Page 7

MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2005 THE BROWN DAILY HERALD PAGE 7

FIRST ROUND

SECOND ROUND

March 17 or 18

ILLINOIS 1 FAIR.DICKINSON 16 TEXAS 8 NEVADA 9 ALABAMA 5 UW-MILWAUKEE 12 BOSTON COLL. 4 PENN 13 LSU 6 UAB 11 ARIZONA 3 UTAH ST. 14 SOUTHERN ILL. 7 ST.MARY’S (CALIF.) 10 OKLAHOMA ST. 2 SE LOUISIANA 15 WASHINGTON MONTANA PACIFIC PITTSBURGH GEORGIA TECH G.WASHINGTON LOUISVILLE LA.-LAFAYETTE TEXAS TECH UCLA GONZAGA WINTHROP WEST VIRGINIA CREIGHTON WAKE FOREST CHATTANOOGA

REGIONALS March 24-27

March 19 or 20

ILLINOIS ILLINOIS

SEMIFINALS April 2

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

SEMIFINALS

SECOND ROUND

REGIONALS

April 2

The Brownpresents Daily Herald

NORTH CAROLINA IOWA ST. VILLANOVA

8

BOSTON COLL.

FLORIDA WISCONSIN

6 11

WISCONSIN

ARIZONA

4 13

SYRACUSE

ARIZONA

5 12

VILLANOVA

UW-MILWAUKEE

CHICAGO

1

9

UW-MILWAUKEE

UAB

March 17 or 18

16

NORTH CAROLINA

Men’s Division I Tournament Bracket

NEVADA

FIRST ROUND

March 19 or 20

March 24-27

BUCKNELL

3 14

SOUTHERN ILL.

N.C.STATE OKLAHOMA ST.

10

N.C.STATE

OKLAHOMA ST.

7

CONNECTICUT

2 15

National Champion 1

WASHINGTON

16 8

DUKE WASHINGTON

16

DUKE

PACIFIC

MISSISSIPPI ST.

9 5

13 6

MICHIGAN ST.

GEORGIA TECH LOUISVILLE

VERMONT

ALBUQUERQUE

AUSTIN

TEXAS TECH

TEXAS TECH

UTAH

OKLAHOMA

3 14

WEST VIRGINIA

10 2

6 11

14 7

4 13

UTAH

GONZAGA

5 12

MICHIGAN ST.

LOUISVILLE

11 3

8 9

12 4

1

CINCINNATI WEST VIRGINIA

KENTUCKY

15

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Before their teams even met Sunday, Rick Pitino and Paul Hewitt made observations that sum up this year’s NCAA tournament as well as any could. After Georgia Tech defeated top-seeded and second-ranked North Carolina in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament semifinals a week ago, Hewitt anticipated the reaction and warned listeners, “This is not an upset.” And on Saturday afternoon, Pitino answered a question about a pair of high-quality opponents facing off so early, in the second round of the tournament, by saying, straight-faced, “Well, it could be bad seeding.” Pitino quickly pleaded to have that remark taken off the record, but he was only half-joking even then. The truth is that “seeding” and “upset” are relative terms this March, maybe more than usual, and Pitino’s Cardinals are perfect examples. Thursday’s Albuquerque Regional semifinal pits the No. 1 seed against the No. 4 — and against all logic, it’s Louisville that’s the lower seed, against Washington. Not that Washington hasn’t justified its position so far, but it hasn’t had to play a team like Georgia Tech. The Jackets had a solid claim to being under-seeded as well at No. 5, yet Louisville ran and shot them off the Gaylord Entertainment Center floor Sunday. Louisville led by 10 points four and a half minutes into the game, and by the midway point of the first half, the question was becoming not if the Cardinals would win, but by how much.

2 15

Louisville plants seeds of doubt in process BY DAVID STEELE THE B ALTIMORE SUN

10

KENTUCKY

WAKE FOREST

7

The last sniff at a chance for Georgia Tech came with just under 10 minutes left in the game; the Yellow Jackets finally had strung together something of an offense, had their three key players in something resembling a groove, and had gotten the deficit back to single digits, at 52-43, for the first time since the opening minutes. Soon afterward, three straight three-pointers by Taquan Dean put an end to that dream; they put the lead back to 18, and it eventually ballooned to 23. B.J. Elder and Will Bynum (11 points combined) might as well have gone back to Atlanta between games, and at halftime, Jarrett Jack (11 points in the first eight minutes, none the rest of the game) might as well have joined them. These, again, were the runners-up in the tournament for the best conference in the country, one that sent three teams to the regional semifinals. Louisville treated them like a Conference USA cellar-dweller (or one from its future home, the Big East). The Cardinal faithful (many of whom turned the arena into Freedom Hall South all weekend, even when Louisville wasn’t playing) eagerly await the selection committee’s explanation of why the No. 4 team in the country, and its 29-4 record, was dropped so low in the field in the first place. They were lumped into that seed with three frauds: Boston College, Syracuse and Florida, which was artificially boosted after winning the Southeastern Conference tournament but got slapped around by Villanova in the first game of Sunday’s doubleheader. Besides that, two No. 2 seeds

and three No. 3s went down the opening weekend. In their place in the Sweet 16 are one 12th seed, WisconsinMilwaukee, and a 10, N.C. State — which 10 days earlier had been in the same position as Maryland, an opening-round ACC tournament loss away from checking on arena dates for the NIT. That probably isn’t chafing Gary Williams much at all. Overall, the committee’s perceived wisdom took a beating, and its reputation landed slightly north of Mark McGwire’s post-congressional hearing. Talk about a lack of trust and credibility. Of course, a gracious person would point out that this reflects the rampant parity the decade-long defections to the NBA have created. To his credit, Pitino chose to be gracious; even as he joked before and after the game about the seeding, he admitted to being only so upset. “There are no levels anymore. Everybody is at the same level,” Pitino said. “That’s what makes it so exciting. That’s what makes it so much fun. And that’s what makes it so tough to seed.” Thus, neither he nor his players plan to join the masses talking about motivation or vindication this week. Dean simply claimed that for him and his teammates, there is “not a chip on our shoulder.” Once they got over the initial anger of Selection Sunday, Pitino said: “I told them that’s the last time we’re going to talk about that. We’re just going to focus on playing great ball.” And they have. But what else do you expect from a top seed? Besides actually getting a top seed, that is.

Secret continued from page 3 describes her feelings of guilt about past sexual experiences with her boyfriends. Another monologue examines the issue of sexual abuse in the South Asian community and a young girl’s decision to lie to her parents about sexual abuse by her uncle. The monologues are among the first in the United States to address the sexuality of South Asian women. Last year, two South Asian cultural organizations at Stanford University hosted “Yoni Ki Baat: Talks of the Vagina,” addressing similar issues. Indian filmmaker Deepa Mehta’s 1999 film “Fire” chronicled a lesbian relationship, triggering strong condemnations and acts of vandalism at theaters that showed the production. Kersawani said she hopes that her production will create dialogue about an issue that has for too long been silenced. The

DPS continued from page 1 appointment, he served as a police dispatcher for the Smithville Police Department and as a forest ranger for the Department of Environmental Management. LeDoux is a licensed emergency medical technician. He said he came to

NORTH CAROLINA PLAY-IN GAME MINNESOTA IOWA ST. VILLANOVA NEW MEXICO FLORIDA OHIO WISCONSIN NORTHERN IOWA KANSAS BUCKNELL CHARLOTTE N.C.STATE CONNECTICUT UCF DUKE DELAWARE ST. STANFORD MISSISSIPPI ST. MICHIGAN ST. OLD DOMINION SYRACUSE VERMONT UTAH UTEP OKLAHOMA NIAGARA CINCINNATI IOWA KENTUCKY EASTERN KY.

show features a talk back after each performance to explore issues the production raises abut the “notion of a South Asian woman as heterosexual, and virginal until marriage,” Kersawani said. She cites Saturday’s South Asian Student Association Spring Cultural Show as an example. Vani Kilakkathi ’08 was prevented from performing an excerpt from a monologue about masturbation because the organizers of the show believed it would offend people in the audience, which included younger children and parents. “That incident exemplifies the need for the show,” Kersawani said, adding, “The most effective change results from people feeling uncomfortable and thinking about ideas they never considered.” Proceeds from “The Secret Life of My Vagina” will benefit Asha for Education, a group that works to educate underprivileged children in India, for which cast member Parendi Mehta ’07 volunteered last summer.

Brown because he wanted to be part of a sworn police department in which all officers have attended a police academy. “This department is as strong as it has ever been, and it can only improve. Each day it gets better and stronger and more professional,” Fioravanti said in the opening remarks of the ceremony. The new additions bring the force to 33 officers.

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Monday, March 21, 2005  

The March 21, 2005 issue of the Brown Daily Herald