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Fact Sheet


Fast Facts about MANE:  MANE: Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians  Formed in 1994  A non-profit organization that provides therapeutic horseback riding for children and adults with physical, emotional, cognitive and/or developmental disabilities.  Logs over 8,000 volunteer hours a year  14 horses are working in the program

 Fully accredited through the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association  44-acre site with new facilities opened fall of 2009

 Features a barn, offices, volunteer lounge, indoor arena and 3-acre state of the art sensory integration trail.  Hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.  www.maneweb.org

Staff: Dr. Bettie C. Borton- Executive Director Anne Alan Duncan- Program Director Audrey Adamson- Staff Instructor/Administrative Coordinator Casey Dixon Houlton- Equine Director/ Volunteer Coordinator Program Dates: Winter Session: January 5- March 13 Spring Session: April 6- June 12 Summer Camp: July 6-31 Fall Session: Sept. 8- Nov. 16 ###

Contact Information: Brooke Glassford at 334-213-0909 or glassbn@mane.org


Program Director Biography


Anne Alan Duncan Program Director, Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians

Hometown: Melbourne, Fla. Age: 25 Anne Alan Duncan’s love for horses started at the age of three when she had her first riding lesson. Thinking she would just grow out of her passion for horses, her parents still cannot believe she’s made a career out of it. Duncan attended Auburn University, where she competed on the AU Equestrian Team in 2002 in both English and Western disciplines. Before graduating, Duncan completed her credited internship with Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians (MANE.) Duncan had previously donated one of her horses to MANE to be used in the program. Duncan received her bachelor’s degree in human development and family studies with an emphasis in adolescent counseling and developmental disabilities in 2006 from Auburn. In May 2006, Duncan became a North American Riding for the Handicapped registered instructor. Duncan then became the MANE equine director. After successfully filling the equine director position for a year and a half, Duncan then became the program director for MANE in summer 2007. Duncan said, “MANE has never been a place of work to me, it has always been a way I can serve the Lord with the gifts and passions He uniquely created me with.”

Duncan riding her horse, Nocean. (Photos/Amanda Soward)

### Contact Information: Brooke Glassford Phone: (334) 213-0909 E-mail: glassbn@mane.org


60-Second Broadcast Release


Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians Producer

Derby Dash 5K, Horse Show and Volunteer Day

Total Time: 60 seconds

glassbn@mane.org

Brooke Glassford,

Phone: (334) 213-0909 E-mail:

THIS SATURDAY, MONTGOMERY AREA NONTRADITIONAL EQUESTRIANS,

LOCALLY KNOWN AS MANE, WILL HOST ITS DERBY DASH 5K, RIDER HORSE

SHOW AND VOLUNTEER DAY. COME CHECK OUT THE NEW BARN AND OTHER FACILITIES! THERE IS A $20 ENTRY FEE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE 5K RUN, ENJOY LUNCH AND TAKE HOME AN EVENT T-SHIRT. ALL PROCEEDS HELP

MANE PAY FOR THEIR NEW FACILITIES. DOOR PRIZES WILL BE GIVEN. THE RIDER HORSE SHOW WILL BEGIN AT 10:30 A.M. AFTER THE SHOW,

VOLUNTEERS WILL BE RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR TIME GIVEN TO MANE THIS

PAST YEAR. MANE PROVIDES SAFE AND EFFECTIVE THERAPUETIC HORSEBACK

RIDING FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL, COGNITIVE, OR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES. HELP MANE CONTINUE GIVING CHILDREN

AND ADULTS A PLACE OF HOPE AND HEALING. MANE IS LOCATED ON 3699

WALLAHATCHIE ROAD. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON MANE’S DERBY DASH 5K, RIDER HORSE SHOW AND VOLUNTEER DAY, VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT WWW.MANEWEB.ORG.

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LOCAL NEWS RELEASE


NEWS RELEASE December 11, 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact Information: Brooke Glassford Phone: 334-213-0909 E-mail: glassbn@mane.org

MANE Announces Winter Session Starting January 5

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians announces winter session sign-ups. This winter session will be from January 5- March 13.

MANE is a non-profit therapeutic horseback riding organization that welcomes children and adults with physical, emotional, cognitive and/or developmental disabilities. MANE is located on 3699 Wallahatchie Road in East Montgomery.

All new riders will be asked to come for an evaluation prior to the start of the session. This evaluation will allow instructors to get to know the rider and determine what each rider will need for his or her lessons.

MANE has recently opened new facilities including a barn, offices and indoor arena. Riders will also use the state-of-the-art sensory integration trail.

MANE has 14 horses that are worked in the program, and all instructors are certified by the -More-


North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Volunteers are a vital part of MANE’s success. MANE welcomes any volunteers who want to serve. No previous experience with horses is required. A volunteer training session is conducted to provide instructions to those interested in working directly with riders.

Volunteers’ duties range from cleaning stalls to helping riders during their lessons. A short application process is included for all volunteers. If you are interested in volunteering with MANE please call Casey Houlton of MANE at 334-213-0909.

To learn more about the cognitive, socio-emotional and physical benefits of therapeutic horseback riding, visit our Web site at www.maneweb.org.

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PITCH LETTER


December 11, 2009 Mr. Doug Lewis Editor, Horse Illustrated P.O. Box 8237 Lexington, Ky. 40533 Dear Mr. Lewis, Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians (MANE) in Pike Road, Ala. would like to thank you for your article, “Horses that Heal,” in your October 2009 issue. We are always pleased to see media speaking on the importance of therapeutic horseback riding. MANE has been serving the Montgomery and tri-county area since 1994. We welcome children and adults with emotional, cognitive and/or developmental disabilities. As a non-profit organization, volunteers are vital to our program’s success. MANE logs over 8,000 volunteer hours a year. Your “Horses that Heal” article explained the benefits of equestrian therapy and encouraged people to volunteer with therapeutic horseback riding organizations in their area. Articles such as this one will spread awareness and increase the number of volunteers with therapeutic horseback riding organizations. We would like you to keep MANE in mind for any further stories you might want to write on equestrian therapy. Local newspapers, radio and television stations frequently run stories on MANE, but we are always looking for opportunities to spread the word about the benefits of therapeutic horseback riding to outside areas. We want families to know that there are places, like MANE, that offer hope and healing. We have also sent this press kit for you to get to know MANE a little better. This kit includes: a press release for local use, a press release for national use, two audio news releases, a feature article, an opinion/editorial piece, photographs, a fact sheet and a short biography on our program director. We have instructors and volunteers available to meet with you. We can also give you a tour of MANE with our program director, Anne Alan Duncan. If you have any further questions or are interested in visiting MANE, please contact me by Email at glassbn@mane.org or by phone at (334) 213-0909.

Sincerely, Brooke Glassford


OPINION EDITORIAL


December 11, 2009 FOR EDITORIAL CONSIDERATION

Contact Information: Brooke Glassford Phone: (334) 213-0909 E-mail: glassbn@maneweb.org

In the United States, about eight babies are born with spina bifida or a similar birth defect of the brain and spine everyday. One in 150 children in the U.S. have autism. Down syndrome occurs in approximately one out of every 800 births. These statistics from the Spina Bifida Association, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Association for Down Syndrome show that the special needs community is prevalent in the U.S. Other disabilities include, but are not limited to, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, visual and hearing impairments, accident victims and stroke patients. Did you know that horses are providing safe and effective therapy for individuals with such physical, cognitive and/or developmental disabilities? Therapeutic horseback riding is beneficial in multiple areas including normalizing muscle tone in hips and legs, bettering balance and digestion, strengthening joints and tendons and improving respiration and circulation. Mentally or emotionally challenged riders experience improved concentration, patience, self-discipline, motivation and self-esteem. While treatment in the physical therapy room offers similar benefits, therapeutic horseback riding provides more opportunities simply due to the environment. The riders have more responsibility during lessons, which fuels their self-confidence. Hippotherapy, which is the therapy used with individuals with disabilities through the use of horses, has evolved over the past 30 years, according to the American Hippotherapy Association. Therapeutic horseback riding will continue to advance and be used throughout the U.S. The American Hippotherapy Association says, “Using the movement of the horse as the strategy of choice has resulted in improved functional outcomes for a wide variety of patients. These positive results ensure that hippotherapy will continue to be used in treatment for many years to come.� According to Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians in Montgomery, Ala., the horse’s body warmth and three-dimensional rhythmical movement offer a type of therapy you cannot get in a physical therapy center.

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The responsibility and control that an individual has over a large animal builds confidence and reinforces the fact that he or she can do it on their own, despite any disability. This atmosphere also builds riders’ interpersonal skills. Riders build relationships with instructors and volunteers, and these social skills will better equip them for the real world. Anne Alan Duncan, program director of MANE, said, “The riders build an intrinsic relationship with the horse. They also build bonds with the instructors, volunteers and other riders. We see confidence levels heightened and social skills improved because of the horses and the atmosphere. ” Volunteers are crucial to the success of these programs. Volunteers help clean the barn and facilities. They help groom and tack the horses, with the help of the riders. Some will also assist with the lessons by side walking or leading the horse while the instructor gives the lesson. If you choose to give your time to serve a therapeutic horseback riding program, you will see that you gain something from it you would never expect. The relationships you build with riders and other volunteers are something you cannot replace. Your main goal as a volunteer is to remind the rider that he or she is important, valued and loved. What better way to show that than by simply giving your time and helping where needed? As stated from the statistics above, there is a need for equine therapy centers in every area of the U.S. Look for therapeutic horseback riding programs in your area. If there are no programs in your area, take the initiative to start one. We cannot control life’s circumstances, but we can control how we handle them. Whether you have had experience with the special needs community before or not, there is a place for your service at these programs. All you have to do is be willing to give your time. Make the choice today. Be a part of this healing phenomenon.

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FEATURE STORY


Sarah: She’s Not Only Walking, but She’s Rding. MONTGOMERY, Ala.— When Tina Halbert was expecting her third child, doctors said that her daughter would not be able to walk. Her unborn daughter was diagnosed with spina bifida after ultra sounds and blood tests were completed. Knowing that miracles are possible, Halbert and her husband prepared for Sarah’s birth and looked into every measure that needed to be taken to give Sarah a chance to walk. Halbert, her husband and their two sons were living in Rome, Ga. when they learned of Sarah’s condition. “I’m thankful for the technology that was able to tell me before her birth. I was planning on having Sarah at a hospital in Rome.” Knowing that they needed a hospital specializing in infants with disabilities, the Halberts made plans to deliver Sarah at Scottish Rite Hospital in Atlanta, Ga. According to the Spina Bifida Association Web site, there are four types of spina bifida, and Sarah’s type, Myelomeningocele, occurs when “parts of the spinal cord and nerves come through the open part of the spine. It causes nerve damage and other disabilities. Seventy to ninety percent of children with this condition also have too much fluid on their brains. This happens because fluid that protects the brain and spinal cord is unable to drain like it should.” Within a few days of Sarah’s birth, doctors operated and placed a shunt to drain the excess fluid around her brain down to her stomach. Sarah has had three revisions since then to fix minor problems such as a kink in the tube and putting in a new valve. -More-


At six months old, braces were put on Sarah’s legs with hopes that it would help her walk in the future. At the age of three, Sarah, with the help of her walker, learned to walk. When Sarah was 11, her family moved to Millbrook, Ala., which is located right outside of Montgomery. Sarah had always expressed an interest in riding horses, so Halbert searched the internet and found a therapeutic horseback riding center in Birmingham. Before making the hour and a half trip to there, a parent told Halbert to take Sarah to MANE (Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians.) Halbert said, “I couldn’t believe there was a place so close, and I called MANE immediately.” Halbert took Sarah to have her evaluation done with Audrey Adamson, staff instructor and administrative coordinator for MANE. “Audrey was so uplifting. She told us that Sarah would be perfect here. She just made us feel good,” Halbert said. 2007 summer camp was Sarah’s first activity at MANE. She was hooked from there and started attending MANE regularly that fall. Halbert explained that MANE has been beneficial not only in the physical realm, but for life in general. “Sarah has been through a lot of things, including a move and my re-marriage. MANE has really helped her with that,” Halbert said. Anne Alan Duncan, program director for MANE, said, “When Sarah first came to MANE, she was shy and wouldn’t make eye contact. That’s definitely not the case anymore. I’ve seen her confidence level increase tremendously.” Duncan explained that MANE helps to boost confidence levels, and social skills are heightened because of the horses and the atmosphere. Halbert said, “The act of controlling such a large animal really does feed that confidence level in a child.” She has seen a huge difference in Sarah, who has now been with MANE for -More-

three and a half years.


MANE even replaced Sarah’s usual visits to a physical therapy center, and she now does just therapeutic horseback riding. Halbert sees all the same physical benefits including better balance and digestion. Halbert said, “I love that at MANE, the sky’s the limit. They let Sarah do what she’s capable of doing. There’s no set criteria and no limits just because of a child’s disability.” Each rider helps groom and tack the horse before and after his or her ride. This is a responsibility that ensures them that they are important. Sarah, who is now 15, hopes to one day be a MANE volunteer. “I’m thankful for MANE because of the new friends I’ve made and the opportunity to ride horses.” ### Contact Information: Brooke Glassford Phone: (334)-213-0909 E-mail: glassbn@maneweb.org

MANE Press Kit  

Press Kit for MANE

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