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UP CLOSE & PERSONAL WITH

STACY ROSE

OF HBO’S BALLERS CELEBRITY CHEF

BRYCE TAYLOR

ACTRESS LISA VIDAL

DISHES ON HIS LOVE FOR ALL THINGS FOOD

ON HER ROLES IN BEING MARY JANE & ROSEWOOD, TALKS MOTHERHOOD AND BEING FEARLESS! GET THE LOOK:

#Selfie Beauty OCTOBER 2016

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Celebrate and embr women o

Photographer: Amina Touray Photography Makeup Artist: Crystal Watana Models (from left to right): Krystal Willis, Alicia Erby, Linda Walton, Angela Meryl, and Chelsy Gantt


race the beauty of of color

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editor’s note

H

ello Bronze beauties! fall is among us and the changing of the seasons is slowly beginning to take place, especially here in NYC. I like to think that embracing change (good or bad) is a sign that I am continuously transitioning and evolving in life. How do you deal with change? Do you accept it with open arms, or do you struggle with or fight it? One way to deal with change is to be fearless! And why not? What do you have to lose? I love the word fearless because it signifies strength, power and self-confidence. As a matter of fact, our bronze and beautiful cover star, Lisa Vidal talks about being fearless in our very special feature on page 22 where she sits down and talks one on one with our resident photographer Amina

Touray. I am so excited to have Lisa grace our cover for the month of October. My admiration for her work as an actor goes back to when she used to play tough detective Magda Ramirez on the TVseries The Division. Now I’m an even bigger fan of her work on two of my all-time favorite showsBeing Mary Jane (ooh, I so love her as Kara) and Rosewood! Featured on other pages of our issue are the talented and lovely actress Stacy Ann from HBO’s Ballers, independent filmmaker Gabrielle Gorman, young celebrity chef Bryce Taylor, and the oh-so stylish and fashionable Creative Director of The New Stereotype, Marquelle TurnerGilchrist. Happy Reading!! xoxo

Shawn

Shawn Stuldivant

Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

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bronze magazine Co-Owner/Editor In Chief Shawn Stuldivant Co-Owner

Barry Stuldivant

Issue Design/Layout Melissa Biggs Writers (this issue) Alexis Alfred Kathleen David Amina Touray Photographer Contributors Amina Touray Henry Muradian


CONTENTS 22

A Day with Lisa Vidal

‘16

Features

8 Marquelle Turner-Gilchrist 14 Gabrielle Gorman 20 Chef Bryce Taylor 34 Stacy Rose

The Man Behind the “New Stereotype”

Age is not a Limitation

Up Close and Personal with...

Beauty

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Get the Look: Selfie Beauty

Special

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Happy Birthday Amina Touray


Amina

our resident photogra

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a Touray

apher

y y b an h rap radi g o ot Mu Ph nry He


The Man Behind “The New Stereotype”

Marquelle Turner-Gilchrist By Kathleen David

I think I can speak for most women when I say there is nothing more pleasing to the eye than a welldressed man. Creative Director of “The New Stereotype,” Marquelle Turner–Gilchrist not only fits that description, but he has also created a movement that unites Black men and women the best way he knows how; through photography and upscale fashion. On top of creating breathtaking photos, TNS has expanded into an online documentary series which discusses the challenges African-Americans face. TNS, which has taken social media by storm, includes an array of skin complexions and hairstyles, and is diverse in terms of careers, locations, and goals. Feeling out of touch with the series of events that were occurring in the US, it led Turner-Gilchrist to create “The New Stereotype” in 2014 after returning to the US from his graduate studies in France. Turner-Gilchrist, a Johnsonville, North Carolina native who is no stranger to racial tension, created TNS as a way of combating negative stereotypes among blacks in the media, and creating positive ones. Turner–Gilchrist, who specializes in Global Luxury Management (Can’t you tell by the sharp clothes), is a visionary who appreciates Black culture and travel. What originally began as a response to media propaganda has now sparked an international movement of solidarity. During his interview with Bronze Magazine, Turner–Gilchrist explains what TNS is, clears any misconceptions, and talks future plans for TNS.

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BM: Tell us about your role as the creative director of The New Stereotype. MTG: As Creative Director of TNS, I focus on developing the theme and the over-arching message for each "installment." TNS is an editorial project, and each photo shoot is called an installment. I help to develop the color palette, chose the locations, and create the copy once we release it to various platforms. I also help with selecting the participants for each installment, and supporting the extensions in other cities. BM: The New Stereotype originally began as a concept for men, what made you decide to open the doors for women as well? MTG: When we completed our first installment, a friend of mine, Nimi, introduced the idea to me to include women. I instantly went to work on the idea. As a black man, I intimately identify with the experience of being a black man, so it came naturally to me and was able to execute the men's installments seamlessly. The women's installments have been the collective efforts of many, specifically our most recent installment, Bedazzled Crown, which was co-led by Roxanne Paul and Bree Wijnaar. They took the charge, along with photographer Olushola Bashorun and videographer Davis Northern to bring Bedazzled Crown to life.

TNS Queens from bottom to top: Sankara Xasha Ture McCain, Kelly Augustine, Bahgi Solomon, Bree Wijnaar, Roxanne Paul, Brittany Wilson, Danielle Jackson) BRONZEMAGONLINE.COM

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BM: So far men have created their own versions of the New Stereotype in Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, London, and Atlanta. Was it one of your goals for TNS to expand to other cities? MTG: In addition to the above mentioned, we recently worked on an installment in Washington DC and Birmingham, AL. With the different extensions, I wanted to continue to highlight how wide our scope of diversity is within the black community. The photo shoots and videos we do in NYC represent a fraction of the stories and journeys' of black men and women. The extensions provide a chance for those who follow the project to see varying perspectives from all over the world. As you know, the African diaspora affects many parts of the world, and these extensions reflect that very fact.

TNS: Atlanta, The Rebellion (Georgia)

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TNS: Dallas (Texas)

TNS: Motor City, The Emergence (Detroit) BRONZEMAGONLINE.COM

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BM: What was some criticism you faced at the beginning stages or currently? MTG: In the beginning of the project, there was a lot of feedback that the project seemed a bit like a respectability politics project, which isn't true at all. This project encourages my melanated brothers and sisters to take the writing instruments of life to create their own narrative. Racism will not end through our medium and that was never a part of the idea; however, racism has created in some cases, color complexes and self-hate. TNS celebrates black life and exemplifies how proud we are to be black. If at all, that's the only tie the project could have to "ending" racism. One of my favorite quotes suggests, "It is through self-love that we heal our people." BM: What made you decide to turn TNS into a documentary series? Are there any plans to possibly bring the online series to TV? MTG: While exploring ways to evolve the project, the next natural trajectory would be through events and an elevated visual element. The documentary truly peeks into our lives and connects the viewers to each participant. It goes beyond surface level and truly discusses aspirations, sacrifice, and growth. I wanted it to be very vulnerable. My goal is to shop the documentary around and find a much bigger home for it. I want the imagery to be exposed to as many people as possible.

The best accessory is Confidence. It never goes out of style, it never goes out of season, it’s always on trend.” -Marquelle Turner-–Gilchrist

BM: Some commenters have the misconception that TNS is a movement that is aiming to send the message that wearing a suit will prevent racial profiling; Can you clarify that misconception? MTG: TNS highlights and celebrates the many diverse layers of black life in America through fashion, photography, and film. Racism is an institution or system built to oppress a very specific and targeted group of people through laws, policy, and media rhetoric. The mission of TNS was never to try and tackle racism. This platform simply shows "alternate" images that aren't often shown in the media and letting people inside (as well as outside) know that we are a dynamic bunch with many layers. BM: What future plans do you have for the movement? Tell Us a little bit about TNS: Black Love. MTG: The thought process behind moving forward is something that I think about on the daily. As mentioned, we have our first event: TNS3: Tuxedos, Toasts, and Trap, so I'm looking forward to how people will engage with the brand in that way. There is potential to do other experiential events as well and partner with brands that align with TNS' pillar of creating your own narrative. The Black Love concept is still to be determined, but could potentially still take place. BM: We take our hats off to Marquelle and everyone who has contributed to this movement of excellence. To see more from “The New Stereotype”, check out these links below: https://vimeo.com/marquelleturner https://vimeo.com/northernxposurefilms/videos https://vimeo.com/142745823 https://www.instagram.com/marquelleturner/

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e i f l e #S y t u a e B Model: Maria Jiminez

FACE EYES

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Guerlain NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer Maxi Lash Mascara

Lancome Le Crayon Kohl Eyeliner Smoky

LIPS Urban Decay Vice Lipstick Electric Pink

Yves Saint Laurent Rouge Volupte Shine Bright Strawberry

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Interview and Photos by Amina Touray At the impressive young age of 18, filmmaker Gabrielle Gorman has already received several awards and recognitions for her films. When she’s not making movies she’s shadowing directors such as Jann Turner (How to Get Away with Murder). Gabrielle is a sharp, yet soft, and intelligent young woman, and a great role model for other young artists. Her main focus is to inspire others and talk about issues that are going on in today’s society, to hopefully encourage people to take action. In our interview Gabrielle takes us through how she got started and where she sees herself in the future. Amina Touray: Gabrielle, tell us about yourself; who are you, where are you from, and where are you heading? Gabrielle Gorman: I am a filmmaker, daydreamer, dancer, and activist. I’m from Los

Angeles, born and raised. And in the future I see myself using my passion for film to inspire positive change and empathy in our world. AT: What kind of films do you make? GG: Right now I’m kind of dipping my toes in everything. I’ve mostly focused on a mixture of experimental and documentary filmmaking, but lately I’ve been trying out comedy because it can be a great way to spark dialogue about important issues which people don’t like to talk about, such as racism and stereotypes. AT: So tell us more about your social justice films and awards (and don’t be shy). GG: Through my short films I like to explore and expose human rights issues. My main focus is to encourage my audience to look at the world through diverse

and authentic lenses. I’ve explored racial prejudice, heteronormativity, human trafficking, and complacency while doing my best to promote allyship, selflove, and social consciousness. As for my awards, I was extremely blessed to be chosen as one of seven National YoungArts winners in the cinematic arts. That was one of the most rewarding and invaluable experiences of my life! YoungArts is a foundation which recognizes and nurtures accomplished young artists, providing opportunities and support. When I became a winner, they flew me to their YoungArts campus in Miami and I had the opportunity to work with the six other young filmmakers in order to create a short film. Being a YoungArts winner is definitely my proudest achievement other than being accepted to UCLA for Film and Television.

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AT: How were you discovered, or how did you get into that program? GG: My sister had applied the year before but I hadn’t because I thought I wasn’t good enough, so I allowed my fears to get in the way. When I went to the YoungArts showcase in Los Angeles where my sister read an excerpt from her novel, they showed the films that had been accepted. I thought to myself “Darn it, I could have gotten in!” So the next year I applied in the hopes that I would make it into the regional program, but then they called me and said, “We want you to come to Miami!” And I said, “Don’t you mean LA?” and they told me I was a winner and that I’d be going to Miami! AT: And how did you feel when you found out that you were a winner? Was it expected at all? GG: I did not expect to be a winner, that wasn’t even on my mind when I applied! In Miami, I got to meet the top dancers in the country as well as musicians, poets, visual artists and so forth. It just felt surreal to be in the same vicinity as them. AT: How long have you been making films now? GG: I’ve been making films for a little more than three years. I started in the summer going into 10th grade when I wrote this poem called “Blossom.” The poem, which was later published in the award winning 2016 WriteGirl

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anthology, was inspired by the ways in which I was changing and blossoming, and I was inspired to make a film about it, as it had actually been a random new year’s resolution of mine to make a short film. So that summer a good friend of mine and I went to this canyon and got footage of a bunch of flowers as well as me running around in this pink sun dress. I spent way too much time editing it because I was having so much fun! Looking back at the film... it is pretty bad! But it ignited my passion for filmmaking and I signed up for Film 1 that fall. AT: Would you say that that’s when you discovered that this is something you could pursue as a career? GG: Definitely! I had the most amazing film teacher, Michelle Opitz! She was and still is the best mentor anyone could ever ask for. She has challenged me and greatly assisted me in finding my voice as a filmmaker and a person. But now that I think about it, I had so many cameras when I was younger. Just those cheap flip cameras. I was always making little stopmotion films with my dolls and things like that. But I think that because I didn’t see many people like me in film, I didn’t believe it was something I could pursue. And that right there is one of the reasons representation is so important. AT: Who’s your inspiration in film/arts? GG: (thinks for a minute)

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...hmm my inspiration...Ok! One of my inspirations is Michelle. AT: And why is she an inspiration? GG: Because she understands my somewhat unconventional filmmaking style and while supporting it, has also pushed me out of my comfort zone at times. When I did film programs or had other film teachers, at times I felt discouraged from making the kind of films that my gut was telling me to make. I was at times told to make a specific type of narrative, a very Hollywood style. I respect that style, but I want to do the type of filmmaking that makes me happy, and when I do a film that’s just about a boy chasing a balloon or something, that’s not what makes me happy. What makes me happy is looking at things that are going on in the world and capturing that on camera. Michelle fully understood that. In high school if I wasn’t in class, I was most likely in her office listening to her invaluable advice. AT: What do you want to accomplish with your films and what do you want people to feel when watching your films? GG: I want them to feel motivated. In my films, my message is usually, “This is something that’s going on and it’s important,” and then it ends with something like, “This is how we can solve it.” AT: With everything that is going on in the world right


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now, how do you feel like that is affecting your creativity in film? (with all the issues that you read about and see) How is that influencing you? GG: The issues are overwhelming me to a point that almost gives me writer’s block at times. There are so many issues that I wish I could put my entire heart into and then I’m like, ‘Oh there’s another issue happening.’ But those are the things I’m mostly inspired by. It’s hard for me to see someone being shot at in the street, and then just go and make a film about a boy chasing a kite or something. So I can’t wait until next year when I’m in college and have a bunch of equipment to just go at it. But I guess my struggle right now is to say something that hasn’t already been said. That’s really what I’m focusing on. What can I add to the conversation? AT: Right, I got it. And you have mentioned that you have a twin sister. Is she also into film, or what does she do? GG: My sister isn’t really into film. She’s taken a couple of animation classes at our school and I’m sure she’ll write some amazing films some day, but she’s very much into politics and writing. She’s the poet laureate of the West Coast and she was the first poet laureate of L.A., and she had her first book published when she was 17! So she’s done quite a bit. AT: Wow! Do you get together with your ideas? You said that she’s a writer and she’s into politics, and you’re into film. Do you ever get together for collaborations?

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GG: We don’t do as many collabs as we should, but we did run the black student union at our school as well as initiating the first Black History Month there. We have also choreographed dances for dance concerts and our high school’s open houses. She’s honestly my best friend. AT: What advice could you give to anyone who wants to get into the film industry? GG: I feel really weird giving advice because I’m not old enough (laughs). But I would say in filmmaking, do whatever makes you happy, and the minute you’re not happy, re evaluate what you’re doing, because I think a lot of people can get very caught up in making money. And I would also say that filmmaking is such a beautiful platform in inspiring people and to shifting culture, so please use it for good. AT: I’m curious, you said that in the filmmaking industry a lot of people have their own views on how films should be made, for example the whole Hollywood typical movies and all. So how do you stay true to yourself and do what you want without getting influenced by what other people think and want? GG: The way that you just stay true to yourself is that you keep track of your emotions and make sure that what you’re doing is bringing you joy. AT: There’s a lot of pressure on young people today; how you should look, how you should act, etc. What do you do to stay confident?

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GG: I talk about this a lot in Dear America, but I was very insecure up until a couple of years ago. I went to a school that was prodimately high class White Americans. That was definitely hard on me growing up and I felt inadequate because I didn’t have the skin tones that my friends had, and I didn’t have the expensive clothes and stuff like that. And so for a long time I was ashamed of my own culture. And when I got older I started learning more about my history from the perspective of the people that went through it. And I think that’s very important. When I finally learned about my history from the perspective of the oppressed, not the oppressors, I realized all of the social constructs put in place in order to make people like me feel inadequate. Everyone knows what it feels like to be judged because of their skin color, sexuality, gender, ability, etc. We all suffer from labels but the fact is, the only labels anyone should have, is “Beautiful.” AT: Where are you in five years from now? GG: You know, I hope to have a feature film that has been accepted into the top film festivals like Sundance and Toronto. And I hope to have or be on the journey of making a lasting difference.


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Age is not a limitation By Alexis Alfred

In many ways, Bryce Taylor is your average 8th grader. He loves to read, draw animated cartoons, and make people laugh. He also enjoys eating breakfast and watching TV on Saturday mornings. Instead of watching cartoons and eating cereal, Taylor prefers to watch ‘The Food Network’ and eat a frittata. While other children chase Pokémon, he’s in the kitchen because 13-year-old Bryce Taylor is a celebrity chef. It was at the young age of 5 that Taylor knew he wanted to be a chef. “It’s just one of those things you know,” he says.

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“I was always a foodie and when I got old enough my mother said, ‘Okay, you can come in the kitchen, you’re gonna start cooking,’ and I remember saying, ‘Okay, I like this, I think I want to do this for the rest of my life.’” He adds, “It was one of those things I’ve known since I was born. I love food.”One of his favorite dishes to make is his pan seared lamb chops with a cabernet reduction sauce. He enjoys making up his own recipes in his spare time.“I like to incorporate my own ideas into recipes that are already made to make them my own.” Since he discovered his passion, Taylor has been going after his dreams at full throttle and is not afraid to challenge himself. He has had some training, but is also self-taught when it comes to the kitchen. Taylor, who has been a participant on the television show “Chopped Junior,” a show designed to showcase the cooking skills of young chefs, says the experience was, “Very, very, very nerve-racking. Not only was it nerve-racking, but it was a great experience because sometimes you don’t know what you’re getting in the basket, and also you are sitting in front of 3 judges who are decorated chefs and it’s like, I need to impress them with my plating and my cooking.You definitely have to be on your A-Game.” He says that this is an experience that he is willing to try again.“It was fun! I got to meet new people and got to show off my skills to some high-up chefs and I would think, I wanna do this again sometime.” He was a finalist, and received second place in the competition, but was recognized by many for his skills in the kitchen. Taylor is known as a celebrity chef in the Baltimore, Maryland area, which brings him a lot of attention. He was recently invited to judge the Adam Jones challenge competition by Adam Jones, a center fielder for the Baltimore Orioles who has been following Taylor’s success. He was also able to throw out the first pitch of the game, and got his own Ginger Burger featured in the restaurant Dempsey’s Brew Pub and Restaurant, named after Oriole Hall of Famer Rick Dempsey. His sliders were a huge success and the most sold item at the restaurant that day. Taylor has gotten a chance to experience the fruit of his labor at a young age, but is also very serious about

his academics. For high school he plans on attending Bard High School Early College in Baltimore. This school specializes in high academics and liberal arts, and is a place where he can feel free to be himself and grow into the young man he wants to be.“When you graduate the school, you graduate with your Associate’s Degree, which is great. I’m always looking for a new opportunity and a new way to express myself.” Taylor is very proactive in making sure that he works toward the future he wants while also exploring his other interests. He is currently part of the Baltimore School Media Team where he is a student news reporter and covers stories that are happening in the school system and in the city.When it comes to Taylor, age has never held him back. Even though this program was looking for 12th graders, Taylor’s hard work and determination earned him a spot on the media team. With his passion for teaching people how to cook, he now has his own City Schools Cooking Show, which will air once a month to teach children’s recipes, and how to shop for healthy groceries. Five years from now Taylor says he sees himself in culinary school. “I really wanna go to Johnson and Wales University in Rhode Island.” He also wants to continue to build his brand, Chef Bryce Taylor, with his company Latchkey, LLC. Under his company he wants to create his own cookbooks as well as create a line of healthy products to help children learn their way around the kitchen. He has dreams to move to New York City after finishing culinary school. “I’ve been to New York twice and just fell in love. They have so many restaurants and so much stuff you can see.” Taylor is always working to better himself and gives credit to this mother, Danielle Allen for her constant support and love that molds him into the young man he is today. Chef Bryce Taylor is a great example of how working towards one’s passion can open doors despite one’s age; and how remaining true to one’s self is the answer to all questions.

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A Day with Lisa Vidal Photographer/writer: Amina Touray, @aminatphoto Actress: Lisa Vidal, @thereallisavidal Makeup artist: Niehla O, @niehlao Wardrobe stylist: Janel Styles, @janelstyles77 PR: Mia Hansen/Portrait Pr, @teamportrait

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ctress Lisa Vidal is truly shining, whether she’s glammed up or dressed “regular.” As we meet up for our interview/photoshoot, it is clear that she has a type of confidence that can only come from within, which makes her so powerful. New York born, thick skinned and a spiritual personality! She is such a breath of fresh air! In our interview Lisa shares the story of a young Puerto Rican girl growing up among strong, impactful women, and being fearless in the industry. She compares her role of the busy career woman Kara Lynch in BET’s Being Mary Jane, to her own life which many women can relate to. You might be surprised to find out how she is privately as a mother, which she’s balancing with the glamorous Hollywood life. We talk about everything from the red carpet, to the dry cleaner stops. Read on as we give you the insights to Lisa Vidals life. Amina Touray: Lisa, we would love to know more about you. You’re originally from NY. When growing up there, did you always know that you wanted to become an actress? Lisa Vidal: I did. I always knew I loved performing. I was always the family clown, always joking and singing. I remember thinking I was either going to become an actress or a veterinarian. The acting bug bit me really early on, and singing as well. So I just followed that suit and ended up going to the High School of Performing Arts and just continued to train. AT: Oh yes, singing! I didn’t know you sang, what kind of singing did you do? LV: Well, I do a little bit of everything honestly. I sang on stage and I’ve recorded before. I used to sing with a club date band. So yeah, I sing a little bit of everything. I love R&B... I love a lot of different stuff.

LV: There’s some Spanish, but mostly English. AT: You’re playing both in Fox’s Rosewood and Being Mary Jane . How do you balance both shows considering they are in two different series in two different cities? how does that work? LV: Well for a while...what was great is that Rosewood was shooting while Being Mary Jane was on hiatus. So that worked out well, but now Being Mary Jane is starting up again so it’s going to be a little trickier to coordinate a schedule. So we’ll see what happens. AT: And you play Kara Lynch on Being Mary Jane. Can you describe the character and compare her to yourself? What are the differences? similarities? LV: Yes, I play Kara Lynch and she’s very ambitious; a very driven producer for the talk show that Gabrielle Union plays the anchor Mary Jane Paul on. Kara is all business. Kara is always dealing with high stress. She’s a juggler because she also has a family; she has two boys, she’s gone through a terrible divorce, and she’s always been the breadwinner. She always thought that that was the right thing to do. She’s sort of this kind of person who follows through with what she thinks she needs to do to be successful. And sometimes she sacrifices a little too much, especially her own self. I would say that the similarities with Kara and myself are definitely ambition; I’m a gogetter, I’m always doing something. I don’t like sacrificing my family for work, although I think every working mother has to, to a certain point. I understand Kara and I think that’s why I can play that kind of a character. I think she’s so relatable to so many women, especially working mothers. (Continued on p. 28)

AT: Would you sing both in English and Spanish?

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Long Coat: Hotel Particulier, @hotel_particulier, from Fashion Forwards Showroom @fashionforwards_la Black top with embellish design: Contessa, @contessa_la Black Pants: GM Studio, @gmstudiola Plain black boots: JF London, @jflondon_official Wardrobe provided by PRB PR Public Relations

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AT: How is it to work with Gabrielle Union? LV: Oh my God, it’s great! It’s like playing a game of basketball; I pass the ball to her and she catches it. Then she passes it to me and I catch it, and we just have great chemistry and friendship. We understand these characters. There’s a certain sensitivity I think, between Kara and Mary Jane that Gabrielle and I really understand. So we’re able to play out the characters really well. AT: As far as movies and TV, and female characters in Hollywood, what would you like to see more of? LV: I would love to see more people who look like us (refering to herself and I). I really feel like we’ve come a ways, but we still have a long way to go. I don’t think film and television represent too much of the real world; as far as how colorful the real world really is. And diversity is still an issue. I think people are afraid of diversity. I don’t understand why, because in real life we all function and we all have diversity around us. But for some reason they feel like the stories are different, but they’re not. Sometimes it’s just the experience that is different. AT: Right, so more diversity. LV: Right, that’s correct. AT: When you look back at your career, it started at 14 when you had your first TV show in NY, right? And just looking back, what do you wish you would have known then about the industry that you know now? LV: I think I wish I would have known that in this industry you have to be fearless. I think that this industry is more fearful than you are, and that’s why you have to appear more fearless, because they feel good when you are more confident about yourself and what you’re doing because it makes them feel safe. And I think that in order to do well in

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this industry, in order to survive, you have to believe in yourself. You have to be sure of your purpose and who you are; and be fearless. AT: I love your answer. Have you always had that confidence? LV: No, I don’t think I’ve always had that confidence. I think I learned to have the confidence over time. I think that I was always opinionated as far as what I wanted, and driven. But sometimes I wasn’t that confident about making certain choices. But I think with experience and then maturity and growth you just become more confident. AT: You’re a mother of three, and you’re balancing Rosewood with Being Mary Jane. What do you do, like do you have any every day mantras, or how do you balance everything? LV: I have a God centered life. And I really feel like I take it one step at a time. I try not to get too overwhelmed. I’m trying to have fun with what I’m doing. I try to prioritize. But my center is always my spiritual center with God and my relationship. I also know that whatever happens in my life and in my career it’s what’s supposed to happen, and I don’t need to fear it. I just need to be open to it. AT: I love that! And you look so fit and healthy… Lisa laughs “eating Chipotle…” I laugh but seriously, what do you do to stay so fresh, so young and so healthy?! LV: Aw you’re so sweet (laughs and jokingly explains). Well if you live the pace of my life you don’t have to run on a treadmill! I usually try to eat healthy, I really do, but I have my cheat days, as I’m having right now (points to her Chipotle plate). But I try to be healthy, I exercise three times a week. (Continued on p. 31)


Cream dress: Contessa, @contessa_la, Dress from PRB PR Public Relations Sandal with gold design: JF London, @ jflondon_official Earrings: by Kat Ong Designs, @katongers, from Now Showroom @now_showroom

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AT: What type of exercise?! LV: I run, I do weights, and I do some step exercises with weights. So it’s a lot of cardio as a kind of base, and strength training. So the cardio burns the fat and the strength training tones. And I’m thankful to have good genes. My mom, she was a skinny minny for a long time. AT: How would you describe a day in your life when you’re not shooting Rosewood or Being Mary Jane? LV: A day in my life when I’m not shooting, looks like I’m the first one up in the house, every single day. AT: You’re the early bird? LV: Well mama’s gotta get everything going.. and my kids are in school. I’m up making a cup of coffee. I’m up making breakfast for them, getting them going. And then I usually go work out and sometimes my day will be filled with house chores like laundry, food shopping, straightening up. And the dogs, I’ve got dogs, and my son just got a new puppy!! I’m a dog person, I love dogs! I’m just constantly going- dry cleaning, car stops. I’m such a mom when I’m not shooting. It’s almost like having another life. And then when I’m working I’m totally working like I’m in the actress mood. AT: It must be a fun contrast being a mom and then being an actress. LV: It’s interesting. Because if people only knew, and if they could only see what I am doing that is so not glamorous and so not red carpet, it’s hilarious! But you know we got to pull it together... come on, put on that dress on, get some makeup on. Do the hair and do the red carpet... and then go home and put everybody to bed, make dinner, you know. That’s my life! And I cook a lot…

LV: A lot of stuff. But I love cooking Puerto Rican food, pasta dishes, tacos...A lot of stuff. I just love to cook and my kids love it! AT: You’re beautiful, successful, and you’re a role model to a lot of women. What advice can you give to any young woman wanting to become successful at what they do, whether it’s being an actress, singer, entrepreneur, or anything? LV: I think it’s so important to find what you love. To find out what gets you excited. Because I think it’s important that everybody taps into their gifts, because everybody has a gift. And I really truly believe that God gives us gifts so that we can use them. And I think that’s important. And I think it’s important for young women to surround themselves with people who uplift them with positivity and encouragement. Stay out of negative situations, and expect to put the footwork in because no one is going to give you anything. But go after your dreams, be fearless. I think that is so important. And you know there are these little angels along the way that are there to help. AT: What role model(s) did you have growing up? LV: Oh my goodness. I grew up with some strong women! The women in my family were always worker’s. My aunt was a judge, my other aunt was an attorney, my mother worked in a hospital, my grandmother owned her own food truck. I come from working women! We don’t sit around and do nothing. So those were my role models, always hustling. (Continued on next page)

AT: What do you cook?

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AT: Tell us something unexpected. What do most people not know about you? LV: I would say most people don’t know what a clown I am ( laughs ). I am that girl friend that is constantly making everybody laugh, is constantly doing something goofy, constantly loosening up the mood like let’s just have a great time, let’s have fun. Because I play so many dramatic roles, I play more serious characters. People don’t really know the comedian in me. Usually people are surprised when they meet me and I’m silly and all that. AT: Considering this year has gone by really fast (I mean it’s not over yet!) but how does next year of 2017 look for you, what do you have in store? LV: I’m excited that Being Mary Jane will be airing it’s 4th season... AT: In January right? LV: Yes, and I’m sure Rosewood will be airing some episodes as well, and I have this beautiful film called Victor coming out in the theaters based on a true story. AT: What kind of film is it? LV: It’s based on a true story and it’s takes place in the late 50’s, early 60’s about this young Puerto Rican guy who comes to New York from Puerto Rico. He gets caught up in gangs and heroin, and all that kind of stuff. And it’s his journey about how he gets out of that. I play his mother in the film. It’s a really beautiful beautiful true life story. AT: When is it going to be released? LV: Well it opens first in Puerto Rico on, I believe, September 15th. Then it opens here in the States. It’s just a really impactful story, really beautiful! AT: I love movies that are based on true stories. I feel like those are the best. There is something more moving about them when

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you know that it has actually happened. LV: You’d love this one! AT: What are you currently working on? LV: Well, I’m working on producing a few things. I’m trying to be my own boss in the sense of creating for myself and creating projects for other people. I kind of want to branch into that, as well as directing. It’s sort of a different part of my career.


Flower Head Piece: PRB Showroom Ring: by Kat Ong Designs, @katongers, from Now Showroom @now_showroom Bracelet: by NMD, from Now Showroom @now_showroom

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Up Close and Personal with ‘Ballers’

Stacy Rose by Alexis Alfred

Stacy Ann Rose, known for her role as Dr. Robbins in the HBO hit series, “Ballers” has known she wanted to be an actress since she was a little girl. She has a recurring role on the show working alongside Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, making her younger self proud. Rose, currently residing in Miami, Florida, is originally from Kingston, Jamaica. She recalls growing up enjoying island life- spending a lot of time with family and playing sports. She knew she had a passion for acting when she was 9 years old. “It’s really clear in my mind, she recalls. I remember watching TV and saying to myself, ’I want to do that.’ I don’t remember exactly what I was watching, it could have been the ‘Cosby Show.’ I was looking at the characters and the young girls like myself and I said, ‘You know what, I can do that and I want to do that.’” She got her first taste of what acting was like when her aunt insisted that she join her church’s drama group. From then on she knew that acting was something she wanted to do for the rest of her life. At 16-years-old, Rose and her family moved to the United States and settled in Miami, Florida. When she arrived in the states, she had already graduated from high school, and her parents kept her close to home. Although Rose was extremely passionate about acting, she admits that it is the more traditional career routes that Caribbean parents expect their children to take. “You know if you’re not becoming a doctor, or a lawyer, or a teacher they really aren’t interested, she explains. So when I talked about doing theater I didn’t even get a response. I knew that it would be a battle I was willing to take on.”

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Taking her parents words into consideration, Rose decided to buckle down and plan her life. She decided to go to school to study business. “In my mind I justified it by saying this is going to be my Plan B. In case acting doesn’t work out, I can get a real job and make something of my life, as my parents would say.” She attended Miami Dade Community College, then went to Florida State to study International and Business Marketing. She received her Bachelor’s Degree from Florida State and then returned home to Miami to attend Florida International University to obtain her Master’s Degree. “When I graduated, I was like, ‘Okay, Plan B is in place. Plan A take effect.’ It’s been a challenge, and it’s not that easy.” She admits that staying true to her dreams while also supporting herself and her family as an actor could be difficult because after each acting job, the actor is now unemployed. Rose worked in corporate America for a while and has held other traditional jobs as a source of income. Living in Miami she admits that jobs are very few and far between. Even when working her more tradition jobs, her dreams always took the front seat. “I’ve used my marketing degree, I’ve worked in the financial industry, I’ve done quite a lot. I’ve always tried to choose jobs that were flexible so that I could audition in the daytime, at a moment’s notice if I needed to. Sometimes you have to quit a job because you booked something and you’ve been at the job for 2 weeks.” She says there was a point in time when she questioned her chosen career path. “I had some questions like, ‘Do I really want to do this? Why?’ I had some doubts and questioned what I really wanted, and then I would go back to what I really knew. I don’t think GOD puts these desires in our head and our hearts to torture us. I’m sure he has a plan and is willing to stick it out to see what his plan is.” After working in corporate America she was able to turn to radio, which gave her meaningful employment to earn income while she pursued her acting dream. Rose admits that deep down in her heart she had always had a desire to do radio. At 16 she remembers listening to the radio in Miami and being “less than impressed” with the level of talent she was hearing. “I remember picking up the phone and calling the radio station and asking if they had any openings. That was my first inclination to get involved with radio.” A few years later the pastor of her church sent her to a Caribbean gospel network that was looking for young DJ’s. For over a decade, she has served as program host of Island Praise, which airs on 9 other stations in the US, Caribbean, Africa and the Pacific. Rose credits her success to her parents. She says her father thought she could be whatever she wanted if she put her mind to it. He taught her the importance of working and careful planning. Rose admits that she knew her family was instilling this mindset in her for the business world, but she took those traits and used it to fuel her desire to act. “While

they were encouraging me in general for a professional life for business, somehow it just fueled me on for my acting and I just never gave up. I kept hearing, ‘You don’t give up, you don’t give up,’ and in my mind all I heard was, ‘Don’t give up, don’t give up, one day you’ll have your star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.” Rose is very selective when it comes to the roles she plays. She says that she tries to do projects that she can be proud of. With her family being very important to her, it is extremely important that she does not embarrass herself or her parents. She is also a Christian and says that these factors help her select the roles she plays. “As much as I can, I try to navigate the choices for the roles I audition for. I am also an organic kind of actor and I improvise with the characters a lot. I learn the lines, then I create a whole life for the characters and I try to step into that life as much as possible in the limited time frame you have to audition.” After an audition, she walks away and tries her hardest to forget it. “When I say that my job is auditioning, I get up every day and audition. When I get a job it’s like a bonus.” With the recent controversy over the lack of roles for black actors in Hollywood, Rose says that in this industry, she tries to stay positive. She admits that through the likes of Michelle Obama she sees an increase of black women in lead roles on Primetime TV. “Before Scandal, I don’t remember any other black women in a lead role on Primetime or any major networks show. That was around the time of Michelle Obama. Every now and again when I saw breakdowns they would give a description of the type of woman they were looking for and they would say, ‘Michelle Obama Type.’ Art imitates life, so it’s so important for women of color in life to excel and do well.” She knows that this trend will continue to grow as well. Rose also thinks that it is important for African Americans to produce content. “There will always be opportunity if we create our own content. I believe that we have the right contacts in order to bring them to the public eye, to bring them to theater houses, cable networks and all that. I think we need to get together and get it done. I think people are doing it and it’s going to get better.”’ In the future she wants to focus on producing. She has recently produced her first feature film and has enjoyed what it feels like to be on the other side of the camera. She plans on producing more content, as well as perfecting her craft. With landing TV roles on Dolphin Tale and Burn Notice, Rose sees herself working successfully in the acting field and dreams of being in feature films. The passion that she has for acting has fueled her for years, and she knows that through her hard work and dedication it will only get better. Follow Stacy on Twitter @StacyAnnRose By Alexis Alfred Photo credit: My Third Eye Media and Studio 504

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MEN

Photographer: Amina Touray Photography Models (from left to right): Tyrone Emanuel Smith, Ray Duran, Alex Cottrell, Quintin Mims, and Jason L. Stover


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October 2016 issue  
October 2016 issue  

This month's issue features on our cover, actress Lisa Vidal of BET's Being Mary Jane and Fox's Rosewood. Featured on other pages of our iss...

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