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BROOKLYN

BREAD Good Food News « Delivered Fresh

inside...

Our Favorite Things To Try PAGES 4-5

THE JUNE ISSUE, 2011 « Vol. 2, No. 5 « Free Publication « Brooklyn, NY

History Of Making Coffee In Brooklyn PAGE 23

My Perfect Brooklyn Day, By Nissa Pierson PAGES 25

Members of the NC Masters Commission youth group at the Fabulous Fifth Avenue Fair in Park Slope on Sunday, May 15 – more photographs on pages 51-55. Photograph by Kim Madalinski

A Chat With Justin Of Gowanus Yacht Club PAGE 59

Please do NOT pick up this FREE paper unless you want to be inspired, informed, fascinated and delighted by Brooklyn food and drink...


Brooklyn Bread

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June, 2011

Elizabeth Bee Ayer and Rayn Rio at BK Farmyards’ Haitian Konbit at the Youth Farm on May 21 – more photographs on pages 24 and 27. Photograph by Allen Ying

Inside This Issue

Our Team

Our Favorite Things 4-5 Treats both inspiring and indulgent.

Plants, Food And Beyond 49 A new(ish) column from Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

Editors Danielle Franca Swift, Jack Wright

The Events Guide 7 Everything you need to plan your food calendar.

Bartender Of The Month 59 Justin Olsen of Gowanus Yacht Club.

Deputy Editors Bec Couche, Jason Greenberg

The Production Line 9 Investigating the source of great dishes.

The Food and Drink Crossword 69 Test your knowledge of all things edible.

Assistant Editor Jon Roth

Knives Out 15 The ultimate kitchen tool, by Joel Bukiewicz.

The Brooklyn Bread Rate Card 71 You’ll be surprised by how affordable we are.

Illustrator Liza Corsillo

WHERE THE BB PHOTOGRAPHERS WENT

Contributors Brooklyn Public Library, Kate Blumm, Joel Bukiewicz, Emily Elsen, Melissa Elsen, Cathy Erway, Joann Kim, Laura Nuter

Try This At Home! 17 Cathy Erway is cooking up a storm. Humble Pie 18 Another helping from Four and Twenty Blackbirds. An Edible History Of Brooklyn 21 The borough’s coffee-making history. My Perfect Brooklyn Day 25 Nissa Pierson, owner of Ger-Nis. Adopt An Animal 29, 31 Six adorable dogs need homes and loving owners. A Chat With... 35 Jack Walsh of Celebrate Brooklyn! The Great Brooklyn Food Safari 32 This month: Red Hook vendors. The Cheese Report 39 Laura Nuter’s irresistibly gooey guide.

Food Truck Rally At Prospect Park 6-10 3rd Ward’s Fifth Birthday BBQ 12-22 BK Farmyards’ Haitian Konbit 24, 27 The Opening Of Smorgasburg 34-41 Thinking Local With Coolhaus NY 42-47 Fabulous Fifth Avenue Fair 51-55 The Festival Of Ideas 56-58 Total Atlantic Avenue Immersion 60-64 Health And Wellness Fair 66-68 Shop The Archway 70

Photographers Liz Clayman, Kim Madalinski, Andrew St. Clair, Jamie Siegel, Allen Ying Brooklyn Bread is published by Brooklyn Bread Press P.O. Box 150026 Brooklyn, NY 11215 (917) 740-1072 You can also read the entire magazine online at BrooklynBreadPress.com Facebook @BrooklynBreadPress Twitter Bbpbreadcrumbs


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

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u OPENINGS, CLOSING AND HAPPENINGS... By Jason Greenberg Williamsburg café Phoebe’s and Bread Stuy in Bed Stuy have closed... Soco, a Cajun and Southern fusion restaurant, will open at 509 Myrtle Avenue in Clinton Hill... The owner of General Greene has opened Salva Vida at 291 Greene Avenue in Bed-Stuy/ Clinton Hill – the eight-stool restaurant serves tacos, burritos, soups and salads... By Brooklyn in Carroll Gardens is open and selling products made only in Brooklyn... The Gowanus Yacht Club, Red Hook Food Vendors and NYC ICY have all opened for the season... Jennifer Shelbo, an alum of Per Se and Maialino, is now the pastry chef at Lot 2 and is also serving her pastries at Southside Coffee, both in South Slope/Greenwood Heights... Atlantic Avenue restaurant Jolie is moving into the space once occupied by Porchetta/Carniceria/Banania on Smith Street... Momofuku Milk Bar’s Christina Tosi is planning a stand-alone Milk Bar for Brooklyn... Beer hall Spritzenhaus is open along McCarren Park in Williamsburg, serving 100 tap beers and thin-crust pizza... Rye on South 1st Street is now offering a happy hour... Three Morimoto alums are opening a Prospect Heights ramen shop called Chuko at 552 Vanderbilt Avenue... A new fish shack called Rosarita is opening in the old Williamsburg Café... Organic burgers will be served at Burger Guru on Berry Street in Williamsburg... The folks behind Manhattan’s Cafe Mogador are opening up a new venture at 133 Wythe Avenue... Limonata Cafe is coming to 189 Bedford Avenue at the old Doner Kebab space and will be serving American, French, Italian and Turkish cuisines... In addition to the opening of Cheeburger Cheeburger, Park Slope has acquired Bare Burger, Sky Ice, Culture and Dumplings and Things, as well as new bars coming to the former Long Tan and Total Wine Bar spaces along 5th Avenue... The under-construction storefront next to Vinegar Hill House it is going to be a café... A lobster roll shack will open in the former Lamb & Jaffy space on Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint... A decade after closing his restaurant in Trinidad to come to the States, Russel Baptiste will open Janelle’s in Prospect Heights, featuring a CaribbeanAmerican menu... On Memorial Day weekend Sixpoint Brewery launched their line of canned beers, including Bengali Tiger IPA, Sweet Action, Righteous Ale and the Crisp. u WIN A $50 GIFT CERTIFICATE IN OUR FUN CLIP ART CONTEST While you are poring over the pages of Brooklyn Bread, you will have the chance to win a $50 gift certificate to spend at Palo Santo restaurant. We have sneakily hidden a happy little sun in one of the ads in this issue. It’s a smaller version of the guy to your left. When you have located the piece of clip art email hello@brooklynbreadpress.com. Tell us on which page and in which ad the clip art is hidden. Make sure you write CLIP ART CONTEST in the subject line, and also include your name and address. A winner will be selected at random on the third week in June, and the name of that lucky person will be printed in the next issue of Brooklyn Bread, and posted on our Facebook page, and on Twitter. Last month’s winner was Chrissy Etienne.


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June, 2011

Our Favorite Things

A roundup of some of the finest dishes and treats from Brooklyn... by Jason Greenberg Horse Radish and Bacon Dip from Kors D’Oeuvres Korey Provencher is a television producer by day. At night he makes some of the best dips around, from a small kitchen in Sunset Park. Producing TV food segments during the day reinforced Korey’s desire to take a stab at cooking. Since his favorite food is chips and dip, it seemed like a natural choice for his enterprise. His stable of 10 mainly sour cream-based dips, including a White Bean and Summer Herb Spread and an Artichoke and Parmesan Dip, are now available at the Fort Greene location of Brooklyn Flea on Saturdays, and at Greene Grape Provisions and Brooklyn Victory Garden. All the dips are also available on Korey’s his website. His most popular dip is a horseradish and bacon combo, inspired by the Super Bowl. A combination of sour cream, cream cheese and mayonaise is then joined by prepared horseradish, chopped bacon, fresh parsley, salt, black pepper and cayenne pepper. And the resulting taste takes it above and beyond above any dip you’ve ever had before. Korey calls it “a man’s dip,” but of course it should, and will, be enjoyed by anyone who tries it. korsdoeuvres.com

Watermelon Salad at Peaches Hothouse Many of you might have heard about the fiery Nashville-style fried chicken at Peaches Hothouse, but the rest of the menu deserves equal acclaim. Owners Craig Samuel and Ben Groosman met while cooking at upscale New York French restaurants Picholine and La Grenouille, but it was their desire to feature American cuisine that led them to open The Smoke Joint in Fort Greene, and Peaches and Peaches Hothouse, in Bed-Stuy. The watermelon salad made its first appearance in 2007 and has been on their menu ever since. The version at Peaches Hothouse is served with farmer’s cheese, arugula and pickled ginger, tossed in a light dressing of lime, chili paste and olive oil. It’s a great way to extinguish some of the heat from the fried chicken. With their homey ambience, Peaches Hothouse is a Brooklyn restaurant that still makes you feel like you’re in a small Southern town. Peaches Hothouse, 415 Tompkins Avenue, Bed-Stuy, 718483-9111, peacheshothouse.com


June, 2011

The Egg at Colonie It ony opened three months ago, but Colonie has already changed the dining landscape in Brooklyn Heights. While the rest of the borough’s dining scenes have been thriving for some time, the Heights had been left behind. Then along came Colonie. Having met while working at PUBLIC restaurant in Manhattan, three Heights residents – Tamer Hamawi, Emelie Kihlstrom and Elise Rosenberg – noticed a void in their area for decent dining options, forcing them to frequently cross Atlantic Avenue into Carroll Gardens and Cobble Hill. They eventually stumbled upon their dream spot and with the support of their community were able to raise $16,000 on Kickstarter. By pledging amounts from $10 up neighbors and friends helped the trio create a beautiful space. A highlight is the small, focused list of obscure, natural and biodynamic wines, which is only slightly overshadowed by the magnificent wine tap, made from old plumbing parts. Meanwhile, Chef Alex Sorenson’s menu features small plates like a quartet of crostinis, an octopus, fennel, arugula, apple and citrus pickled-onion salad, and larger dishes like scallops with kabocha squash and red cabbage, and a duck breast with smoky lentils and ramps. The stand-out dish is called The Egg. A chicken egg is “blistered” (basically fried) in very hot duck fat, causing it to blister up around the edges and get crispy while still leaving a beautifully runny yolk. It is served atop a mix of hon shimejis mushrooms, asparagus, ramps and rye berries. With each bite of food or sip of wine at Colonie, it is hard to ignore the good neighborhood karma this place has created. Finally, the perfect place to eat in the Heights. Colonie, 127 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn Heights, 917-7274575, colonienyc.com

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Brooklyn Bread

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bicycle station

Bicycle Station

June, 2011

Food Truck Rally At Grand Army Plaza Sunday, May 22 in Prospect Park

photographS by allen ying

“The Bicycle Station is a godsend for cyclists...” Time Out New York

Megan and Eric Stallworth, with Steve

Tune-ups v repairs restorations v sales Owner Mike has more than 30 years of experience in bike maintenance and care

Preston Johnson, Joe Brady

All spring and summer-long, ask for the Ready to Ride TUNE-UP... Only $45! Need a bike? We’ve got great deals on new and used models. 171 Park Avenue, corner of Adelphi 1 block from Flushing Avenue (718) 638-0300 bicycylestationbrooklyn.com Mathew Chasan, Aliya Caler, Aviva Palmer, Nani Beraha, Josh Beraha, Stephanie Baum, Travis Beck


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June, 2011

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The Food & Drink Events Guide Crack a crawfish and grab yourself a beer – the summer is heating up.

6/4 Annual Crawfish Boil At Sycamore Enjoy a taste of the bayou on Saturday with live music, crawfish and beer from Louisiana’s Abita Brewing Company. They’re offering two feedings: one at 2pm and one at 5pm. For $25 you’ll receive a sizeable bucket of crawfish and a pint of beer. Then it’s $5 beers all day long. Go soak in the sun, drinks and atmosphere. Limited tickets available. Sycamore, 1118 Cortelyou Road, 347240-5850, sycamorebrooklyn.com. 6/5 Applewood Cocktail Social It’s time for summer libations, and Applewood is leading the way with mouthwatering beverages you’ve never heard of before: there will be a jalapeno punch bowl, Pennsylvania ramp-infused gin, rhubarbinfused rum and watermelon old-fashioneds. There’s no better reason to break out that cocktail dress. Pay as you go. 8pm to midnight. Applewood, 501 11th Street, 718788-1810, applewoodny.com. 6/7 Spring Gala And After Party At Brooklyn Botanic Garden Spend a magical evening consuming botanical cocktails and a delicious dinner in the Herb Garden, Rose Garden and Cherry Esplanade, followed by an after party, where you’ll enjoy more drinks, dessert and dancing in the garden. There’s no better way to ring in June! Gala ticket prices vary. Visit bbg.org/support/gala_2011/ to register. Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 900 Washington Street, 718-623-7200, bbg.org. 6/9 Homebrewing At The Brooklyn Kitchen You’ll find some exceptional craft beer in Brooklyn, but why not get crafty yourself and make it at home? This class will take you through all the basics, from malt to tools to yeast. Attendees will leave with a few bottles of home brew and a brewing starter kit, complete with 6.5 gallon fermenter and bucket with spigot, cleanser and more. Class runs from 6:30 to 8:30pm. $125. The Brooklyn Kitchen, 100 Frost Street, 718-389-2982, thebrooklynkitchen.com. 6/15 Cooking With Strawberries And Rhubarb At Ger-Nis In this installment of “What’s In Season,” you’ll learn about varieties and qualities of strawberries and rhubarb. Recipes include duck crostini with ginger-rhubarb sauce, black bass with orange-rhubarb sauce and strawberry basil lemonade. At the end of

Geoffrey Young and Justin Briggs will keep you swilling in style at Applewood. Photograph by Allen Ying

this three-hour class your mind will be broadened and you’ll be heading home with a complimentary jar of strawberry-rhubarb jam. $50. Runs from 6:30-9:30pm. Ger-Nis Culinary & Herb Center, 540 President Street Suite 2E, 347-422-0337, ger-nis.com. 6/18 The Total Smith Street Immersion Brooklyn Based’s block party series, sponsored by Brooklyn Brewery, is ready to take Smith Street. Stop by 61 Local, Bar Great Harry and Angry Wade’s for complimentary half pints of Brooklyn Brewery beer. Don’t just hit the bars though – there will be specials and sales at many shops and restaurants along Smith Street. The block party runs from noon to 6pm. For details and to RSVP, visit brooklynbased.net. 6/25 Eating Local At Brooklyn Botanic Garden If you’re searching for ways to eat local in the urban jungle, drink in the wisdom of expert locavore Leda Meredith, author of The Locavore’s Handbook. You’ll learn where to source local ingredients, how to eat local on a budget, how to eat local in the city for the season and how to handle time shortages. There will also be a cooking demonstration and tasting. $42 for members, $47 for non-members. 10am-1pm. Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 900 Washington Street, 718623-7200, bbg.org.

6/26 Beer Dinner Of The Year At Eleven Madison Park Brooklyn Brewery and Eleven Madison Park collaborate on a multi-course tasting menu that proves beer can be a part of fine dining. Chef Daniel Humm and Brooklyn brewmaster Garrett Oliver have joined forces to create delicious plates and some never-before-tasted beers. The evening also marks the release of Local 11 and Nine Pin Brown Ale, barrel-aged beers created with Garrett, Kirk Kelewae, Old Rip Van Winkle Bourbon and designer Milton Glaser. $150. For tickets, email beer@elevenmadisonpark.com. Eleven Madison Park, 11 Madison Avenue, 212-889-0905, elevenmadisonpark.com. 6/28 Go Bananas At Ger-Nis There are few foods simpler or more satisfying than the humble banana. But do you know the back story of your go-to fruit? In this class you’ll learn where bananas are commercially grown, our impact on those regions, and how fair-trade movements pertain to banana distribution. Then it’s down to the cooking, where you’ll learn how to make jalapeno-banana fritters, banana nut cookies and much more. 6:309:30pm. $50. Ger-Nis Culinary & Herb Center, 540 President Street Suite 2E, 347-422-0337, ger-nis.com.


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June, 2011

Food Truck Rally At Grand Army Plaza Sunday, May 22 in Prospect Park

Julie Finkel, Rae Draizen, Sarah Linden

Jean Hanks, Julia Kolikoff, Lexie Forsell

The Dorvillier family

KK Apple, Casey Pugh, Sarah DeNicola

Ria Cooper, Jessa Hughes, Laura Plaster, Anneka Fagundes

Hannah Waters, Caitlin Waters, Brittaney Whitford, Mona Bhatti

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


June, 2011

Brooklyn Bread

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The Production Line

We uncover how some of your favorite dishes and drinks came to be, and what path they took to get there... by Bec Couche

Bardshar Chutney Wendy Smith’s mom’s chutneys were always a winner at hospital fundraisers in upstate New York. Now president of the Schoolhouse Kitchen, Wendy continues to be inspired by those family recipes. We talked to her about what it takes to make the perfect accompaniment to a sandwich near you – the Bardshar Chutney... “The Bardshar Chutney was the secret family recipe of my mom’s best friend, Nan Bardshar Joyce. Nan’s mother wouldn’t share it with any of her daughters but after six years of trial and error, she worked it out and shared it with my mom, so we named it after Nan. 1. The first step is to cook the vegetables, the onion, celery, garlic and green peppers, because it takes longer for them to break down. 2. Next in we add the spices, cayenne pepper, paprika and vinegar, and keep scraping and scraping, and turning and turning. You can never let it sit, because it will burn. 3. We put the peaches and apples in last, because they have higher water content and cook faster. We cook it for around about five hours. Some people use xanthum gum to cut out some of the heating time, but we like to keep everything natural. 4. At home you can taste test things along the way, but when you start to make these in larger batches the process has to change to make it more reliable. We measure the sugar content by putting some of the chutney on a special reader so we know when it’s ready. 5. In the last half an hour, the flavors really mature. It turns into this whole new animal. It’s a bit fruity and a bit spicy, but delicious and all natural. South African people say it’s like Mrs Ball’s chutney, and British people say it’s more like a Branston Pickle. 6. Next we go into bottling and labelling. Then it gets packed, six jars per case, and we do about 200 cases per batch – and then it gets distributed. We’re gaining popularity – it’s all about showing people what to do with chutney. Cook a pork loin! Throw it on a sandwich! My favorite is to have it with poached eggs on a bed of arugula. Delicious.” For more information on SchoolHouse Kitchen chutneys and where to get them, check out schoolhousekitchen.com.

exceedingly tasty baked goods

260 Fifth Avenue, Park Slope 718.230.3119 Mon 7-6 « Tue/Wed/Thu 7-7 « Fri 7-9 « Sat 8-9 « Sun 8-7

troispommespatisserie.com


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June, 2011

Food Truck Rally At Grand Army Plaza Sunday, May 22 in Prospect Park

Alice Hayes, Kate Gratson

Jillian Leitao, Merilee Martin

Megan and Lincoln Malone

Elizabeth Chua, Leah Somerville

Benoit Azagoh-Kouadio, Jennifer Black

Scary Kardashian, Calyann Barnett, Kim Scott

Amanda McCleod, Paul Simundich

Wesley Gunn, Sandra Charles

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

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BR TUESDAY

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MONTHLY MASH JUNE 2011

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B N R Y l E WE K OO

TASTE OF LONG ISLAND CITY Tuesday, June 7, 6:30pm

Sample international cuisine and sip Brooklyn Brewery “Big Bottle” beers before partaking in a Brooklyn rare beer auction. Gantry Plaza State Park 49th Avenue at the East River, Long Island City, NY 11109 www.chocolatefactorytheater.org/e_tasteoflic_2011.html

SATURDAY

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CONEY ISLAND MERMAID PARADE Saturday, June 18, 2pm

Become a part of the historic Coney Island Mermaid Parade and enjoy an after party with beer provided by Brooklyn Brewery. Coney Island West 21st Street & Surf Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11224 www.coneyisland.com/mermaid.shtml

WEDNESDAY

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TASTE OF GREENMARKET Wednesday, June 22, 6pm

Savor culinary delights by twenty chefs and mixologists inspired by Greenmarket. Brooklyn beer will be served. Studio 450 450 West 31st Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10001 www.grownyc.org/tasteofgreenmarket2011

WEDNESDAY

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MEET THE MAKER

Wednesday, June 29, 5pm Choose from a tour of Brooklyn Brewery, Brooklyn Winery, Blue Bottle or Mast Brothers. Mixer to follow at the Brewery with all producers. The Brooklyn Brewery 79 North 11th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211 www.brooklynbrewery.com/blog/category/events/ *Always remember to check Brooklynbrewery.com/events for a full calendar of Brooklyn Brewery events


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June, 2011

3rd Ward’s Fifth Birthday Barbecue in Bushwick Saturday, May 21

Oleg Ivgovskoy Jr, Katya Ivanova

Renata Mann, Dana Haim

Devin Matute and Owen Cook at an animation class demo

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


June, 2011

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June, 2011

3rd Ward’s Fifth Birthday Barbecue in Bushwick Saturday, May 21

photographS by allen ying

Nikita Tolani, Ida Shiang, Chloe McNerney, Amanda Hellman

SHK.brooklynbread11.1x.pdf

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Laura Mulholland and Allegra Fisher at a screen-printing demo

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Zach Pickens explaining bucket gardening


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Knives Out

A

Joel Bukiewicz of Cut Brooklyn tackles that tricky word – “authentic”

uthenticity wafts from Brooklyn makers like a pheromone these days. It’s the dirt under your fingernails, the four hours of sleep you lost working until dawn. It’s not the pork pie hat you wear, it’s the hashmarks burned up your arm that you hide with long sleeves. It’s windburn from chasing the thing you love. Authenticity’s a little crazy. Deep down (but not too deep) it wants to punch someone in the face. It’s why Whole Foods calls, and Williams-Sonoma. It’s marketing unobtainium, hunted and coveted like no other commodity in the world. You can earn it, but claim it and it goes to dust in your fingers, burning your face off like those guys who opened the Lost Ark. If you’re talking about it, it’s already slipped out the back door. Oop, there it goes skittering down 3rd Avenue. And hey, it happens. The spotlight moves on. The next super-ultra-authentic thing is what they’re hunting for. If you’re not in the crosshairs, you’re likely back in

the dust, in a heap on the side of the road. Pork pie hat pulled down tight, huddled in your vintage leather with no one to notice your new tattoo. That’s the narrative. The cooler you are the more fun it is to watch you tumble away in the rear view. The end of our Brooklyn thing is neigh. Bullshit.

The spotlight isn’t authenticity, it’s just a light the marketing gods strapped to the word when they leased it for five years. The danger isn’t that the cool will fade. It will. It’s a marketing narrative, and they’re already changing the copy. The danger is in believing their stories, and forgetting who we are, what we do and why we do it. The truth at its core is that our center of gravity will always be the work. When things go off kilter, you find your way back to your bench, your work table, your loom. You in your shop, at your work — that’s a sacred space. Your outfit doesn’t matter there; your successes and failures stay in the room and you live them fully. There’s no irony, no image at all; there’s you, your tools and your materials – conjuring something beautiful. That something beautiful is far more than the sum of its parts. It’s an object, but it’s also a paving stone. Project by project, stone by stone, we’re laying the streets and foundations of our community. And we’ll rig our own spotlights, thanks very much.


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Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

3rd Ward’s Fifth Birthday Barbecue in Bushwick Saturday, May 21

photographS by allen ying

Sarah Martin, Leonor Barreiro, making clay for animation

The band, Intelligent Dancers: Jordan Parker, Tim Rusterholz, Sara Stokes

Amanda Burr, Katie Cordeal, Heather Nadine


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

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Try This At Home!

Inspired by Brooklyn’s finest culinary creations, Cathy Erway tries them out in her own kitchen

If you were a few pints into your night at 61 Local, you might glance at the menu and mistake the Tide Is High sandwich for something more normal. And then you’d get it a few minutes later, replete with shimmery flags of nori stuck in slabs of foccaccia, like a small fleet of rafts, each one thickly spread with salsa verde, hard-boiled eggs and a mysterious pink substance called taramasalata. The extra sheets of nori at the side are left to your own wiles – stick them in the sandwich, crumble them up and scatter on top, or just let the papery sheaths dissolve on your tongue in between bites. It’s a new type of pub food, for sure – but one that satisfies the umami tastebuds all the same. Granted, there are plenty of comfort food choices at this Boerum Hill watering hole. In fact, each menu option seems designed to sop up would-be hangovers with a baby blanket – there’s a grilled cheese with ham and relish, a brat from the Meat Hook on a baguette, spicysweet peanuts, pickles and cheese plates... your classic bar-snacky things. But 61 Local (its address is 61 Bergen Street) is not your average bar. With a drink menu whose only rule is that each tonic be produced locally, there are wild cards like Brooklyn Kombucha and Red Hook Winery’s fizzy Brooklynbrusco on tap, along with the more expected offerings of Sixpoint, Kelso, and Captain Lawrence beers.

The owner of 61 Local, Dave Liatti, is not a nutcase on a vendetta against any brewery or food business that’s outside of commuter rail range. He’s worked in and around local food and drink for years and just knows how good the goods are. As does Chris Munsey, who’s responsible for many of the food creations served at 61 Local. It all begins with a slice of really good Scratchbread... so the saying goes among the staff. Most of the menu items are collaborations but Chris can take credit for the Tide Is High. A longtime fan of Sahadi’s, the Middle-Eastern food mecca on Atlantic Avenue, he’d simply combined a few favorite specialty foods that include Greek, Japanese, Mexican and Italian elements into one dish. What could be more Brooklyn than that?

I started out with crusts of sourdough bread. Once soaked in water and squeezed out, this was plopped into a food processor along with cured carp roe (tarama). Next went lemon juice, salt and pepper and an egg yolk. I then drizzled in a cup of olive oil and some chopped scallions.

I wanted to make the green salsa and taramasalata from scratch, and I began with the latter. It’s essentially an aioli with mashed-up roe and some soaked, stale bread. Its creamy, white appearance is misleading as there’s no dairy at all.

Chris Munsey’s salsa verde is more like a pesto of fresh herbs than a spicy tomatillo sauce. He makes this condiment from scratch at 61 Local, too, and insists the name still applies since salsa verde just means it has to be green. Combining half a bunch of parsley and cilantro left over in my fridge with a clove of garlic, squeeze of lime juice and plenty of olive oil produced a spread that much resembled his. There is definitely room for one’s own experimentation in this element – and you can always get pre-made salsas like this at your favorite Mexican restaurant, or in a jar.

INGREDIENTS One square foccaccia bread (about 4 x 4”), sliced width-wise and grilled 1 hard-boiled egg, sliced 2 sheets nori (roasted seaweed) For the taramasalata 1 Tb tarama (carp or cod roe – can be found in Greek or specialty food stores, such as Sahadi’s) 1 crust sourdough bread, soaked in water 1-2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 scallion, finely chopped salt to taste

It was time to assemble this beast. I sliced a slab of foccaccia in half and grilled each piece for some surface texture and char. I spread the taramasalata and placed torn-up bits of nori on top, followed by slices of hard-boiled egg. The salsa verde was pooled on top.

For those brave souls planning to make the taramasalata and salsa from scratch, here are some in-depth instructions. To make taramasalata: Squeeze the water from the bread and place in a food processor. Add tarama and lemon juice and pulse until well blended. Slowly pour in the olive oil. Season with salt and lemon juice as desired. Remove from food processor and stir in the scallions. Cover and refrigerate for up to one week. To make the salsa verde: Coarsley chop the herbs and transfer to a food processor along with the garlic. Pulse several times until well-chopped. Add the lime juice. While blade is running, pour in the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.

For the salsa verde ½ bunch each cilantro and parsley 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 2-3 tablespoons fresh lime juice ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil salt and pepper to taste

Illustrations by Jon Roth


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June, 2011

Humble Pie

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The sweetest of treats... By Emily and Melissa Elsen of Four and Twenty Blackbirds

trawberries are one of the first colorful and delicious fruits to emerge in springtime – when they finally do appear in the farmers markets, they don’t last long, and the early morning shoppers are the lucky buyers. And yes, indeed, they make a very tasty pie. Here’s a simple recipe for a classic strawberry pie. Use a butter crust with a lattice top, and serve with a little fresh cream on the side. Strawberry Pie Filling Step 1: Pre Soak About four to six cups of in season, ripe strawberries, washed and halved or quartered depending on size 1/4 c white sugar 1/4 tsp salt

ing, drain the berries thoroughly and place in a large mixing bowl. Step 2: Filling 1/4 c cornstarch or arrowroot 1/4 c white sugar 1/4 c brown sugar A dash or two of Angostura bitters A couple fine grinds fresh black pepper

Coat the cleaned and sliced strawberries with the 1/4 cup white sugar and 1/4 tsp salt. Let soak for at least one hour, up to three hours. This pre-soak stage will help to release some of the juices from the berries and result in a less watery pie. After soak-

Combine the berries with Angostura bitters and black pepper. Sift together the brown and white sugar and cornstarch and then combine gently with the berries. Use this filling in a double crusted pie – baking time will vary, but at least one hour at 350˚F should do it. Four and Twenty Blackbirds is located at 439 3rd Avenue, Gowanus.

3rd Ward’s Fifth Birthday Barbecue in Bushwick Saturday, May 21

Mandisa Wright, Jenna Weiss-Berman, of 3rd Ward

Style Descartes, Katy Alonzo

Gwen Arber, Sam Doroff

Justine McLellan, Mike Drucker

Danielle Schwartz, Haleh Nematzadeh

Katya Ivanova, Style Descartes

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


June, 2011

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Eight good reasons to visit Michael & Ping’s 1. Healthier food – never (ever) MSG 2. Bahn Mi – Slow-roasted pork, char sui, spicy mayo on toasted baguette 3. Tamarind-glazed Spare Ribs – Slow-cooked for eight hours 4. See the magic happen in our 51-foot open kitchen 5. Wood beams + exposed brick walls = cool (but cozy) vibe 6. Great lunch specials – get out of the office already! 7. Enjoy dessert next door at 4 & 20 Blackbirds, Brooklyn’s best pie shop 8. We’re the first Certified Green Restaurant in Brooklyn* eat in « takeout « Delivery to Gowanus/Park Slope/Carroll Gardens/Cobble Hill Entire restaurant IS available for events (GREAT PARTY SPACE!) *Admittedly, this doesn’t necessarily make the food taste any better, but it DOES make everyone feel better

437 Third Ave (corner of 8th Street), Gowanus 718-788-0017


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June, 2011

3rd Ward’s Fifth Birthday Barbecue in Bushwick URBAN

Saturday, May 21

photographS by allen ying

RUSTIC

Massiel Estevez, Deirdre Lewis, Dulce Yepez

236 N 12th St

Brooklyn, NY 11211

sandwiches + beer tasty sandwiches artfully made on house baked breads

growlers!!!!

delivery

3 draught lines

north side. greenpoint parts of south side

local & regional focus. 750/22oz bottles 12 packs craft beer in cans single 12 oz bottles drink in house! create your own six pack!

718.388.9444

Eric Sherman, Toko Harada

catering see website for catering menu

urbanrusticnyc.com Hannah Schultz, Colleen Hammond, Brenda Malvini


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An Edible History Of Brooklyn

A highly nutritious, fascinating series in collaboration with Brooklyn Public Library. By Benjamin Gocker

Edward Dannemiller, Robert Sasseen and Chester Chapman test brews.

The beans are then ground...

L

isted in the 1900 Trow Business Directory for Brooklyn and Queens between “Coal Miners & Shippers” and “Coffin Dealers” (which precedes the now connotatively complicated “Coke Dealers”) you’ll find listings for the cleaners, polishers, purveyors, importers and roasters of coffee. At this time in Brooklyn there were six coffee cleaners and polishers; two dealers in essence of coffee; seven coffee importers; nine coffee roasters and one dealer in coffee pots, tea pots and urns. Not yet listed among these caffeinated capitalists was the name of Edward Dannemiller, a Canton, Ohio native who first arrived in Brooklyn in 1900. Perhaps sensing an opening in this area’s coffee trade, Dannemiller, already an established coffee merchant, decided to set up a plant at the

The chosen beans are shovelled into an air suction elevator.

packaged...

...and shipped. Photos from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle

bustling Bush Terminal. Though this company would eventually become one of the world’s largest packers of private-label coffee and tea, we have few materials concerning the Dannemiller Coffee Company in our collection – no trade pamphlets with close-ups of bean types, no elaborate letterheads and hardly a Brooklyn Daily Eagle article regarding the Dannemillers and their trade. Yet, out of this coffeelessness we were able to dredge up one folder of photos taken on the occasion of the company’s 75th anniversary. These photos give a small glimpse into a once giant Brooklyn business. Before you have a perfect cup of coffee you need the perfect coffee bean – and finding

that bean meant tasting a variety of coffees. This job fell to the men at the top: Edward I. Dannemiller, Robert B. Sasseen and Chester Chapman. After each man had slurped his fill and the bean had been selected, the processing could begin. The first step involved running the beans through an air suction elevator designed to pull out any “extra materials.” Following that, the beans headed off to the roaster where a foreman was charged with inspecting each batch as they came out of the 400-degree ovens. After roasting came grinding, and after grinding the packaging. This was done in two ways: either bagged or canned. Once packaged, the coffee was wheeled out of the plant, off to meet its fate in one of the innumerable coffee mugs of American coffee connoisseurs.


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June, 2011

3rd Ward’s Fifth Birthday Barbecue in Bushwick Saturday, May 21

Paul Kehoe, Sarah Wyatt

Steven Ma and Derek Zahedi at a bicycle class demo

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072

blanc&ROUGE “Excellent, wide-ranging selection, high end to low.” – New York Times

Organic and biodynamic selections Wine tastings every Wednesday Free delivery with no minimum purchase within DUMBO and Brooklyn Heights. Delivery elsewhere in Brooklyn and Manhattan is free for orders over $200 81 Washington Street, DUMBO 718-858-9463 Visit our online store at brwines.com


June, 2011

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Thank You! For allowing us to serve you for the last 40 years. ÂŻWe are dedicated to supplying you with the organic products you need to maintain a healthy, natural lifestyle. ÂŻLook out for special offers and events throughout June as we celebrate this special anniversary with you...


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June, 2011

BK Farmyards’ Haitian Konbit At The Youth Farm Saturday, May 21 in East Flatbush

Natalie Baker, Doreen Black

Kathy Rushforth, Michelle Harris

Lois Wilcken, Eric Dalio

Marco Rondinini, Alexia Nader, of cityspoonful.com

Cilla Ehly, John McDermott

Colleen and Rory Grant

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

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My Perfect Brooklyn Day

By Nissa Pierson, owner of Ger-Nis Culinary & Herb Center and Ger-Nis International

I

“I couldn’t be more grateful for the people that make Brooklyn what it is,” says Nissa Pierson.

’d like to say I am one of those folks who utilize the heck out of my nook of Brooklyn, Park Slope, but the truth is I have lived here for about eight years and have spent most of the time building my business, Ger-Nis International and the Ger-Nis Culinary & Herb Center. My perfect day in Brooklyn would take place on a Sunday, mainly because my phone doesn’t ring much and the emails are at an all-time low. It starts out in my Windsor Terrace apartment where I enjoy a 7am sunrise… that is sleeping in for me!

I start with a cup of coffee (Stumptown direct trade usually), and then my faithful and furry friend Sadie, a 14-year-old RotPit-Chow mix, and I venture to Prospect Park. While she chases squirrels I drink my coffee and revel in the fact that I live on this sprawling park. We walk around the park center, around the lake, under the bridges and, on a sunny, cold winter day, I must admit that my perfect day could happily end right here. I’ll then venture over to Miriam Restau-

rant in Park Slope to visit with my friend Rafi and indulge in a little breakfast. It’s usually packed, and I like to watch all the folks get excited about his food. I typically opt for the grilled chicken sandwich on pita with harissa mayo, cucumbers, and tomatoes, a salad, and some of those hand-cut fries that everyone loves! On occasion Rafi tries to push one of his new drinks on me, and, as any good friend would do, I oblige – my favorite is the Sake Bloody Mary. Continued On Page 26 ?


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My Perfect Day

find something handy for my home or my wardrobe); Olive’s Very Vintage, where I often find little things for friends; and Andie-Woo’s lingerie – I love this sexy little spot which also has some really nice clothes, jewelry and trinkets. I like to stop at Quercy for lunch for a salad and soup. They often have a guitar player there on Sundays and I do love guitar players! The chicken salad with homemade buttermilk dressing is exceptional, and I won’t hesitate for a second to enjoy a glass of wine. At that point Sadie and I head back to our little home on Prospect Park, typically making one last stop at Union Market for any last-minute groceries we may need for dinner or the week ahead. After our Union Market stop it’s really difficult not to

? From Page 25 From there, Sadie and I head over to the Stone Park Farmers Market on 5th Avenue, en route to the Ger-Nis Culinary & Herb Center. It’s actually my favorite farmers market because it is just a few blocks from the culinary center, and I can easily load up on lots of things without having to rent a pack mule! I like to go there without expectations and leave with ideas for lunches for the staff at Ger-Nis and fresh produce for the classes. Last time I went I discovered Raaka chocolate and thought about how great it would be to have a chocolate class. I’m always thinking of how I can offer our community more opportunities to learn.

“Sadie and I stroll through Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill and the Court Street area. If I didn’t love living on Prospect Park so much, I would live here in a second – there is just so much good energy and vibrancy in this particular part of Brooklyn.” Next stop: the center. My heaven exists Sundays at the center, full of an unusual, quiet calmness. I get to enjoy the beautiful kitchen and unpack all my farmers market goods. Oftentimes you can find me whipping up some baked goods (experimenting, that is, as I am not known for my baking) or crock-pot chilies and lasagnas to keep us all warm during the work week. I enjoy cooking for the staff, and we all take turns using the farmers market goods, making lunches for the week. After doing some work, mostly catching up with emails and preparing for the busy week ahead, Sadie and I stroll through Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill and the Court Street area. If I didn’t love living on Prospect Park so much, I would live here in a second – there is just so much good energy and vibrancy in this particular part of Brooklyn. Some of my favorite shops on Court Street include Home Ec and Flirt Brooklyn (sometimes I

stop at my favorite wine pushers for the last eight years – Slope Cellars! I walk in and tell them what I’m cooking. They know I take only biodynamic or organic wines, and they hand me a bottle. It’s perfect every time. At this point, we’ll make our way home and keep house. I’ll make a nice dinner with my farmers market goods and enjoy a little wine. I get to relax, play on the computer (yes, play), browse the internet, read trash websites and read up on what is happening in my hood. I couldn’t be more grateful for the people that make Brooklyn what it is, or for the ability to take life slowly once in a blue moon. Nissa Pierson is the owner of Ger-Nis International and the GerNis Culinary & Herb Center in Park Slope, an organic and fair trade fruit and vegetable importer and distributor. Ger-Nis also offers recreational and educational classes and hosts events. 540 President Street, Suite 2E, 347-422-0337, ger-nis.com, gernis.com/culinaryherbcenter.


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

BK Farmyards’ Haitian Konbit At The Youth Farm Saturday, May 21 in East Flatbush

photographS by allen ying

BK Farmyards apprentices James Filsaime and Martha Jackson

Robin, Chelsea, Shaianice, Darrius, Josiah

Ronide Gedeon, Sophie Louis, Adriana Gedeon

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Enrich Your Life... Adopt An Animal

Three beautiful creatures need homes... call Dog Habitat Rescue at 347-203-3934 or email rescue@doghabitat.org

«

Magnus is a six-month-old gray shorthair. This cat is long and lean and still growing. He’s a charming young male who will put on a show just to get you to notice him. He prances and purrs loudly hoping he’ll get your attention for a few minutes of quality cuddle time, and if you pick him up for a nuzzle, he’ll be forever grateful.

«

Ashley is a red chihuahua who was pulled from a high-kill shelter. She’s feisty and playful – like most chis she’s a real firecracker! She’s under two years old and in very good health. Ashley is currently living with a foster family in Brooklyn. Please let us know if you’d like to arrange a meeting with this cute pup.

«

Binx is a senior black cat with the most striking green eyes you’ve ever seen! They’re just stunning. His black coat of fur is luxurious, but poor Binx, he may look good on the outside, but he’s torn up inside. His life was turned upside down when his separated owners gave him up and now he needs a new family to set things right.


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Enrich Your Life... Adopt An Animal

Three beautiful creatures need homes... call Dog Habitat Rescue at 347-203-3934 or email rescue@doghabitat.org

«

Jeffrey Lebowski, aka The Dude, was forced out of his home because of regulations that forbid dogs of certain breeds from living in public housing. His owner had to give him up or be evicted. This ninemonth-old is a big boy with a big heart and is named after the character from the movie because he’s just a very cool dog.

«

LONDON is named after dog-loving author Jack London. This dashing young Maltese has come a long way from a puppy mill in Virginia. His other siblings made it to NYC and found loving homes in Brooklyn. Now it’s London’s turn to find happiness and begin a new life of leisure. Are you the perfect match for this white wolf?

«

Kingsley’s current family is unable to care for him and they’ve asked us to help find him a new home. We’ve known this wonderful dog for nearly two years. He’ll be a great companion for a household without children. He needs a home with a backyard and lots of time to run and play, as he’s high energy and very loyal.


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#4: A Red Hook Vendor Safari The Red Hook Ball Field Food Vendors provide all-important sustenance for those playing soccer, football and baseball on weekends, and for their less-agile family members who watch from the sidelines. This month, the Food Safari team joins the cheer squad for an authentic Central and South American feast on the sidelines. Grade 8 Spanish skills wholly encouraged... – Bec Couche THE FIRST THING... to get smart about, fast, is that you are not the only one who thinks the Red Hook Food Vendors are a goldmine. There can be long lines for some of the best snacks, and you will get hungry waiting. It’s best to go with a few friends and eat your spoils family-style. This maximizes time and taste. And remember, it’s not only okay to snack and queue at the same time – it’s recommended. PLAN OF ATTACK 1. We started by grabbing beverages. Selections included watermelon juice, horchata (rice, almond, cinnamon, brown sugar, vanilla and milk) and a curiously refreshing cashew nut juice from Victor’s & Ana’s Blended Wonders. 2. The longest line is always for El Olomega – who lay claim to “The Original Red Hook El Salvadoran Papusa” honor. A papusa is a corn tortilla stuffed with various fillings while being cooked, and El Olomega does a good one. We nominated one of our team players to wait in line and request our healthy order of two papusa platters starring zucchini and cheese, chicken and cheese, and pork and loroco – a type of flower

that kind of tastes like asparagus. All served with sour cream and curtido, a sort of pickled cabbage. 3. It’s polite to leave the one losing their mind in the slow-moving queue at El Olomega with corn, served with cheese, lime and chili from the Red Hook Food stand, so we got one for our noble teammate, and an extra for the table. 4. Guatemalan and El Salvadoran-style tamales are cornmeal parcels wrapped and steamed in a banana leaf instead of the cornhusk used in Mexican versions. Antojitos Chapines provided two delicate, (not rubbery, as some incarnations tend to be) moist chicken and pork versions for our table. 5. When you flatten a piece of masa (corn dough), cook it, wait for it to puff up, and then fill with beans, meat, lettuce and guacamole, you get huaraches, something the Country Boys don’t mess around with. We ordered one with chicken and one with pork. Make sure you dose up on free chilis and salsas. 6. The women at the unnamed ceviche cart serve up three versions of the raw fish dish – camaron (shrimp),

pescado (fish) or mixto (a combination of the two). All are freshly prepared and marinated in spices, cilantro and lime – and make for a nice break from the rest of the cheesy, corny, meaty guacamole-fest. 7. We knew appetizers wouldn’t be needed, but it’s not like we’re at the Red Hook markets every day, so we loaded up on chips and dip (saucy guacamole and corn chips), chicharron (crispy, fried pork skin) and fried plantains from Piatzlan. 8. After the standard 20-minute wait later (and one pair of cops pushing to the front of the line), our papusa order had been filled, finally, and we had a Central and South American degustation ready to lay out on the picnic tables. Tips for novice players – eat a light breakfast and make the most of the stalls’ complimentary napkins. Red Hook Ball Fields is messy eating. Red Hook Ball Field Food Vendors, Clinton Street and Bay Street, Brooklyn. Saturday and Sundays, 11am-8pm until October. Illustration by Liza Corsillo


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June, 2011

The Grand Opening Of Smorgasburg Saturday, May 21 on the Williamsburg waterfront

Michelle Plotnik, Eileen Ramos, Amanda Goiri

Renee Barton, Emily Gosselin

Katherine Mulholland, Amanda Valdez, Mallory Box

David Papiasuili, Hae-Joon Kim

Aida Cadres, Lindsey Sands

Nicole Centeno of Sea Bean Goods, Greenpoint

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


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Cause For Celebration

A

Jack Walsh of Celebrate Brooklyn! tells Bec Couche what we can expect at this year’s festival

BOUT 30 years ago Jack Walsh was fresh out of NYU and started working behind the scenes at Celebrate Brooklyn!, an annual performing arts festival. Three decades later, he’s the Director of Performing Arts Programs and Executive Producer. He talked to us about this year’s festival and a few anticipated highlights, as well as his own “once in a lifetime” career-defining moment. How did your involvement begin with the organization? I started producing performances at NYU – upon my graduation I began work on Celebrate Brooklyn! in 1982. I started as the founding producer’s assistant, I worked seasonally, then took on more and more responsibility. In 1994 I became Executive Producer of the festival. It’s hard to believe this is my 30th season! What was the inspiration behind the festival originally? The festival started in 1979 by BRIC Arts at a time when the cultural landscape was fairly stark and there was not a lot going on in Prospect Park. It was perceived as a dangerous place to be. There was a dual agenda: breaking people’s impressions about the park and providing a platform for Brooklyn performers to build an audience and raise their profile. How has the festival changed since then? The festival grew rapidly in the first few years. We went from a handful of performances to 35 in the mid-80s, then contracted a little in the early 90s, then when I began producing we went through a building process. Now the festival is a private public partnership – we raise enough money to have free programs. This year we have 24 free performances. Your voicemail suggests you get a lot of unsolicited proposals for acts – what’s the selection process? Our curating guideline is to present world-class, diverse programming for the people of Brooklyn. I have an artistic team that works with me – we’ve worked together for a long time – and it’s a bit of a puzzle. There’s no application process for it – and every year we have a vision for the festival. We get a lot of unsolicited material and proposals, and we can’t respond to them all. Occasionally something comes from out of the blue and it fits the vision but for the most part we are out there proactively choosing what we want – it’s a year-round effort.

“We do keep an eye on what’s happening around the world but one of the great things about New York is that there is so much creativity, so many artists that come here.” Photograph by Allen Ying

Do you look overseas for inspiration? We do keep an eye on what’s happening around the world but one of the great things about New York is that there is so much creativity, so many artists that come here. I did just came from the New Orleans Jazz festival and Coachella, to be fair. Did you see any possible future Celebrate Brooklyn! performers there? John Botte, an absolutely stunning singer from New Orleans, blew me away. I will try and get him in for next summer. He is kind of a raspier version of Sam Cooke. Who is catering for the festival this year? This year we have The Farm on Adderly as the festival food partner. We’re always looking for ways to enhance the experience for our attendees, and food and merchandise are a really important part of the experience. The Farm on Adderly really stood out in their proposal. They are committed to locally sourced food and keeping the park green. We’re launching a composting program with them, and they bought into the whole concept well beyond the food – which is fantastic by the way. Anything else new for the festival this year? The other new partnership is a collective of Etsy crafters, The New New. They are going to do a store with local Brooklyncentric clothing, crafts and jewelry – we’re

excited about that. We want to attract audiences from all over the city and work to get different communities to come out an enjoy it. We have what many consider the best outdoor space to see a performing artist and we’re proud of that. Who is opening the festival this year? Andrew Bird, he’s an acoustic-based, folksy indie musician with a rock sensibility. I can’t tell you how many people from a certain age group have told me they are so excited that Andrew Bird is going to be performing, and how many people of another age who have no idea who he is. His last show in Radio City sold out – and to have him play a free show is not only exciting for his fans, but to a broader public that have an opportunity to see him. I think we’ve earned a place of trust with the public, and we’ve put in a lot of time and care to introduce something that’s new for them. What’s been your festival highlight? David Byrne in 2009 opening the season with a free concert was one of the highlights of my career. The show was fantastic and he’s an icon – so identifiable with NYC. That was enormously special. Working with Celebrate Brooklyn! and having such a contribution to the community really has been terrific. It’s a real privilege.


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The grand opening on May 21 of Brooklyn’s latest food market, the Smorgasburg, by the same folks who brought you Brooklyn Flea. The market is being staged every Saturday on the Williamsburg waterfront. Photograph by Allen Ying

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June, 2011

The Grand Opening Of Smorgasburg Saturday, May 21 on the Williamsburg waterfront

Chantal Chadwick, Spencer Dennis

Sarah Johnson, Jaime Keeling

Kim Schreiber and Janis Bui of Bep

Julie Laenkholn, Malene Hvidt

Jon Jackson, Nicole Campoy

Lolita Koutoudi, Lila Kyrtata

Genevieve Oliver, Tamanna Siddique

Justin Solitrin, Sarah Waiser

Katie Fong, Toy Vano

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


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The Cheese Report

A

Seriously tasty dispatches... By Laura Nuter of GRAB Specialty Foods, in Park Slope

lrighty folks, a few important cheesey reminders for June. First, many of us know and love someone graduating high school or college this month. Just because summer’s around the bend, that’s no excuse for your proud graduates to stop thinking for the next three months and risk their brains turning to Swiss cheese! That being said, what better graduation gift than the gift of cheese education? Consider the following books for your graduate... or for yourself. FOR THE ENTERTAINER: The Cheese Plate, David Gibbons/Max McCalman: A great choice for those who are interested in impressing their friends by assembling a beautiful cheese plate and choosing wines that are a perfect match. FOR THE KNOW-IT-ALL: The Murray’s Cheese Handbook, Rob Kaufelt/Liz Thorpe: An easy read that is sorted alphabetically and covers all the important details such as texture, aroma, milk type, pasteurization, country of origin, pairings and more.

FOR THE BUDDING CHEESE MAKER: American Farmstead Cheese, Paul Kindsedt: Geared towards those who really want to learn what it takes to start their own cheesemaking business. Recipes not included! Or, if your recipient is a more of a handson guy or gal, you might instead consider a field trip. We recommend a Sprout Creek Farm cheese-maker’s workshop. Less than two hours away from NYC, this is a trip well worth taking We had a blast making cheese under the direction of Head Cheese Maker, Colin McGrath. The day includes a tour of the

farm, hands-on experience making cheese and a comprehensive discussion on aging cheeses. Of course you will have the opportunity to taste the type of cheese you made as well many other varieties. I can’t think of a better way to spend a Saturday... take a breath of fresh air and enjoy the breeze (and the cheese)! Now, let’s talk about Dad’s Day. Remember, nothing says Happy Father’s Day like a selection of his favorite man-cheeses. Landaff: Aged in the Cellars at Jasper Hill Farm, this beauty is fantastic enjoyed by itself or alongside smoked meats with wholegrain mustard. If I were stranded on an island and could choose only one cheese... Winnemere: Meaty, fruity and washed in beer – he’ll want to grab a spoon and a crusty baguette and park himself in front of the tube! Valdeon: A big, strong and spicy blue that will be sure to knock his socks off. You may want to consider throwing in salami, and for that we recommend Salumeria Biellese’s Finnochiona, a delightfully spicy pork salami flavored with fennel.

PA R K D E L I C AT E S S E N

5 3 3

PA R K

P L A C E

7 I 8 . 7 8 9 . 8 8 8 9


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June, 2011

The Grand Opening Of Smorgasburg Saturday, May 21 on Williamsburg waterfront

An oyster stand

Jenna Melnyk and Stephanie Covell, of The Brooklyn Grange

Matt Jacoby, Bryan Derballa

Leo, Joanna, Nicolee

Tran Ly, Frances Lee, Claudia Zhao

People’s Pops stand

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


June, 2011

Our Favorite Places For... Loret Gamboa, 27, works in retail management at Modo in Nolita and lives on the south side of Williamsburg Breakfast: Jimmy’s Diner (Williamsburg) Dinner: Roberta’s (Bushwick) CocktailS: Clem’s (Williamsburg) Frankie Hsu, 23, is a graphic designer at Modo in Nolita and moved to the East Village from Fort Greene Breakfast: Chez Oskar (Fort Greene) Dinner: The Smoke Joint (Fort Greene) CocktailS: Night of Joy (Williamsburg) Photographed by Allen Ying at Smorgasburg

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Thinking Local With Coolhaus NY Monday, May 23 in Williamsburg

photographS by allen ying

Steve Hopkins, Josh Cantor

Rebecca Wingfield, Caroline Gulde, Sarah Tweedie

Jenesy Claire, Alicia Tyree


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Thinking Local With Coolhaus NY At Brooklyn Winery Monday, May 23 in Williamsburg

Joey Nicholson, Karin Aebersold

Lindsay Illian, Michael Auerbach

Adam Saewitz, Elaine Bodian

Michelle Bondioli and Shannon Estrelle of Coolhaus

Mike Frazier

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


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June, 2011

Four & Twenty Blackbirds

WE LOVE YOU Four & Twenty Blackbirds 439 3rd Avenue at 8th Street Gowanus, Brooklyn www.birdsblack.com

Pie by the slice in the shop, whole pies are made to order with 48 hours notice. Please call to order: tel 718.499.2917

Closed Mondays Tuesday to Friday: 8am–7pm Saturday: 9am–7pm Sunday: 10am–6pm


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Thinking Local With Coolhaus NY At Brooklyn Winery Monday, May 23 in Williamsburg

Brian Leventhal (owner of Brooklyn Winery), Loren Brill (Sweet Loren’s Cookie)

Roger Krueger, Erin O’Reilly, Suzanne Stack

Nick Cucé, Kirstyn Soles

Bernadette Blanco, Michelle McSwain, Jeff Enlow

Abbey Henrickson, Jaclyn Simms

Mike Pereira, Kaylle Defer

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


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Thinking Local With Coolhaus NY At Brooklyn Winery Monday, May 23 in Williamsburg

Marc Geffen, Foster Bell, Mike Greenfield

Charlotte Montfils, Alex Beitzke

Andrew Hamilton, Courtney Sprecher, Steve Hopkins, Todd Jensen

Hama Schwartz, Shaya Elcock, Melissa Herder

photographS by allen ying... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072

“In a café-crazed town, Iris is one of a kind.” “Best Café” in 2010 “Best of New York” issue, New York magazine Stumptown coffee ¯ Pastries, cookies and biscuits, all baked in-house All-day breakfast classics ¯ Sandwiches ¯ Salads For full menu and more details, visit us online at www.iriscafenyc.com 20 Columbia Place, b/w State & Joralemon | Brooklyn Heights | 718-722-7395 No computers or iPads please – take some time out from the real world!


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Flour/Flower: Plants, Food and Beyond

T

Kate Blumm of Brooklyn Botanic Garden writes on the wonderful world of horticulture

he majority of people you encounter in New York are likely to be transplants to the city. The same claim can be made for plants: those that are native to the metropolitan area are few and far between compared to those that have moved in from places near and far. We know this because 20 years ago, BBG’s respected science department created the New York Metropolitan Flora Project (NYMF) to study the plant species distribution in every county within a 50-mile radius of New York City. NYMF has mapped the distribution of more than 3,000 native and nonnative species, painting a sometimes dramatic portrait of the decline of some native plants and the surge of invasive species. This is problematic because the indigenous plant system itself supports a community of native wildlife and pollinators that have adapted to the rigors of the city. This kind of self-reliant community is not terribly unlike the tight-knit population of local food artisans in Brooklyn. According

to jam-maker Laena McCarthy of Anarchy in a Jar, they rely on each other to navigate the world of New York City foodstuff. “We all started around the same time, at the same market,” McCarthy says, “and now we all use each others’ products and grow together.” McCarthy and many of her peers will be at BBG on June 11 for Homegrown, an event kicking off two seasons of programming dedicated to our 100-year old Native Flora Garden and the indigenous plants found on BBG’s 52 acres, farther into the borough and beyond. Homegrown will spotlight locally cultivated culinary talent, many of whom source their ingredients from the surrounding area. Chefs including McCarthy, Kelly Geary of Sweet Deliverance NYC, and Shamus Jones of Brooklyn Brine Co. will be on hand to demonstrate how to make delectable items from the summer’s bounty, with dishes like strawberry–bay leaf jam, rhubarb-lavender syrup, French lavender cucumber pickles, and strawberry jam with pink peppercorns and mint. Elsewhere in the Garden we’ll offer herb but-

ters and vinegars, handmade paper and more. The authors of The New Brooklyn Cookbook, Tart and Sweet, and It’s a Long Road to a Tomato will be signing copies, and a dozen additional local food purveyors, including Mama O’s Premium Kimchee, People’s Pops and the Brooklyn Salsa Company will be offering tastings. Plus, Native Flora Garden curator Uli Lorimer will lead a walk-through of that garden, highlighting wildflowers and touching on relationships between native plants, insects, and wildlife. So if you’re all about eating local and supporting local businesses, consider planting local, too. Join us at Homegrown, or anytime through November for our on-site exhibit “Native New Yorkers,” designed to draw attention to the plight of some threatened species— and celebrate those that remain with us in the city. Get tips for choosing indigenous plants for an apartment-friendly container, or design ideas for landscaping with natives in a larger space. Every native plant cultivated by a fellow New Yorker strengthens the botanical community and our city as a whole.


Brooklyn Bread

Page 50

June, 2011

Definition of FIND (find)

1. To come upon, often by accident; meet with. i.e. FIND a unique collection of home furnishings in an unlikely location 2. To discover by searching or making an effort: i.e. FIND beautiful things for your home while traversing 9th St., Gowanus

59 9th Street (between Smith & Second) 718.369.2705

findhomefurnishings.com


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 51

The Fabulous Fifth Avenue Fair In Park Slope Sunday, May 15

photographS by kim madalinski

Laura Critchlow, Brad Swanson, Scott Mason, Orlando Benites

Miami Comes to Brooklyn

Crystal Rodriguez, Steve Hackett, Joel Kidd

Ranked #1 Cuban restaurant in the five boroughs by Yelp Serving up mostly traditional Cuban dishes from a foodie approach (such as our house-smoked Spanish chorizo which flavors many of our dishes) while leaving room to play around with ingredients (such as our grilled cheese that has fried sweet plantains and our espresso mustard)

Catering Available 393 Classon Ave (b/w Greene and Clifton) in Clinton Hill/Bed Stuy 718-623 Cuba (2822) Pilarny.com find us on

Joe Leopoldi, Joe Leopoldi, Jack Holmes

pilarny

closed mondays

–

limited seating


Brooklyn Bread

Page 52

June, 2011

The Fabulous Fifth Avenue Fair In Park Slope Sunday, May 15

Samantha Vincai, Andrew Cioppa

Felix Carchipulla

Chris Sherman, Elizabeth Marangoudakis, Sasha Foo

Yar and Andrea Dal Monte

Jason Fager, Mirium Lipstein

Ezra and Vivian Schwerner

Marcas and Maya Velazquez

Libby Devonshire and Katie Rapheal

Mike Foley and Billy

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 53

The Fabulous Fifth Avenue Fair In Park Slope Sunday, May 15

Tom Riccobono, Erikka Bohm

Peter Horan and Tori Turner

Odin and Tod Levi

Brittony and Afton Vermeer

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Page 54

Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

The Fabulous Fifth Avenue Fair In Park Slope Sunday, May 15

photographS by kim madalinski

Nico, Mike, Maceo and Parnel Lettunich

Dominic Maniscalco, Tori Turner, Afton Vermeer, Brittony Vermeer, Erikka Bohm, Mike Foley (with Billy the dog), Tom Riccobono

Danielle Exceus, Sachyne Bruny, Carine Bruny


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 55

The Fabulous Fifth Avenue Fair In Park Slope Sunday, May 15

Nancy and Cassie Schwerner

Tiffany and Own Sole

Victoria and Olivia Kolemba

Theo Vrettos

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

Page 56

June, 2011

Festival Of Ideas For The New City Street Festival Sunday, April 8 on the Bowery in Manhattan

Emily Martin of Seed Library talking to Seamus Lee Henry

Sarah, Bebe, Wiley and Kitty Holbrooke

Sandi DuBowski, Esther Robinson, David Thorpe

Daniel Sklaar, owner of Fine and Raw Chocolate

Erica Livingston, Lauren Parrish, Matt Poole and Will Myrick of Fab CafĂŠ

Maria Piessis, Tara Palmeri

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 57

Festival Of Ideas For The New City Street Festival Sunday, April 8 on the Bowery in Manhattan

Caroline Mak, Mary Hannah Lynn

James Beacham and Joyce LainĂŠ

Laura Cline and Patrick Kiley

Jazmin and Martin Juarez

Andrea Lam at Seeding the City

Marina Zamalin and Shani Peters at Laundromat Project

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

Page 58

June, 2011

Festival Of Ideas For The New City Street Festival Sunday, April 8 on the Bowery in Manhattan

Karin Burger, Fabiola García, and Robin Burger at Hot Bread Kitchen

Athena, May, Andrea and Andre Lam making green roof modules at Seeding the City

Sarah and Wiley Holbrooke sniffing cocoa beans

On the Bowery

Rachel Falcone, Michael Premo

Nathalie Jordi of People’s Pops

Jean Lee and Seamus Lee Henry

Jacob and Viola Lou Wildschioedtz

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 59

Bartender Of The Month

W

Justin Olsen of Gowanus Yacht Club... Interview by Bec Couche

e talked to Justin Olsen, 28, about bartending at GYC, the bar that for six months of the year manages to serve the cheapest beer in Brooklyn, but still gets out-of-towners thinking they are about to hit the Hamptons. How long have you been a bartender? I’ve been in the business since I was about 16, but I was 18 the first time I was behind a bar. I was living outside of Chicago – working a terrible job in an Olive Garden – and the other bartender got evicted from the YMCA or whatever and I got to serve wine to all the bored office workers. How did you end up here? I moved out to Cleveland, then to Ireland, then to New York in 2005. I was working at a restaurant in the city, it’s now closed, but it was windowless and in a basement – I’ve always liked the idea of working outside. One of the girls I worked with knew one of the owners of Gowanus Yacht Club, and that gave me an in. What do you like about GYC? It’s an outside bar, so it has a slightly gimmicky thing to it. It’s small, and has a clubhouse feel. We work long hours, but because it’s so open it doesn’t seem like work. There’s a lot more interplay and random interactions between the bar and people on the sidewalk – it’s also seasonal, so kind of fleeting. People want to enjoy it while it lasts. When does the GYC season start? We’re open from April until Halloween, give or take. This year we opened later because of the weather, but hopefully we’ll be open later in the year as well. What are you up to in the off-season? I end up travelling a bit, this year I went to Panama, but I’ve travelled all over. A lot of the bars I’ve end up going to have a similar ramshackle idea as GYC. In India there were quite a few. What’s the crowd like? We get labeled as a bit of a hipster bar, but that’s not true. The yacht club has this weather-beaten, cobbled together look and I think that it has a laidback feeling and attracts that kind of customer. We get a good mix of people who’ve lived in the neighborhood for a long time and have been coming in for years. There are always people new to the

“Every year, we’ll see people who meet, date, marry and split up – just from being at the yacht club,” says Olsen of Gowanus Yacht Club, where all the seating is communal. Photograph by Allen Ying

bar every season, too. They tend to make it a “summer at GYC,” – they’ll bring their friends and we’ll see them every day. It’s kind of like camp. Then there are people who were going to get on the subway but went through the wrong door… Sounds like a pretty friendly environment. All of our seating is communal. Unless you’re really cantankerous you’ll have to talk to someone. It’s very convivial. Every year, we’ll see people who meet, date, marry and split up – just from being at the yacht club. What drinks are on the menu? We’re a cheap outside spot. Our least expensive beer is $2.50 and our most expensive is $6. For $20 you can have more than your share of drinks and food. So it’s pretty cheap. What’s the food on offer? It’s all grilled stuff – burgers, dogs, Polish sausages, pulled pork. We have a newer chef and he’s coming up with new items every day. It’s a

bit like the bar itself: thrown together. Do you have any special events on different nights? We don’t have any event nights but at the end of the season we have a prom at the end of it all – a dance party for the regulars. Do you ever get people coming expecting an actual yacht club? Sometimes we get people coming in from the city all dressed up, thinking that it’s something a little bit smarter than what it actually is. They are usually good for one beer. It’s seldom they turn away. What’s the best drink to have at GYC? In general, whatever’s coldest and cheap. We do a good shandy, though. Can you share the secret? We make it with Ting, a Jamaican grapefruit soda, and beer. It’s very enticing. Gowanus Yacht Club, open until late October, closed if it’s raining. 323 Smith Street, 718246-1321.


Brooklyn Bread

Page 60

June, 2011

Total Atlantic Avenue Immersion

Saturday, May 21 at The Brazen Head, Last Exit, Roebling Inn and Waterfront Ale House

Melissa Wong, Jen Puchalski

Bella Lewis, Jeremy Lewis, Raphe Curley

Andy Dudley, Summer Smith

Mary Keane, Robyn Malachowsky, Kristin Di Quollo

Liz Wentworth, Nicole Weriz, Allison March

In the garden of Last Exit

Kat Eseiritu, Angela Amendola,and Chloe

Rebecca Sosa, Frank Fattori

Susan and Perry Roland

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 61

Total Atlantic Avenue Immersion

Saturday, May 21 at The Brazen Head, Last Exit, Roebling Inn and Waterfront Ale House

Vince Santos, Holly Veneracion, Leandrei Santor, Rachel Novales, RenĂŠe Criselda, Mike De Lota

Roebling bartenders Marni Ludwig, Lizanne Hinkle

Heather and Parker Perceval

Kate, Norah and Derek Taylor

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

Page 62

June, 2011

Total Atlantic Avenue Immersion

Saturday, May 21 at The Brazen Head, Last Exit, Roebling Inn and Waterfront Ale House

Vince Santos, Holly Veneracion, Leandrei Santor, Rachel Novales, RenĂŠe Criselda, Mike De Lota

Tony Depietro. Lincoln Depietro, Meredith Craig Depietro

Chris and Autumn Martin

The bar at The Brazen Head

Kim Valenza, Alli Salvitta, Sydney Arkin

Sean Tarrant, Sara Danielsen, Frank Fattori, Rebecca Sosa

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 63

Total Atlantic Avenue Immersion

Saturday, May 21 at The Brazen Head, Last Exit, Roebling Inn and Waterfront Ale House

Holly Veneracion at Waterfront Ale House

Jen Trepinkski, Ben Loftis, Ricardo Gotla

Michael Barbaro, Tim Levin

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072

Advertising in Brooklyn Bread isn’t just economical (This nice big half-page costs as little as $104) It’s also effective... people LOVE this magazine

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For more information, call us on 917-740-1072 Or email advertise@BrooklynBreadPress.com


Brooklyn Bread

Page 64

June, 2011

Total Atlantic Avenue Immersion

Saturday, May 21 at The Brazen Head, Last Exit, Roebling Inn and Waterfront Ale House

Amy Utter, Jeff Albert

Meg Muirhead, Annaliese Griffin, Nicole Davis of event organizers Brooklyn Based

Mike Housley, Aly Housley, Dante Benedetti, Josh Brown

At Roebling Inn

Tim Levin, Bibi Privalm

The discount ticket

photographS by kim madalinski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


June, 2011

Brooklyn Bread

Page 65


Brooklyn Bread

Page 66

June, 2011

Brooklyn Health And Wellness Fair At Triomph Fitness Saturday, May 14 in Gowanus

Brian Carter of Brooklyn Drum Circle

David Yaden, Linda Camarda, Frank Esposito of Natural Balance Massage

Ellie Herman, Miguel Lampel, Anna Scheinman

Karen Lawson, Shoshana Levy

Elorie Tate, JP McDavid, Leslie Brooks

Andrew Hall, Dawson Harford, Pedro Caban, Dion McBean

photographS by Grzegorz Mizerski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 67

Brooklyn Health And Wellness Fair At Triomph Fitness Saturday, May 14 in Gowanus

Bayo Simmonds, Liz Lovejoy

Karen Ranney, David Blum

Melissa Edwards, Therese Edwards

Christina Noel Peaves, Laura Stein, Rachel Stein

John Shannon, Caroline McMahon

Bryan Milne, JB Brown

photographS by Grzegorz Mizerski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

Page 68

June, 2011

Brooklyn Health And Wellness Fair At Triomph Fitness Saturday, May 14 in Gowanus

Pedro Arrota

Janine Flasschoen

Justine Walsh, Elle Walters

Lauren Tepper

Belinda Mello, Efrain Vargas

Pyeng Threadgill

Risha London Nathan

photographS by Grzegorz Mizerski... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072

Marie’s CookinG I’m cooking. For you. We eat, therefore, I’ll cook. And everything I’ll cook for you will be carefully planned and meticulously shopped for. I love the whole experience. I’d rather food shop than shoe shop. Organic, fresh, fragrant, healthy, flavorful; these words excite, entice and inspire me. My specialty is rustic Italian with a healthy flare. Only organic, fresh ingredients go into my dishes, buying locally whenever possible. My mission is to bring the freshest tastes to you trying never to use a can or a box. Fresh homemade pasta from linguine to gnocchi. Sweet tomato sauce from the plumpest of plum tomatoes, straight from the garden. My goal is to recreate the meals of my ancestors in the hills of Italy; robust, fresh and from scratch.

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Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 69

The Food & Drink Crossword

If you love food and drink and you love Brooklyn, this is for you. By Jason Greenberg LOVE crosswords? Great. Sit down, grab your favorite beverage, relax and enjoy this puzzle, which revolves around local food and drink businesses. The solution can be found on the front page of BrooklynBreadPress.com. No peeking! (Or Googling.)

Across 4. This restaurant in the former Bonita space shares its name with what you would call people from Italy’s capital. 6. This shrine to one of America’s favorite summertime foods is known for some of their chef-inspired variations, including the “Wylie.” 9. This Red Hook restaurant is literally synonymous with “agreeable eating utensil.” 12. Hopefully no Hurricane Katrina memories come to mind at this Williamsburg bar. 13. To a chemist, this common table topper would be known as sodium chloride. 17. This vegetable is “all-ears.”

Try this at a certain British-themed spot... 15 Down.

18. Paul Giamatti’s character in Sideways famously snubbed this type of red wine. 19. Adding this to water creates a frothy base for bread and beer. 20. A popular tea time cookie that doesn’t quite measure up. 22. A Yiddish snack. 23. This leafy herb that many say tastes like soap comes from coriander seeds. 24. If you didn’t know better, you might think this establishment was a tiki haunt for the walking dead. DOWN 1. This might be a useful brunch cocktail for a handyman. 2. This Williamsburg arepas restaurant is named for the capital of Venezuala for good reason. 3. James Bond orders this classic cocktail “Shaken, not stirred.” 5. This common ingredient used in Southwestern cuisine is derived from smoked

jalapeños. 7. You don’t need a boat, a membership or a pair of Sperrys to frequent this outdoor Smith Street joint. 8. This type of butterfly might frequent this Carroll Gardens cocktail bar, Brooklyn ______. 10. This is a mountain in Japan or a type of sweet, crispy apple. 11. A San Francisco neighborhood named after an expensive cut of meat. 13. Your motorcycle wouldn’t be complete without this, which novices might call a passenger seat. This is also a Park Slope beer bar and restaurant. 14. Not named for your grandmother, but a great place for pie named for someone else’s. 15. At this restaurant they fry almost everything, including the British specialty. 16. Surname of “Dark Side of the Moon” band and a bar on Atlantic Avenue. 21. In Italian “Mangia!” In English, this small Greenpoint restaurant.


Brooklyn Bread

Page 70

June, 2011

Brooklyn Craft Central’s Shop The Archway Saturday, May 21 in Dumbo

Lemanja Brow and Kate Sarrantonio of Swordfish Street Printing

Grace Kim and Dianna Block of Vaya Bags

Lucas Near-Verbrugghe and Jessica Howell of Kombucha Brooklyn

Molly Greenberg, Lisa Bracigliano and Robin Greenberg of the Chocolate Swirl

Lauren Blais selling handcrafted jewelry

Jean Wen and Kimi Ainley at the Vivi Sun Jewelry booth

photographS by jamie siegel... TO ORDER COPIES, PLEASE CALL (917) 740-1072


Brooklyn Bread

June, 2011

Page 71

2011 Rate Card Every month, 7,000 copies of hot and tasty Brooklyn Bread are delivered to 400 selected food and drink establishments in the wonderful borough of Brooklyn. {Visit BrooklynBreadPress.com for the full list}

The “One-Night Stand” rate

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The “Let’s Take This To The Next Level” Rate

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Rates are per issue and include ad design. ad specifications Full Page 6.8” wide x 9.2” tall Half Page 3.3” wide x 9.2” tall or 6.8 x 4.5 Quarter Page 3.3” wide x 4.5” tall

to place an ad in brooklyn bread, contact: (917) 740-1072

advertise@BrooklynBreadPress.com


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Brooklyn Bread June 2011 Vol. 2 No. 5  

Brooklyn Bread is a monthly magazine that celebrates the borough’s thriving food community and diverse food culture.

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