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Portfolio Brooks Caton

Brooks Caton University of Houston M. Arch. Candidate 2018 Cumulative gpa : 3.8

Texas A&M University B.A. Environmental Design 2016 Cum Laude

brookscaton@gmail.com 214 533 5958


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Redefining the Hearth Affordable Single Family Housing

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Il Muro Y.A.C Submission

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Spatial Diffusion Digital Fabrication

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Hopper House A Hypothetical Dwelling

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Long Acres Ranch Visitor’s Center

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The Centre Brazos Valley Art Council H.Q.

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

Redefining the Hearth Affordable Single Family Housing Awards : 3rd Place Competition Medalist Professor : Rafael Longoria The Sharpstown Prize for Architecture was the newest initiative by the Seeds of Sharpstown organization in Southwest Houston. The competition sought to reinvigorate a forgotten Houston neighborhood, allowing the student designs to ultimately serve as a benchmark for what Sharpstown can eventually become. The task included adhering to a 1200 square foot limit, consisting of three bedrooms, two bathrooms and a strict budget; promoting the application of progressive materials and design strategies. For centuries, the hearth has been the center of the home. A pivotal fixture that has existed as an interior centerpiece that all activities and secondary spaces have circulated around. This proposal seeks to invert this ideology and redefine the role of the hearth within the context of the modern architectural era. This concept decisively locates the hearth on the exterior of the home, within a dedicated courtyard, allowing the internal spaces to circulate around the exterior fixture. Along with purposefully located glazing, carefully crafted interior sight lines and operable walls, this fixture successfully creates a natural connection to the exterior, but more importantly, redefines the definition of what the, “center of the home,� can truly be.

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Fall | 2017 Redefining the Hearth

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(1) Exterior Front Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

DEFINE

CONNECT

PROTECT

ACTIVATE

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(1) Conceptual Parti Diagrams


Fall | 2017 Redefining the Hearth

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Entry - Foyer Living Room Kitchen Master Bedroom Master Bathroom Master Porch Bedroom Guest Bathroom

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Garage Courtyard Backyard Covered Entry Covered Patio Exterior Hearth Driveway

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Washer/Dryer

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Fall | 2017 Redefining the Hearth

(1) Covered Entry Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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Fall | 2017 Redefining the Hearth

(1) Exterior Courtyard Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Axonometric Structural Diagram


Fall | 2017 Redefining the Hearth

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(2) Interior Living Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

Il Murro Y.A.C. Submission Professor : Marta Rodriguez Partners : Parimala Venkatesh . Andy Rowell Located in the Italian hills, the castle of Roccamandolfi is a medieval fragment, perched above the surrounding cliffs forests and settlements. The Castle Resort (Young Architects) competition sought to re-imagine what this historic fortification could be, in hopes that it’s transformation would provide a scenic venue for tourists and enthusiasts alike. Currently, the rampart is under-utilized and lack’s any true connection with the populous city below. Il Muro (The Wall) seeks to restore said connection between fortress and village. With weighty magnitude, the modern rampart scales the hillside and embeds itself within the castle enclosure. Along the slender form, guest room’s offer lofty views of the countryside and town below, culminating in a viewing platform that elevates the visitor high above the ruins for a breathtaking vista.

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Spring | 2017 IL Muro

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(1) Exterior Entry Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Parti Diagrams - Site Plan


Spring | 2017 IL Muro

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(2) Exterior Hillside Perspective (3) Interior Pod Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

Spatial Diffusion Digital Fabrication Professor : Andrew Vrana Partner : Garrett Callen Exhibition spaces rarely receive the attention to detail that the projects it proudly displays, exude. With the inception and implementation of the Spatial Diffusion installation, the university of Houston will forever retain the ability to properly showcase student work. Said installation, composed of a curvilinear wooden waffle structure and translucent underlying layer, works to diffuse excess light and noise where jurors, critics and guests typically view architectural work by naturally lowering the structure to a more human-scaled elevation. The organic shape then tapers toward the edges of the enclosure to allow adequate amounts of light to bleed out and gently wash over the students proposals. The Spatial Diffusion installation will set the standard for what an exhibition space can and will achieve, allowing the architectural community to successfully critique and ultimately learn from the youngest minds in the ever-changing profession.

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Spring | 2017 Spatial Diffusion

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(1) Installation - Exploded Axonometric Diagram

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Model Photograph


Spring 2017 Spatial Diffusion

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(2) Longitudinal Section (3) Horizontal Section

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

Hopper House A Hypothetical Dwelling Professor : Marta Rodriguez Partner : Tatiana Luzardo What would it be like to live above the trees, free of the confines of suburbia, effortlessly floating away from the relentless struggles of everyday life? Inspired by the essence of Lina bo Bardi’s Glass House, the Hopper House prototype promotes two basic human needs. Intimacy and gathering. While inherently different in their nature, said concepts intentionally intersect within this project to provide programmatic spaces and community connections that fulfill the human desire to not only meditate and reflect in a personal environment, but the need for communal human interaction as well. The utilization of shifting, folding interior planes, thoughtful materiality, and operable connections between exterior units, means that no space within the prototype will remain stagnant, subsequently granting the residents the freedom to alter their spatial experiences. Hopper House ultimately provides a dynamic environment where more private, intimate locations, or welcoming gathering spaces, are simply a fold away.

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Fall | 2016 Hopper House

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(1) Project Gesture

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

be transformed and create unique spaces simply utilizing what is already there? What if the planes themselves could be altered in a way that produces new and interesting results?

into rectangles, squares and even triangular segments.? Subsequently, what if these planes could be translated up and down.

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(1) Breaking of Planes - First Model Sequence


rotated around seperate points? What if the individual planes were also folded and translated up and down to create variation in elevation?

defined space? What if cuts and sepa fold over each other and begin to somehwat were not neccesary to create new, inno enclose the interior space? Would this create spaces? a sense of security or produce a more intimate environment? Fall | 2016 Hopper House

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(2) Breaking of Planes - Second Model Sequence

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Interior Unit Perspective


Fall | 2016 Hopper House

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Access Stair Reflection Zone Entrance Ramp Sociability Slider Unit Connection Zone Privacy Zone Restroom Zone

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Cooking Station

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(2) Floor Plan Iterations

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(1) Community Privacy Variation Diagrams


Fall | 2016 Hopper House

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(2) Community Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Floor System Axonometric


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Portfolio Brooks Caton

Long Acres Ranch Visitor’s Center Professor : Craig Babe Partner : Megan Zhang Located along the Brazos River in Richmond Texas; Long Acres Ranch is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts. Providing a unique setting for educational and recreational activities, the site promotes an inherent appreciation for the natural environment. Despite Long Acres dedication to an agrarian simplicity, a welcome and information center that could serve as an entrance node as well as house potential visitors, was absolutely crucial. The proposed solution was driven by simplistic concepts. The idea that the extrusion and depression of simple geometries, such as rectangles and circles can provide the foundation for structurally based architecture and site design. Inspired Robert Smithsons’’ broken circle, the site began with a simple shape, eventually cut and extruded to become a visual barrier that not only theoretically protects the welcome center, but defines the site as a whole. It was pivotal to not only allow the structure to be the driving force behind the aesthetic appeal of the architecture, but to utilize naturally sourced materials that respected the surrounding landscape as well. The beams, columns, joists and wood siding cohesively combine to create an architecturally sensitive solution; reading as an elegant, structurally based design that serve’s as the appropriate entry node for Long Acres Ranch.

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Fall | 2015 Long Acres Ranch

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(1) Main Structure - Exterior Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

SITE ADD + SUBTRACT

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(1) Site Plan - Parti Diagrams


Fall | 2015 Long Acres Ranch

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(2) Site Plan

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Main Structure - Floor Plan


Fall | 2015 Long Acres Ranch

01 Welcome Center 02 Men’s Restroom 03 Women’s Restroom 04 Storage 05 Circulation 06 Classroom 07 Classroom Storage 08 Event Space 09 Auditorium 10 Auditorium Storage 11 Office 12 Conference Space 13 Future Restrooms 14 Community Lounge 15 Storage 16 Community Restroom 17 Community Dining Hall 18 Community Kitchen 19 Visiting Lecturer Suite

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(2) Secondary Structure - Floor Plan

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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Fall | 2015 Long Acres Ranch

(1) Main Building - Auditorium Section

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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Fall | 2015 Long Acres Ranch

(1) Main Building - Classroom Section

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Exploded Construction Detail


Fall | 2015 Long Acres Ranch

01 Double Height Bunk Beds 02 Study / Work Area 03 Restroom 04 Covered Entry 05 Covered Exterior Patio 06 Vented Fire Pit

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

The Centre Brazos Valley Art Council H.Q. Professor : James Haliburton Partner : Mariela Flores The centre was a multi - use facility in the Bryan, College Station Area. It was projected to be the home of not only both chapter’s of the Brazos Valley Art Society but the Aggies Go to War Museum as well. The concept for the design was detachment, the various programmatic spaces that could be separated were, allowing for multiple buildings with various exterior spaces. From the main structure housing the fine art galleries and event spaces to the designated office and gift shop massings, each building had a specific purpose. The materials and form were inspired by the delicate balance of concrete, glass and water, displayed in the Tadao Ando Fort Worth museum design. Access to the adjacent veterans park was crucial in terms of attracting as many guests as possible. The uncommon separation and detachment of programmatic spaces produced an interesting case study that could adequately serve as the fine art’s hub for the Brazos valley.

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Spring | 2014 The Centre

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(1) Entrance Perspective

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Exterior Perspective - Main Structure


Spring | 2014 The Centre

01 Covered Entry 02 Gallery Reception Hall 03 Gallery I 04 Gallery II 05 Banquet Hall 06 Event Storage 07 Commercial Kitchen 08 Men’s Restroom 09 Women’s Restroom 10 Aggies Go to War Museum 11 Exterior Event Space

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Portfolio Brooks Caton

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(1) Exterior Perspective - Secondary Structure


Spring | 2014 The Centre

01 Circulation Hall 02 Seating / Exhibition space 03 Community Studio 04 Community Restroom 05 Conference Space 06 Employee Break Room 07 Future Office Circulation 08 Administrative Office 09 Welcome Center 10 Productivity Island 11 Employee Restroom 12 Community Reception

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(1) Site Plan


Spring | 2014 The Centre

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(2) Interior Perspective - Secondary Structure (3) Interior Perspective - Museum Reception

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BROOKS CATON houston

brookscaton@gmail.com

08.2016 05.2018

University of Houston

08.2012 05.2016

Texas A&M University

05.2016 08.2017

Fusch Architects

214.533.5958

Master of Architecture Cumulative GPA: 3.8

Bachelor of Environmental Design Cum Laude

Dallas, TX | Architectural Intern: Interacted with Landscape Architects and contractors on commercial and luxury residential projects. Assisted with schematic design, design development, construction documentation and construction administration. Designed and collaborated alongside Principal, Craig Vaughn on various commercial and residential projects.

05.2015 08.2015

Heights Venture Architects

07.2014 12.2014

BRW Architects

07.2017 Present

PCH Residence

Awards

Medalist (3rd) in the Sharpstown Prize for Architecture (Redefining the Hearth). Participant in experimental (Vertical Studio) at the University of Houston.

Skills

Auto-CAD, Revit, Rhino, Grasshopper, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Sketchup, Word, Excel, Power-point

Plano, TX | Architectural Intern: Participated in every facet of design and document production. Worked alongside architects on various projects across the United States. Produced detailed rendering packages for clients.

College Station, TX | Architectural Intern: Collaborated with architects on commercial and government projects. Performed tasks such as 3D modeling, concept visualization, landscape design and project programming. Acted as drawing production lead for commercial project in Aldine, TX.

College Station, TX | Working directly with Paul & Cindy Hons as sole designer for retirement residence. Performed duties such as, initial code search, site analysis, site planning, programming, floor plan and elevation design and drawing set compilation. Collaborated to produce initial proposal including first iteration floor plan and perspective rendering. Project is ongoing.


BROOKS CATON houston

brookscaton@gmail.com

07.2017 Present

Paul & Cindy Hons

08.2017 12.2017

Rafael Longoria

05.2016 08.2017

Craig Vaughn

05.2015 08.2015

Blake Sloan

Phone: 469.261.4400 Email: cindy.hons@hotmail.com

Phone: 713.743.2386 Email: lpstudio@swbell.net

Phone: 214.492.3331 Email: cvaughn@fuscharchitects.com

Phone: 281.854.6134 Email: blake.sloan@hva.cc

214.533.5958

Brooks Caton 2018 Selected Works  
Brooks Caton 2018 Selected Works  
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