Issuu on Google+


Contents Message from the Principal.................................. 3 Humanities Department..................................... 26 Introduction.......................................................... 5 Art Department.................................................... 9 GCSE General Art (OCR)....................................... 9

GCSE Geography (OCR)...................................... 26 GCSE History (OCR)............................................ 27 GCSE Religious Studies – Philosophy and Ethics (OCR)................................................................. 28

GCSE Photography (OCR)................................... 11 Mathematics Department.................................. 30 OCR Level 2 National Award in Art and Design. 12 GCSE Mathematics (AQA Modular)................... 30 Business Department......................................... 13

GCSE Linked Pair (Mathematics Pilot)............... 31

GCSE Business Studies (OCR)............................. 13 Modern Foreign Languages Department........... 33 Design & Technology Department..................... 15

GCSE in Spanish, French or German (AQA)....... 33

GCSE Design & Technology: Product Design Performing Arts Department.............................. 35 (AQA)................................................................. 15 GCSE Dance (AQA)............................................. 35 GCSE Design & Technology: Textiles Technology (AQA)................................................................. 16 GCSE Drama (Edexcel)....................................... 37 GCSE Hospitality & Catering (WJEC).................. 17 GCSE Music (Edexcel)........................................ 38 GCSE Catering (WJEC)........................................ 18 PH&F Department.............................................. 40 BTEC Level 2 Diploma in Construction (Edexcel).18 GCSE PE (OCR)................................................... 40 IMI Level 2 Award in Vehicle Fitting Operations (IMI)................................................................... 19 Science Department........................................... 42 English Department............................................ 21 GCSE English Language (OCR)............................ 21 GCSE English Literature (OCR)........................... 22 GCSE English (OCR)............................................ 23 GCSE Media Studies (OCR)................................ 24

Science (OCR Gateway Suite)............................ 42 GCSE Additional Science (OCR Gateway Suite).. 43 Separate sciences (OCR Gateway suite)............ 44 Triple Science Fast track entry (OCR)................. 45 OCR Level 2 National Award in Science............. 46 FAQs.................................................................... 48


2 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 3

“ Students make outstanding progress because of consistently high-quality teaching, teachers’ exemplary use of assessment, rigorous tracking, sharply focused interventions, and excellent support and guidance. “ – Ofsted 2011

Message from the Principal Dear students As you approach your final two years of compulsory education, you will be able to make some choices about which courses you wish to pursue to GCSE. This presents you with a genuine opportunity to compile a personalised curriculum appropriate to you. In creating the range of optional subjects, we have attempted to consider every interest and enthusiasm. Students of different aptitudes and abilities should be able to create a selection of courses that fulfil their ambitions and interests. We have ensured that the optional element of the curriculum along with the compulsory core subjects, such as English, mathematics and science, will enable you to follow any future career pathways. You should have already secured the equivalent of four GCSE grades in ICT before embarking on your Year 10 studies. This is an excellent achievement and one that should provide you with much confidence as you start your new courses. You will be aware that if you chose a route which combines English, mathematics, science, a humanities option and a modern foreign language, then you will be eligible to secure the English Baccalaureate certificate. This will be an important qualification for students thinking of going to University in the future. The optional element of your curriculum will provide you with a wide range of subjects. Genuine interest and enthusiasm in a subject is always a sound basis from which to start the selection process. The choices are for you and your parents to make. We will always be happy to provide you with advice and guidance; but we are insistent that the choice is yours. I do hope you find the information in the booklet helpful. If you need to seek clarification from me, staff in subject departments or from any of my senior colleagues, please do not hesitate in approaching any of us. Mr Primmett, the careers advisor, is also available to help you. I am intensely proud of your achievements in your first three years at Brooke Weston. I am very confident that you will go on to achieve high levels of success in this very important phase of your studies and we will be here to support you in every way that we can. Good luck

Trish Stringer


4 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 5

Introduction This Key Stage 4 course booklet sets out the subjects available to students. It introduces a range of additional academic and vocational choices for you to select in readiness for the final phase of your compulsory secondary education. The subjects that Brooke Weston students are required to study up to 16 years of age ensure that the doors of opportunity for most careers and vocations will remain open to you. Nevertheless, some choices must be made. How much science must I study? How many subjects can I realistically pursue to examination level? What subjects must I definitely prioritise for my career ambitions? Should I select some courses which are more for pleasure than academic purposes? All of these questions will need answering and much counselling, advice-seeking and consultation will be necessary before you can make the most relevant decision for you. The opportunities we offer our students during Key Stage 4 will include: „„ General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) in a range of subjects „„ Vocational qualifications „„ A construction option „„ A motor vehicle option „„ Industrial and commercial work experience (at the start of Year 11) „„ A clear progression of courses into the Sixth Form and then on to Higher Education through academic or vocational routes „„ Additional recreational activities such as residential experiences, competitive and individual sports, music tuition and the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Brooke Weston’s curriculum aims to provide opportunities beyond the minimum National Curriculum requirements with the core of English, mathematics and science well provided for in time and resources at Key Stage 4. Everyone is already competent in information and communication technology and should have already gained a formal qualification in this subject at the end of Year 9.

Time allocation In apportioning time to the curriculum, Brooke Weston is conscious of the fact that its day and year are significantly longer than other schools. Consequently, students are able to spend more time on particular subjects or to take more subjects. Both possibilities are available. An average school curriculum is based on 24 and 25 hours per week. This does not, of course, include tutor time and assemblies. The Brooke Weston curriculum is 31.25 hours per week and for seven or eight days more per year than local schools (this depends on Bank Holiday dates). The net effect of this is that our students study more than 325 extra hours each year. Much of this extra time is absorbed in improving the quality of what is learned, but some is devoted to the quantity. The extra time in Years 7, 8 and 9 was allocated to broadening Key Stage 3 experiences in some subjects, with enhancement and bridging activities to GCSE level study in other subjects, such as business studies. The investment of time into the core subjects identifies our priorities; it is in the subjects of English, mathematics and science that we encourage GCSE entry for everyone. In addition to this, all students should have already secured an OCR Level 2 National Certificate qualification in ICT, equivalent to 4 GCSEs, during Key Stage 3. We wish to emphasise that it is not our intention to compel every student to pursue as many GCSEs as possible, particularly if this influences the quality of your work.


6 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Structure Core Subjects (15 lessons per week) English (4 lessons per week) GCSE English Language with GCSE English Literature or GCSE English Students will pursue one of these two routes, leading to one or two GCSEs for those studying both language and literature.

Mathematics (4 lessons per week) GCSE mathematics or GCSE Linked Pair (Mathematics Pilot) All students will pursue a course leading to one or two GCSEs in mathematics.

Science (4 lessons per week) GCSE Science (1 GCSE) with GCSE Additional Science (1 GCSE); Separate Sciences (3 GCSEs); OCR Level 2 National Award in Science (2 GCSEs) All students will study one of these courses. Fast track students must choose fast track science as one of their options as they will require an additional two lessons per week.

Personal Health and Fitness (2 lessons per week) All students are expected to follow an individualised programme of physical education. This will be negotiated between the students and their teacher.

Citizenship (1 lesson per week) The Citizenship programme is delivered by Brooke Weston staff but is, in some instances, supported by external specialists. The programme integrates the delivery of citizenship; sex and relationship education; drugs education; careers education and guidance; personal health and social education. The curriculum in Year 10 is very varied and offers students opportunities, through a wide range of topics, to express opinions as well as to reflect on their own life and goals. Through the investigation of their role as a global citizen, students will develop their empathy to others and their understanding of complex international situations. Students will widen their understanding of major worldwide institutions such as the European Union and the UN. Students will also expand their enterprise skills and their active citizenship role in organising a Fair Trade Christmas Market. Year 10 students will also investigate their own learning styles and prepare for their work experience. In Year 11, students concentrate on reflection and dealing with the pressure of exams. Indeed, they will explore a variety of techniques to help them manage their own time and their deadlines. Students will be taught how to plan their revision time and how to perform well during their exams. They will be given opportunities to self-reflect on their work experience in order to discuss future options such as progression to the Sixth Form and apprenticeships. Students will also explore how media influences the society we are living in through the study of world affairs and conflict resolution.

Either Optional Subjects (10 lessons) There is a wide and varied choice of optional subjects available to students covering the arts, languages, humanities-based subjects, business-related subjects, sports studies and music. These courses are all


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 7

offered at GCSE or equivalent level, with some being taught in four lessons per week and others in two lessons per week.

Or Construction Option (10 lessons) The BTEC Level 2 Diploma in Construction offers students an insight into the many elements of the construction industry. It is designed to provide specialist work-related knowledge, understanding and skills to prepare students for future employment and/or further education. Students will be taught off-site one day a week. In addition to this, students will have one taught lesson at Brooke Weston to cover other aspects of this qualification and will also be able to select one other option.

Or Motor Vehicle Option (10 lessons) This option offers students a mix of theoretical and practical learning whilst working on performance racing cars based at Rockingham Motor Speedway. This is designed to develop a range of intellectual skills, coupled with hands on practical skills and working to critical deadlines in the real situation of maintaining a car that will compete throughout the racing season. With these qualifications, students may progress to a college course, an Apprenticeship or employment. The Principal Learning of the award will be delivered over one day a week. In addition to this, students choose one further option. One lesson each week will be devoted to the completion of a project and individual mentoring.

English Baccalaureate The Government believes that schools should offer students a broad range of academic subjects to age 16, and the English Baccalaureate (EBacc) is designed to ensure this happens. The EBacc is not a new qualification in itself. It will recognise students’ achievements across a core of selected academic subjects. The English Baccalaureate will cover achievement in English, mathematics, sciences, a language and a humanities subject. To achieve the EBacc, students will need to ensure they opt to study GCSE English and GCSE mathematics (both core options), either triple science or GCSE Science with GCSE Additional Science, a modern foreign language and either history or geography.

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award At Brooke Weston we offer the Duke of Edinburgh Award to anyone over the age of 14. It is a programme that is enjoyable, challenging at times and rewarding to all who take part. The Award is tailor-made to reflect a student’s abilities, interests and commitment plus local provision. Each level of the award (Bronze, Silver or Gold) has 4 sections to it (5 at gold). „„ Volunteering - unpaid work that gives something back to a less fortunate individual or a whole community „„ Skills - development of a personal interest or social and practical skills „„ Physical recreation - an activity that improves the level of physical fitness of the individual „„ Expedition - a camping adventure over 1, 2 or 3 nights „„ Residential project (Gold level only) - a voluntary service in a residential setting to broaden experience through involvement with others The award, once gained at any level, shows that a person has interests outside formal education. Students develop their self-belief and confidence; they gain independence and a sense of responsibility; and they become aware of their abilities and potential.


8 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

All these qualities produce a more rounded individual which is attractive to over-subscribed universities and then later in life to future employers

Trips and visits In addition to their academic studies, Brooke Weston offers students a range of curriculum trips as well as our well-developed residential programme.

Art students Students have the opportunity to spend a day at a London art gallery to experience original works of art first-hand. This visit takes place during Term 5 of Year 10 and it is recommended that all art students take part in order to extend their creative horizons. The trip takes place within the normal day and there is a small charge for transport.

Geography students GCSE Geography students are required to complete some primary data research as part of their controlled assessment. This takes the form of a day trip to a place of geographical interest towards the end of Year 10 or the beginning of Year 11. There is a small charge for transport.

History students GCSE History students who are doing the “History Around Us” option for their controlled assessment will visit Stoke Bruerne towards the end of Year 10 in order to gather evidence for their assignment, assessing their ability to interpret and analyse historical evidence. The trip takes place within the normal day and there is a small charge for transport and museum entrance.

Modern Languages students The Modern Languages Department regularly organises a range of trips to mainland Europe. In previous years, these have included cultural visits to Barcelona for Year 11 and 12 students of Spanish, a trip to the Christmas Markets in Aachen and Cologne for students of German in Years 10 and 11 and a Work Experience trip to Brittany for Year 12 students of French. There has also been an opportunity to participate in an exchange programme with our partner school in Hannover, Germany. Last year students in Year 12 took part in a one week Language Summer School in Berlin, which was repeated in the March of 2011. In 2012 there will be a one week trip to Cuba for any students who are studying Spanish.

Residentials Students in Year 10 will have the opportunity to sign up once again for a residential experience which will take place in the July of 2012. It is expected that there will be a choice of cultural and active trips to Europe. In the past, we have run trips to a variety of places including Paris; Berlin; Madrid; Italy; the French Alps; the Ardѐche region of France; Costa Brava; Normandy and New York.

World Challenge Following a very successful expedition to Peru two years ago, an expedition went to Poland last year and students from Years 11 to 13 are now preparing for a further extended expedition to Botswana and Namibia in July, under the auspices of the World Challenge organisation.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 9

“ Brooke Weston Academy provides students with an outstanding education. “ – Ofsted 2011

Art Department The Art department offers three exciting courses; General Art GCSE, Photography GCSE and OCR Level 2 National Award in Art and Design. Students have the opportunity to specialise in the art subject that best reflects their ability with artistic techniques ranging from 3-dimensional ceramic constructions to the tactile world of textiles, fine painting and draughtsmanship to digitally manipulated imagery. The Art department comprises of 4 spacious classrooms, each containing a wealth of subject specific equipment. The choice of materials is endless and the support of subject specialist teachers enables students to achieve any set goal. Students will find a haven in their photography suite; the generously sized darkroom is fully kitted out and contains 8 enlargers for the development of black and white photography. The photography room also accommodates 12 computers with CS3 Photoshop packages, scanners and an interactive whiteboard. Students will be required to attend a trip to a London gallery to experience the work of artists first-hand.

Optional courses offered in Art: „„ GCSE General Art „„ GCSE Photography „„ OCR Level 2 National Award in Art and Design (co-taught with the Design & Technology department)

GCSE General Art (OCR) Entry: Students will have experienced a GCSE taster course in Year 9; this provides an accurate representation of the course requirements at GCSE level. A good indicator to success would be to achieve at least a grade D in Year 9 in their chosen specialism.


10 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. It comprises of one coursework unit, totalling 60% of the GCSE. Students will undergo an introductory skills based course to establish individual strengths. They will then complete a selection of units from which one coursework unit will be compiled. This will result in either a 3-Dimensional or 2 Dimensional outcome depending on the identified strengths of each student. Students will be given an externally set examination paper during Term 3 of Year 11, culminating in a 10hour final examination during Term 4.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Skills and Techniques Unit 2: Festivals 2D Unit 3: Festivals 3D Each unit of work will begin with students selecting relevant subject matter. They will be then given a number of tasks to explore their chosen area of interest; involving many different artistic techniques. Students will need to demonstrate the ability to accurately record observations of their chosen subjects. They will study a selection of artists and crafts people to aid progression through the unit. Students will then design a final piece, reflecting their observational studies combined with the artistic styles they have researched. Students will also produce a final piece within a 10-hour controlled time period.

Assessment: Students must demonstrate ability in the following Assessment Objectives in each of the 3 units of coursework: „„ Studying artists and crafts people „„ Development of ideas through the use of various materials and techniques „„ Recording observations from first-hand information and showing technical ability „„ Completing a final piece in relation to all the supporting studies. „„ The externally set examination provides 40% of the GCSE marks.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of Fine Art at A Level, Photography at A Level, Art 3D at A Level or the OCR Level 3 National Certificate in Art and Design.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 11

GCSE Photography (OCR) Entry: Students will have experienced a GCSE taster course in Year 9; this provides an accurate representation of the course requirements at GCSE level. A good indicator to success would be to achieve at least a grade D in Year 9.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. It comprises of three coursework units, totalling 60% of the GCSE. Students will have two terms to complete each unit of work, resulting in a large-scale final piece. Students will be given an externally set examination paper during Term 3 of Year 11, culminating in a 10-hour final examination.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Portraiture Unit 2: Urban Landscape Unit 3: Trial Exam Each unit of work will begin with students selecting relevant subject matter. They will be then given a number of tasks to explore their chosen subject matter; involving digital photography, image manipulation with CS3 Photoshop and dark room photography. Students will need to demonstrate the ability to accurately record observations of their chosen subjects. They will study a selection of artists and crafts people to aid the progression through the unit. Students will then design a final piece, reflecting their observation studies combined with the artistic styles they have researched. Students will also produce a professional photographic final piece within a 10-hour controlled time period.

Assessment: Students must demonstrate ability in the following Assessment Objectives in each of the 3 units of coursework: „„ Studying artists and crafts people „„ Development of ideas through the use of various photographic techniques „„ Recording observations from first-hand information and showing technical ability „„ Completing a final piece in relation to all the supporting studies. The externally set examination provides 40% of the GCSE marks.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of Photography at A Level.


12 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

OCR Level 2 National Award in Art and Design Entry: Students will have experienced a taster course in Year 9; this provides an accurate representation of the course requirements at Key Stage 4. A good indicator to success would be to achieve at least a Pass grade in Year 9.

Overview: This is an optional course equivalent to two GCSEs, taught over four lessons per week with two lessons taught by the art department and two by the DT department. It comprises three coursework units, totalling 100% of the qualification; there are no external examinations for this qualification. This qualification aims to develop a knowledge and understanding of the art and design sector and how to work autonomously and effectively in an art and design context. Students will investigate areas of industry relevant to their career ambitions.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Planning and researching design briefs Unit 2: Exploring media, materials and techniques Unit 3: Realising art and design ideas Students will select a design brief from a preferred area of industry (such as architecture, fashion design, product design, fine art, interior design and automotive design). They must thoroughly investigate, research and interpret the design brief through the completion of three portfolios. Students will spend two lessons a week in the DT department and two lessons a week in the art department. It is vital that students explore a full range of 2D and 3D techniques and so they will be taught by subject specialist teachers in both departments.

Assessment: Students can achieve an OCR Level 2 National Award in Art and Design at grades Pass, Merit and Distinction; this is equivalent to two GCSE grades A*-C. Students will submit Units 1 and 2 in term 5 of Year 10; the final assessment of Unit 3 will take place during term 4 of Year 11. Students will not gain any credit if they have not completed all three units of work.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of OCR Level 3 National Certificate in Art and Design.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 13

“ Classrooms are stimulating places to learn; lessons have a buzz of activity that reflect students’ excellent attitudes and teachers’ high level of commitment. “ – Ofsted 2011

Business Department The Business Studies department has subject specialists with experience of both teaching and working in industry. In addition to their normal lessons, students will have the opportunity to gain first-hand experience of the topics they are studying. Previously, a HR manager from RS Components visited Year 10 students of Business Studies to lead a recruitment activity. The department makes use of a range of technology, including the use of interactive whiteboards and extensive use of computers around the building.

Optional courses offered in Business: „„ GCSE Business

GCSE Business Studies (OCR) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in business studies.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. The course is assessed by a combination of examination (75%) and externally assessed controlled assessment (25%). Students will develop a knowledge and understanding of various aspects of business, including marketing; human resources; production; and ecommerce.

Unit descriptors: Human Resources Students will learn about the activities of this important department, particularly in relation to recruiting and training staff. As well as thinking about the most suitable ways to recruit new members of staff, students will design their own CV and apply for a job of their choice.


14 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Production Students will take part in a competition, working in teams to produce birthday cards. Each team will use a different method of production and once complete, students will reflect on the advantages and disadvantages of the methods that they have used.

Marketing Students will learn about different aspects of marketing, including market research; market segmentation and the marketing mix. In addition to enabling them to develop knowledge and understanding needed for their final exam, the knowledge developed in this unit will be an important component of the externally assessed controlled assessment.

Finance Students will find about different sources of finance (from bank loans to selling shares) and how businesses manage their finances (from budgeting to cash-flow forecasting). They will also learn how to put together a basic profit and loss account and a balance sheet.

The External Business Environment Students will learn how businesses are affected by the environment around them. This unit will explain to students how businesses can be affected by changes in interest rates, exchange rates and taxation.

Marketing and Communication Students will be encouraged to think about how businesses can benefit from the use of technology to promote their products and services. They will find out about the importance of effective communication, particularly in relation to the ways in which businesses communicate with their customers.

Assessment: Students will take two externally set examinations worth 50% and 25% respectively. The externally assessed controlled assessment makes up the other 25% of the marks and is based on marketing and enterprise.

Progression to Sixth Form: A GCSE in Business Studies enables students to pursue a wide range of Sixth Form subjects. A Level Business Studies allows students to build on their knowledge from GCSE, giving them a deeper understanding of all areas of business. For those students preferring a portfolio-based course, OCR Level 3 National Certificate in Travel and Tourism will build on their knowledge and enable them to relate it to the travel and tourism industry.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 15

“ In lessons, students are active participants and their positive attitudes contribute to their outstanding progress and achievement. “ – Ofsted 2011

Design & Technology Department The Design & Technology department has two well-equipped workshops; a specialist electronics room; excellent ICT facilities that include CAD/CAM; and a dedicated textiles suite. The addition of a fullyequipped food technology area gives our GCSE students access to a wide variety of manufacturing and catering processes.

Optional courses offered in Design & Technology: „„ GCSE Design & Technology: Product Design „„ GCSE Design & Technology: Textiles Technology „„ GCSE Hospitality & Catering „„ GCSE Catering „„ OCR Level 2 National Award in Art and Design (co-taught with the Art department) „„ BTEC Level 2 Diploma in Construction „„ IMI Level 2 Award in Vehicle Fitting Operations

GCSE Design & Technology: Product Design (AQA) Entry: This course builds on the Key Stage 3 programme of study for Design and Technology. It would be beneficial for students to have studied the product design module in Year 9 before commencing this course.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. Product design is suited to students who enjoy the more creative aspects of Design & Technology and who enjoy working with a wide range of materials. Students will learn about a range of materials, manufacturing processes, techniques and technologies and be able to use them, as appropriate, in the design and make process.


16 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Unit descriptors: Controlled Assessment The controlled assessment consists of four main units of work that focus on: research; development of design; making; testing and evaluation. The majority of marks are achieved through the developmental and design stages.

Examination The externally set examination will test the knowledge, skills and understanding that students have acquired throughout the course. This includes analysing and evaluating products and processes; engaging in focused tasks to develop and demonstrate techniques; engaging in strategies for developing ideas; planning and producing products; considering how past and present design and technology affects society; and recognising the moral, cultural and environmental issues linked to design and technology.

Assessment: The course consists of one piece of internally assessed controlled assessment that is worth 60% and an externally set examination that is worth 40%.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of Product Design at A Level or OCR Level 3 National Certificate in Art and Design.

GCSE Design & Technology: Textiles Technology (AQA) Entry: This course builds on the Key Stage 3 programme of study for Design and Technology. It would be beneficial for students to have studied the textiles technology module in Year 9 before commencing this course.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. Textiles Technology is suited to students who have a sound understanding and skill base when working with textiles. The course consists of a piece of coursework that is worth 60% and one final examination that is worth 40%.

Unit descriptors: Controlled Assessment Students will be required to produce a textiles product that can be marketed. The underlying influence on the project is that it must be suitable for commercial production and realised in school with the facilities that are available. Students will complete a prototype of this product. Suitable products they could design include some clothing, bag design, hats, and interior design products such as cushions and wall hangings. The evidence required to be submitted for assessment must include a 3-dimensional product with a concise portfolio.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 17

Examination The examination will test students’ specialist knowledge, skills and understanding of textiles technology through questions on the subject content which includes: materials; processes; applications; sustainability and industrial applications.

Assessment: The course consists of a piece of internally assessed controlled assessment that is worth 60% and an externally set examination that are worth 40% in total.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of Product Design at A Level or OCR Level 3 National Certificate in Art & Design.

GCSE Hospitality & Catering (WJEC) Entry: This course builds on the Key Stage 3 programme of study for Design and Technology. It would be beneficial for students to have studied the Licence to Cook module in Year 9 before commencing this course.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over four lessons and worth two GCSEs. GCSE Hospitality & Catering offers a unique opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and extend their skills within hospitality and catering in a vocational context. It is a suitable qualification for those who want a broad background in this area and for those who wish to progress to further education. It will offer valuable preparation for those entering the world of work. The specification encourages the investigation and study of hospitality and catering in a variety of contexts and uses a range of assessment techniques to enable the candidate to respond through practical and investigative work.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Catering skills related to food preparation and service Unit 2: Catering, food and the customer Unit 3: Hospitality skills related to events and functions Unit 4: Hospitality and the customer

Assessment: This course is 60% coursework and 40% exam which is internally assessed and externally moderated.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course could lead to further study in a business-related/hospitality course in Key stage 5.


18 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

GCSE Catering (WJEC) Entry: This course builds on the Key Stage 3 programme of study for Design and Technology. It would be beneficial for students to have studied the Licence to Cook module in Year 9 before commencing this course.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. GCSE Catering offers a unique opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and extend their skills within catering in a vocational context. It is a suitable qualification for those who want a broad background in this area and for those who wish to progress to further education. It will offer valuable preparation for those entering the world of work.

Unit descriptors: These units concentrate on the food preparation and service aspect of the hospitality and catering industry and can be studied as a single award or as a component of the double award hospitality and catering.

Unit 1: Catering skills related to food preparation and service Unit 2: Catering, food and the customer

Assessment: This course is 60% coursework and 40% exam which is internally assessed and externally moderated.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course could lead to further study in food and catering.

BTEC Level 2 Diploma in Construction (Edexcel) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in the construction industry, who are keen to develop their practical skills and improve their knowledge of various elements of construction.

Overview: This is an optional course worth a maximum of four GCSEs, taught over a full day off-site with support from Brooke Weston staff. There are three compulsory core units and three selected units following a trowel, brickwork and blockwork pathway or a building services engineering pathway. Each of these units are internally marked and externally moderated.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 19

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: An Introduction to the Construction Industry Introduces students to the structure of the construction industry, it’s social and economic significance and the wide range of work undertaken by the industry.

Unit 2: Exploring Health, Safety and Welfare in Construction Provides students with an insight into the importance of health, safety and welfare within construction.

Unit 3: Sustainability in the Construction Industry Develops learners’ understanding of sustainability, explores how sustainability is integrated into construction projects and investigates how sustainability issues can be addressed more effectively in the future. A range of further optional units are available. These are chosen in conjunction with the course tutor.

Assessment: A variety of internally assessed and externally moderated assignments including a combination of case studies, assignments, work-based assessments, projects, performance observations and time-constrained assessments are used in this qualification.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to further study in the Sixth Form, an apprenticeship or employment.

IMI Level 2 Award in Vehicle Fitting Operations (IMI) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in the motor vehicle /motor racing industry. Once students have expressed an interest in this course they will be interviewed to confirm suitability.

Overview: This is an optional course worth a maximum of five GCSEs at grade B, taught over a full day off-site with support from Brooke Weston staff. This qualification has been designed primarily as a pre-apprenticeship for candidates who are 14-16 years old or above; wish to develop occupational knowledge of the motor industry and want to progress into an ASL apprenticeship.

Unit descriptors: The course is split into 7 modules. Students must be successful in 3 mandatory units and 4 optional units to achieve the Level 2 Certificate. Mandatory Units „„ Health and Safety and Good Housekeeping „„ Job Roles in the Automotive Environment


20 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

„

Materials, Fabrication and Tools

„

Optional Units

„

Routine Light Vehicle Maintenance

„

Engine Mechanical, Lubrication and Cooling

„

Fuel, Ignition, Air and Exhaust

„

Vehicle Electronics

„

Vehicle Chassis

„

Vehicle Transmission

Assessment: Each module has an end of phase test and the optional units have online tests. There are also 11 externally assessed workshop tasks.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to further study in the Sixth Form, an apprenticeship or employment.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 21

“ Assessment, particularly in informing students on how well they are doing and what they need to do to further improve, is used by teachers to set suitably ambitious targets that are well matched to students’ different needs. “ – Ofsted 2011

English Department The English department offers four GCSEs: English Language, English Literature, English and Media Studies. The department has a suite of rooms designed to meet the creative challenges demanded by these academic, yet creative, GCSEs. We have a range of classrooms, each with an interactive whiteboard, Mac-equipped media suite, a dedicated computer study area and use of the Weston Theatre. The facilities boasted by the English department, plus the dedication of teachers who are passionate about their subjects and experts in their field, ensure that all students receive the highest quality teaching and learning.

Courses offered in English: „„ GCSE English Language „„ GCSE English Literature „„ GCSE English

Optional courses offered in English: „„ GCSE Media Studies

GCSE English Language (OCR) Entry: The majority of students will take GCSE English Language.

Overview: This is a core course, taught over four lessons with GCSE English Literature. It develops students’ abilities to communicate effectively in speech and writing and to listen with understanding. It also enables them to be enthusiastic, responsive and knowledgeable readers.


22 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Unit descriptors: Controlled Assessment The assessment of Unit 1: Extended Literary Texts and Imaginative Writing will be based on the production of two controlled assessment pieces. The first assignment will show appreciation of a prose text. The second assignment will require students to produce two linked, continuous imaginative writing responses. In addition, for Unit 2 students will study Spoken Language and complete three speaking and listening assessments.

Examination There will be one externally set written paper for Unit 3: Information and Ideas. The examination requires students to show understanding of how meaning is constructed in media and non-fiction texts and produce a continuous writing response, adapting style and language to a range of purposes and audiences. This final examination is worth 40%.

Assessment: Controlled Assessment (60% of the GCSE) Students must submit three assignments: a reading response to a prose text; two linked imaginative writing responses; and a spoken language study. In total they contribute 40% of the final GCSE. Students must also complete three speaking and listening assessments – a drama focused activity, a group activity and an individual extended contribution, worth 20%.

Examination (40% of the GCSE) There is one 2 hour examination for GCSE English Language.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level English Literature or A Level English Language. It will also enable students to access other courses in the Sixth Form such as A Level Media Studies, A Level Sociology and A Level Psychology.

GCSE English Literature (OCR) Entry: The majority of students take GCSE English Literature.

Overview: This is a core course, taught over four lessons, with GCSE English Language. It enables students to explore the world of literature and to be enthusiastic, responsive and knowledgeable readers. Students are given the opportunity to read, understand and respond to a wide range of literary texts, to appreciate the ways in which authors achieve their effects and to develop the skills necessary for literary study. Students are also encouraged to be aware of social, historical and cultural contexts and influences in the study of


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 23

literature and to construct and convey meaning in speech and writing, matching style to audience and purpose.

Unit descriptors: Controlled Assessment The assessment of Unit 1: Literary Heritage Linked Texts will be based on the production of two controlled assessment pieces. The first assignment will show appreciation of a Shakespeare play linked to a film version. The second assignment will answer one comparative question linking poems studied on the course.

Examination There will be three externally set written papers. The examination for Unit 2 requires study of a modern drama text and is worth 25%. The Unit 3 examination requires students to respond to a prose text from a different culture, worth 25%. The terminal examination for Unit 4 requires students to respond to a literary heritage prose text and respond to an anthology of contemporary poetry studied; this final examination is worth 25%.

Assessment: Controlled Assessment (25% of the GCSE) Students must submit two essays in response to a Shakespeare play and Literary Heritage Poetry.

Examination (75% of the GCSE) There are two 1 hour examinations and one 1 and a half hour examination for GCSE English Literature.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level English Literature or A Level English Language. It will also enable students to access other courses in the Sixth Form such as A Level Media Studies, A Level Sociology and A Level Psychology.

GCSE English (OCR) Entry: Some students will take GCSE English.

Overview: This is a core course, taught over four lessons. It develops students’ abilities to communicate effectively in speech and writing and to listen with understanding. It also enables them to be enthusiastic, responsive and knowledgeable readers.


24 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Unit descriptors: Controlled Assessment The assessment of Unit 1: Reading Literary Texts will be based on the production of three controlled assessment pieces and requires students to study drama, prose and poetry. For Unit 2 students will produce two linked, continuous imaginative writing responses. Unit 3 requires students to complete three speaking and listening assessments.

Examination There will be one externally set written paper for Unit 4: Information and Ideas. The examination requires students to show understanding of how meaning is constructed in media and non-fiction texts and produce a continuous writing response, adapting style and language to a range of purposes and audiences. This final examination is worth 40%.

Assessment: Controlled Assessment (60% of the GCSE) Students must submit four assignments in total. The three essays for Unit 1, responses to drama, poetry and prose comprise 20% of the total GCSE. The Unit 2 Imaginative Writing task is worth 20%. Students must also complete three speaking and listening assessments – a drama focused activity, a group activity and an individual extended contribution, worth a further 20%.

Examination (40% of the GCSE) There is one 2 hour examination for GCSE English.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course may enable students to access other courses in the Sixth Form such as A Level Media Studies, A Level Sociology and A Level Psychology.

GCSE Media Studies (OCR) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in a career in the media industry or creative field of further education.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. This course allows students to sample aspects of the media industry through one of the most popular subjects that is rising in status. Students will explore a wide range of media texts and will have the opportunity to be creative by producing media texts.

Unit descriptors: Coursework Individual Portfolio 1


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 25

Media Messages and Values (approx. 1000 word essay) This unit of work looks at representations in the media. Students will analyse a variety of media texts to become familiar with the concept of representation and the effect on audiences. Teaching will include a focus on magazines and newspapers, as well as action adventure movies.

Production Students will be required to work independently on this project. They will have the choice of producing a range of media texts, showing a clear representation of a chosen group of people, for example, celebrities. Part of this portfolio will include original planning and designs as well as research into the chosen medium.

Evaluation This takes the form of a short essay to evaluate the success of your production task. „„ Production Portfolio 2 The Production Portfolio offers candidates the opportunity to demonstrate their skills in research, planning, construction and evaluation and their understanding of the following media key concepts: „„ Audience „„ Institutions „„ Media Language „„ Genre Students will be able to choose from a range of media forms to produce a media artefact. „„ Textual Analysis and Media Topic Exam „„ Students will analyse two topics for the exam: „„ Action adventure movies „„ Television sit-com Section 1 requires a detailed analysis of the text. Section 2 consider the audiences and institutions of sitcoms

Assessment: Students will take two internally marked coursework portfolios worth 60% of the course. The examined unit makes up the other 40% of the marks.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Media Studies.


26 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

“ Exemplary care, guidance and support pervade all aspects of the academy’s provision. “ – Ofsted 2011

Humanities Department The Humanities Department offers a variety of optional subjects at GCSE level. The department is based in a suite of rooms equipped with interactive whiteboards and with access to video/DVD players. Courses are well-resourced with text books and audio-visual resources, and a wide variety of teaching methods are used in lessons, including use of ICT, role play and group work.

Optional courses offered in Humanities: „„ GCSE Geography „„ GCSE History „„ GCSE Religious Studies: Philosophy and Ethics

GCSE Geography (OCR) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in finding out about the world and who wish to work on geographical subjects of their own choosing.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. Students will study a variety of geographical topics. They will study two contrasting extreme environments, the similarities and differences between Corby and other parts of the world, how our decisions impact on the globe and important issues affecting the earth such as overpopulation and trade.

Unit descriptors: In Year 10, students study two units: Extreme environments: Students look at the Arctic in terms of its climate, landscapes and how people are able to live here. They follow a journey to Svalbard on a sailing ship and are given a DVD each to use


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 27

as reference material for homework and class work. They will then study desert environments using the Sahara as an example. Similarities and Differences: Students study aspects of their own area. A speaker from North Northants Development Corporation helps give students an idea about the future of Corby or Kettering. They will then study areas in India to see how similar or different from Corby they are.

In Year 11, students study two Units. You as a global citizen: Two controlled assessment pieces are produced on an aspect of consumer decisions and a study of a local retail area. Issues in our fast changing world: students study population change, our changing planet, trade, aid and superpowers and the challenge of planning.

Assessment: Students sit two exams of 1 hour each in Year 10. In Year 11 they submit two small pieces of coursework and sit one exam of one hour duration.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Geography.

GCSE History (OCR) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in finding out about what people did in the past and why.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. Students will study three different historical topics which will be taught using a variety of methods. Through studying these topics, students will develop a knowledge and understanding of the past and of the reasons some of these events took place and how it affects the attitudes of people today. They will also develop important skills, such as the ability to analyse and communicate information.

Unit descriptors: A Study in Depth: Germany 1919 – 1945 This unit looks at Germany after the First World War, the rise of Hitler and life in Germany under the Nazis.

A Study in Development: Medicine through Time This unit looks at how beliefs and practices about health and medicine have changed through the course of history, starting from prehistoric times up to the 20th century.

And one of the following units: „„ A Modern World Study:


28 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

„„ The Arab Israeli Conflict „„ History Around Us This unit looks at the history behind the current conflict so that students gain some understanding of the reasons for what is happening in the world around them today. This topic is based on the evaluation of a historical site as evidence, and will involve a visit to the site so that students can collect the necessary evidence. Students will also be taught about the historical period relevant to the site so that they can place the site into its historical context.

Assessment: Assessment is through two externally set examinations and one piece of coursework. Paper 1 tests knowledge of both Germany and Medicine through Time. It is worth 45% of the total marks. Paper 2 uses historical sources about a specific aspect of the history of medicine to assess students’ source evaluation skills. It is worth 30% of the final grade. Coursework is worth 25% of the GCSE. It consists of one essay type question of around 2000 words based on either the Arab Israeli Conflict or History Around Us. Students will be given time to prepare their answer, which will then have to be written up in lessons within a set amount of time.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level History.

GCSE Religious Studies – Philosophy and Ethics (OCR) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in thinking about philosophical topics.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. Students will study six topics on the philosophy of religion and six topics on ethics. Students will develop important skills in analytical thinking and in producing coherent arguments.

Unit descriptors: The Study of Philosophy of Religion This includes the nature of God; the nature of belief; death and afterlife; science and religion; good and evil and revelation.

The Study of Ethics This includes human relations; medical ethics; racism; capitalism; war and peace, and media.

Assessment: There are four externally set examination papers; two in philosophy of religion and two in ethics and religion. Each paper is one hour long and carries 25% of the marks for the course. There is no coursework.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 29

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Philosophy and Ethics.


30 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

“ The staff work incredibly hard to meet the needs of every individual student regardless of their background. “ – Ofsted 2011

Mathematics Department The Mathematics Department gives students the opportunity to study mathematics at GCSE level in order to prepare them for the challenges of working life. After studying GCSE Mathematics at Brooke Weston, many students continue their mathematical studies at AS and A2 level, as well as following university and college courses. The Department is well equipped with resources to support students, including the use of software packages and PowerPoint presentations.

Courses offered in Mathematics: „„ GCSE Mathematics „„ GCSE Linked Pair (Mathematics Pilot)

GCSE Mathematics (AQA Modular) Entry: Most students take GCSE Mathematics.

Overview: This is a core course, taught over four lessons per week. This course follows the AQA (B) Modular Scheme. It provides a carefully staged route of progression through mathematics at this level; fosters an understanding of the relationship between the mathematics content and its actual use in the real world; and enables students to be functional in their use of mathematics.

Unit descriptors: The course is designed to give students a broad and balanced mathematics curriculum covering topics in: „„ Number: Percentages, fractions, ratio, indices „„ Algebra: Simplifying, solving and dealing with complex expressions and equations „„ Shape & Space: Transforming complex shapes using translations and enlargements


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 31

„„ Trigonometry and Pythagoras „„ Handling Data: Cumulative frequency diagrams and histograms „„ Using & Applying Mathematics: Applying complicated mathematical techniques in real world contexts.

Assessment: The course is assessed solely through externally set examinations. There is no coursework element. Students will take 3 modular examinations:

Year 10, Term 2 - Unit 1: Statistics and Data, (26.7% of the final grade). Year 10, Term 5 - Unit 2: Number and Algebra, (33.3% of the final grade). Year 10, Term 5 - Unit 3: Geometry and Algebra, (40% of the final grade).

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Mathematics and/or A Level Further Mathematics.

GCSE Linked Pair (Mathematics Pilot) Entry: Students targeting an A* in Mathematics.

Overview: This course is intended to stretch and expand the knowledge of the students and is more rigorous than the usual GCSE in Mathematics. It is a two-year course taught over four lessons per week, and as well as covering all of the content of the current GCSE in Mathematics, extends the knowledge taught in both pure and applied mathematics. Successful completion of the course results in the award of two GCSEs, Methods in Mathematics, and Applications of Mathematics. The courses follow the AQA pilot specifications and provide a coherent link between mathematical methods and modelling, and the application this mathematics in the ‘real world’.

Unit descriptors: Methods in Mathematics concentrates on mathematics as a discipline in its own right. The course will encourage learners to develop sound, basic techniques in number, algebra and geometry, and then to be confident in applying those techniques in solving problems in mathematical contexts. Applications of Mathematics concentrates on the skills and content that is required in our everyday lives and in gaining a mathematical understanding of the world around us. Questions on all topic areas emphasise the relevance and purpose of the subject with many set in financial, scientific and other relevant contexts.


32 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Assessment: The course is assessed solely through externally set examinations. There is no coursework element. Students will take four examinations:

Year 10, Term 5 - Methods in Mathematics, (25% of the final grade). Year 10, Term 5 - Applications of Mathematics, (25% of the final grade). Year 11, Term 5 - Methods in Mathematics, (25% of the final grade). Year 11, Term 5 - Applications of Mathematics, (25% of the final grade).

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Mathematics and/or A Level Further Mathematics.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 33

“ Students make outstanding progress as a result of mostly outstanding teaching and excellent monitoring and intervention strategies. “ – Ofsted 2011

Modern Foreign Languages Department The Modern Foreign Languages department is situated in a suite of five classrooms, all of which are equipped with data projectors and interactive whiteboards. The Department offers GCSE courses in French, German and Spanish and is fortunate in having an experienced staff including one French native speaker and one native German speaker. The Department also currently has the support of a team of Foreign Language Assistants, one for each language taught, who are able to give additional help with spoken language and conversation. Each year, the Department organises a series of trips to France, Germany and Spain. In the past year these have included a cultural visit to Barcelona for students of Spanish and an exchange visit to a school in Hannover, for students of German.

Optional courses offered in Modern Foreign Languages: „„ GCSE French „„ GCSE German „„ GCSE Spanish

GCSE in Spanish, French or German (AQA) Entry: Open to all students though to GCSE in Year 11, based on the language studied during Key Stage 3.

Overview: The course is taught over four lessons per week and seeks to develop an understanding of the chosen language in both its written and spoken form in a number of different contexts. At the same time students are encouraged to develop their knowledge of the people, culture and country where the target language is spoken and to develop positive attitudes towards the learning of the language. As students’ awareness of the structure and grammar of the language improves, their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills will also develop.


34 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Unit descriptors: During the study of this course, students will cover a number of topics grouped broadly under the following four themes:

Lifestyle This will include discussion of healthy and unhealthy lifestyles, relationships with family and friends, future plans and social issues such as equality in society.

Leisure Students will learn to discuss free time activities, shopping, fashion and trends. They will also share ideas on holiday preferences and the advantages of new technology.

Work and Education In this topic students will discuss their own school and learn about schools in the countries where the language is spoken. They will look at the workplace and the problems of looking for a job.

Home and Environment This topic deals with the students’ homes and neighbourhoods and includes a discussion of the importance of looking after the environment. They will also learn how these questions are handled in other countries.

Assessment: Assessment is by a combination of externally set, written examinations, coursework and a speaking test. All four skills are tested. The reading and listening are tested through written examinations whilst the speaking and writing skills are assessed by means of two short recorded interviews and two pieces of written coursework that are produced under controlled conditions.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course is specifically designed to prepare students for further study of their chosen language at A Level.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 35

“ Behaviour is outstanding, both in classrooms and around the academy. “ – Ofsted 2011

Performing Arts Department The Performing Arts Department consists of four specialist teachers; 2 music teachers and 2 dance/ drama teachers. There is strong and well-developed peripatetic provision within Brooke Weston and the department offers a variety of extra-curricular activities for students and has also established a regular concert programme which takes different ensembles to perform nationally, in collaboration with other groups. Performing arts is taught in the state-of-the-art purpose-built Creative Arts and Media wing. Teaching takes place in a specifically designed drama studio, dance studio with a sprung floor and music department with practice rooms and a recording studio. There is a main music room to cater for practical music and extracurricular rehearsals and a music technology suite that houses a classroom set of music-based computers with a selection of music software. The 3 practice rooms and the bigger ensemble room are all soundproofed and benefit from being connected to the studio control room. The drama and dance studios benefit from projectors. This interactive learning environment is a superb and exciting addition to Brooke Weston that aims to develop the learning experience of all performing arts students.

Optional courses offered in Performing Arts: „„ GCSE Dance „„ GCSE Drama „„ GCSE Music

GCSE Dance (AQA) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in dance. They should ideally have experience of some dance styles and have a basic grasp of dance terminology. Students will hopefully have a developed level of physical and rhythmic awareness.


36 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. This course allows students to capitalise on using symbolic movement to express themselves. The areas of study include a range of dance styles and aims to develop dance styles already experienced by the students. The course is designed to allow the study of dance through the integration of performing, choreography and reflection and appraisal.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Critical Appreciation of Dance In this unit students will develop their ability to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate features of dance using appropriate terminology. They will study dance, comparing and contrasting different choreographers, dance works, styles and cultural influences. Students will develop an understanding of the physical, aesthetic and artistic contexts of dance.

Unit 2: Set Dance In this unit students will demonstrate their physical competence and effectiveness as performers and their knowledge of safe working practice.

Unit 3: Performance In a Duo/Group Dance In this unit students will demonstrate their physical competence and effectiveness as performers and their knowledge of safe working practice within a specific role as a member of a group and team dance work.

Unit 4: Choreography In this unit students will demonstrate their increasing effectiveness as a choreographer and their ability to appreciate dance. They will explore their thoughts, ideas and meaning through movement. Students will select and use actions, dynamics, space and relationships to convey artistic intention and create and structure dances.

Assessment: Paper 1: Critical Appreciation of Dance Students sit an externally set examination paper on listening and appraising. This is worth 20% of the total marks for the course.

Paper 2: Set Dance Students will perform a choreographed routine externally set for the duration of the course. This is worth 20% of the total marks for the course.

Paper 3: Performance in a Duo/Group Dance Students sit an internal practical assessment under controlled conditions. This is worth 20% of the total marks for the course.

Paper 4: Choreography Students sit an internal practical assessment under controlled conditions. This is worth 40% of the total marks for the course.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 37

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Dance and/or BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Performing Arts.

GCSE Drama (Edexcel) Entry: Open to all students with an interest in performance related professions or creative fields of further education.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. Drama is a subject that requires students to combine their creative and imaginative skills, with practical techniques used for creating effective dramatic performances. Students will have access to a range of published plays, but will also have lots of opportunity to devise and create their own performances. Students are required to see one live theatre performance as part of the course.

Unit descriptors: Paper 1 This consists of two units. Unit A asks you to explore your responses to a range of materials chosen by your teacher. Unit B is an exploration of a play. Students are assessed on practical work and on the supporting notes kept during the workshops.

Paper 2 This is where students can take part in a play they have created as a group or have rehearsed from a script. They are assessed on their acting skills. This performance takes place in front of an audience and an examiner.

Assessment: The examination for GCSE Drama is a practical performance. This is externally assessed by a visiting examiner and is worth 40% of the marks. The 60% coursework part of the course consists of 2 different practical workshops, internally assessed by the teacher and a written portfolio of evidence to support these workshops.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Drama and/or BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Performing Arts. The skills acquired during the course such as working with others, problem solving and communication will be valuable on any A Level course.


38 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

GCSE Music (Edexcel) Entry: Open to all students who are learning a musical instrument and have a basic grasp of music terminology. Students will hopefully have experienced music technology in one format of another. It is invaluable if students can read music notation.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. This course allows students to capitalise on their different musical interests. The areas of study include a wide range of music from classical and world music to popular music. It is designed to allow the study of music through the integration of performing, composing, listening and appraising with the opportunity to use music technology in performance and as a compositional tool.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Performing Music In this unit students will submit both a solo and ensemble recorded performance. Performances may be on any instrument and in any style.

Unit 2: Composing Music In this unit students will submit two original compositions based on different areas of study from Unit 3: “Listening and Appraising”. Although students will have the freedom to compose in any style, they will have to show their understanding through the study of music of the same genre.

Unit 3: Listening and Appraising In this unit students develop their listening and appraising skills through the study of music across a variety of styles and genres grouped into four areas of study each of which contains three set works: „„ Area of study 1 - Western Classical Music 1600-1899 „„ Area of Study 2 - Music in the 20th Century „„ Area of Study 3 - Popular Music in Context „„ Area of Study 4 - World Music

Assessment: Paper 1: Performing There are two aspects to this – solo and ensemble performing. Each is worth 15% of the total marks for the course.

Paper 2: Composing Two different compositions are written, based on one of the areas of study. Each is worth 15% of the total marks for the course.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 39

Paper 3: Listening and Appraising Students sit an externally set examination paper on listening and appraising. This is worth 40% of the total marks for the course.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Music, BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Music Technology (Production).


40 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

“ Because teachers consistently have high expectations of what students should achieve, lessons proceed at a brisk pace using activities that constantly engage and challenge them. “ – Ofsted 2011

PH&F Department The PH&F department has a wide range of resources that fully meet the needs of students studying Physical Education at both core and examination level. In practical areas, students have access to a fullyequipped sports hall, dedicated fitness equipment, two Astroturf pitches, a high-quality rugby pitch, a high-quality football pitch, five tennis courts, three netball courts and access to the Weston Theatre for dance activities. Work in the classroom is supported by the latest technology, such as interactive whiteboards, to ensure the curriculum is developed to meet the learning needs of all our students.

Optional courses offered in PH&F: „„ GCSE PE

GCSE PE (OCR) Entry: Open to all students with strong sporting ability and an interest in developing their theoretical knowledge.

Overview: This is an optional course, taught over two lessons. This course encourages students to develop their sporting ability in at least two of the following activity areas: games, dance, athletics, swimming and outdoor and adventurous activities. The theoretical element looks at helping to consolidate knowledge within a wide range of Physical Education contexts.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Theoretical – An Introduction to Physical Education Section A: Key concepts in Physical Education. The concepts covered are competence, performance, creativity and healthy, active lifestyles.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 41

Section B: Key processes in Physical Education. The areas covered are developing skills and techniques, decision making, physical and mental capacity, evaluating and improving and making informed choices about active, healthy lifestyles. Section C: Opportunities, pathways and participation in Physical Education. This will cover levels of participation in sport and physical activity, reasons for participation and non participation, specific social, cultural and locational reasons affecting participation, schools influences on participation and the identification and description of pathways for involvement in physical activity.

Unit 2: Practical – Effective Performance and Analysis of Physical Activities (1) Section 1: Analysing lifestyle Task Section 2: Two performances from two different activity areas

Unit 3: Theoretical- Developing Knowledge in Physical Education Section A: Developing skills, techniques and motivation. This will cover the learning of skills through a range of methods, the importance of different types of feedback and the importance of goal setting. Section B: Developing physical and mental capacity. This will cover the development of the skeletal system and its role in physical activity, the development and maintenance of healthy joints and the ways in which different types of joint affect participation and performance in an active, healthy lifestyle, understanding the muscular system in relation to physical performance, the role and function of tendons and mental preparation. Section C: Informed decision making using the principles of training and safe exercise. This will cover the short term and long term effects of an active, healthy lifestyle, exercise and training principles, aerobic and anaerobic exercise and training, identifying potential hazards and reducing the risks and injuries. Section D: Opportunities, pathways and participation in Physical Education. This will cover levels of participation, reasons for participation and non participation, current government initiatives to promote active, healthy lifestyles and the influence of schools in young people’s involvement in physical activity.

Unit 4: Practical- Effective performance and analysis of physical activities (2) Section 1: Analysing Performance task for one activity Section 2: Two performances from any activity areas

Assessment: Students will take two externally set examinations, one in Year 10 and one in Year 11, worth 40% of the total marks for the course. The coursework unit makes up the other 60% of the marks, 30% in Year 10 and 30% in Year 11.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of a BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Sport.


42 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

“ Technology is used exceptionally well by both staff and students to enhance the learning and well being of all concerned. “ – Ofsted 2011

Science Department The Science department has fifteen subject specialists and is supported by a team of four technicians. Learning takes place in a block of ten modern, purpose-built laboratories. All laboratories have been enhanced to provide excellent facilities including built in video and Internet access and interactive whiteboards. There are two preparation rooms enabling the department to be fully stocked with the chemicals and equipment needed for Key Stage 4 courses.

Courses offered in Science (all students must choose one of the following routes): „„ GCSE Science followed by GCSE Additional Science „„ Separate sciences leading to GCSEs in Biology, Chemistry and Physics „„ OCR Level 2 National Award in Science „„ Fast track entry leading to GCSEs in the separate sciences at the end of Year 10 and AS Science in Year 11

Science (OCR Gateway Suite) Entry: This course is for students who benefit from studying at a slower pace, allowing them to fulfil their potential in science. This course is taken with GCSE Additional Science.

Overview: This is one of the Science courses, taught over four lessons a week. It is centred on exciting, innovative activities and investigations that are linked to the role of science in our everyday lives. All of the modules studied are common to the separate science GCSEs, allowing students the flexibility and choice of course that will maximise their potential.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 43

Unit descriptors: Unit 1

Unit 2

P1: Energy for the Home

P2: Living for the Future

C1: Carbon chemistry

C2: Chemical Resources

B1: Understanding ourselves

B2: Understanding Our Environment

Unit 3 Controlled Assessment

Assessment: Students will take two externally set examinations: Unit 1 is worth 35% and Unit 2 is worth 40% of the marks for the course. The controlled Assessment unit makes up the other 25% of the marks.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of OCR Level 3 National Award in Health, Social Care and Early Years

GCSE Additional Science (OCR Gateway Suite) Entry: This course is for students who feel they wish to study science in less depth than is found in the separate sciences. It gives them access to a single GCSE in Additional Science which is added to their Science GCSE.

Overview: The course deals with aspects of biology, chemistry and physics found in the world around us. It follows on from the Science course, dealing with scientific ideas in more detail and is taught over four lessons a week with GCSE Science. It will appeal to students of all abilities and is centred on exciting, innovative activities and investigations that are linked to the role of science in our everyday lives. Students undertake practical work throughout the course, some of which will be assessed as part of the Controlled Assessment.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1

Unit 2

B3: Living and Growing

B4: It’s a Green World

C3: Chemical Economics

C4: The Periodic Table

P3: Forces for Transport

P4: Radiation for Life


44 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Unit 3: Controlled Assessment

Assessment: Students will take two externally set examinations: Unit 1 is worth 35% and Unit 2 is worth 40% of the marks for the course. The controlled Assessment unit makes up the other 25% of the marks.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Biology, A Level Chemistry and/or A Level Physics as well as OCR Level 3 National Award in Health, Social Care and Early Years.

Separate sciences (OCR Gateway suite) Entry: This is the course for students who wish to study the sciences in more depth, allowing them access to 3 GCSEs in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Overview: This is one of the Science courses, taught over four lessons a week. It will appeal to students who wish to study the sciences at A level and is centred on exciting, innovative activities and investigations that are linked to the role of science in our everyday lives. The first 4 modules in each of the Biology, Chemistry and Physics qualifications are common to GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science, allowing students the flexibility and choice of course that will maximise their potential.

Unit descriptors: Biology Unit 1

Biology Unit 2

B1: Understanding ourselves

B4: It’s a green world

B2: Understanding Our Environment

B5: The Living Body

B3: Living and Growing

B6: Beyond the microscope

Chemistry Unit 1

Chemistry Unit 2

C1: Carbon chemistry

C4: The Periodic Table

C2: Chemical resources

C5: How much?

C3: Chemical economics

C6: Chemistry out there


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 45

Physics Unit 1

Physics Unit 2

P1: Energy for the Home

P4: Radiation for Life

P2: Living for the Future

P5: Space for reflection

P3: Forces for Transport

P6: Electricity for gadgets

Biology, Chemistry and Physics Unit 3: Controlled Assessment

Assessment: For each of the three sciences, students will take two externally set examinations, Unit 1 is worth 35% and Unit 2 is worth 40% of the marks for the course. The controlled Assessment unit makes up the other 25% of the marks.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Biology, A Level Chemistry and/or A Level Physics as well as OCR Level 3 National Award in Health, Social Care and Early Years.

Triple Science Fast track entry (OCR) Entry: This is the course for those students who work at an accelerated pace through the activities and are then able to achieve a very good grade in each of the separate sciences at the end of year 10.

Overview: This is one of the Science optional courses, taught over six lessons. GCSEs in the three separate sciences will be completed at the end of Year 10. In Year 11, students have the opportunity to study AS Level Science. This course contains elements of biology, chemistry and physics, as well as earth science and environmental science. It offers students a broad, balanced study of science beyond GCSE that will provide firm foundations if they then wish to go on to study the science in the Sixth Form. Students who follow this route will need to choose fast track science as one of their options.

Unit descriptors: GCSE Biology, Chemistry and Physics are outlined under the Separate Sciences section.

AS Level Unit 1 Remote sensing and the Natural Environment; sensing the environment using electromagnetic radiation; and Stable and vulnerable ecosystems


46 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

Unit 2 Science and human activity; weather, climate and climate change; chemical processes in the atmosphere; proteins and genetic engineering; and options for energy generation

Unit 3: Coursework Practical skills in Science; case study; and practical task

Assessment: GCSE Biology, Chemistry and Physics are outlined under the Separate Sciences section.

AS science Students will take two externally set examinations worth 30% and 50% respectively. The coursework unit makes up the other 20% of the marks for this AS Level.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of A Level Biology, A Level Chemistry and/or A Level Physics as well as OCR Level 3 National Award in Health, Social Care and Early Years

OCR Level 2 National Award in Science Entry: This course is for students who benefit from studying at a slower pace, allowing them to fulfil their potential in science.

Overview: This is one of the Science courses, taught over four lessons a week. There are no exams, so students are not under pressure to perform in a one-off test. Instead, assessment and learning support throughout the course give students an accurate indication of their progress, and a greater chance of success. Taking a broad approach to Science, OCR Nationals enable students to develop workplace skills without having to choose between Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Challenging yet attainable, these qualifications are designed to meet the needs and expectations of employers. Students study 3 compulsory units to gain a qualification that is equivalent to 2 GCSEs.

Unit descriptors: Unit 1: Best Practice in Science This unit is designed to give students a comprehensive introduction to scientific research. They learn how to prepare laboratory materials and equipment, and to follow standard procedures safely. They carry out sampling and testing operations, and gain an understanding of the importance of working in aseptic or clean room conditions.


Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011 – 47

Unit 2: Materials’ science Students cover the key principles of identifying and testing materials to ensure that they are fit for a purpose. Students learn how materials are maintained and manufactured and look at ways of testing their physical properties and usability.

Unit 11: The Science of the Universe and Humanity Students under 16 must take this unit to meet the statutory requirements of the Key Stage 4 Programme of Study for Science. It introduces deeper scientific questions, such as the origins of the universe and the evolution of human beings, with specific topics including the solar system and the composition of the Earth’s surface.

Assessment: All units are internally assessed, and then externally moderated by an OCR Visiting Moderator. There are no external tests or exams, and on-going assessments and moderations take place throughout the course. All individual units are graded as Pass, Merit or Distinction. The qualification is equivalent to 2 GCSEs.

Progression to Sixth Form: This course can lead to the study of OCR Level 3 National Award in Health, Social Care and Early Years


48 – Key Stage 4 Choices, 2011

FAQs How will the teaching groups be organised? You will, generally, be in groups related to your ability or options selected. When entering GCSE exams, decisions have to be made about the degree of difficulty of the exam you will take, for example whether the highest grade achievable in a course is an A* or maybe a C. Different students will need to deal with different skills, concepts and knowledge and sets are the most suitable way to cope with these challenges. Differentiation within sets will continue to operate, which means that students who work well in a set can move up and not be ‘out of phase’ with the new group. Conversely, those who do not work well will move down.

How many lessons will I be taught in each subject? Subject

Lessons

English

4 lessons

Mathematics

4 lessons

Science

4 lessons

PH&F

2 lessons

Citizenship

1 lesson

Options

10 lessons

How many can I select? On the options sheet, some of the subjects are taught with 4 lessons per week and others with 2 lessons. You will need to choose a range of options that will fill 10 lessons per week.

Are there any restrictions? There are a very small number of restrictions on the combination of subjects that you can select. You may only select one of the subjects offered by Art

Who do I consult? Clearly your parents must be involved. At Brooke Weston, your Tutor is obviously the first person to talk with. Subject Teachers and Heads of Department are willing to speak with you informally and by appointment. You can also take the opportunity to talk to teachers in lesson time. Mr Primmett, the careers advisor, will be available to discuss any issues concerning the choices and vocational implications. The final decisions are made by you and your parents.


What do I need to achieve if I take five GCSEs and want to go on to higher education? Usually students are expected to achieve five GCSEs at grade B or above to pursue AS Level in Year 12 and onto A2 (the full A Level) in Year 13. It is normal for those with three A Level passes at grade C or above to gain entrance to higher education. Those students who wish to proceed to the highly competitive courses such as medicine, law, business studies, veterinary science, etc. often need to study four A Levels and achieve at least an A grade in each.

Will all the courses listed in this booklet take place? We hope to be able to offer all the courses listed in this booklet. However, if there are insufficient numbers to allow a course to run then we will endeavour, where possible, to offer an alternative. There may also be some changes to the curriculum offered as a result of staffing and timetabling constraints.

What after school clubs are available? There are a wide range of post 16:05 clubs and activities to take part in. As well as sports clubs and teams, there are activities offered by different departments. A full list of current activities can be accessed on our website. They are also listed on the television screens each day.

Will I be able to take part in the residential programme? Students in Year 10 are able to take part in our varied residential programme which occurs each year at the beginning of July. We offer a range of active and cultural trips. Past trips have included water-based activities in Spain, mountain-based activities in the Alps, trips to Berlin, Madrid, Paris, New York, Greece, Italy, London and a French chateau.

What happens if I am unhappy with my subject choices after a short period of time? If you decide early during the first term of Year 10 that you may have made the wrong choices, you should discuss this initially with your subject teachers and tutor. In most cases, you will be able to change course without too much difficulty although, of course, you would need to catch up on work missed from the new course.


Brooke Weston Coomb Road Corby Northants NN18 8LA

Any further questions please contac t us on: 01536 396366

For more information please visit: www.brookeweston.org


Brooke Weston Key Stage 4 Prospectus 2011