper techniques. In many classes, your instructor will advise on accident prevention and childproofing your home. CPR for an infant is different from CPR for adults. You use your fingers to do chest compressions (as opposed to your hands). A child’s smaller and more fragile body requires less pressure when performing the compressions.

30 | My BABY!

There are three basic parts to CPR: Circulation, airway, and breathing with compressions being the most important. Call 911 immediately and let them know of your emergency – if someone is with you and has a phone, have them make the call while you begin to administer CPR. Get the patient on a flat surface on their back: • Check for normal breathing by looking for the rise and fall of the chest. • Ensure that the airway is open; food or another object could be blocking the airway. Open the airway to enable effective CPR. • If there is not normal breathing, you will start chest compressions – 30 chest compressions, followed by two breaths. This cycle will continue. To give breaths, open the airway using a head-tilt chin-lift. • Check the child’s carotid artery for a pulse by placing two fingertips and applying slight pressure on the artery for five to 10 seconds. The carotid artery is located in the depression between the windpipe and the neck muscles. You should also check the infants pulse on the brachial artery (inside of the arm between the elbow and shoulder). Remember: You may be your child’s only chance of survival. Early recognition, getting help there as soon as possible, and early bystander CPR can double and even triple the chances of survival.


Safety and

Baby-Proofing Your Home

Y

our child’s safety is an important responsibility – your responsibility. The following tips should help you keep your baby safe and out of harm’s way. For the first two months, don’t take your baby to large public places such as malls and grocery stores – avoid crowds (germs). Keep your well-baby doctor appointments, as it is important to check your baby’s developmental milestones.

Smoking and Fire Safety: Do not smoke or allow smoking around your baby. Install a working smoke alarm on every level of your home. Change the batteries on your smoke detector every six months. Have at least one fire extinguisher on every level of your home. If your home uses gas heat, install a carbon monoxide detector. Safety in the Car: Always use a federally approved car seat. Read the instructions for installation. Car seats should face the rear of the vehicle for the for the first two years of the baby’s life. The safest location for the seat is the middle of the back seat. Never put the baby in the front seat or on your lap. Disengage the air bag if you are in a truck with no back seat. Leave your purse, briefcase, or cell phone in the back seat to avoid accidentally leaving the child in the car – this will get you in the habit of looking in the back seat.

Toy Safety: Inspect toys regularly for breaks, sharp edges or small parts – toys should be larger than your baby’s mouth. Toy chests need to be open (no lids) or with supports that keep it open in any position. Choking/Strangulation: Keep cords away from the baby’s crib; secure cords on blinds. Make sure buttons on clothing are secure and tight. Don’t use baby items that have strings or cords. Put away small objects that can cause choking. Safe Sleeping: The baby should have a separate sleeping space (crib, bassinet or cradle). A firm mattress with a tightfitting sheet is best. No bumper pad, pillows or fluffy blankets in the crib. Make sure crib is away from cords/blinds/electric outlets. Place your baby on his or her back for the first four months – no pillows. A one-piece sleeper is a good choice for sleeping. Don’t share a bed with your baby. More Tips: Take a CPR class. Gather a list of emergency numbers and keep them by the phone (or in your mobile) – pediatrician, health care provider, family doctor, police department, fire department, and poison control. Have a will and name a guardian for your child in the event something should happen to you or your partner.

Preventing Falls: If you use an infant carrier, always place it on the floor – not on a counter or table – and make sure the baby is strapped in. Never leave the baby alone on a couch, changing table, or bed. Preventing Baby Burns: Don’t hold hot liquids when holding your baby. Do not microwave the baby’s bottle – microwaves heat unevenly and can burn the baby’s mouth. Warm the bottle in a bowl of warm wate, shake the bottle, and test the temperature. Preventing Accidents: Keep sharp objects in secure places, out of baby’s reach. Don’t shake or throw the baby in the air (blindness and brain damage can occur). Secure lamps that have cords to the baseboards (try using electrical tape along the baseboards). Keep cleaning items and drugs out of your child’s reach. Bath Safety: Start bathing after the cord falls off using soap for sensitive skin. Always test the water to make sure it is not too hot (before setting your baby in the water). Dipping your elbow in the water is a good way to test. It’s a good idea to turn the hot water heater to 120 degrees F. Never leave the baby unattended or with a sibling – it only takes seconds for a baby to drown. Bathroom appliances (hair dryer, curling iron, radio) should be away from the water/tub. Make sure these appliances are unplugged when not in use.

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

My BABY! | 31


Essentials of Baby Shower

T

hrowing a baby shower is just like throwing any other party. You’ll need to answer these questions when planning a shower: Who do you invite, when do you have it, where do you have it, is there a theme, what time of day or night? Be aware there are certain times of day when the mom-to-be feels her best – ask her – she’ll let you know.

Appropriate Time for a Baby Shower

Baby showers can be held before the baby is born or after. Many choose to do it a couple of months before, when the mom is really showing (and glowing), while others wait until afterward, giving the mom the perfect opportunity to show off her little one to several people at once. Your host should check with you and make sure of the date and time and the guest list.

Etiquette for a Second Child Shower (or third, or fourth, etc.)

Every baby should be celebrated – right? When it comes to a second pregnancy, people have differing opinions on shower etiquette. But what if the child is a different gender? What if she’s having twins? What if she needs a few things? What if it’s been a few years since the first child? Have that shower and enjoy being together. Find out what the mom needs, have a shower, and celebrate. Sometimes a second baby shower is called a sprinkle. The entire celebration is less formal, low-key, less expensive – it’s about celebrating.

Who will host the party?

According to etiquette, anyone but the mom-to-be and her family can host a shower. This tradition is outdated and often disregarded. If you love the person, you’re related, are a best friend, or a close co-worker host the shower. Consult with the guest of honor to determine the guest list. Consider having a couples shower – dads need car seats, too. A recent trend has been diaper showers for dads. You’re going to need them (diapers and dads), so you might as well get them (diapers).

Whatever you do, make it memorable! Location

Most showers are held at the host’s home, but it can be held at a restaurant, party room, the office conference room, even at the home of the mom-to-be (it’s her most comfortable place). Whatever works.

Invitations

The host may go casual and phone or email each invited guest (evites are very popular and so much quicker in this busy world). Some people like a more formal invite and spend the money on this type of invitation (it is a memento and can be charming and 32 | My BABY!

Etiquette

set the tone or theme of the shower). Make sure all the details are on the invite (who, date, time, location, theme, where registered, list of needs, and RSVP information).

How many guests should you invite?

There are no hard and fast rules on this subject, but the normal number should be about 20 guests. If inviting more than 25 guests, you might want to co-host the shower with another person to keep the costs in line. The host should know how many people will fit in the venue (home, restaurant, etc.), so consider these things carefully.

Themes

The theme of the shower will be determined by the host. People are getting more and more clever (thank you, Pinterest) with themed showers and celebrations. For example, if the parents are Irish, the shower might be Luck o’ the Irish inspired (Can you see the green and the shamrocks?). Check out the background of the parents and go from there. What you want to do is consider the parents and you’ll have your theme. Questions to ask are: Do you go co-ed? Do you go traditional? What is the venue (that can also determine your theme)? What works best in your setting? What is appropriate at your shower location? Are you trying to match the baby’s nursery theme? These are just a few ways to set the theme of the shower.

Trends in Shower Themes • Nursery Rhymes • Travel • Monograms • Butterflies • Color Themes • Golden Book • Vintage • Baby Bling • Carnivals • Love you to the moon…

Gifts

Though a gift is expected if a guest attends the shower, guests should only be invited to help celebrate the upcoming arrival. If you cannot attend, you are not obligated to give a gift (though you might want to). Creating a registry at your favorite store or stores is a helpful way for guests to find the gifts that are needed. Registry information should be included with the invitation or provided when the guest sends their RSVP in the affirmative. If you are relatively well-equipped in the baby department, the shower host might consider themes that benefit the mom and/or dad: a night of babysitting, coupons for takeout meals, spa days, date-night dinners, or movie tickets.


Your

Baby Registry

T

he list of gear needed for your new baby is quite large, and baby showers are a wonderful way for your friends and family to shower your baby with gifts. But let’s be practical – you have specific needs and a gift registry lets your loved ones know what you really want and what you need for your baby’s first year of life.

Here are a list of items your baby will need during the first year of life: • Crib and mattress, mattress pads, fitted sheets • Blankets – swaddling, heavy, receiving • Diapers – all sizes, wipes • Diaper pail and liners • Detergent (baby-safe, dye-free) • Sleep gowns, footies, converter gowns, seasonally appropriate clothing • Baby monitor • Travel bed • Infant and toddler car seat, seat protector • Back seat mirror • Stroller • Humidifier • Nightlight • Bottles, pacifiers • Drying rack

Some Tips: • Research large items a little at a time. • Ask other moms for advice and reviews on items they use and love.

• Put as much as you want on your registry it’s better to have more than less.

• Plan ahead – babies grow quickly. You’ll need larger size clothes and diapers.

• Don’t forget safety items for the house and those required for your automobile.

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

• Food processor • High chair, bibs, burp cloths • Breast pump, storage bags, nipple cream, nursing bras, pads, tops, cover • Diaper bag with lots of pockets, changing pad • Bath towels, grooming kit, soap, shampoo, lotion, diaper rash cream, sunscreen • First-aid kit • Socks, mittens, onesies • Books, toys • Floor seat • Baby carrier/sling

My BABY! | 33


Planning Baby’s

Birth

F

rom the first positive pregnancy test, many moms-tobe fret over labor. Writing a birth plan can help relieve your anxiety, and – like Kegels – it’s a valuable pre-delivery exercise. A birth plan is a document that tells your medical team your preferences and desires for such things as how to manage labor pain. Most hospitals provide a birth plan worksheet or brochure that explains the hospital’s philosophy regarding childbirth, giving you options and guidelines. Much of your birth experience will be dictated by the setting you select and the caregivers assisting, so it’s important to learn your options before penning your preferences. In addition, it is impossible to completely control how your little one will make his or her grand entrance.

Things to Think About when Creating Your Birth Plan: Procedures of your health care provider: You may

want to chow down on hamburgers during labor, but many hospitals limit your consumption to ice chips. Get familiar with your delivery location’s policies ahead of time.

Atmosphere: Do you want a high-energy ambiance

with jazzy music or a quiet, softly lit setting for your baby’s big debut?

Preparatory procedures: In earlier eras, a woman

arriving at the hospital to give birth was given an enema and a trim (down there). Ask if these are still routine procedures where you’ll be delivering. There likely won’t be, but it’s better to know so there’s no surprise on labor day!

Pain management: Is your strategy “Get an epidural

ASAP!” or do you want to avoid pain medications, if possible? What pain management techniques will you use?

Monitoring: Many hospitals use constant electronic

fetal monitoring, but if you don’t want to be bedridden, intermittent monitoring may be an option.

Episiotomies and assisted birth: If your baby is being bashful, your caregiver may wish to perform an episiotomy – an incision between the vagina and anus – or use forceps or vacuum extraction. Discuss the pros and cons of each in advance.

C-section: In what circumstances would you want a

Cesarean to be performed? Does five hours of pushing grant a ticket to the OR or is your baby’s distress the only call for surgery? Discuss this with your physician.

34 | My BABY!

Photos and videos: Do you wish to document every

moment from the first twinge through baby’s first bath, or hold the flashbulbs until all are clean and content?

Crowning: Some non-squeamish mothers request to have a mirror positioned so they can see the baby crown (when it’s head first appears) or even reach down and touch it’s tiny noggin.

Cutting the cord: Indicate when you’d like baby’s

umbilical cord to be clamped, and specify whether Daddy wants to take part in the snipping ritual.

Post-birth: After a vaginal delivery, your delivery facility

may practice placing baby immediately on your chest, known as skin-to-skin. This promotes bonding and successful breastfeeding. For a C-section, indicate who should bond with your baby while you recover.

Nursing: It is recommended to start breastfeeding right

away. You can also ask the hospital staff not to offer baby a bottle or pacifier, which could interfere with nursing.

Additional info: Mention factors that may affect your

delivery, like if you can’t see without glasses, have gestational diabetes, or wish to bank baby’s cord blood. Don’t forget – while creating a birth plan is a great idea, don’t get so attached to it that you won’t allow any flexibility in the delivery room. Birth is different for every woman, every time, so no matter how much you plan there’s a good chance things won’t go exactly the way you envisioned them. Remember to expect the unexpected!


Hospital Bag

Checklist

Reduce your stress by packing for your trip to the hospital a few weeks before your expected due date. ____ Bath Robe

For Mom

____ Lotion

____ Night Gown

____ Hair Ties and Pins

____ Pajamas

____ Pillow

____ Loose, Comfy Clothing

____ Tennis Ball for Labor Massage

____ An Outfit to Leave In

____ Cell Phone and Charger

____ Slippers

____ Camera and Charger

____ Nursing Bras

____ Music Player/Laptop/Tablet

____ Several Pairs of Comfortable Underwear

____ Snacks for Husband/Family

____ Socks

____ Coins for Vending Machine

____ Nursing Pads/Nipple Cream

____ Birth Plan

____ Toiletries and Makeup

____ List of Family Contacts

____ Brush and Blow Dryer

____ Magazines/Books

____ Glasses/Contact Lenses

____ Identification

____ Lip Balm

____ Insurance Card/Info

For Baby ____ Going Home Outfit

____ Baby Fingernail Clippers

____ Onesie/Sleepers

____ Car Seat

____ Baby Socks

____ Receiving Blankets

____ Baby Mittens/Hat

____ Newborn Diapers and Baby Wipes

Call List ______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

My BABY! | 35


Safe Sleep for Your

Baby

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography Who is at risk for SIDS?

SIDS is the leading cause of death for infants between 1 month and 12 months of age. SIDS is most common among infants that are 1 to 4 months old.

What can I do before my baby is born to reduce the risk of SIDS?

Take care of yourself during pregnancy and after the birth of your baby. During pregnancy, before you even give birth, you can reduce the risk of your baby dying from SIDS! Don’t smoke or expose yourself to others’ smoke while you are pregnant and after the baby is born. Alcohol and drug use can also increase your baby’s risk for SIDS. Be sure to visit a physician for regular prenatal checkups to reduce your risk of having a low-birthweight or premature baby.

Where is the safest place for my baby to sleep?

The safest place for your baby to sleep is in the room where you sleep, but not in your bed. Place the baby’s crib or bassinet near your bed (within arm’s reach). This makes it easier to breastfeed and to bond with your baby. The crib or bassinet should be free from toys, soft bedding, blankets and pillows.

Safe Sleep Practices

Always place babies to sleep on their backs during naps and at nighttime. Because babies sleeping on their sides are more likely to accidentally roll onto their stomach, the side position is just as dangerous as the stomach position. Avoid letting the baby get too hot. The baby could be too hot if you notice sweating,

36 | My BABY!

damp hair, flushed cheeks, a heat rash, or rapid breathing. Dress the baby lightly for sleep. Set the room temperature in a range that is comfortable for a lightly clothed adult. Consider using a pacifier at naptime and bedtime. The pacifier should not have cords or clips that might be a strangulation risk.

Safe Sleep Environment

Place your baby on a firm mattress, covered by a fitted sheet that meets current safety standards. Place the crib in an area that is always smoke-free. Don’t place babies to sleep on adult beds, chairs, sofas, water beds, pillows, or cushions. Toys and other soft bedding, including fluffy blankets, comforters, pillows, stuffed animals, bumper pads, and wedges should not be placed in the crib with the baby. Loose bedding, such as sheets and blankets, should not be used, as these items can impair the infant’s ability to breathe if they are close to it’s face. Sleep clothing, such as sleepers, sleep sacks, and wearable blankets are better alternatives to blankets.

Is it ever safe to have babies on their tummies?

Yes! You should talk to your child care provider about making tummy time a part of your baby’s daily activities. Your baby needs plenty of tummy time while supervised and awake to help build strong neck and shoulder muscles. Remember to make sure that your baby is having tummy time at home with you.

Resource: American Academy of Pediatrics


Baby’s Nutrition: Learning the

Y

Dance of Breastfeeding

our first dance with a new partner can be a bit awkward. With practice, you both learn how to move with one another gracefully. Learning to comfortably nurse your baby is very much like learning to dance. It may not be perfect at first, but with practice, it becomes effortless. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding exclusively through baby’s first six months and continuing to breastfeed as you add in other foods during months six to12. Even a small amount of breast milk in the first few days after your baby’s birth makes a difference. Breastfeeding provides warmth and closeness. The physical contact helps create a special bond between you and your baby. Breast milk has many benefits – it is easier to digest, doesn’t need to be prepared, and it is always available. It has all the nutrients, calories and fluids your baby needs to be healthy, and growth factors that ensure best development of your baby’s organs. Breast milk also has substances that formulas don’t have that help protect your baby from many diseases and infections. In fact, breastfed babies are less likely to have ear infections, diarrhea, pneumonia, wheezing, bronchiolitis, and other bacterial and viral infections.

with you on the phone or in person. You can search ‘find a lactation consultant’ at www.ilca.org. The La Leche League offers support groups.

Interview Pediatricians

When choosing a Pediatrician, be sure to ask if he or she has experience supporting breastfeeding Mothers and babies. Your baby’s doctor will be a valuable part of your support system. They are the best source of information about medications you may be prescribed during the postpartum period.

If you are returning to work or school

Let your employer know that you will need regular breaks to pump human milk for your infant and ask about a comfortable, private space. Your insurance may provide a double electric pump or you can buy or rent one. A good pump is critical. Ask a lactation counselor about the best models. Take a few weeks to practice pumping before you return to work. Work with your childcare provider to plan baby’s feeding around your schedule.

Breastfeeding is good for Mom, too. It helps to release hormones in your body that promote mothering behavior and return your uterus to the size it was before pregnancy more quickly. It also burns calories, which may help in losing pregnancy weight. Breastfeeding will delay the return of your menstrual period to help keep iron in your body. It also keeps bones strong.

Plan Ahead

Attend a breastfeeding class. It is important to learn how to latch the baby to the breast correctly so that you are comfortable and the baby is effective at getting milk. Check your local health department and area hospitals for breastfeeding classes. Ask friends and family members who breastfed for their support. You can get excellent and accurate information from www.womenshealth.gov. Include breastfeeding goals in your birth plan. Ask about skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth. Research shows it eases the baby’s transition into the world. Often referred to as ‘kangaroo care,’ this close contact helps stabilize baby’s breathing and heartbeat – and has been shown to increase milk supply.

Establish a Support System

New Moms need support and reassurance. While you are pregnant, develop a list of ‘who to call’ in case you have questions or concerns. It can be a friend who had a successful breastfeeding experience or a lactation professional. Most hospitals have lactation professionals on staff and they will consult

My BABY! | 37


Vaccine

Tracker

Hepatitis B Diptheria, Tetanus, Pertussis Haemophilus Influenza Type B Inactivated Poliovirus Measles, Mumps, Rubella Varicella Meningococcal Pneumococcal Influenza Hepatitis A Rotavirus HPV 38 | My BABY!

11-12 years

4-6 years

24 months

18 months

15 months

12 months

6 months

4 months

2 months

1 month

Vaccine

Birth

This immunization schedule is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you’d like to try a modified schedule, speak with your pediatrician.


Baby’s Tooth

Chart

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

B A

Date of Eruption

D

C

Date of Eruption

D

UPPER

UPPER

E

E

E Date of Eruption

D Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

B

C

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

A

E

LOWER LOWER C

B

A

A

B

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

D C

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

Date of Eruption

A. Central Incisor

B. Lateral Incisor

C. Cuspid

D. First Molar

E. Second Molar My BABY! | 39


1 Month

Checkup

You can expect your baby’s doctor to:

Weigh and measure your baby to make sure she’s growing at a healthy rate. Do a complete physical. Probably give your baby a hepatitis B shot. Recommend vitamin D drops for breastfed babies. Address any other concerns.

How is your baby sleeping? What position does she sleep in?____________________________________________ How often is your baby eating?______________________________________________________________________ What are your baby’s bowel movements like?__________________________________________________________ Does she quiet down, at least briefly, at the sound of your voice?_________________________________________ Is your baby awake for longer periods of time?_________________________________________________________ Does she make soft cooing noises when content and alert?______________________________________________ Have you noticed anything unusual about your baby’s eyes or the way she looks at things?___________________ Is she a little fussier at the end of the day?_____________________________________________________________ Are you giving your baby tummy time when she’s awake?________________________________________________ Does your baby hold her head up when she’s placed on her tummy?______________________________________ How are you doing?________________________________________________________________________________ Notes:____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

2 Month

Checkup

You can expect your baby’s doctor to:

Weigh and measure your baby to make sure she’s growing at a healthy rate. Do a complete physical. Recommend vitamin D drops for breastfed babies. Address any other concerns.

How is your baby sleeping? What position does she sleep in?____________________________________________ How often is your baby eating?______________________________________________________________________ What are your baby’s bowel movements like?__________________________________________________________ Does she quiet down, at least briefly, at the sound of your voice?_________________________________________ Is your baby awake for longer periods of time?_________________________________________________________ Does she make soft cooing noises when content and alert?______________________________________________ Have you noticed anything unusual about your baby’s eyes or the way she looks at things?___________________ Is she a little fussier at the end of the day?_____________________________________________________________ Are you giving your baby tummy time when she’s awake?________________________________________________ Does your baby hold her head up when she’s placed on her tummy?______________________________________ How are you doing?________________________________________________________________________________ Notes:____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

40 | My BABY!


4 Month

Checkup

You can expect your baby’s doctor to:

Weigh and measure your baby to make sure she’s growing at a healthy rate. Do a complete physical. Recommend vitamin D drops for breastfed babies. Address any other concerns.

How is your baby sleeping? What position does she sleep in?____________________________________________ How often is your baby eating?______________________________________________________________________ What are your baby’s bowel movements like?__________________________________________________________ Does she quiet down, at least briefly, at the sound of your voice?_________________________________________ Is your baby awake for longer periods of time?_________________________________________________________ Does she make soft cooing noises when content and alert?______________________________________________ Have you noticed anything unusual about your baby’s eyes or the way she looks at things?___________________ Is she a little fussier at the end of the day?_____________________________________________________________ Are you giving your baby tummy time when she’s awake?________________________________________________ Does your baby hold her head up when she’s placed on her tummy?______________________________________ How are you doing?________________________________________________________________________________ Notes:____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

6 Month

Checkup

You can expect your baby’s doctor to:

Weigh and measure your baby to make sure she’s growing at a healthy rate. Do a complete physical. Recommend vitamin D drops for breastfed babies. Address any other concerns.

How is your baby sleeping? What position does she sleep in?____________________________________________ How often is your baby eating?______________________________________________________________________ What are your baby’s bowel movements like?__________________________________________________________ Does she quiet down, at least briefly, at the sound of your voice?_________________________________________ Is your baby awake for longer periods of time?_________________________________________________________ Does she make soft cooing noises when content and alert?______________________________________________ Have you noticed anything unusual about your baby’s eyes or the way she looks at things?___________________ Is she a little fussier at the end of the day?_____________________________________________________________ Are you giving your baby tummy time when she’s awake?________________________________________________ Does your baby hold her head up when she’s placed on her tummy?______________________________________ How are you doing?________________________________________________________________________________ Notes:____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

My BABY! | 41


9 Month

Checkup

You can expect your baby’s doctor to:

Weigh and measure your baby to make sure she’s growing at a healthy rate. Do a complete physical. Recommend vitamin D drops for breastfed babies. Address any other concerns.

How is your baby sleeping? What position does she sleep in?____________________________________________ How often is your baby eating?______________________________________________________________________ What are your baby’s bowel movements like?__________________________________________________________ Does she quiet down, at least briefly, at the sound of your voice?_________________________________________ Is your baby awake for longer periods of time?_________________________________________________________ Does she make soft cooing noises when content and alert?______________________________________________ Have you noticed anything unusual about your baby’s eyes or the way she looks at things?___________________ Is she a little fussier at the end of the day?_____________________________________________________________ Are you giving your baby tummy time when she’s awake?________________________________________________ Does your baby hold her head up when she’s placed on her tummy?______________________________________ How are you doing?________________________________________________________________________________ Notes:____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

12 Month

Checkup

You can expect your baby’s doctor to:

Weigh and measure your baby to make sure she’s growing at a healthy rate. Do a complete physical. Recommend vitamin D drops for breastfed babies. Address any other concerns.

How is your baby sleeping? What position does she sleep in?____________________________________________ How often is your baby eating?______________________________________________________________________ What are your baby’s bowel movements like?__________________________________________________________ Does she quiet down, at least briefly, at the sound of your voice?_________________________________________ Is your baby awake for longer periods of time?_________________________________________________________ Does she make soft cooing noises when content and alert?______________________________________________ Have you noticed anything unusual about your baby’s eyes or the way she looks at things?___________________ Is she a little fussier at the end of the day?_____________________________________________________________ Are you giving your baby tummy time when she’s awake?________________________________________________ Does your baby hold her head up when she’s placed on her tummy?______________________________________ How are you doing?________________________________________________________________________________ Notes:____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

42 | My BABY!


When to Take Your Child to the

• If your child is having difficulty breathing for any reason you should take him/her to the emergency room right away. If it is an infant and he/she is flaring his nostrils to breath or his chest is moving up and down very fast you should head to the emergency room. If he/she has any color change to grey or blue you should call 911. • Convulsions need to be taken seriously and child should be taken to nearest emergency room. • Injury to the head or broken bones should be seen in the emergency room. • Any uncontrolled bleeding should be seen right away in the emergency room or call 911. • If your child won’t wake up or is comatose take him to the emergency room or call 911. • Any severe stomach pain should be taken to the emergency room .

ER

• An infant (less than 3 months) with a temperature of 100.4 degrees. • Not urinating. • In case of poisoning call the poison hotline 1800 222 1222 You DO NOT need to take your child to emergency room if they have a low-grade fever, runny nose, or rash. BUT, you should go to the pediatrician’s office the same or next day.     Fever causes anxiety in most parents but unless you have an infant who is less than 3 months old, you do NOT need to worry unless the fever lasts more than 2 days or is associated with the symptoms above.  If your child feels warm give him or her age appropriate tylenol or ibuprofen first and then check the temperature. There is no need to give your child a bath unless it is heat stroke and they have been in the sun for many hours.

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

My BABY! | 43


Tracking Your Baby… The First Month

Developmental Milestones

• Can lift head momentarily • Turns head from side to side when lying on back • Hands stay clenched • Strong grasp reflex present • Looks and follows object moving in front of them in range of 45 degrees • Sees black-and-white patterns • Quiets when a voice is heard • Cries to express displeasure • Makes throaty sounds • Looks intently at parents when they talk to him/her

The Second Month

• Lifts head almost 45 degrees when lying on stomach • Head bobs forward when held in sitting position • Grasp reflex decreases • Follows dangling objects with eyes • Visually searches for sounds • Makes noises other than crying • Cries become distinctive (wet, hungry, etc.) • Vocalizes to familiar voices • Social smile demonstrated in response to various stimuli

Red flags:

Each child develops at her own pace, but talk to your baby’s doctor if your 1-month-old: • Feeds slowly or doesn’t suck well • Doesn’t seem to focus her eyes or watch things moving nearby • Doesn’t react to bright lights • Seems especially stiff or floppy • Doesn’t respond to loud sounds

The Third Month

• Begins to bear partial weight on both legs when held in a standing position • Able to hold head up when sitting but still bobs forward • When lying on stomach can raise head and shoulders between 45 and 90 degrees • Bears weight on forearms • Grasp reflex absent • Holds objects but does not reach for them • Clutches own hands and pulls at blankets and clothes • Follows objects 180 degrees • Locates sound by turning head and looking in the same direction • Squeals, coos, babbles and chuckles • “Talks” when spoken to • Recognizes faces, voices and objects • Smiles when he/she sees familiar people, and engages in play with them • Shows awareness to strange situations

44 | My BABY!

Red flags:

Each child develops at his own pace, but talk to your child’s doctor if your 3-month-old: • Can’t support his head well • Can’t grasp objects • Can’t focus on moving objects • Doesn’t smile • Doesn’t react to loud sounds • Ignores new faces • Seems upset by unfamiliar people or surroundings

The Fourth Month

• Drooling begins • Good head control • Sits with support • Bears some weight on legs when held upright • Raises head and chest off surface to a 90 degree angle • Rolls from back to side • Explores and plays with hands • Tries to reach for objects but overshoots • Grasps objects with both hands • Eye-hand coordination begins • Makes consonant sounds • Laughs • Enjoys being rocked, bounced or swung

The Fifth Month

• Signs of teething begin • Holds head up when sitting • Rolls from stomach to back • When lying on back puts feet to mouth • Voluntarily grasps and holds objects • Plays with toes • Takes objects directly to mouth • Watches objects that are dropped • Says “ah-goo” or similar vowel-consonant combinations • Smiles at mirror image • Gets upset if you take a toy away • Can tell family and strangers apart • Begins to discover parts of his/her body

The Sixth Month

• Chewing and biting occur • When on stomach, can lift chest and part of stomach off the surface, bearing weight on hands • Lifts head when pulled to a sitting position • Rolls from back to stomach • Bears majority of weight when being held in a standing position • Grasps and controls small objects • Holds bottle • Grabs feet and pulls to mouth • Adjusts body to see an object • Turns head from side to side, and then looks up or down • Prefers more complex visual stimuli • Says one syllable sounds like “ma,” “mu,” “da,” and “di” • Recognizes parents


Red flags:

Each child develops at her own pace, but talk to your child’s doctor if your baby: • Seems very stiff or floppy • Can’t hold her head steady • Can’t sit on her own • Doesn’t respond to noises or smiles • Isn’t affectionate with those closest to her • Doesn’t reach for objects

The Seventh Month

• Sits without support, may lean forward on both hands • Bears full weight on feet • Bounces when held in standing position • Bears weight on one hand when lying on stomach • Transfers objects from one hand to another • Bangs objects on surfaces • Able to fixate on small objects • Responds to name • Awareness of depth and space begin • Has taste preferences • “Talks” when others are talking

Red flags:

Each child develops at her own pace, but talk to your child’s doctor if your baby: • Seems very stiff or floppy • Can’t hold her head steady • Can’t sit on her own • Doesn’t respond to noises or smiles • Isn’t affectionate with those closest to her • Doesn’t reach for objects

The Eight Month

• Sits well without support • Bears weight on legs, and may stand holding on to furniture • Adjusts posture to reach an object • Picks up objects using index, fourth and fifth finger against thumb • Able to release objects • Pulls string to obtain object • Reaches for toys that are out of reach • Listens selectively to familiar words • Begins combining syllables like “mama” and “dada” but does not attach a meaning • Understands the word “no” (but does not always obey it) • Dislikes having diaper changed and being dressed

The Ninth Month

• Begins crawling • Pulls up to standing position from sitting • Sits for a prolonged time (10 minutes) • May develop a preference for use of one hand • Uses thumb and index finger to pick up objects • Responds to simple verbal commands • Comprehends the word “no” • Increased interest in pleasing parents • Puts arms in front of face to avoid having it washed

The 10th Month

• Goes from stomach to sitting position • Sits by falling down • Recovers balance easily while sitting • Lifts one foot to take a step while standing • Comprehends “bye-bye” • Says “dada” or “mama” with meaning • Says one other word beside “mama” and “dada” (“hi,” “bye,” “no,” “go”) • Waves bye-bye • Object permanence begins to develop • Repeats actions that attract attention • Plays interactive games such a “pat-a-cake” • Enjoys being read to and follows pictures in books

The 11th Month

• Walks, holding on to furniture or other objects • Places one object after another into a container • Reaches back to pick up an object when sitting • Explores objects more thoroughly • Able to manipulate objects out of tight-fitting spaces • Rolls a ball when asked • Becomes excited when a task is mastered • Acts frustrated when restricted • Shakes head for “no”

The12th Month

• Walks with one hand held • May stand alone and attempt first steps alone • Sits down from standing position without help • Attempts to build two-block tower but may fail • Turns pages in a book • Follows rapidly moving objects • Says three or more words other than “mama” or “dada” • Comprehends the meaning of several words • Repeats the same words over and over again • Imitates sounds, such as the sounds dogs and cats make • Recognizes objects by name • Understands simple verbal commands • Shows affection • Shows independence in familiar surroundings • Clings to parents in strange situations • Searches for object where it was last seen

Red flags:

Each child develops at his own pace, but talk to your child’s doctor if your baby: • Doesn’t crawl • Seems to drag one side while he’s crawling for a month or more • Can’t stand with support • Doesn’t try to find objects you’ve hidden in front of him • Doesn’t say any words • Doesn’t use gestures, such as shaking his head “no” and pointing

My BABY! | 45


Baby’s First

Birthday

Photo by: Brooke Mendenhall Photography

Y

our baby is turning 1 and that’s worth celebrating! Of course, you want to have a first birthday party in honor of his special day. But how do you plan for such an important occasion? How do you make sure your baby’s first birthday is a wonderful time for both you and him? These top12 do’s and don’ts will point you in the right direction.

DO keep your eyes open for potential dangers. If a balloon

DO keep the birthday party simple. Your baby won’t really

DO have a birthday cake or cupcakes. It is fun for everyone

comprehend what all the fuss is about. This day is for you to enjoy and to celebrate the amazing child that has transformed your life. Just don’t over complicate anything. This allows you to be free to relish every moment.

DON’T struggle over finding the perfect theme for the party.

pops, make sure you put it in the trash immediately, because it could become a choking hazard.

DON’T serve food that is challenging to eat. Finger foods are best for little ones. And adults like them, too!

to watch your 1-year-old eat his first birthday cake, and a great photo opportunity. Just watch out for your baby and the lighted candle.

DO consider invitations and favors that are personalized with

Your 1-year-old won’t notice. Next year, he/she may be begging you for Cinderella, Elsa, Wonder Pets, Dora the Explorer, or Thomas the Train theme, but this year you can do whatever makes sense for you.

your child’s photo. Most of your guests for this birthday party will be adults who have loved and supported you and your baby through the first year. Grandmothers, aunts and other friends and loved ones will be thrilled with a keepsake featuring a picture or pictures of the birthday boy or girl.

DO make the party short. An hour or so is enough excitement

DON’T forget to charge the camera batteries or take tons

for a 1-year-old. Any longer than two hours and he/she might go into celebration overload.

DO schedule the birthday party for a time when your baby is

less likely to be tired and cranky. If he/ she usually takes an early afternoon nap, then a late afternoon party is best.

of photos. You may be busy and preoccupied with the celebration, but your 1-year-old won’t remember the party so you’ll want to make sure you document every moment. Assign someone this task. A nice tip is to send out photo thank you notes after the party.

DON’T invite too many people. A room full of strangers

DO create a first birthday memory book after the party. This is

crowding around your little one can be overwhelming. Choose close friends and relatives to share this special day.

DO have the party at home, if possible. This is the place your

baby feels most secure. There will be a lot of activity that day that he/she doesn’t quite understand. So it’s important for him/ her to feel comfortable and safe in the midst of all the strange birthday festivities.

46 | My BABY!

a great future gift you can give to your child. Take photos of the cake, decorations, guests and, of course, him/her. You can put these photos in a photo album or make a scrapbook, complete with journaling your thoughts about his special day. Include a page where each guest writes something special to your 1-yearold. Simplify, relax and enjoy this special day. Your baby’s first birthday party is a milestone that comes along only once in his/ her life, so cherish every wonderful moment.


What do my parents think today?

Say it in a sentence. Say it in a word.

Year 1:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 2:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 3:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 4:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 5:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 6:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 7:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 8:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 9:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 10:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 11:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 12:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 13:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 14:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 15:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 16:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 17:________________________________________________________________________________________ Year 18:________________________________________________________________________________________

My BABY! | 47


We’re ready,

baby!

At Texas Health, we are proud that more families choose us to welcome their babies each year than any other health system in North Texas. So when you’re ready to be a mom, you can rest assured you’ll be in good hands. From caring for natural to high-risk pregnancies to providing breastfeeding support and childbirth education classes, we’re here for you and your little one. Plus, Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Stephenville has newly renovated, spacious accommodations. Learn more and schedule your labor and delivery tour today.

1-877-THR-WELL | TexasHealth.org/Stephenville-Baby

Doctors on the medical staffs practice independently and are not employees or agents of Texas Health hospitals or Texas Health Resources. © 2019

48 | My BABY!

Profile for Brownwood Bulletin

Stephenville Oh Baby! 2019-2020  

Stephenville Oh Baby! 2019-2020  

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