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Covering the entire spectrum of the Emergency Services

December 2015

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Volume 16 | 6


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ESTCONTENTS | 1

IN EVERY ISSUE

15

COMMENT

3

NEWS

4

EVENTS

12

COMPANY PROFILE

29

17

41 | 49

PEOPLE

20

PRODUCTS

50

LAST WORDS

52

IN THIS ISSUE NATIONAL RESILIENCE

10

The National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT), supported by lead CFOA officers, coordinated the national response to help people affected by Storm Desmond, which caused widespread flooding in

13

Cumbria in early December; and the revised version of the National Coordination and Advisory Framework (NCAF), which was issued in September 2015, is tested during Storm Abigail in November.

ESS2015 REVIEW

15

The Emergency Services Show 2015 (ESS2015), held at the

41

NEC in Birmingham from 23-24 September, attracted a record number of 6151 visitors. Are you featured in our gallery of highlights from the event? From the many product launches from the show’s 450 exhibitors, we feature Manx Telecom, Pickup Systems, Laerdal and Dräger in this comprehensive round up of the UK’s leading event for the emergency services sector.

42

6

ICT

23

Airwave CTO Euros Evans takes a look at what the next five years have to offer the emergency services in a new Blue Light Futures report; how emergency services can ensure a smooth transition to the Emergency Services Network is the focus for Helen Shapcott from Mott MacDonald; Neil Moore, CFOA’s ICT lead discusses why

19

collaboration demands such a high place in the minds of ICT professionals; and Globalstar believes the solution to more streamlined operations, reduced costs and a better service to the public lies in a more hybrid approach to emergency services communications.

COLLABORATION

42

The coordinated approach to the Shoreham Airshow crash; analysis of the responses to the Government’s recent consultation, Enabling loser working between Emergency Services; co-responding trials

23

begin in Kent and Surrey; and NARU publishes its latest guidance documents, which have all been updated to reflect JESIP principles.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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2 | ESTA-Z

Companies Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

Age UK............................................................................................................5

Dräger...........................................................................................................19

Local Government Association ..............................................................4, 43

Scottish Neonatal Service.............................................................................6

Air Accident Investigations Branch ............................................................42

Durham Constabulary ...................................................................................5

London Ambulance Service .........................................................................4

Security & Counter Terror Expo .................................................................12

Airwave .....................................................................................................4, 24

East of England Ambulance Service............................................................9

London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority .......................................5

Ambition 2016 .............................................................................................12

EE ..............................................................................................................4, 29

London Fire Brigade .....................................................................5, 6, 10, 29

Angloco...........................................................................................................9

Emergency Medical Retrieval Service.........................................................6

London's Air Ambulance ...........................................................................4, 6

Arqiva ............................................................................................................38

Emergency Services Collaboration Working Group ..................................3

Manx Telecom..............................................................................................16

St John Ambulance & Rescue Service ......................................................20

Association of Air Ambulances...................................................................20

The Emergency Services Show.................................................................15

MARCH Trauma Systems Ltd.......................................................................9

Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service......................................................38

Atos ...............................................................................................................33

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service.......................................................9

Mercedes-Benz ...........................................................................................16

Barts Health NHS Trust .................................................................................4

Essex Police .................................................................................................20

Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service ........................................................10

Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service........................................................9

Excelerate Technology................................................................................15

Metropolitan Police Service....................................................................5, 33

Bedfordshire Police.....................................................................................20

FLIR Systems Inc.........................................................................................50

Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service............................................6

Bristol City Council.........................................................................................4

Forensics Expo Europe...............................................................................12

Mitsubishi........................................................................................................9

Surrey County Council ................................................................................45

Bristol Uniforms .............................................................................................6

Globalstar .....................................................................................................32

Motorola Solutions ..................................................................................4, 23

Surrey Fire and Rescue Service.................................................................45

British Compressed Gases Association ....................................................12

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority.......................................43

Mott MacDonald ..........................................................................................28

British Safety Industry Federation..............................................................52

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service .........................................10

National Ambulance Resilience Unit .........................................................48

Broden Media ..............................................................................................15

Greater Manchester Police.........................................................................20

National Crime Agency...............................................................................20

Buckinghamshire Fire and Rescue Services............................................29

Haix Footwear..............................................................................................15

NEPO ..............................................................................................................6

Cabinet Office........................................................................................12, 39

Hampshire Constabulary............................................................................47

NEPRO ...........................................................................................................6

Thames Valley Police ............................................................................44, 47

Cambridgeshire Constabulary ...................................................................20

Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service...................................................30, 47

NHS England..................................................................................................5

Transport of Critically Ill and Injured Children Service................................6

Capita Communication and Control Solutions.........................................29

Health and Safety Executive.......................................................................52

Nightsearcher ..............................................................................................50

Capita IT Enterprise Services .....................................................................29

Health and Safety Laboratory.....................................................................52

Norfolk Constabulary............................................................................20, 20

Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.............5

Helly Hansen Workwear..............................................................................50

Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service ...............................................................20

Centriforce Products...................................................................................50

HELP Appeal..................................................................................................5

North West Ambulance Service ...................................................................5

Updata Infrastructure ..................................................................................29

Cheshire Constabulary................................................................................20

Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service...............................9, 10

North Yorkshire Police...................................................................................5

Warning Zone...............................................................................................49

Chief Fire Officers' Association.....................................5, 10, 12, 20, 30, 43

Hertfordshire Constabulary........................................................................20

Northamptonshire County Council............................................................40

City Health Care Partnership CIC...............................................................47

Hertfordshire Fire and Rescue Service.....................................................10

Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service ............................................40

Civil Contingencies Secretariat............................................................12, 39

Home Office.............................................................................................4, 25

Northamptonshire Police........................................................................9, 20

Clare Fire and Rescue Service...................................................................27

Humber NHS Foundation Trust .................................................................47

Northumbria Police .....................................................................................48

Cleveland Police.............................................................................................5

Humberside Fire and Rescue Service.......................................................47

PBI Performance Products Inc...................................................................41

West Mercia Police.........................................................................................9

Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service.............................................................16

Humberside Police......................................................................................16

Peli Products (UK) Ltd ................................................................................50

West Mercia Search & Rescue .....................................................................9

Council of Gas Detection & Environmental Monitoring Gas...................12

incidentcontrolroom.com® .........................................................................26

Pickup Systems ...........................................................................................16

Cumbria Fire and Rescue Service .............................................................10

INSARAG......................................................................................................13

Police Scotland ............................................................................................20

Department for Communities and Local Government......................10, 25

JESIP......................................................................................3, 25, 39, 46, 48

Procom A/S .................................................................................................29

Department for Transport ...........................................................................12

KBR Inc ...........................................................................................................5

Public Health England ...................................................................................5

Department of Health .................................................................................25

Kent Fire and Rescue Service....................................................................45

Resilience Direct..........................................................................................12

West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service ......................................................42

Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service...................................................20, 44

Kent Police ...................................................................................................20

RNLI ..........................................................................................................9, 20

West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service...................................................12

Devon and Cornwall Police...........................................................................6

Kind Minds Health and Wellbeing Ltd........................................................40

Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service.................................................44

Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service........................................36

Laerdal Medical............................................................................................17

Royal Society for Public Health.....................................................................6

Dorset and Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service............................................4

LARS Communications.................................................................................5

SAREXPO International 2016....................................................................13

Dorset Fire and Rescue Service...................................................................5

Leicestershire Fire and Rescue Service....................................................49

SCOTSTAR......................................................................................................6

Yorkshire Ambulance Service..............................................................33, 47

Dorset Police ..................................................................................................6

Leicestershire Police...................................................................................49

Scottish Ambulance Service.........................................................................6

YPO...............................................................................................................41

Company Name

Company Name

Company Name

South East Coast Ambulance Service.......................................................45 South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue ........................................................47, 49

Staffordshire Police...............................................................................20, 29 Suffolk Constabulary...................................................................................20 Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service ..................................................................9

Sussex Police ...............................................................................................42 TC Communications....................................................................................33 telent .............................................................................................................38

Trauma Care.................................................................................................12 Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service...................................................48

Warwickshire Police.......................................................................................9 Weightmans LLP.........................................................................................44 Welbeing.......................................................................................................33

West Midlands Fire Service...........................................................................6 West Midlands Police ..................................................................................15 West Sussex County Council......................................................................42

WL Gore & Associates...................................................................................5 Women to Work ...........................................................................................49

Advertisers Company Name

Page No

Page No

Page No

4C Strategies................................................................................................25

Getac UK ......................................................................................................22

Mercedes-Benz..........................................................................................IFC

Alnmaritec ....................................................................................................11

Globalstar .....................................................................................................21

Nightsearcher ..............................................................................................18

Ambition 2016 .............................................................................................51

Idhammar Systems......................................................................................37

Paraid Medical................................................................................................8

British Red Cross .........................................................................................37

Incidentcontrolroom.com® ...............................................................OFC, 31

Rapid Response Rescue Services.............................................................14

Emergency Services Show 2016.............................................................IBC

Lyon Equipment Limited ...............................................................................7

RUD Chains Ltd ...........................................................................................18

Excelerate Technology Ltd ...................................................................34-35

Manx Telecom..............................................................................................37

SP Services (UK) Ltd ..............................................................................OBC

Page No

Strongs Plastic Products Ltd.........................................................................8 University of Leicester.................................................................................39 University of South Wales ...........................................................................39

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Vimpex Ltd....................................................................................................22 YPO...............................................................................................................14

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ESTCOMMENT | 3

ISSN 1472-1090 Date: December 2015 Editor: David J. Holden MEng(Hons) Twitter: @999editor davidholden@brodenmedia.com Advertisement Manager: David Brown davidbrown@brodenmedia.com Advertisement Sales: Carol Fox carolfox@brodenmedia.com Office & Events Manager: Lesley Stevenson lesleystevenson@brodenmedia.com Marketing Manager: Emma Nicholls emmanicholls@brodenmedia.com Circulation: Christine Knoll admin@hpcpublishing.com Joint Managing Directors: David Brown David Holden Published by

Robert Denholm House, Bletchingley Road Nutfield, Surrey RH1 4HW Tel: 01737 824010 Fax: 01737 824011 e-mail: davidbrown@brodenmedia.com www: brodenmedia.com Distribution: EMERGENCY SERVICES TIMES is free of charge to officers and managers who are buyers or specifiers actively involved in the procurement of equipment or services within the emergency response industry and based in the UK and Irish Republic. All other categories of reader are invited to subscribe at £130.00 to UK addresses and £165.00 overseas. Single copy price £25.00 including post and packing. The articles within Emergency Services Times are copyright and are the property of the publisher Broden Media Limited and cannot be reproduced in any media form without permission of the publisher. Application should be made in writing. Reprints of articles and advertisements are available, allow 28 days for delivery. PDF pages are available by email at £20.00 (+VAT) per page (€32.50, $33). Prices on application to the publisher. Printed by Manor Creative Tel: 01323 514400 Studio work by Friskywhiska Design Tel: 01947 811333 Mobile: 07976 917411 charlotte@friskywhiska.co.uk

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Change is coming: consultation raises collaboration questions Words: Jonathan Smith, Emergency Services Collaboration Working Group The recent publication of the Government’s consultation paper Enabling closer working between the Emergency Services is an interesting statement of intent on the direction of travel and potential changes to governance structures ministers would like to see. With the consultation now closed, the results stemming from the various submissions put forward by stakeholders from across the sector will make interesting reading. Locally led collaboration Although expanding the role of Police and Crime Commissioners was not necessarily a great surprise; potential changes to the law governing the role of Chief Constable were a little unexpected. In addition, the proposal to place collaboration between the emergency services on a statutory footing, designed to enable greater efficiency and effectiveness, is also an interesting move and clearly highlights central government’s determination to encourage and drive locally led emergency service collaboration. There are a number of proposals contained within the consultation around changes to governance structures; and in particular the relationship between police and fire, which are eliciting much debate. Although there are clear synergies around community safety, protection and reassurance between police and fire, concerns have been expressed around whether or not the consultation is a little narrow in its scope given the wider collaboration in which all emergency services are involved; especially with local government, the NHS, and indeed the charitable and private sectors. The expansion of the role of Police and Crime Commissioners needs very careful consideration. The abolition of fire and rescue authorities, and their replacement with PCCs where there is local agreement, is an interesting proposition. It could be argued that it is simply a change in governance. The challenge for government, however, will be to demonstrate that moving fire under PCC governance, and the creation of a single employer, will drive the efficiencies explicitly referenced in the consultation and resolve any perceived democratic deficit. It must also be remembered that collaboration between the emergency services has actually been gathering traction for some time. In terms of operational response, the efforts of the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme (JESIP), in ensuring multiagency working between the emergency services is now seen as being a central determinant for ensuring a successful outcome to complex incidents. The response to the recent mill explosion in Bosley, Cheshire and the

Shoreham air crash in West Sussex, are testament to the efforts of all three emergency services in establishing joint working as the norm for operational response. Collaboration in the broader sense is also now well established. The creation of the Emergency Services Collaboration Working Group, with strategic representation from across the emergency services and government departments, has seen the publication of a national overview of collaboration projects; the commissioning and publication of academic research; and the establishment of a dedicated network to share innovation and best practice. The group continues to act as a central repository in order to help reduce duplication of effort or repetition of error. Work streams have also included driving down demand between the emergency services and promoting emergency co-responding between fire and rescue and ambulance services.

“Public sector organisations simply cannot operate in isolation within the modern context.” Significant change The public sector in general and emergency services in particular, will see a number of significant changes over the course of the next three to four years. Challenging budgetary settlements emanating from the Comprehensive Spending Review will present strategic leaders with difficult questions to answer. Potential changes to governance structures, including those proposed in the consultation on emergency service collaboration, need to be considered very carefully. The future will be complex and thwart with difficulty but collaboration between the emergency services will continue unabated. The impact of English devolution also adds an interesting dimension to both governance structures and the broader collaboration agenda. What is clear however is that public sector organisations simply cannot operate in isolation within the modern context. How best to ensure this collaboration continues is the fundamental question now concentrating the minds of emergency service leaders. http://ow.ly/HODGG Read more on pages 43 and 44

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4 | ESTNEWS London’s Air Ambulance, alongside partners Barts Health NHS Trust and London Ambulance Service, have scooped the ‘Cross-sector Partnership’ award at the Charity Times Awards for their pioneering work on REBOA, a technique to control haemorrhage in trauma patients. REBOA was first developed in the Emergency Department at The Royal London Hospital and, after two years of development, the procedure was delivered for the first time at the roadside with London’s Air Ambulance. It has been the culmination of several years of hard work by a variety of teams and individuals including The Royal London Hospital Emergency Department, interventional radiologists, trauma surgeons and anaesthetists, as well as paramedics from London Ambulance Service. www.londonsairambulance.co.uk

Bristol City Council’s Emergency Management, Traffic Management and Community Safety (CCTV) control rooms are to be relocated to a multi-purpose operation centre in a bid to deliver significant savings for the council and secure the future of these core services. The centre’s construction and team relocation is expected to take 18 months. www.bristol.gov.uk

New and creative ideas to make policing more effective are to be encouraged through changes to the Police Innovation Fund. For 2016/17 the multi-million pound fund will consider proof-of concept bids as well as implementation-ready bids in a move designed to reward more breakthrough ideas than ever before. The change will mean police forces will be able to seek funding to assess an innovative idea, as well as fully worked through proposals. This will allow for more funding to be targeted at ideas coming from the grassroots of policing at a much earlier stage. www.gov.uk

When the new Dorset and Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service comes into being on 1 April 2016 it will occupy part of the Five Rivers Community Campus in Salisbury, it has been announced. The campus will be home to the service’s ‘strategic hub’, providing: a central workplace for its management team and some support functions; a number of flexible working options for the new service personnel, as part of the wider approach to working across Wiltshire and Dorset; and a meeting place for teams, departments and the new fire authority. www.wiltsfire.gov.uk www.dorsetfire.gov.uk

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

EE and Motorola win contracts for new Emergency Services Network (ESN) Delivery of a cheaper, smarter communications network that will enable more effective use of police, fire and ambulance resources has moved a step closer. The Home Office announced on 10 December that EE and Motorola Solutions would join Kellogg, Brown and Root to provide the emergency services with a more affordable and capable Emergency Services Network (ESN). Offering more flexibility than the old system, the new services will replace the existing system from mid-2017 as the current contracts expire. Motorola Solutions will now be responsible for the delivery of the user services contract (Lot 2), providing systems integration and public safety functionality. EE, winner of the mobile services contract (Lot 3), will be required to provide an enhanced radio access service with nationwide coverage. Signing of the final contracts follows the announcement in the Spending Review that the Government has committed an additional £1bn to overhaul the emergency services network. The

new network is expected to save the taxpayer £1m a day. Minister of State for Policing, Criminal Justice and Victims Mike Penning said, “ESN will not only provide this capability to the three emergency services but over 300 other public safety organisations that rely on this ability everyday. “We have carefully evaluated each bidder’s skills and expertise against requirements that were set by the emergency services themselves and are confident that the successful bidders will provide a world class communications network that our services deserve in today’s modern world.” EE has already committed to spend £1.5bn on its network up to 2017, and will increase that investment in order to deliver the Emergency Services Network. In order to deliver the mission critical Emergency Services Network (ESN), EE will: build a new, highly resilient dedicated core network for the emergency services; build more than 500 new sites, expanding coverage in rural areas; switch on low frequency 800MHz

spectrum on more than 3800 sites to enhance rural and indoor coverage; implement the capability to afford network access priority to emergency services when required; implement VoLTE (calls over 4G), and new LTE voice capabilities including ‘push to talk’; deploy a fleet of rapid response vehicles to ensure maximum service availability; and implement satellite backhaul for Britain’s most hard-to-reach areas. Work to enhance and expand the EE network has already commenced in order to be ready in time for the first transitions, and existing consumer, business and public sector customers will benefit from this. The dedicated EE Emergency Services team will work closely with the current provider, Airwave, the Lot 2 service provider, Motorola, and Lot 1 delivery partner KBR, as well as all 300,000 end users to manage a smooth transition to the new 4G network. www.ee.co.uk www.motorolasolutions.co.uk www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Motorola Solutions agrees to acquire Airwave Motorola Solutions and Airwave have entered into an agreement for Motorola Solutions to acquire Airwave for £817.5m (approximately $1.2bn). Motorola Solutions expects its net cash payment to be approximately £700m (approximately $1bn) at closing, based on purchase price adjustments and cash in the business. In addition, a deferred cash payment of £64m will be made in November 2018. The agreement is subject to required approvals and other customary closing conditions, and is expected to close in the first quarter of 2016. Airwave is the largest private operator of a public safety network in the world, delivering mission-critical voice and data communications to more than 300 emergency and public service agencies in Great Britain. Based on Terrestrial Trunked Radio (TETRA) technology provided by Motorola Solutions, its network covers 99 percent of Great Britain’s landmass, is resilient and enables more than 300,000 police, fire, ambulance and other emergency personnel to easily and securely communicate with each other. Motorola Solutions currently plans to fund the transaction with bank financing and cash on hand, predominantly from international funds. Upon closing, the company expects the transaction to be

immediately accretive to non-GAAP earnings and free cash flow. “The Airwave acquisition demonstrates our commitment to public safety in Great Britain and to growing our Managed & Support Services business,” said Greg Brown, chairman and CEO of Motorola Solutions. “The combination of our years of experience as a trusted global leader in mission-critical communications and Airwave’s proven service delivery platform will provide Great Britain with innovative emergency services technology that enhances public safety today and into the future.” Motorola Solutions has been a trusted, reliable communications partner to the emergency services community in Great Britain for more than 45 years. The Airwave Network operates on the company’s TETRA technology. “Airwave has proven expertise in delivering mission-critical voice and data communications services, and over the past 15 years we’ve invested significantly

Greg Brown, Chairman and CEO, Motorola Solutions.

in the development of a secure, resilient and interoperable network,” said Richard Bobbett, Chief Executive Officer of Airwave. “We are delighted that through this new relationship with global leader Motorola Solutions, we are able to enhance our offering and ensure our customers continue to benefit from the highquality service they have come to expect.” Motorola Solutions delivers, manages and operates large-scale and complex public safety networks throughout the world. It currently operates more than 20 systems in countries such as Norway, Denmark, Austria, Australia and the United States. Formed in 2000, Airwave is headquartered in Berkshire, England, with approximately 600 employees. The company is owned by investment fund Macquarie European Infrastructure Fund 2, which is supportive of the transaction. www.motorolasolutions.com

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ESTNEWS | 5

Adaptable tower assists HART training North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) has recently completed phase one of a new training facility for its Hazardous Area Response Team (HART). The facility includes a bespoke training tower, which was commissioned to provide an adaptable training at height facility for the team. Designed, fabricated and erected on site by Carnforth-based LARS Communications, the tower stands at 8m tall and incorporates various climbing elements designed for different working at height scenarios. It includes two working platforms with access hatches, fixed ladder access from ground level to the second platform hatch, mast climbing pegs and mast climbing staples. Standard eye bolts have also been fitted to act as secure points for safety lines to allow personnel to climb the tower externally. Alongside the tower are two storage containers, each measuring 30ft, designed to simulate further hazardous scenarios. HART Team Leader James Woodsell said, “This has been an exciting opportunity to be involved in from start to finish. The facility allows us to greatly enhance how our emergency services teams are trained to respond to a range of realistic scenarios where certain potential dangers are involved. “This is particularly important for our Hazardous Area Response Team who

www.gore.com

is specifically experienced in responding to patients who are in high risk locations. To have a training facility such as this is excellent news and will be invaluable to help support our staff to conduct their training both realistically and safely. “The benefits of this facility can also be shared with our multi-agency partners so they too can similarly develop their knowledge and skills in this area.” Phase two of the project will now see the containers further developed, one into a confined space rescue facility with crawl spaces and difficult extrication routes, while the other will be a multi-

purpose domestic facility able to simulate realistic incidents such as Illicit Drug Laboratories or Individual Chemical Exposure (ICE). Head of Special Operations Joe Barrett said, “To be able to develop a training facility such as this is excellent news and demonstrates the trust’s commitment to supporting staff in realistic training for their roles. I would like to express my personal thanks to the team for the hard work they have put in to this project over the last 12 months.” www.nwas.nhs.uk

Firefighters and NHS sign health partnership Firefighters have joined forces with the NHS in a new health partnership to tackle health and social problems and reduce winter pressures. Five organisations – NHS England, Public Health England, the Fire and Rescue Service, Age UK and the Local Government Association – signed a new ‘Consensus’ promising to work together to make changes throughout their workforce. The new ‘Consensus’ sets out how the organisations can work together to encourage local action to prevent or minimise service demand and improve the quality of life of people with longterm conditions. It means firefighters across the country will aim to carry out more ‘Safe and Well’ checks in people’s homes when they visit. The firefighters will aim to extend the 670,000 home safety checks already carried out each year into a ‘Safe and Well’ visit to help particularly the vulnerable and those with complex conditions. As well as reducing the risks of a fire, they will aim to reduce health risks such as falls, loneliness and isolation, which

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Michael Stead, an Area Manager at Dorset Fire and Rescue Service, is the first recipient of the Gore Bursary Award for delegates on the Fire Service Executive Leadership Programme (ELP). Michael will receive a £1500 Delegates’ Delegate Bursary, after been chosen by all of the ELP delegates on the course for demonstrating support and guidance for colleagues, personal leadership, and a desire to develop and learn. A second Gore bursary, for Best Overall Assignments, is given to the delegate who achieves the highest marks across all six assignments on the programme and will be announced later this year.

will also reduce visits to A&E, broken hips and depression. Simon Stevens, NHS England CEO, said, “Fire service home visits already prevent fires, and now will help prevent falls, accidents and trips to casualty. It’s great to see two of the most trusted public services getting creative about jointly supporting vulnerable people to stay healthy and independent.” Evidence shows that a high percentage of people will allow firefighters into their home due to the high level of trust they have making it easier for them to give simple advice, which could save or change a life. The firefighters may, for example, quickly install a handrail, notice and change falls hazards such as loose rugs, spot hazards such as piled up papers or signpost people to local groups for help, support or company. Some areas are already doing this joined up work but the ‘Consensus’ now pledges a drive to roll it out across the country. Paul Hancock, President of the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA), said,

“The Safe and Well checks will help to identify issues at an early stage, which could reduce the likelihood of older people being admitted to hospital by focusing on prevention measures. Firefighters carrying out these checks already have a high level of trust from the people they are visiting and will be able to give help and advice on a wide range of issues, while helping to keep our older residents safer.” Duncan Selbie, Chief Executive of Public Health England, said, “Saving peoples’ lives is the most important thing for firefighters. They have already had astonishing success in reducing deaths from fires and can now bring this experience to bear more widely. They are perfectly placed to spot the dangers facing the most vulnerable when making their hundreds of thousands of visits each year to homes across the country. “This agreement will help ensure older people, and those with complex needs, get the care and support they need to live healthier, more independent lives.” www.cfoa.org.uk

The HELP Appeal, the only charity in the country dedicated to delivering helicopter landing pads at all Major Trauma Centres and key A&E hospitals across England and Scotland, has pledged £1m to Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CMFT) Charity’s new helipad appeal. The donation amounts to over a quarter of the total funds needed to create the new 24-hour access primary helicopter landing site, the first of its kind in central Manchester. Located on the roof of a nearby multi-storey car park, the helipad will be connected to the hospitals by a high-level link bridge and roof top corridor. www.helpappeal.com

KBR Inc has been selected by the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority, under the current Mayor’s Office for Policing And Crime framework, to provide various facilities management services on behalf of the London Fire Brigade. Services to be provided include the procurement, management and auditing of the facilities management supply chain on behalf of the LFB as well as the management of a shared Metropolitan Police Service and LFB help desk centre available 24/7, and a computer aided facilities management system. www.kbruk.co.uk

Durham Constabulary, Cleveland Police and North Yorkshire Police are to merge their police dog sections to create a single integrated service from summer 2016, in a move that will reduce overall costs by more than £3m over the next five years and enable a substantial 24-hour dog unit to be retained across the three forces. The decision to progress the combined dog section is part of the Evolve Programme, a three-force initiative to look at how the police can improve services and save money by collaborating across organisational and geographical borders. www.durham.police.uk

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6 | ESTNEWS 1 January 2016 marks the start of London Fire Brigade’s 150th year in operation. To celebrate the anniversary, LFB has released an illustrated history of the brigade. Every current serving London firefighter will receive a free copy of the limited edition book, which has been funded by sponsorship from Bristol Uniforms. Members of the public can buy the book by going to www.LFB150.co.uk and the profits will go to charity. www.lfb150.co.uk NEPRO has been awarded a four-year agreement available for use by all UK public sector organisations, including police and emergency services, central and local government, NHS and registered charities to procure specialist professional and consultancy services through its extensive and independent supplier network. The agreement, awarded by the North East Procurement Organisation (NEPO), is for a neutral vendor solution designed to deliver significant spend reductions in all forms of consultancy and professional services expenditure, in addition to simplifying the process and reducing the administrative costs. www.nepro.org.uk

SCOTSTAR, Scotland’s national specialist transport and retrieval service for critically ill NHS patients, has moved into a new purpose built base at Glasgow airport as part of a £9.5m a year investment in patient care. SCOTSTAR brings together the Scottish Neonatal Service (SNTS), the Transport of Critically Ill and Injured Children Service and the Emergency Medical Retrieval Service, with the Scottish Ambulance Service (SAS), which coordinates the teams.

Second helicopter for London’s Air Ambulance London’s Air Ambulance, the charity that delivers an advanced trauma team to critically injured people in London, has now acquired a second emergency medical helicopter thanks to generous contributions from the people and organisations of London. The used MD902 Explorer, which is now registered as G-LNDN, is targeted to be operational in early 2016. Following the launch of the charity’s ‘Your London, Your Helicopter’ fundraising campaign seven months ago, just over £4m has been raised to date, with just under £2m still needed to reach the £6m target. This support has allowed the charity to acquire the aircraft and it will cover the costs of converting the helicopter to meet UK regulations. However, more money is still needed to fund associated running costs of operating the second aircraft and extending summer daylight flying hours for five years. www.londonsairambulance.co.uk

Photo: Jon Le Ray

Police trial drone technology

Police in Devon, Cornwall and Dorset have embarked on a six-month trial of drones to aid officers in a number of policing matters, including missing people searches and crime scene photography. Police in the region are able to call upon the services of two DJI Inspire 1 drones, which are equipped with high definition (HD) cameras, which can capture both video and still images. Inspector Andy Hamilton from Devon and Cornwall Police, who is heading up the trial, said, “Drones offer many benefits that complement the National Police Air Service (NPAS) Helicopter. This technology offers a highly cost effective approach to missing person searches, crime scene photography, and responding to major road traffic collisions. “Using a drone to capture footage on difficult terrain and hard to reach areas such as cliffs, woodland or the moors to find a missing person, combat wildlife crime or even a firearm incident, will allow officers to gain vital information, quickly, safely, and allow us to respond effectively at the scene.” Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) regulations state that drone operators must

pass a national CAA accredited qualification. Currently the force has three trained operators in place for the trial, including Inspector Hamilton, and there are plans to train further officers should the trial prove to be a success. Inspector Hamilton added, “This technology still has its limitations; the models we are trialling are currently unable to fly at night or in adverse weather, but having the option to put a drone in the air in a few minutes’ notice could help save lives. “Both drones have a HD downlink, which means officers on the ground can see live footage captured by the drone in the air. It can stay in the air for up to 18 minutes at a time before returning to the operator to change batteries. Each drone has several batteries and therefore can be kept operational for a prolonged period of time if required.” A new twitter account has been created @DC_PoliceDrones, which will keep the public informed about where and when the drone is in operational use within Devon and Cornwall, as well as sharing operational footage and images of the drone in action. www.devon-cornwall.police.uk

www.scottishambulance.com

West Midlands Fire Service (WMFS) has been recognised by the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) for its ongoing commitment to promoting health and wellbeing. The RSPH’s Health and Wellbeing Awards 2015, now in their eighth year, showcase wide-ranging achievements that empower communities and individuals, improve the population’s health and address the wider social determinants of health. The service’s ‘two year award’ is for its ‘Improving lives to Save Lives’ programme, which the RSPH says demonstrates an embedded health improvement strategy that is measurable, effective and efficient, enabling people and communities in the West Midlands to improve their health. www.wmfs.net

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Drone trial after Welsh Government investment Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service (MAWWFRS) launched a trial of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) on 12 November with a demonstration of the technology at the service’s training centre in Earlswood, near Swansea, for Welsh Government Public Services Minister Leighton Andrews AM. The UAV, also known as a drone, was purchased thanks to a £20,000 grant from the Welsh Government. MAWWFRS Chief Fire Officer, Chris Davies said, “New technology such as this UAV allows us to improve the safety of our firefighters by enabling the more efficient resolution of operational incidents. The UAV can provide live video footage and still photos to allow an Incident Commander to plan for an incident, allowing us to get an overhead

view from up to 400ft above activity on the ground.

“During wildfires, such as those that devastated the valley communities back in the Spring, a UAV could be dispatched in areas of highest risk to support fire fighting operations and to possibly identify those attempting to set fires. The additional reconnaissance during search and rescue operations that the UAV provides could also be invaluable in being able to quickly locate any individuals or animals that may be trapped, and subsequently allow us to direct resources to them quickly.” Following an initial three months of evaluation, if successful the trial will continue for up to 12 months when a decision on a wider rollout will be taken. www.mawwfire.gov.uk

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ESTNEWS | 9

Firefighter helps develop new trauma Go Bags New trauma Go Bags, developed with the help of Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service (HWFRS) employee Thom Morgan, are now on every frontline appliance in the service and will ensure that members of the community receive high quality, sustainable care.

Watch Commander Thom Morgan, in 2013, had the privilege of training on a Special Forces Patrol Medic's course where he was exposed to not only the equipment, but also the mentality that is born of performing life-saving intervention in the most hostile of environments. It was on this course that he discovered that, although the circumstances and mechanisms of injury are different, the trauma and medicine are very similar to the pre-hospital environment in which the fire and rescue service operates. Taking this into consideration, Thom felt that a more compact, transportable trauma kit, similar to those used within the military sector, would be far more efficient. With the full support and encouragement of the service, Thom worked with military personnel at MARCH Trauma System Ltd to develop a trauma bag bespoke to the fire and rescue service. Over time, the configuration of the bag has been redesigned, trialled and tested to incorporate the kit appropriate to the service’s role in the pre-hospital scene.

Essex takes joint approach to fire appliance purchasing Seven new custom-built fire appliances will begin their working lives in Essex shortly, thanks to a joint money-saving purchasing arrangement with Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service (BFRS). The new appliances are part of a £10m contract with Angloco to provide a total of 42 new fire appliances over the next four years to Essex County Fire and Rescue Service. The first seven appliances will be new Heavy Rescue Pumps, which have been designed on a bespoke basis to meet the needs of Essex. They combine the proven reliability of a Scania chassis with innovative design features created by appliance builder Angloco. The vehicles incorporate a raft of specialist rescue equipment along with pumps and hoses, which mean they can be deployed at a wide variety of incidents from house fires to complex rescues including road traffic collisions. The design of these appliances has been based on a consultation with six fire and rescue services in the Eastern Region. Each service contributed their best specification elements, which has resulted in a modern fire appliance using advanced technology and innovation to make fire fighting more effective and safer for Essex’s crews.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Acting Chief Fire Officer Adam Eckley said, “These appliances have been designed to meet the demands of a modern fire and rescue service. Their flexibility reflects the wide range of work our crews carry out and they provide an excellent response capability. “These vehicles are not only innovative in their design and application they also have been designed and bought under an innovative arrangement, which combines knowledge and spending power to ensure we have the most appropriate equipment at the best price.” Paul Fuller, Chief Fire Officer at BFRS, said, “These vehicles are a much needed and extremely useful addition to both services’ fleet. This is a great example of collaborative partnership working, not just between ourselves and Essex but with all the regional fire services. It has created a fire appliance which includes cutting edge technology and innovations to make fire fighting both more effective and safer for our firefighters.” The vehicles benefit from improved standard CFOA Best Practice conspicuity, and sharing the cost of Joint Vehicle Certification Agency Testing (VCA). www.essex-fire.gov.uk

The Go Bag is much smaller than a standard trauma bag so is stored inside a larger holdall, stowed on the appliance, which contains oxygen therapy, bag valve masks, burns film and a Blizzard blanket. The idea is that the Go Bag is taken to the casualty to deal with any time critical, life threatening injuries and the larger pieces of equipment can be brought on while the casualty is being stabilised. The size and weight of the Go Bag means it can be taken quickly into difficult or restricted situations to allow rapid casualty access, for example, actually into vehicles involved in road traffic collisions. www.hwfire.org.uk

All terrain vehicle set to tackle rural crime

Warwickshire Police has recently taken delivery of a new 4x4 vehicle, funded by the Police and Crime Commissioner, which will be used to tackle rural crime and to take part in local initiatives across South Warwickshire. The new marked police vehicle, a high performance, all terrain Mitsubishi L200 model has the capability to access remote and challenging areas that may have previously been more challenging to access. The impact of rural crime on local communities is a serious issue across the UK and a recent rural crime survey estimated the value to be in excess of £800m. Warwickshire Police are working hard in partnership with Warwickshire Rural Watch to combat rural crime and has recently launched the campaign 'Rural Matters' to reinforce the police's commitment to the rural community. www.warwickshire.police.uk

West Mercia Search & Rescue (WMSAR) has become the latest voluntary rescue team to be awarded full membership of ALSAR. This marks the culmination of a three-part plan for the charity to better serve the needs of West Mercia Police, with nationally accredited land and water-SAR capabilities. The plan also involved a change of name – from West Midlands SAR – and a merging of search management assets with neighbouring Lowland Rescue partner, Warwickshire Search & Rescue. www.wmsar.org.uk

A new Atlantic 85 class lifeboat has gone on service at Sligo Bay RNLI. The Atlantic 85 design allows room for four crewmembers and more kit than the Atlantic 75 lifeboat it replaces, which only had room for three crewmembers. The lifeboat is powered by two 115hp engines and has a stronger hull and greater top speed of 35 knots. The vessel also has a manually operated self-righting mechanism, which combined with inversion-proofed engines keeps the lifeboat operational even after capsize. The lifeboat also carries a full suite of communication and electronic navigation aids, as well as a searchlight, night vision equipment and flares for nighttime operations. www.rnli.org.uk

Nearly 300 police officers and PCSOs now have access to their local fire station, with police and fire and rescue services in Northamptonshire sharing more buildings as part of their ongoing programme of collaboration and integration. Local community and response officers can now make use of facilities at the county’s retained fire stations at any time of the day or night. Officers are able to go to their local fire station rather than return to their main base, meaning they are able to stay within their beat area for longer. It is expected that this new joint fire and police facility will be completed by March 2016. www.northants.police.uk

A shared Bury St Edmunds base for Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) and the East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) was officially opened on 14 November. The adapted Bury St Edmunds fire station has been designed to share property assets, reduce operating costs, and improve services for Suffolk communities. Among the new facilities available on site for the ambulance service is a reporting station that will house up to 28 operational staff, an office for three administrative staff, dedicated crew room and locker facilities and three new response vehicle bays with vehicle charging points. www.eastamb.nhs.uk

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10 | ESTNATIONAL RESILIENCE

Storm Abigail tests revised National Coordination and Advisory Framework A revised version of the National Coordination and Advisory Framework (NCAF) was issued in September 2015. The revised guidance was developed through collaboration between the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA), the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and the Chief Fire and Rescue Advisor (CFRA). Words: Dan Stephens, Chief Fire Officer, Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service & CFOA National Resilience Strategic Lead. The Fire and Rescue National Framework for England states that during emergencies DCLG will work with other government departments, partner agencies and the Devolved Administrations to coordinate the deployment arrangements for fire and rescue assets. The National Coordination and Advisory Framework (NCAF) is the mechanism to provide this coordination of nationally available assets, capabilities and resources to an incident developing, or with the potential to develop, from local to national in scale and the provision of advice between the affected fire and rescue service (FRS) and government emergency structures.

Severe weather In anticipation of Storm Abigail, severe weather warnings, which indicate a risk to life, were issued for North West and North East England for the weekend of 14 and 15 November. This initiated a series of telephone calls between the Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser (CFRA) Peter Holland, the CFOA Operations Director, Chief Fire Officer (CFO) Roy Wilsher, from Hertfordshire FRS, the CFOA National Resilience strategic lead, CFO Dan Stephens, from Merseyside FRS, and the CFOA Capability lead for High Volume Pumping (HVP) and Flood Response, DCFO Richard Lawrence, from Hereford and Worcester FRS.

The first action was to establish the situation across the North West and North East through liaison with the CFOs of the constituent FRSs. It was quickly determined that the significant area of concern was Cumbria, where 1600 properties in Kendal and Egremont had been identified as being at risk from flooding. A dialogue was then established with the Cumbria FRS strategic command team to develop an understanding of the extent of additional capability support that might be required. One benefit of the severe weather warnings issued by the Environment Agency is the ability to pre-plan and pre-deploy resources. This is clearly not something that can be done in a sudden onset emergency. In parallel the status of National Resilience HVP and boat rescue assets was confirmed through the National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT), which supports the CFOA capability leads with the operational delivery and assurance of the FRS national capabilities. By the afternoon of Friday 13 November DCFO Lawrence had developed a pre-deployment plan that could be adapted to meet any reasonably foreseeable request over the weekend. At around 1600hrs on Saturday afternoon Cumbria FRS requested two Type B boat rescue teams and a Flood Rescue Tactical Advisor via the Fire and Rescue Service National Coordination Centre (FRSNCC), hosted by London Fire Brigade. The FRSNCC then contacted

the NRAT duty officer who, in conjunction with DCFO Lawrence, activated the pre-deployment plan. A Type B boat rescue team from Merseyside FRS was deployed to Kendal and a Type B boat rescue team from Greater Manchester FRS was deployed to Egremont. A Flood Rescue Tactical Advisor from Merseyside FRS was deployed to Penrith to support the Cumbria FRS strategic command team.

Business as usual The teams from Merseyside and Greater Manchester remained in Cumbria until being stood down the following morning after the Strategic Coordination Group was able to determine that the situation could be managed through business as usual arrangements. This deployment was managed and delivered at the same time work was being undertaken in response to the attacks on Paris, which had occurred the previous evening. This required a significant additional commitment, which while not something that will be covered in any detail in this article serves to highlight the breadth of the challenges faced by the fire and rescue service and the worth of the NCAF arrangements, which work effectively in no small part due to the contribution provided by the CFOA Operations Directorate.

www.cfoa.org.uk

National response to flooding in Cumbria At the time of going to press, fire and rescue services and partner agencies from across the UK continued their work to help people affected by Storm Desmond, with a focus on the current situation in Cumbria. The work is part of a national response, coordinated by the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) national resilience arrangements. This means teams can be quickly mobilised nationally to assist with equipment, rescue teams and expertise. A number of national resilience assets were mobilised to the incident, including: High Volume Pumps (HVPs) – capable of moving 7000 litres of water per minute; powered boats crewed by swift water rescue trained firefighters; wading teams; tactical advisers; and logistics support. The National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT), supported by lead CFOA officers, coordinated the national response and provided support to the government.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Huge credit to all services

Coordinated response

Dan Stephens, CFOA National Resilience Strategic Lead, said, “All of the emergency services have been working together to assist people who have been affected by the flooding in Cumbria and surrounding areas. Huge credit must go to all services, which have been working around the clock to support communities across Cumbria and in Lancaster. “Being able to mobilise our national assets quickly and effectively is an essential part of our national resilience response. The public need to have confidence that the emergency services can and will respond quickly when they need us. “We have seen a huge amount of calls to the fire and rescue service over the past 24 hours and I am confident that our national response has been managed exceptionally.”

Roy Wilsher, CFOA’s Director of Operations, said, “Incidents such as this highlight how essential an efficient national response is for the UK, and I believe fire and rescue services must play a leading role in delivering this. “In addition, it is essential that the government ensures national resilience assets are not understated, to ensure CFOA can continue to coordinate a national response and continue to offer this level of response as and when required.” Flood alerts remained in place across the country on 7 December and with another band of bad weather on the way, further widespread flooding was expected.

www.cfoa.org.uk

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12 | ESTEVENTS

Government support for Ambition Ambition 2016 takes place at London Olympia from 19-20 April 2016. Adding fresh interest to the show, the event is now directly aligned with the National Resilience Capabilities Programme and the National Respond and Rescue Strategy written by the Civil Contingencies Secretariat and supported by the Cabinet Office. Following this significant development in the show’s unique position, Ambition will bring together both UK and International policymakers and senior operational managers to focus on how multiple parties work successfully on an integrated emergency management plan in ‘major incident’ emergency scenarios. Bringing together all those who must prepare for and respond to terrorist attacks or mass casualty emergencies and building resilience by working together, Ambition is a key event for anybody involved in the worldwide emergency preparedness, resilience and response (EPRR) community. As well as meeting new suppliers, visitors will have access to free-to-attend learning sessions, networking opportunities and a host of other benefits. Ambition 2016 is expected to be much larger than the 2015 event and will provide professionals from

Government departments, the NHS, councils, local resilience forums, ambulance trusts, fire and police organisations and specialist agencies the unique opportunity to meet, network and debate the latest challenges facing the emergency services today.

Free-to-attend Conference At the heart of Ambition sits a free-to-attend highlevel conference. Open to all members of the EPRR community, it provides a unique platform for thought leaders to discuss and debate the current issues shaping the emergency response community. Luana Avagliano, Head of Resilience Direct at the Cabinet Office and the Chair for the Ambition 2016 Conference, says, “We are excited about building Ambition into an international platform for the resilience community who can learn of the UK Emergency Preparedness strategy so that the public and private sectors can work together in managing major incidents while organically building knowledge on the latest technologies and services that support this critical area.” The Ambition 2016 conference also offers an excellent opportunity to unveil new developments in

EPRR and brings together all those who must prepare for terrorist attacks or mass casualty emergencies. Ambition is co-located alongside two other high-level events, Security & Counter Terror Expo and Forensics Europe Expo.

www.ambitionexpouk.com

Blue light speakers at BCGA event The British Compressed Gases Association (BCGA) 2016 annual conference takes place on 21 April at Oulton Hall in Leeds. The conference programme will offer a blend of industry updates and speakers from associated sectors, in keeping with the BCGA’s position as the go-to body for relevant, accurate and interesting

information. These include the hot topic of clean energy vehicles, with Chris Parkin from the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) keeping guests abreast of the latest developments in this field. OLEV works across government to support the early market for ultra-low emission vehicles (ULEV). Mr Parkin will set out the policy context, barriers and challenges, as well as the Government’s ULEV policy and the role of hydrogen and LNG/CNG within it.

Hazardous materials

Doug Thornton, Chief Executive of the BCGA.

Other speakers include West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service’s Dave Walton, the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) lead on hazardous materials, who will give an insight into the scope and activity of the service, plus an insight into the management of incidents involving hazardous materials. Leigh Greenham, Director for the Council of Gas Detection & Environmental Monitoring Gas, will discuss

detection instruments and compressed gases, while John Mairs, Deputy Head of the Dangerous Goods Division for the Department for Transport, will talk about the work of his department and some of the proposals that could amend the international regulations governing the transport of compressed gases. Doug Thornton, Chief Executive of the BCGA, said, “The calibre and expertise of the speakers signed up for the 2016 conference reflects the scope and scale of our industry and its proactive, innovative and collaborative approach. We’ve designed the event to be of appeal to members of BCGA and also offer an informative experience for those operating in organisations with a wider interest in compressed gases. The conference goes from strength to strength each year and the programme in place for 2016 provides the platform for continued success.”

www.bcga.co.uk

Trauma management in focus The 17th international Trauma Care conference will be held at Yarnfield Park Conference Centre in Staffordshire from 17-21 April 2016. This multi-disciplinary event provides trauma education for everyone involved in UK trauma management: from volunteer first-aiders to major trauma centre specialists. The conference includes several educational themes each day with high-quality presentations from some of the leading experts in trauma. Sessions include: Lessons from the Nepal Earthquake; Burns, Plastics & Reconstruction; Orthopaedic Trauma; Lessons from

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2015 Rugby World Cup; and Damage Control Surgery. Candidates have the opportunity to move between the different programmes, as well as book into the

conference educational workshops, and visit the show’s exhibition stands to review the latest products. If you have an interesting trauma audit or research project to present, there is opportunity to showcase this in the Trauma Care poster competition. Structured abstracts may cover any aspect of trauma (minor or major) and should be no more than 250 words submitted to editor.trauma@gmail.com by 1 February 2016. Selected posters will be presented at the conference and abstracts will be published in the journal Trauma. Delegate prices start at the affordable price of £30 for one day.

www.traumacare.org.uk

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UAE hosts Global Diary dates Meeting of USAR leaders in 2016 The 2015 International Search and Rescue Advisory Group (INSARAG) Global Meeting on Search and Rescue was hosted for the first time by the UAE and held at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre from 19-20 October. The meeting was held back to back with the INSARAG Training Working Group, INSARAG USAR Team Leaders Meeting and INSARAG Regional Meetings. INSARAG is a network of disaster-prone and disasterresponding countries and organisations dedicated to urban search and rescue (USAR) and operational field coordination. It aims to establish standards and classification for international USAR teams, as well as methodology for international response coordination in the aftermath of earthquakes and collapsed structure disasters in support of the affected population and governments. During the Global Meeting, which was attended by 300 participants from over 90 countries and organisations, a large number of seminars and forums were held, maximising the benefit of bringing together search and rescue teams’ leaders from all over the world, among these being representatives from the UK International Search and Rescue (UK ISAR) team. Agenda items for the Global Meeting included: lessons learnt from the Nepal earthquake; the official launch of the revised INSARAG Guidelines and methodology; response mechanisms to natural disasters around the world; the development of work systems, classification and accreditation of search and rescue teams; and the use of modern techniques in the search and rescue field. In light of the progress achieved by INSARAG over the past 25 years in creating a well-established, professional urban search and rescue network, a number of resolutions and recommendations were made at the 2015 Global Meeting. These included calling upon the Member States of the United Nations to continue to fully support the provisions within the UN General Assembly Resolution 57/150 of 16 Dec 2002 on ‘Strengthening the Effectiveness and Coordination of International Urban Search and Rescue assistance’, and to continue to support INSARAG and its activities. INSARAG reiterated this commitment from 2015-20 within the 2015 Abu Dhabi Declaration, which was signed during the Global Meeting.

17-19 January Intersec 2016 Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Centre, Dubai www.intersecexpo.com 8-10 March Security and Policing Farnborough FIVE, Hampshire www.securityandpolicing.co.uk 22-23 March British APCO The International Centre, Telford www.bapco-show.co.uk Sean Moore, UK ISAR Team Leader.

The meeting also reaffirmed its full support for disaster-affected countries in executing their primary role to initiate, coordinate and organise international humanitarian assistance on their territories, facilitating the deployment and work of international USAR teams; approving the modern updated version of the International Search and Rescue Advisory Group (INSARAG) 2015 Guidelines and methodology; and encouraging member countries to adopt these guidelines in their own disaster response plans. In addition, they stressed the increasing role of international USAR teams to the ‘post-rubble’ response in major disasters, assisting in the transition from disaster response to humanitarian assistance. UK ISAR National Coordinator Sean Moore stated, “The INSARAG meetings provide an excellent opportunity for political and operational focal points to come together and discuss major issues impacting international USAR teams. This year’s meetings were focused upon the recent response to Nepal, and the strategic vision for the next five years, which was captured within the Abu Dhabi Declaration. However, many other areas were discussed in order to improve how we best support disaster-affected communities. “The new INSARAG Guidelines were launched at the meeting, and we will be implementing applicable concepts within the USAR Concept of Operations, to further improve national response within the UK. “Attendance at these meetings is crucial to ensure that we remain at the ‘cutting edge’ of international USAR operations, and to maintain links with teams from all corners of the globe.”

www.insarag.org

17-21 April Trauma Care Yarnfield Park Conference Centre, Staffordshire www.traumacare.org.uk 19-20 April Security & Counter Terror Expo (SCTX) Olympia, London www.counterterrorexpo.com 19-20 April Ambition Olympia, London www.ambitionexpouk.com 21 April BCGA 2016 Oulton Hall, Leeds www.bcga.co.uk 25-28 April UKFSC 2016 www.ukfsc.org.uk 17-19 May Police Federation Annual Conference Bournemouth International Centre www.polfed.org 7-8 June NAPFM The Emergency Fleet Exhibition The International Centre, Telford www.napfmevent.org.uk 21-23 June IFSEC International ExCel, London www.ifsecglobal.com 21-23 June FIREX International ExCel, London www.firex.co.uk 21-22 September The Emergency Services Show Hall 5, NEC, Birmingham www.emergencyuk.com 3-7 October EMS World Expo New Orleans, Louisiana, USA www.emsworldexpo.com

A new networking event for the SAR community SAREXPO International 2016 takes place from 1-3 March at Palais des Festivals, Cannes, in France. The three-day event offers a mixture of theory and practice, featuring a conference, exhibition, live displays and site visits, bringing all search and rescue (SAR) disciplines together under one roof – sea rescue, mountain, disaster management etc – from global perspectives.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Study tours and site visits Keynotes, three parallel conference tracks, exhibitor seminars, live displays of rescue vessels just outside the venue on the Port of Cannes pier, helicopters just across the marina, press conferences, study tours and site visits – SAREXPO is the only event in the world for the exchange of experience and knowledge about search and rescue.

With world-class presentations, social networking events and more, SAREXPO will unite SAR workers and industry figures to discuss the vital rescue requirements needed to mitigate the risk of an isolated incident and fulfil the basic tenet of saving our fellow man.

www.sarexpo.com

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ESTESS2015 REVIEW | 15

Record visitor attendance sees ESS2016 move to bigger hall The Emergency Services Show 2015 (ESS2015), held at the NEC in Birmingham from 23-24 September, attracted a record number of 6151 visitors. This represents the ninth consecutive year-on-year increase in visitor numbers and a 10 percent increase on last year’s attendance record. Following this success, The Emergency Services Show 2016 (ESS2016) will move to the larger Hall 5 at the NEC, enabling the expanding event to be housed in a single hall.

The event organisers, Broden Media, attribute the record number of visitors to a number of factors, including: the fast-changing landscape of the emergency services; more exhibitors (at over 450) with many launching new products and services; and a comprehensive free-to-attend three-stream conference programme. Collaboration, community response and the expansion of blue light services into preventative and social care were among hot topics at this year’s event. Senior figures from the fire, police and ambulance services shared their experiences of co-responding to incidents.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

The latest communications technology, drones, defibrillators and a unique fire ambulance were among the many new products at the show that are helping to improve the effectiveness of the emergency services against a background of reducing budgets and increasing demand. Visitor Superintendent Kerry Blakeman, of West Midlands Police, commented, “I was really interested in vehicles and the equipment that we can carry in vehicles as well. Investing in some really good kit can save money in the long term, so I found the show really beneficial.”

Record attendance “This is a period of extraordinary transformation for the emergency services and their partner agencies,” said Event Director David Brown. “I believe this and The Emergency Services Show’s unique ability to bring together innovators from all parts of the public, private and volunteer sectors were drivers behind the record attendance at this year’s event. It proved to be a truly thought-provoking event and offered opportunities for all our visitors to network, share experiences and learn.”

Exhibitor David Savage, CEO of Excelerate Technology, said, “For anyone who is focused on the blue light services I think this is the premier show to attend.” Simon Ash, UK Sales Manager for Haix Footwear, said, “The quality of the people coming onto the stand was very relevant to the products we are selling and we’ve met the people who have the influence within their business to make purchasing decisions. We’ve also been talking to end users and getting valuable feedback direct from the people who are wearing our products.” The Emergency Services Show 2016 will take place from 21-22 September. The organisers have confirmed they will continue to offer entry to the exhibition and seminars free of charge as well as provide free parking.

www.emergencyuk.com

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Chameleon strongest signal SIMs showcased

The Chameleon stand at The Emergency Services Show.

Manx Telecom showcased its Chameleon Direct strongest signal SIM technology at The Emergency Services Show 2015. Chameleon SIMs can be used in virtually any mobile handset and automatically detect and connect to the strongest available local network signal anywhere in the UK. This makes the technology ideal for critical connection scenarios and Chameleon SIMs are already being used by several emergency services, including Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service and Humberside Police. Chameleon Direct provides one of the most convenient and cost-effective solutions for mobile communications in areas where coverage is patchy. It’s simple to set up, easy to operate, and scalable. Reaction at The Emergency Services Show was very positive. Sarah Ennett, Chameleon Product Manager, said, “It was interesting to hear first-hand the challenges for people who travel for their work, especially where the nature of that work means it is critical that they are contactable. Many people had heard about Chameleon, but were pleased to have a chance to meet us, gain

understanding of how it works and to see for themselves that the benefits far outweigh the relatively small costs involved.” Simon Taylor, Business Development Manager for Chameleon, added, “The show was a great success and we look forward to developing relationships with the many potential customers and partners we met, who could soon be benefiting from the capabilities of Manx Telecom’s Chameleon product. If connecting customers anywhere, anytime, with innovative Smart SIM solutions is important to your business, and you didn’t get a chance to meet us at the show, please get in touch.” Chameleon clients include Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service, which uses the strongest signal SIMs to contact on-call firefighters. The service has 31 fire stations located across the county staffed by 144 full-time firefighters, but there are also 25 community fire stations, which rely on 400 on-call firefighters who respond from their regular job, or from home. Humberside Police use Chameleon SIMs to help them protect vulnerable crime victims. Officers provide victims with alarms that have Chameleon Direct Strongest Signal SIMs. The type of alarm can vary, from a panic button activated by a victim, to a passive or silent alarm, which alerts the police without an intruder knowing. However it is being used, Chameleon Direct SIMs automatically select the strongest signal in any given location, to offer the best possible level of coverage at all times. It means that alarms can be deployed at short notice, or in locations where landlines are not appropriate to use or are unavailable.

www.strongestsignalmobile.com

Pickup’s Sprinter conversion concept Body conversion specialist Pickup Systems, of Burnley, launched a new concept in fire fighting vehicles at The Emergency Services Show 2015. The company’s prototype ‘Compac’ vehicle is built on a 5.0-tonne Sprinter 519 CDI chassis supplied by Dealer Ciceley Commercials. Managing Director John McGauley from Pickup Systems said, “Our vehicle has generated a real buzz of interest and is in great demand from fire and rescue services all over Britain who want to take a closer look at it. “Fire and rescue services, just like everyone else, are facing pressure on their budgets and looking for ways to operate as efficiently as possible – and that includes running the most cost-effective vehicles. At the same time, largely thanks to the excellent work they do in spreading fire safety advice, fitting free smoke alarms, and generally

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

800-litre water tank and Godiva KP2 PTO-powered pump. A 9m ladder is stowed on the roof.

Restricted access benefits

raising awareness, the number of callouts is falling. Yet the standard size of a fire tender has remained the same. “We believe there’s a growing need for a smaller, lighter, more efficient vehicle, one that provides a high level of fire fighting ability but with much lower running costs. Our Mercedes-Benz Sprinter conversion meets this requirement perfectly.” The Sprinter Compac is powered by a 190hp Euro VI engine, which drives through an automatic or six-speed manual transmission, and has a factory-built steel crew cab with seating for up to five firefighters. Its body is constructed from high-strength polypropylene and includes lockers and slide-and-tilt drawers to carry tools and equipment safely and securely, as well as an

“The vehicle is just like a standard fire tender, but downsized,” said Mr McGauley. “It can easily cope with the majority of fire situations and is also well suited for responding to road traffic collisions and water rescues. It really comes into its own, though, when attending incidents in areas where access is restricted, such as tight inner-city streets or narrow country lanes. “At the same time its lower initial purchase price, and greatly improved maintenance costs and fuel economy, mean it can be as much as 60 percent cheaper to operate than a traditional truck-based fire engine.” He added, “The Mercedes-Benz Sprinter chassis was the obvious choice when we decided to develop this concept. The chassis was also very easy to work on and we had full technical support from both Mercedes-Benz and Ciceley Commercials – we’re now working closely with the dealer to offer a ‘one-stop shop’ arrangement for customers.”

www.pickup-systems.com

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ESTESS2015 REVIEW | 17

Realism focus for latest Laerdal launches identifying key anatomical landmarks, normal anatomy and physiology so that this information can be used to make informed decisions in the future. Additional SimMan 3G packages for SonoSim include the Trauma Care, Critical Care and a Cardiac Resuscitation bundles, while SonoSim can act alongside SimMom with obstetric training cases and scenarios to make training more realistic and relevant for both early and late stage pregnancies.

ShockLink SonoSim allows for real ultrasound cases with pathological findings to be integrated into full-scale simulations.

Celebrating 75 years of helping save lives in 2015 and with a continued commitment to innovation to simulation, Laerdal launched two new products – SonoSim and ShockLink – at ESS2015. Both products ultimately improve patient care and safety by aiming to make the medical training process more realistic and easier to integrate into the wide variety of training environments.

SonoSim The increasingly true-to-life feel of Laerdal products is highlighted in the SonoSim’s ultrasound capabilities. The product allows for real ultrasound cases with pathological findings to be integrated into full-scale simulations, bringing a whole new dimension to medical training. The SonoSim will first be available with SimMan 3G and SimMom to assess the accuracy of trainees in

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

If you’re looking to improve your live defibrillation training, look no further than ShockLink. It simply connects most commonly used defibrillators to the majority of current CPR manikins, saving you the cost and time of buying a completely new manikin. With the ShockLink remote control, or a SimPad, you can prompt changes to simulated heart rhythm scenarios, providing more realistic and effective training. When ShockLink is used alongside SimPad SkillReporter, training notes can be logged for debriefing sessions at a later date; this includes all action relating to time spent administering QCPR, placing the pads correctly and delivering a shock with minimal interruptions. The flexible nature of both of these latest costeffective innovations will help medically trained professionals to make quick and informed decisions wherever they are.

www.laerdal.co.uk

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18 |

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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Thousands visit Dräger to see next generation products Thousands of visitors attended Dräger’s stand at The Emergency Services Show 2015 to find out more about its next generation products dedicated to keeping firefighters safe. Dräger showcased its latest range of products at the show, with specialists on hand to discuss product features, service, training and maintenance options. Among the advanced technological products on display was the new fire ground communications range – the Dräger FPS-COM 5000, FPS-COM 7000, the HPS 7000 firefighters‘ helmet and the new HPS 3500 tactical rescue helmet. The HPS 3500 has been designed as a multifunctional and universal helmet for mission teams in a variety of different scenarios, including search and rescue, forest and wildfires, traffic accidents, flooding, rescues from height and providing technical assistance. The HPS 3500’s internal four-point harness and padding give great comfort for wearers, while the adjusting wheel is easy to use wearing gloves, and is easily adapted to individual head sizes without the need to remove it. The helmet also benefits from a robust shell, made from high quality thermoplastic, which protects the head reliably, while remaining lightweight.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Dräger products have been protecting emergency services workers‘ lives for over 125 years and its latest range of fire ground communications systems ensure firefighters are protected and prepared for every situation in which they find themselves. Voice amplifier and hands free team communications improve team cooperation and can save firefighters‘ lives – and Dräger has incorporated both into its 2016 next generation FPS-COM 5000 and FPS-COM 7000 communications units, along with wireless radio connection via Bluetooth. Dräger has introduced TeamTalk with the FPS-COM 7000, a feature, which enables firefighters to communicate with each other, hands free, by using a voice activated full duplex communications system. Combined with direct Bluetooth wireless connectivity to radio and instant relaying of inbound radio communications, meaning everyone gets the message – first hand, loud and clear. The new FPS-COM devices pick up speech directly in the inner mask. This is reproduced without interference from the voice amplifier before transmitting it to the radio. Breathing sounds are completely filtered out and the inner mask screens the microphone from ambient noise.

The new HPS 3500 tactical rescue helmet.

Firefighters can send radio messages to command, even at extreme ambient noise levels, and they are received loud and clear. By connecting the FPS-COM 5000 or 7000 to the tactical radio unit, evacuation alarms are screened out and emergency calls can be made quickly. The Dräger FPS-COM 5000 and 7000 products are ATEX approved for use in explosive areas (Zone 0), EN 136 and EN 137 Type 2.

www.draeger.com/ukfire

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20 | ESTPEOPLE

The Association of Air Ambulances has appointed Liz Campbell as the Independent Chair of the Association of Air Ambulances Charity (AAAC), a legally independent body, which is designed to funnel national donations into individual air ambulance charities. Liz replaces Chloe Smith MP, the interim Independent Chair of the AAAC, and brings a wealth of experience and knowledge to the role. www.aoaa.org.uk

Staffordshire Police has appointed Nick Adderley from Greater Manchester Police as a new Assistant Chief Constable. http://staffspolice.com

Alison Marquis has been appointed to the newly created post of Deputy Chief Officer of the St John Ambulance & Rescue Service LBG (SJARS). Mrs Marquis’ principal role is to deputise for the Chief Officer and assist and support the Board of SJARS in providing efficient and effective ambulance, rescue and community services throughout the Bailiwick of Guernsey. She will also support the Chief Officer on strategic and policy issues, providing leadership and management skills to ensure the delivery of the highest levels of patient care, pre-hospital medical treatment and rescue and community services. https://stjohn.gg

Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Authority has appointed its former Deputy Chief Fire Officer Terry McDermott to the position of Chief Fire Officer/Chief Executive for Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service. www.derbys-fire.gov.uk

Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service (NFRS) has a new Chief Fire Officer following the appointment of Roy Harold. Roy, who replaces Nigel Williams, joined NFRS as Assistant Chief Fire Officer in 2010 and was promoted to Deputy Chief Fire Officer in 2013. Roy served as Chair of the CFOA Water Rescue Group from 2010-2014 where he led the national flood support team. He was awarded an MBE in 2006, for his work on fire and rescue service modernisation and national contingency planning.

Essex Police lead seven forces looking to maximise joint working Assistant Chief Constable (ACC) Julia Wortley, of Essex Police, will be undertaking the role of temporary Deputy Chief Constable (DCC) to help Essex, the five other Eastern Region forces – Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk – and Kent maximise joint working. ACC Wortley will lead work to explore and develop proposals for future collaborative working between the seven forces, helping to drive out inefficiencies at a crucial time for policing. Essex Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh says, “The challenges of rising demand and falling budgets are so serious that they cannot be solved by individual forces acting alone. If we do not find ways of making what we do more efficient and effective our prospects are grave.

www.scotland.police.uk

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Essex Police ACC Julia Wortley.

to deliver policing services in a different, more joined-up way. “I am looking forward to the challenge of building more collaboration projects and want our team of forces to be the UK leader in making collaboration work.” www.essex.police.uk

Greater Manchester Police makes changes at the top Ian Hopkins has been selected as the new Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police (GMP). Ian’s appointment has led to Assistant Chief Constable Ian Pilling being selected as the new Deputy Chief Constable, a role the new Chief vacated upon appointment to the top job. Ian Hopkins has been with GMP since 2008 following roles with Staffordshire, Northamptonshire and Cheshire Police. Tony Lloyd, Mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner, said, “Ian is a highly regarded figure in British policing and has extensive experience

of the challenges of policing Greater Manchester. As Deputy Chief Constable he has been at the forefront of helping the service cope with the cuts imposed by government, while driving a programme of change to make the service more reflective of the community it serves. This strategic expertise is complemented by first-rate operational experience of leading the police response to major incidents such as the 2011 riots. “Continuing budget pressures combined with the changing landscape of policing means we have increasingly

tough times ahead. I’m confident that Ian is the person to lead GMP and work with me to build safer, stronger communities and ensure the people of Greater Manchester have an effective police service. Ian Hopkins said, “I am honoured to be taking over the role of Chief Constable and look forward to continuing to work with all my colleagues and wider partners during what is going to be a really difficult time for GMP. www.gmp.police.uk

New Lifeboat Operations Manager takes the helm

www.norfolkfireservice.gov.uk/nfrs

Philip Gormley is to replace Sir Stephen House as Chief Constable of Police Scotland. Mr Gormley was formerly Chief Constable for Norfolk Constabulary and Director Deputy General of the National Crime Agency.

“Our Essex and Kent Support Services and Serious Crime directorates show what we can do when we do it together. Julia’s advice, commitment and leadership in the ACC role will be hugely missed but her reputation within the region and experience in taking forward complex collaboration projects such as Athena makes her the perfect choice for this hugely important role. “I would like to thank her on behalf of the force for her remarkable contribution to Essex Police.” ACC Wortley said, “Working together efficiently across force boundaries saves time and money and ultimately improves local service delivery to the public. As a group of forces, we have much to do to maximise the benefits of collaboration but the incentives to do so compel us to work harder than ever

New Lifeboat Operations Manager Bruce Baker. Photo: RNLI/John Julian.

Bruce Baker has taken over the role of Lifeboat Operations Manager for St Agnes RNLI following the retirement of Nick Marsh after 15 years of service. Bruce has previously been a helm on the lifeboat and a member of the shore crew and will now authorise launch requests and be responsible for the day-to-day management of the station. Tom Mansell, RNLI Divisional Operations Manager, paid tribute to Nick’s selfless commitment. He said, “Nick has been a key part of St Agnes RNLI for over 15 years and has carried out the role with exceptional dedication and commitment. He has worked really hard

to ensure that he leaves the station in a very strong position, we thank him and wish him every happiness in his retirement from the RNLI.” Coinciding with a change of Operations Manager came a new lifeboat, St Agnes’ new D class. The lifeboat XK-alibur replaces Blue Peter IV, which has come to the end of her operational life. The new £41,000 lifeboat has been part funded by the Jaguar Enthusiasts Club, with the remaining amount being raised in the community. www.rnli.org.uk

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22 | ESTADVERTORIAL

The changing landscape of first responders In a few decades the role of first responders has changed beyond recognition. For hundreds of years the concept of a professional first responder was alien. Ambulance personnel, if they were even called that, had to transport the patient to the nearest hospital or doctor as quickly as they could. This role could be taken on by anyone with a cart, anyone who happened to be near. Speed was the only consideration.

Vital role At Getac, we are aware of how vital the role of first responders is, how their equipment can change the outcome, tipping the balance between life and death. It is all we work towards, making reliable, rugged, life-saving devices. Our technology is designed to inform and empower medical professionals and save human lives. Whatever the conditions, our devices are reliable, removing doubt from first responders’ minds. They can send and receive data, transfer diagnosis and other critical details to their destination hospital. Our devices are trusted. The Scottish Ambulance Service now uses our T800 devices. Times have changed. The horrors of the First World War brought the first motorised ambulances, which entered service in September 1914. Yet, even though this period saw huge advances in medicine, such as skin grafts and early cosmetic surgery, the role of ambulances stayed mostly the same. They remained transport only. William Kouwenhoven invented the first defibrillator in 1930, yet they were housed in hospitals, not ambulances. Another human tragedy hastened change. The 1952 Harrow and Wealdstone Rail Crash highlighted the lack of first responder technology. Many of the 112 fatalities could have been saved if the ambulances had better equipment. This shift in thinking focused on saving patients’ lives at the scene and not merely transporting them to a hospital.

Significant change This subtle yet significant change saw ambulances being fitted with modern devices, designed to save patients’ lives. They were seen as an integral part of the treatment, altering the outcome and stacking the odds in the patient’s favour. Defibrillators were no longer restricted to hospitals, but housed in ambulances. You could almost call this early ‘mobile technology’. At Getac, we are focused on developing the next wave of mobile devices, giving even more capability to first responders. Speed has taken on a new meaning. Speed of connection, speed of sending and receiving data, speed of diagnosis; all these critical actions are made possible by Getac’s rugged technology. As part of a $29.4bn global business, operating across the most challenging environments in the world, they have a wealth of knowledge and expertise to drink from. Getac’s new RX10H is designed for medical professionals, first responders and hospital-based experts alike. Tested, reliable and able to withstand the most severe conditions, so medical professionals can do what they are trained to: save human life.

www.getac.co.uk If you would like to discuss any aspect of your rugged computing solution requirements, call 01952 207 221, e-mail: Sales-Getac-UK@getac.com or visit www.getac.co.uk

Getac’s new RX10H is designed for medical professionals, first responders and hospital-based experts alike.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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Getting smart about public safety The forward pace of technology innovation is creating tremendous potential for new and enhanced operational capabilities, with the promise to help emergency services see, hear and do more with less. Words: Peter Goulding, Public Safety Specialist, Motorola Solutions. associated with the emergency services will be interconnected through an intelligent network that captures and delivers everything from mission-critical voice calls, to mission-critical use of data including vehicle telemetry and video that can be triggered automatically when a user is in harm’s way. This could start to transform emergency services equipment, from new data driven communications devices to smart clothes with biometrics and environmental sensors, video capture devices and the possibility of ‘head up displays’ delivered through smartglasses. Vehicles will also become hyper-connected hubs, helping to deploy search robotics and surveillance drones.

online news and databases – to analyse crime patterns in real time. This is enabling us to predict where crime will likely occur and deal with it. In fact, with analytics, Motorola Solutions is able to help police forces predict potential criminal activity in an upcoming shift, so patrol plans can be altered in designated areas to reduce crime.

Network of networks

Peter Goulding, Public Safety Specialist, Motorola Solutions.

In the coming years you can expect to see the Internet of Things (IoT) become increasingly standardised, enabling millions of connected devices to communicate and make decisions automatically. Applications will also become increasingly integrated with devices, driving hyper-connected technology ecosystems. This will continue to drive increasing amounts of data. Understanding and managing this data will ultimately define and distinguish a successful organisation.

Critical operational data Consider this; apparently 90 percent of the data in the world was created in just the past two years. Although most emergency services organisations have only just begun to scratch the surface of what can be achieved through intelligent use of data, most public safety decision makers we talk to view data as critical. Every second, critical operational data is being created, collected and stored – incidents reported, video recorded, calls for service received. But unstructured data can rapidly become a debilitating challenge, filling servers, be hard to search and access.

Communities and the public will undoubtedly be kept safer by connecting police, fire and ambulance service personnel with a network of networks formed around the individual, the vehicle and their command and control systems.

“Consider this; apparently 90 percent of the data in the world was created in just the past two years.” This requires a mission-critical operating environment that makes data work, turning information into intelligence, and that intelligence into action, meaning we are all kept safe. This is achieved by analysing information from multiple sources, including information like social media and tapping into the terabytes of data coming from the many sensors and other IP-enabled devices, in real time, to identify and use that crucial bit of information that can make a real difference. Crucially this can now be done in a matter of minutes rather than days through the application of software and services that will be increasingly cloud-based. For the police, this means collating data from multiple sources – body worn video cameras, social media,

When an incident does occur, the unique needs of the emergency services now go beyond rugged, dependable communications. The underlying networks and software that connects and empowers officers must not only enhance real-time situational awareness, it must do so within the context of any changing situation. Intelligence is now smartly and intuitively delivered, enabling officers to prioritise response and stay focused on the task at hand. All without the technology ever becoming a distraction.

Improved response After an incident, video and data capture from cameras and sensors on personnel and vehicles will enable digital reconstruction of events to independently confirm, and if required exonerate, actions of personnel in the course of their duty. Digital evidence management can securely store evidence and enable search and sharing of information while guaranteeing chain of custody required by the Court processes. Analytics and investigative tools can also be applied to generate new links within and between information. This can deliver a single view of the public safety environment, from assessing the scene of an incident, to identifying the cause and effects and thus helping managers and supervisors to strengthen and improve their responses in the future to keep our communities safe and secure.

www.motorolasolutions.com

Data only becomes a valuable asset if you can make sense of it. This is driving the need for the right tools to generate, compile, access and then share data in a cost effective and smart way, turning data into a tangible asset and transforming operational reaction and response into prediction and prevention. To stay a step ahead, front line officers and those who watch over them, need the right data to have better visibility to what is happening around them at all times. This near-term vision is one where all solutions

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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24 | ESTICT

Blue Light Futures – innovations that will transform emergency response In a new Blue Light Futures report, Airwave’s CTO Euros Evans takes a look at what the next five years have to offer the emergency services. He also offers seven recommendations on how we can take action to safeguard the technology of the future. Words: Euros Evans, CTO, Airwave. Technological advances are critical to the future of the emergency services. But our ability to apply, integrate and exploit these new technologies is even more crucial, especially in a time of budgets tightening year on year while the risk to the public grows ever greater. Behind these advances is the creation and transmission of data, which depends on the spread of 4G/LTE networks. We are already seeing their impact, with innovations including body-worn cameras and electronic notebooks transforming working processes and the availability of information both at the scene of the incident and in the control room. From paperless policing to telemetry and even drones, the innovation of tomorrow has the potential to further revolutionise the blue light services to drive efficiency, boost public safety and drive cost savings. But such rapid change also brings new challenges – from the protection of data to the importance of making sure infrastructure is ready to accommodate new innovations.

The next five years Many of the technologies that have the potential to transform the emergency services already exist, but they are either not being used to their full potential or need to evolve to bring significant benefits. With development, intelligent application and a platform capable of hosting the data they create, today’s innovations could transform the speed and accuracy of emergency responses.

Drones Drones are already familiar on the consumer market, with the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) predicting that the drone market will be worth about £86m by the end of 2015. But as drones become smaller, lighter and more stable, they will be increasingly used in a wide variety of roles in emergency response. By 2020, drones will be used by the emergency services in hard-to-reach locations, isolated by bad

Further advances could be realised when telemetry is combined with visual data collected via CCTV, to detect the behaviours of suspicious individuals to enable their potential intent to be analysed. The small devices used in telemetry will also develop – for example, to enable an elderly person to be fitted with a monitor that relays vital information to the emergency services to detect the signs or symptoms of a stroke, cutting down the crucial response time that makes a great difference to the patient’s prognosis.

Mobile apps

Euros Evans, Airwave’s CTO.

weather, hazards or terrain. Equipped with different sensors and cameras, they will soon become sophisticated tools for gathering useful intelligence and responding to the most challenging emergencies, at the same time lowering the risk to emergency responders on the scene.

Telemetry Telemetry powers everything from the small devices used to collect personal health data to the Internet of Things, which allows equipment ranging from fridges to cars to power grids to gather and share data. Advances in telemetry already enable the emergency services to monitor crowd flows, identify suspects from their body language and help keep firefighters safe by tracking their body temperature and warning them if they are dangerously hot. The European Union has taken this a step further, recently mandating that a telemetry system must be installed in every new vehicle by 31 March 2018, so that the emergency services are automatically notified if it has been involved in an accident.

About Airwave Over the last 15 years, Airwave has invested in the development and maintenance of a world-leading network for the emergency services that is encrypted, interoperable between different emergency services, resilient and covers 99 percent of Great Britain’s landmass, including remote areas such as the Highlands and Islands. It has taken a leading role in advising other countries including Germany, the Netherlands and Norway on their public safety networks as well as in the international discussions about the next generation of 4G/LTE critical communications technology. More recently, its application services division has developed mobile data applications (apps) and services, including electronic notebooks, to enable users to enter data directly into systems and download information from databases in the field. These changes are just the start, and already have the potential to save individual forces over £1m per annum.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

The full capability of smartphone apps is currently underused in the emergency services – even though Ofcom estimates that 62 percent of adults in the general population now own a smartphone. Apps used by both incident victims and emergency responders could hugely improve public safety by harnessing increasingly sensitive sensors, better data analysis, and advancements in telemetry. This will enable the emergency services to make more accurate decisions, gather enhanced intelligence, and at their most effective, prevent loss of life.

Members of the public could use apps to connect to the emergency services so that responders are notified of an incident as soon as it occurs. Its location, size and severity can be immediately assessed, and, where injuries have occurred, first aid can be given remotely. In the future, apps could be used by the emergency responders themselves to access the medical records of an accident victim while at the scene, to check the plans for a building that is on fire, and to send messages automatically back to the control room about their own location and wellbeing.

Cloud technology More and more organisations are using cloud technology to work collaboratively with dispersed teams, partners and suppliers. As emergency services budgets come under pressure and resources are required to stretch further, cloud technology will play a similarly transformative role for police forces, ambulance services, and fire and rescue services across the country. As the cloud is a platform that can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection, it will make centralised, flexible workforces a growing part of emergency response, helping to overcome resource challenges and enabling the deployment of more resource to the front line.

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ESTICT | 25 Adoption of cloud technologies could lead to the virtualisation of control rooms, and give frontline responders access to specialists wherever they are in the country.

“The future will open up a large number of opportunities for the emergency services to get a step ahead.” Securing the future: Airwave’s recommendations

4. Ensure technology risks are comprehensively and honestly considered, thoroughly evaluated and that any necessary mitigation plans are suitably robust for each new technology 5. Build a single, centralised, and secure cloud-based, emergency services data management system that is capable of storing and processing the vast quantities of data, from multiple sources, that emergency services will rely on in the future 6. Responsibility for driving these agreements and developments forwards should be taken by a multidisciplinary working group, such as the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme (JESIP). This should include representatives from all of the emergency services, the Home Office, the Criminal Justice System (CJS), the Department of Health (DH), and the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG)

7. This multi-disciplinary working group should encourage nationwide uptake of new technologies and data systems in a way that is consistent, maximises the benefit of the technology, and continually strives to define and achieve best practice. The future will open up a large number of opportunities for the emergency services to get a step ahead – whether it is through immediate diagnosis of patients, pre-emption of crimes or greater protection of those on the front line. The key challenge now is for government departments, public safety professionals and industry to come together and do the heavy lifting needed for these technologies to bear fruit.

www.airwavesolutions.co.uk

Each of these innovations will create, rely on or carry significant amounts of data. With these come a number of major challenges that will need to be addressed sooner rather than later. At a time when the need for secure, reliable and resilient mission critical communications is greater than ever, the following will be necessary to confront these challenges: 1. Upgrade wireless networks to ensure that they offer sufficient coverage, resilience and availability to cope with increasing volumes of mission critical data 2. Ensure data protection is of the highest priority and all data handling systems are encrypted and protected against hacking 3. Agree clear guidelines and regulations for how public data should be shared

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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28 | ESTICT

How can emergency services ensure a smooth transition to ESN? The Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP) promises to provide a raft of benefits supporting operations in the 21st Century, such as enhanced data services and increased flexibility. As with any large ICT programme, there are a multitude of risks and challenges to overcome to transition to a new system and realise these benefits. Given the sphere of operations that the emergency services cover, these risks are magnified due to public safety implications. Words: Helen Shapcott, Consultant, Emergency Services Team, Digital Infrastructure Practice, Mott MacDonald. To fully capitalise on ESMCP, emergency services will have to shoulder most of the responsibility for managing their transition on to the new Emergency Services Network (ESN). By understanding the technical and commercial landscape under which ESMCP is being delivered, risks can be managed, and mitigation strategies developed. There are a number of areas that emergency services should begin considering now in order to ensure a smooth transition.

Project management and resourcing The primary responsibility of emergency services during transition is to ensure the uncompromised continuity of their operations. Detailed planning will be required to ensure that timescales are met and operations remain uninterrupted. To manage risks, ensure operational continuity and minimise costs, the right skills and levels of resources will need to be in place. By taking a strategic view of the way transition will be managed from the outset, the correct level of focus can be given to the tasks that need to be carried out on the ground. For example, the physical logistics of procuring devices, including issuing equipment to personnel and fitting out vehicles, against an aggressive timetable, can bring with it many challenges and the potential for disruption to operations. Realistic and careful planning (for both normal and spate conditions) of fleet downtime, logistics modelling, staffing requirements and testing, can help manage and mitigate costs, reduce delays and minimise any resource overruns.

“The transition to ESN presents a complex suite of challenges that each emergency service must address.” An over-arching plan and appropriate governance structure for transition should be developed, which is tailored to each service’s specific operational needs. This can ensure that project teams are empowered to proactively address emerging risks and issues throughout this technically challenging and complex delivery programme. Emergency services will have to interact with multiple suppliers, both existing and future, and ESMCP management teams. Each service’s project teams will need to be technically competent and commercially astute so that they are able to confidently

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

address problems head on. Requirements for project teams need to be identified and planned for early on, to ensure that appropriate levels and timing of funding are secured to enable delivery. By addressing these organisational needs now, business cases can be written and approved so that the right resources are in place when needed.

Technology and supplier management To realise the benefits of ESN, new technology will need to seamlessly interface with legacy equipment and be operationally integrated to support each service’s specific working practice requirements. If designed and defined correctly, testing and acceptance regimes will provide a mechanism to ensure that suppliers have met their contractual requirements, and credibly assure emergency services that solutions are ready for users. Current control room solutions, their designs and configurations (which are often bespoke), will need to be well understood, as well as new solutions and products being offered by ESN suppliers. It is likely that multiple suppliers will be involved, with different technical and quality standards, ways of working, cultures and levels of communication. By getting to grips with the technical designs and specifications, emergency services’ project teams can ensure that suppliers are delivering according to contracted services and outputs. Information sharing tools that facilitate collaboration between multiple organisations and stakeholders should also be considered as a means to further manage the technical integration challenges. Emergency services are already delivering ICT projects that provide new functionality and drive efficiencies through the use of mobile data for mobilisation, including body worn video and the smarter use of back-office systems. The outputs being delivered by emergency services’ current projects and their dependencies need to be clearly mapped, so that the desired outcomes and benefits of these projects can continue to be realised. How does a current project delivering new PDAs that interact with existing resource management systems interplay with ESN?

Commercial considerations Robust contracts need to be developed and actively negotiated with suppliers, so that they meet and protect services’ needs and interests. Commercial arrangements will need to be in place with emergency services’ existing service providers that support transition to ESN, including relationships held directly through ESMCP’s suppliers and service chain. Clarity over lines of demarcation between suppliers and their responsibilities will need to be understood when drafting any such contracts. Strong contracts will

provide the foundation for the delivery of solutions during transition and for future maintenance. The eventual ESN solutions are likely to be in place for a number of years, so the services and systems being procured need contracts that hold suppliers to account during steady state, as well as during delivery and transition.

Collaboration In an ever more connected operational environment, emergency services collaborative working is increasing and evolving. To support this, ESN transition plans will need to address the complexities of multi-lateral business continuity and partnering fall-back arrangements between responders, control rooms and back-office systems. How these end-to-end solutions link operational partners, and how and when these separate entities will be transitioning to the new ESN, will be an issue needing close management by each service’s project team.

Foundation for maximising benefits The transition to ESN presents a complex suite of challenges that each emergency service must address. By successfully assuring operational continuity and the technical development, installation and upgrade of equipment and systems from the outset, focus can then move to exploiting the new service to maximise its benefits and propagate new ways of working. Mott MacDonald successfully managed the transition of 9000 radios and MDTs, 30,000 users and 148 control rooms onto the Airwave system under the Firelink project. The company has practical knowledge and detailed experience in the areas discussed above that will increase your likelihood of successful transition and would be happy to assist you in managing your programme delivery. Please get in touch for further advice on managing your ESN transition.

www.mottmac.com/communications

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4G and Internet of Things Telephony evolution drive vital innovation EE has announced a new range of products for businesses aimed at connecting workers, their customers and machines as the Internet of Things (IoT) has an increasing impact on business. EE now has more than half a million business and public sector organisation accounts, 75 percent of which are on 4G. In 2015, EE has been working with customers to outline the impact that 4G adoption is having on Britain’s most important public services. Deployments of new mobile technologies, including Connected Vehicle, 4G Rapid Site, and Connected Health, show the significant impact of enhanced connectivity on vital UK services and some of the most pressing issues facing the UK today. 4G is helping to ease the pressure that many organisations are facing to deliver better public services, more efficiently: • For emergency services like Staffordshire Police, deploying 4G mobile devices could save 250,000 hours of front line staff time per year, the equivalent of more than 100 officers on the beat • In the NHS, mobile technologies can improve communications between patients and primary/secondary care providers, potentially reducing missed and unnecessary GP and outpatient appointments by 65 percent and saving £585m towards reducing the current £2bn deficit. EE CEO Olaf Swantee says, “We’ve shown what 4G can do for consumers, and now businesses and the public sector are using the quality and reliability of the network that we’ve built to boost the UK economy and tackle some of the biggest issues facing Britain today. The impact of 4G adoption on vital UK services is incredibly powerful. Helping the NHS and emergency services provide better service to the community, more cost effectively, is exactly the type of real world benefit that our world-leading mobile network enables. That’s why we’re launching our new capabilities for these sectors and helping them prepare for the IoT future where everything is connected.”

Updata Infrastructure, part of Capita IT Enterprise Services, has been awarded a £140,000 contract to migrate Buckinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service’s (BFRS) telephony infrastructure to a Skype for Business solution. The implementation will transfer all 20 fire stations to a Skype for Business solution, which allows staff to work more effectively and provide an improved service for the public. The unified solution will also provide BFRS with significant savings in telephony costs.

www.capita.co.uk

Wireless hotspots Connected Vehicle from EE integrates an industrial 4G router and powerful high gain antenna into cars and vans, turning them into wireless hotspots that can connect any device, from laptops and tablets in utility vehicles to EKG machines in ambulances. Matthew Ellis, Police and Crime Commissioner, Staffordshire, says, “My aspiration is for Staffordshire to be the most technologically advanced police service by 2016. Fast, reliable connectivity in the field means officers can spend more time in the community – allowing them to access critical systems remotely and cut the time they spend on administrative tasks. The ongoing roll-out of mobile technology to officers is helping to free up an extra 250,000 hours of police time to be out on the beat, the equivalent of over an extra 100 officers on duty. “Deploying 4G connected devices has already boosted efficiency, in some cases allowing officers to cut administrative time on jobs that could take days down to minutes. By providing high speed connectivity in vehicles as well, we'll be able to turn their police vehicles into hotspots – giving officers, support teams and, in the future, partners, vital access to information on the move.”

TETRA band selective repeater Danish manufacturer Procom A/S has an incredible array of TETRA products in its portfolio, which provide communication solutions to many industries and organisations. The CBBR-400 TETRA band selective repeater is the company’s latest TETRA product, designed for 400MHz TETRA systems in areas, which cannot be covered economically with base stations. The compact CBBR-400 repeater is easy to install and can be set locally or remotely by its remote control software, which also provides monitoring capability. This new repeater is an ideal solution for buildings or open fields, where field strength is weak.

www.procomuk.co.uk

www.ee.co.uk

Capita helps LFB launch new mobilising system for 999 calls London Fire Brigade (LFB) has launched a new mobilising system for handling 999 calls in the capital. The new system, supplied by Capita Communication and Control Solutions, will be used by 999 control officers to deal with emergency fire calls and assign fire appliances to emergencies. In London over 170,000 emergency fire calls are received each year. The system uses GPS tracking technology combined with real-time status information, similar to taxi apps like Uber, allowing the brigade’s control officers to track all of London’s 155 fire appliances on screen in order to send the closest available appliance to an emergency. Control officers are also able to watch each fire

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

appliance’s journey on-screen, while at the same time reassuring callers as to the estimated time of arrival. It will also allow the brigade to determine the location of those dialling 999 from a mobile, which should help control officers to pinpoint the location of emergencies with greater speed and accuracy. The new system also means that fire appliances will now be mobilised to emergencies according to their proximity to incidents, a change from the old system, where engines were mobilised from the closest fire station, rather than where the actual engines were. This should lead to a quicker response to emergencies. The new system will lead to a more streamlined and

quicker call handling process when people report fires and other emergencies to the brigade. As well being able to track fire appliances, the new system will also provide control officers with much more specific addresses for incidents, again leading to faster response times. The brigade’s old system allowed the brigade to search for over 80,000 street records when directing a fire appliance to an emergency, whereas the new system holds over 7.5 million addresses.

www.capitacontrolsolutions.co.uk www.london-fire.gov.uk

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Collaboration is driving efficiency and delivering better services At the recent Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) ICT Professionals conference a straw poll of the top issues occupying the minds of the delegates revealed some interesting trends within the sector. Just a couple of years ago cost reduction would have been firmly at the top of the list, however it was notable that it had been knocked out of poll position by another focus – collaboration. Words: Neil Moore, Head of ICT, Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service & CFOA ICT lead. investment cost of technology solutions to enable secure integration, although the non-integration route comes with its own costs, not only through duplicating infrastructure in shared locations, but also in reducing the number of opportunities for cost savings arising from economies of scale.

Arguably, collaboration is being driven by a requirement to reduce costs in the face of the ongoing rounds of spending review, and while this is an important motive, there are signs also within the sector of more positive reasons for collaboration, especially among emergency services organisations. The aim is that the formation of strategic alliances will deliver better services to the public as well as providing services that are more efficient. Partnerships are being established between individual fire and rescue services, but also between different emergency services, such as police and fire, and also with other organisations. In Hampshire we even have an example of four emergency services (fire, police, ambulance and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency) operating out of a retained fire station.

partners might actually encourage us to maintain our cosy silos for a little longer. But at least it’s a start.

Devil in the detail

Sharing common systems

So, why does collaboration demand such a high place in the minds of the ICT professionals? Well ‘The Devil’ as they say, ‘is in the detail’. From an ICT perspective there are two broad challenges; firstly how to provide the technical infrastructure to support collaboration and secondly how to drive down the cost of that technology.

More radical than joining up different systems though, are those emergency services who have taken the next step and whose collaboration includes sharing common systems. Whether or not there is an associated joint control room, fire sector partnerships have emerged in recent years that have jointly procured and networked their system solutions to achieve greater resilience as well as driving down cost. These services have not only embraced shared technologies, but also adopted the wider package of cultural and operational change that accompanies real collaboration. It can involve compromise, but opens up opportunities for the ICT professionals to deliver more cost effective technologies based on greater economies of scale.

Finding the right technology is as much about people and culture as it is about technical innovation. Even among fire and rescue services the case is often made that ‘we’re different’ to justify why collaboration shouldn’t be considered. Of course there are local variations, and over recent years a lot of effort has been put into trying to establish common standards, for example to exchange operational information between diverse systems, but in some ways that’s more like sticking plaster rather than getting to the heart of the issue. Simply (or not so simply) trying to join up our disparate systems so we can exchange information with

Security concerns

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Neil Moore, Head of ICT, Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service.

With collaboration between different types of emergency services, for example ambulance and fire, the challenges of providing integrated technologies are greater, and especially, in my experience, where one of the partners is police. The key concern of course is security. How do we bring organisations with differing levels of baseline security together onto an integrated platform? This is not an easy question to answer, and all too often leads to us defaulting to the ‘safe’ position of zero ICT integration, even where partners are sharing the same physical premises. Part of the objection is the

“An important part of overcoming the technical barriers to collaboration lies in building positive working relationships between ICT professionals across different organisations.” Central government has played a key role in trying to establish common standards for security across both central and local government organisations. Ongoing development of the Public Services Network (PSN) continues to work towards a common secure data infrastructure for collaboration across public services, however for a variety of reasons including cost and suitability, uptake remains less than comprehensive leaving us with a patchwork of individual partnerships addressing the needs of specific transactional processes rather than a common national base standard secure infrastructure across all public services. In some ways, we all continue to have to re-invent the wheel. There are of course no simple answers, but it strikes me that an important part of overcoming the technical barriers to collaboration lies in building positive working relationships between ICT professionals across different organisations. This builds trust, and trust is a prerequisite for collaboration.

www.cfoa.org.uk

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Providing support from space Emergency services can benefit from improved communications networks through the integration of satellite communications with existing terrestrial infrastructure. Providing robust ubiquitous mission-critical communications for the emergency services is a bigger challenge today than ever before. However, the increased demands and challenges placed on police, ambulance and fire and rescue services are set against a backdrop of continuous pressures on public spending. As a result, budgets have barely kept pace. A hybrid technology approach can help improve operational efficiencies, while enhancing personnel safety. Words: Gavan Murphy, Director of Marketing, EMEA at Globalstar. Currently the emergency services typically rely on a mix of commercial mobile networks including LTE (longterm evolution) / 4G, 3G and 2G based communications networks and bespoke network technologies such as TETRA in the UK. However it is a simple technological fact that these terrestrial based networks do not deliver 100 percent coverage. Bob Buckle, CTO of wireless communication specialist Intelcomm, explains that total coverage remains a major challenge. He says, “Most of the UK’s current commercial mobile network operators offer good high-speed 4G / LTE mobile coverage in reasonably populated areas. However, as soon as you travel out of the city centres, the service level can quickly drop back to 3G or even 2G and in many areas there is no service at all.” He adds, “The investment in time and money needed to upgrade and harden commercial networks in order to deliver ubiquitous nationwide coverage to the emergency services that is truly fit-for-purpose would be immense.”

“We believe the solution lies in adopting a hybrid approach to emergency services communications, overlaying terrestrial infrastructure with solutions that use reliable satellite capacity.” The TETRA network in the UK was designed specifically to support emergency services communications. The key asset of the TETRA network is its extensive grid of bespoke towers. However, according to Buckle, “Even after more than 10 years of service there are still many parts of the UK not covered by the TETRA network. This is not a weakness of the TETRA technology itself,” says Buckle, “It comes down to the tough economics of installing and maintaining antennas and masts across the nation, particularly in remote locations. Although LTE can substantially increase data rates, switching from TETRA to LTE alone will do little to increase coverage.”

The advantages of hybrid technologies Many government agencies, police forces and other emergency services around the globe are actively exploring how alternative technologies can help them

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

communicate more effectively in order to provide a better service to the public. At the same time they are looking at how technology innovations can help them streamline their operations and reduce costs. We believe the solution lies in adopting a hybrid approach to emergency services communications, overlaying terrestrial infrastructure with solutions that use reliable satellite capacity. Globalstar’s Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites orbit at just 1400km from the earth and therefore experience much reduced signal latency, or delay, than other kinds of satellite networks. Furthermore, with multiple satellites speeding across the skies in LEO, at any given point, one, two or more satellites are visible. This results in high levels of reliability and minimises the potential for calls and signals being dropped. The technical configuration of such a network also means lower service cost compared to other satellite solutions. Our view is that a model which combines existing terrestrial infrastructure with LEO satellite services yields a clear return on investment, particularly in view of the much improved communications reliability. By integrating legacy and future land-based infrastructure with satellites orbiting the Earth, the UK’s emergency services have the chance to benefit from always-on, reliable and ubiquitous communications capability right across the UK’s – in fact the same applies to almost any country’s – landmass. In addition to this, unlike conventional terrestrial alternatives, satellites can deliver reliable coverage offshore, enabling seamless communications for the coastguard, police and other rescuers across islands and coastal waters.

Satellites are at work 24/7 helping first responders At Globalstar, we are proud of the fact that our satellite technologies have been adopted by emergency services in many parts of the world. Our affordable satellite communications devices, which include the SPOT Gen3 and the GSP-1700 satellite phone, are used to enhance first response capabilities by military organisations carrying out operations in locations across the globe. By the same token, firefighters in countries as diverse as Spain, US, Canada and Chile trust our satellite devices to help them manage fires, safeguard crews, and protect life and property for the public. UK mountain rescue teams have also come to rely on satellite communications from Globalstar to support them in providing help to adventurers who fall foul of erratic and severe weather, while regional fire and rescue services have successfully used our solutions in the aftermath of floods in numerous counties in the UK.

Improve safety, promote efficiency With every new emergency situation, first response teams need to quickly assess what is required and to deploy the crew and equipment to the right places at the right times. Traditional radio communications can work well, but in any region that is remote, radio and GSM mobile might not be reliable enough. When multiple agencies are coordinating rescue and recovery operations, they need to be able to communicate reliably and speedily. Remotely working emergency services personnel, even in semi-suburban areas, require a communications system they can completely trust, rain or shine, and one that enables an always-on link with colleagues.

Communications lifeline A satellite-based communications solution offers the only viable communications lifeline. A new low-cost, purpose designed device is now able to deliver that mission-critical connectivity. With Sat-Fi from Globalstar, wherever they are, first responders can keep in touch with colleagues using their own COTS (Commercial Off The Shelf) smartphones, tablets and laptops. Using a Sat-Fi satellite hotspot, the world’s most powerful in its class, emergency services personnel can make and receive voice calls, send/receive text messages and e-mail while on the move using an app that runs on any Wi-Fi enabled device. Up to eight users can get online over Globalstar’s network, even if they are in remote regions.

Satellite solutions A Sat-Fi satellite hotspot offers connectivity up to 100ft from the antenna. It’s also easy to set up – users simply download the Sat-Fi app from Apple iTunes or the Google Play store and the app connects to voice and data services. We believe that satellite solutions such as Sat-Fi can play a major role in helping emergency services carry out their important jobs more efficiently and safely. Bob Buckle comments, “There is no doubt that LTE is the right technology for next generation mobile services. But by weaving direct-to-user satellite capability into the terrestrial infrastructure you have a more reliable, cost efficient, unified network, which can provide coverage and efficiencies far greater than either system can do alone. This will help ensure that emergency services can always count on being connected, wherever they are.”

https://eu.globalstar.com/en/ .jp

Globalstar Sat-Fi - world's most powerful satellite hotspot - turning any Wi-fi device into a satphone

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Radio over Ambulance service launches telecare scheme IP solutions Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust has joined forces with Welbeing, a leading national telecare provider, to launch a subscriber scheme to deliver telecare assistance to people living in the Yorkshire and Humber region. Called Independent™, the 24/7 pendant alarm telecare service carries a small weekly charge and provides help and support for users at the push of a button, particularly if they find themselves in a difficult or crisis situation. A dedicated team will be alerted to respond to calls for help from subscribers and they will arrange for the most appropriate health/social care or advice to be provided to them. The trust’s decision to enter the telecare market was based on complementing its existing services for the public in an area where it has expertise responding to emergency situations and providing appropriate care and referrals to health and social care partners. The scheme forms part of the trust’s ongoing commitment to provide the right care in the right place, first time.

YAS Chief Executive, Rod Barnes, launches the scheme with Welbeing Head of Sales, Adrian Sowden at Trust Headquarters in Wakefield.

Rod Barnes, Chief Executive of Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust, said, “This service is designed to ensure users feel safe and secure in their own home and it provides reassurance to their families and carers. When people find themselves in a difficult situation, for example when they have fallen, this service will provide the support they need. Health-related calls can be channelled through the Clinical Hub in our Emergency Operations Centre and our clinical staff will be able to assess a patient’s needs and arrange for the right help or advice to be given. “The service uses the latest technology and draws upon our vast experience of responding to emergencies. We are delighted to be working in partnership with Welbeing, a well-respected independent provider of telecare and telehealth services in the UK. “It’s important to note that all income generated from this initiative will be put back into patient services for the benefit of everyone living in the region.” Chief Executive at Welbeing, Steve Smith, said, “We are delighted to be working with YAS, the first ambulance service to launch a pay scheme in partnership with a private provider. If someone has a fall or is in any way anxious at home, they can press the red button and get straight through to the Welbeing team who will assess what action is needed to help them, whether that’s to call an ambulance or simply contact a friend or member of the family.”

www.yourindependant.co.uk

Met Police chooses Atos to improve ICT delivery The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and Atos will be working together to deliver a major new element of the force’s IT services and systems strategy. Through the Total Technology Programme – Infrastructure (TTPi), MPS has created a multi-supplier operating model to deliver core infrastructure services to meet both the current and future needs of the business. Atos will provide the Service Integration and Management Tower (SIAM), service desk and management to ensure a coordinated end-to-end delivery of ICT infrastructure. The contract was signed on 2 November 2015 between Atos and the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC). Chris Naylor, Director of Digital Policing at MPS, said, “This contract award signals a change in the way we deliver ICT for the MPS. Working in partnership with the emerging Digital Policing Intelligent Client Function (ICF), Atos brings a wealth of experience in managing the SIAM Towers model and will be our partners in managing the ICT infrastructure. “The SIAM Towers model is all about collaboration and leveraging the best capabilities from our technology partners. We have a joint commitment to continuous improvement, delivering vital savings for the MPS over

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

time and bringing innovation to the way the MPS delivers and supports technology for colleagues.” The MPS has identified an efficient IT infrastructure as a key enabler in its One Met transformation programme to deliver its ‘20:20:20’ strategic priority – to decrease key crimes by 20 percent, increase public confidence by 20 percent and decrease costs by 20 percent. Atos will manage the 24/7 service desk, encouraging a shift to self-service and driving efficiency and up to date ICT good practice. Atos will be MPS's technology partner delivering value for money solutions, driving collaboration and innovation and supporting MPS's future technology aspirations including a more mobile workforce and faster, smarter, better kit. Atos will also manage the transformation of the other suppliers for data centre, hosting, end user, network and application management services as those contracts are awarded. Critically, Atos will test and release new applications for use by officers and staff. The result will be an integrated end-to-end service with increased quality and greater value for money.

news.met.police.uk uk.atos.ne

Radio communications systems for emergency services applications must provide maximum reliability and seamlessly transmit critical messages across networks that include diverse interfaces from multiple vendors. TC Communications has developed a range of industrial radio grade Radio over Internet Protocol (RoIP) products to meet exactly these requirements. Fire and rescue, ambulance and police first responders are often faced with difficulties in maintaining reliable communications with their own dispatch centres, and in sharing information with other emergency services in real time. This can hamper rescue efforts, and potentially put emergency services personnel at increased risk.

Maximum reliability Industrial grade radio communication network products from TC Communications for linking or extending two/four wire analogue, audio and intercom devices, deliver high quality voice communications combined with maximum system reliability between emergency dispatch centres and remote radio transmitters and receivers. The TC3846-6 and TC8000 meet the needs of RoIP for emergency services applications. The ‘analogue direct to IP’ functionality means users can preserve existing analogue equipment, migrating two-wire and four-wire analogue signals to IP/Ethernet networks without the need to convert for a digital line as an intermediate step. These RoIP products eliminate leased line dependency, utilise existing network infrastructure and increase network transparency. The TC3846-6 is an analogue and dry contact Ethernet gateway that can link or extend up to four channels of 600Ω two/four wire analogue and dry contacts across Layer two/three Ethernet networks. It is simple to configure and supports both point-to-point and point-to-multipoint topologies. The ability of the TC3846-6 to broadcast four-wire analogue signals over MPLS (multi protocol label switching) means it is the only communications device in its class that is viable for use in public network solutions. Part of the TC Communications JumboSwitch product family, the TC3846-6 offers a highly versatile analogue radio connectivity solution. It is available either as a standalone product or in a chassis that can support up to 13 other types of interfaces including T1 and legacy interfaces such as modem/fax over IP.

Radio tower site solution The TC8000 28-channel analogue fibre multiplexer provides a simple and economical radio tower site solution. Because it uses fibre optic cable rather than phone circuits, it delivers clean and consistent audio signal quality, thus offering improvements on radio dispatch systems that use leased phone lines, which can be susceptible to line distortions and where quality can vary from day to day. The TC3846-6 and TC8000 support voice bandwidths from 300Hz to 3.4kHz. They feature hot swappable interface cards, offer fibre optic and power redundancy, and are available in extreme temperature versions.

www.tccomm.com

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IT as an agent of change It was well over 2000 years ago that the Greek philosopher Heraclitus posited that ‘The only constant in life is change’. However, after 25 years in the IT industry I believe there is a second constant in life, namely ‘IT departments will always have to do more, with less’. Words: Harvey Durrant, Head of ICT, Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service. While a continuous model of review and refinement of budgets is, and should be, the norm in any strategic IT role, there is obviously a significant difference between refining budgets and making the savings required to address the current funding reductions across the public sector. It tends to be inevitable that, when such significant savings need to made, the IT department is faced with two competing pressures. On the one hand, the IT budget has to significantly shrink; on the other hand, the demand for its services grows in order to support the budget reductions across the rest of the organisation.

“The IT transformation is running parallel to, but tightly integrated with, the organisational change programme.”

It also provides, from an IT perspective, the ability to map our technology estate onto the Business Services. In short, it provides a very lightweight Enterprise Architecture model that can be understood and used across the organisation. The diagram above shows a partial extract of the ontology, mapping IT to Business Services.

The challenge posed by these competing pressures is far from trivial and should not be underestimated. However, the current situation presents, in my opinion, a real and tangible opportunity for IT departments to both raise their profile within the organisation and utilise the budgetary pressure to gain support for a transformational approach to IT. While it’s possible to ‘salami-slice’ a few percentage points off a budget, if you need to save tens of percent off a budget then you really have no choice but to fundamentally change what and how you do things.

The new Target Architecture leverages Open Source platforms locally and Cloud solutions, where appropriate, in order to reduce short and medium term revenue and capital costs. The Target Architecture is designed around a loosely coupled, orchestrated set of discrete application and data micro-services, enabling us to minimise technical debt and facilitate costeffective change.

IT transformation

3. Make IT easy to use

At Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service my team and I, working closely with colleagues from across the service, are embarking on a fundamental transformation of our IT. The IT transformation is running parallel to, but tightly integrated with, the organisational change programme and its scope is virtually every IT service within the organisation. The transformation of our IT is based upon five interrelated pieces of work, which provide the foundation for not only driving down ongoing IT costs, but are enabling us to align our IT far more tightly to the current, and changing, needs of the business.

We have developed a single User Interface, known as the Firefighters Workbench, in order to provide a consistent experience for colleagues, drive down the training burden and decrease the time required to implement new IT services. The Workbench also enables us to improve the user experience for people who may have some form of disability or impairment and project services to a range of devices at an architectural, rather than system specific, level.

1. Align IT to the business Create a simple, but effective Business Service Ontology model. The Business Service Ontology provides an abstracted, but valuable representation of the organisation. It captures both how our operational colleagues provide a wide range of services to the citizens of Devon and Somerset; and how the rest of the organisation supports them in meeting their objectives.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

2. Develop a Target Architecture

4. Transform the IT department We are restructuring the IT department and changing how we operate. The Service Delivery team is adopting robust ITIL Service Management (industry best practice) using, wherever possible, the common vernacular of the Business Service Ontology so our customers clearly understand what we are providing. The Service Development team is transitioning to an agile development methodology and is being well supported by engaged and knowledgeable customers assigned to each project.

5. Question everything We are fostering a culture within the ICT department that empowers our teams to ask ‘Why?’ This applies to both how we operate and the technology we currently provide. In the last few months we have saved tens of thousands of pounds by rationalising a number of our services, all enabled by tapping into, and valuing, our team’s knowledge and relationships across the service.

“Engage, engage, engage – listen to the issues.” Significant savings Although we have only started on our transformation plan this year the impact is already being felt and early indications are that we should yield significant savings over the next Comprehensive Spending Review, while actually improving the ICT services we provide our colleagues. We are looking to achieve this not through adopting radical new technology, or the use of some consultancy ‘magic bullet’, but by seizing the opportunity presented by significant budget cuts and blending together pragmatic use of IT best practice, while fostering a culture that sees IT as an agent of change, rather than a ‘money pit’. Of course, all of this is only possible with the support of our Executive Board, which understands that simply cutting the budget, without transforming our approach to IT, would not solve the challenges we face. If I have only one piece of advice for colleagues in a similar situation it is this; engage, engage, engage – listen to the issues and build your strategy accordingly, but take a chance and find some quick wins that prove a transformational approach can deliver.

www.dsfire.gov.uk

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www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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Windows based Command and Control solution impresses the sceptics During the past few years most fire and rescue services have moved from legacy Command and Control (C&C) systems to Windows based systems. For Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service this change did not go far enough. The software and hardware were refreshed but the architecture still resembled the service’s legacy approach to disaster recovery using a primary and secondary server. Software solution

Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) has continually invested in its infrastructure over the past five years because it recognises the importance of technology for delivering its service. As a result the corporate network provided a highly available platform that outstripped the resilience of SFRS’s most business critical function, the C&C system, according to ICT Manager, Sally Edwards.

“Our ICT team are unafraid to question traditional methods and we have come to recognise the advantages of exploiting modern technology in making our communities safer.” “The recovery time from a technical failure could take up to eight hours depending upon the severity of the fault and I felt this was unacceptable,” said Sally. “So I suggested that the C&C system runs on the same platform as the corporate network, although this suggestion was met with some scepticism and challenge from both within the organisation and from partners.” Despite the scepticism Sally remained unfazed and carried out research to find out why her proposal was being met with so much reluctance. After extensive investigations she found that the business case to move away from the existing architecture was compelling. “I was repeatedly told that there were reasons why

Sally Edwards and Ron Davis.

virtualised platforms are not used for C&C systems,” said Sally. “I eventually concluded that the only reason was that no one else had done it. To me there was a greater degree of risk if we didn’t upgrade our physical architecture and move to the virtualised platform.”

Optimising performance Sally and her colleague, Ron Davis, designed the solution using a range of technologies and suppliers to ensure that performance was optimised and security requirements where met. The solution had to be easy to manage and maintain so all of the components used were industry standard technologies. Ron says, “The ICT team in Shropshire is fairly small so we needed to keep the management overhead to a minimum. We used well known, leading products to prevent the system becoming too complex, which meant that the whole team had the skills to support it.” High availability was considered at every level of the design phase including the wide area network (WAN) and the storage area network (SAN). An example of this is the use of Nimble Storage array because it offers the InfoSight cloud-based management. Ron said, “It allows us to work in a preventative way, giving us early notification of problems and the opportunity to fix them before the end users are even aware of it.”

When it came to the software layer the supplier, Seed Software, confirmed that the application was hardware agnostic so that Ron was able to follow Microsoft best practice and guides for building the servers. “The design offers significantly more resilience but we are still always looking to improve it,” said Ron. “We constantly consider ‘what if’ scenarios to identify and prevent any potential single points of failure.” The virtualised platform has been in place for the last six months and the benefits are fully appreciated throughout the organisation, from fire authority members to fire control staff. The reluctance and the scepticism have vanished.

Bold step Chief Fire Officer John Redmond said, “Initially I was nervous about this very different approach, but after Sally and Ron explained how it worked compared to the existing system, it seemed to offer many advantages, and minimal risk.” Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service has taken a bold step, one that underlines the crucial role technology now plays in enabling a modern fire and rescue service to deliver consistently high levels of resilience and availability. CFO Redmond went on to say, “Taking this step has been a huge leap forward but we have no intention of stopping where we are. It has opened up endless opportunities to integrate with industry-standard products and so improve even further. “Our ICT team are unafraid to question traditional methods and we have come to recognise the advantages of exploiting modern technology in making our communities safer.”

www.shropshirefire.gov.uk

telent acquires Arqiva’s Secure Solutions telent has completed its acquisition of Arqiva’s Secure Solutions business. Equipping telent with increased capabilities in the public safety market, the acquired business contributes an annual turnover of £15m and will be re-named telent with immediate effect. The acquisition follows several investments made by telent, including the recent acquisition of Telindus in the UK. Mark Plato, CEO of telent, said, “Completing the acquisition of Arqiva’s Secure Solutions business is an important step forward for telent as we look to increase

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

our presence in the public safety market. The acquisition will also provide us with the opportunity to expand our presence in Northern Ireland and have a significant presence in the Republic of Ireland. With the added support of Arqiva’s highly skilled workforce, who are well versed in working in secure, mission-critical environments, we will have a clear technological advantage offering a comprehensive portfolio of solutions and services.” The deal will considerably increase telent’s capabilities

and footprint in the emergency services and transport sectors. In addition to its established customer base, Arqiva’s Secure Solutions business includes communications and command and control technology, all of which is supported by a highly skilled workforce who are well versed in working in secure, missioncritical environments.

www.telent.com www.arqiva.com

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MAIT: the journey continues Words: Sue Lampard, BAPCO 2016 Event Coordinator. When the Cabinet Office (CCS) asked British APCO to develop an open standard for incident transfer, I’m not sure that anyone envisaged the journey that would result! For B-APCO it was new territory. Although we had members with technical and commercial skills, our focus had been (and remains) operational. Bringing together knowledge and experience from the User community, ICT colleagues and vendors, we developed the XML Schema that has since become ‘MAIT’. From the outset we took a pragmatic view of what the standard needed to deliver. The technical bit was easy (at least in principle). The greater challenge was getting agencies and vendors to sign up to both adopt and adhere to the standard. A vendor recently described how they look at a number of different open standards and pick the one they think best suits their product. This would not necessarily enable compatibility and interoperability with other products in different agencies. Proprietary interfaces become the necessary result. MAIT is about driving a vision as much as it is developing a Schema. At this point in time, the MAIT journey is really only beginning. The technical standard is going through the required process for adoption by HM Government. Even this has been a challenge. We’re optimistic that with the support and involvement of James Findlay from HS2 Ltd (the challenge owner for MAIT), it will be adopted soon. When it is, it will be easier for the public safety community to justify using it as a main tool for interoperability.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Version 1.0 of the Schema is out there (see www.mait.org.uk). JESIP are engaging with us for some of their doctrine to be included (eg METHANE). Their drive to get doctrine embedded in day-to-day life aligns entirely with the mantra of MAIT. Indeed the latter sprung out of an operational desire to ‘normalise’ civil contingencies when the National Resilience Extranet (now Resilience Direct) was introduced. The original Welsh data exchange pilot has moved on in leaps and bounds, with many agencies now using this Schema. The ‘hub’ (router) procured in Wales under the original ‘DEIT’ banner has been replicated in Surrey for use with their blue light interoperability programme. The two organisations are working together so the routers can be connected to provide resilience. A national strategy needs to be put in place to discourage agencies from procuring routers on an ad hoc basis with the associated wasted money. Any agency considering ‘plugging in’ to a MAIT router should speak to B-APCO first. The Coastguard will be building two ‘MAIT compliant’ routers, and along with those in Wales and Surrey it is believed that this will suffice for all early MAIT traffic. More can be added as needed in the future. The MAIT team has been developing a certification scheme for end users and routers and B-APCO will (at least in the early days) become the certifying body. It is envisaged that the scheme will be self-sustaining on a not-for-profit basis through vendors paying a fee. This will

enable a paid resource to be at the helm rather than a volunteer. Strategic ownership has been an issue with MAIT from the outset. The Emergency Services Collaboration Working Group has provided formal support (albeit in name only). It is hoped they will be in a position to endorse (or reject) proposals from the MAIT team (such as the Router strategy) and with the help of JESIP encourage emergency services to align with the proposals.

So what are the next steps? The next steps are: Version 2 of MAIT with additional data fields providing a richer context for information exchange; looking at whether XML is the right technical architecture for later versions; aligning MAIT with other standards, such as the Common Alerting Protocol used widely for data sharing (including the proposed UK Alert system); aligning other data sources (such as 999 apps) with MAIT so that information can flow seamlessly from customer to agency, agency to agency and then back out to the customer; aligning with the complementary standard (ONAT) being developed for tracking and viewing resources from different agencies – quite important in a world where interoperability is becoming critical. There is a lot to do and no doubt the journey will continue for some time to come!

www.mait.org.uk www.bapco.org.uk

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40 | ESTHEALTH AND WELLBEING

A colleague led approach to well-being support Workplace stress is a particular issue in the fire and rescue service. Research suggests this is related to excessive demands, relationships with senior managers, changing roles and exposure to traumatic events. However, there is a growing awareness that mental health awareness and promotion training in the fire and rescue service can help create a healthier, happier and less stressed workforce (Moffitt et al (2014)). An innovative approach has been commissioned in Northamptonshire, which makes use of a colleague led, stepped care approach to providing emotional and psychological support to the workforce. Words: Dr Mike Scanlan and Sonya Terry, Kind Minds Health and Wellbeing Ltd. A member of the ‘Watch’ experiences a distressing event. They are aware that there are a number of colleagues who are trained to offer a confidential listening ear. The staff member looks at the names on the list and chooses to approach someone from their own team. The meeting takes place within a day of the initial contact; as well as feeling listened to the staff member is helped to feel less stigmatised by their emotional reaction. At the meeting the Wellbeing Support Team (WST) member recognises that their colleague is possibly experiencing an Acute Stress Reaction, which can (if untreated) be a precursor of a more serious psychological trauma reaction such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). They advise the firefighter to contact occupational health and to ask for a referral for psychological therapy with the Kind Minds Service. They are then seen by Kind Minds (within a week) for five sessions of therapy and return, fully recovered, back to work where the individual is seen again by a colleague who helps them make a staggered return to active duty. This is an accurate but anonymous account of how the Wellbeing Support Service helps fire and rescue staffs retain and sometimes regain their psychological resilience.

Wellbeing Support Team In May 2014 Northamptonshire County Council, in collaboration with the Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service (NFRS) Health and Safety Team and with the support of the NFRS leadership team, took a decision to work with a psychological therapy/wellbeing provider to train and help develop a Wellbeing Support Team staffed by volunteers from within the NFRS workforce. The NFRS Health and Safety Team had already learnt from the experiences of services such as the Northumberland Fire and Rescue Service who were able to illustrate how increased awareness of mental health and wellbeing benefitted the workforce (Moffitt et al (2014)) and were keen to build upon this research and provide an actual colleague-led service. Following a tender process Kind Minds Health and Wellbeing Ltd, led by Sonya Terry and Dr Mike Scanlan, were commissioned to help recruit, train, develop and support the new colleague led team. Both Dr Scanlan and Sonya Terry have valuable experience of training and developing mental health peer support teams that work closely with health professionals in the NHS.

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Together Mike and Sonya learnt that peers can bring something very special to the support process – they: • See more – those with whom we work closely naturally have a better window into what we do, ways we contribute, and how we behave • Understand more – because they are often in similar roles, peers understand the context and the many variables of the work situation. They can more easily appreciate the complexity of day-to-day demands • Support more – peers are in the same trenches. They work most closely with their colleagues to deliver the near-terms goals. They are the ones that most likely know how we are feeling and why. Peers become a more natural support mechanism at work.

“The Wellbeing Support Team plays a crucial role in promoting mental health support in the workplace and signposting individuals to professional help when necessary.” Training and development Twelve staff from within NFRS (members of the watch and non-operational staff) were recruited from those staff who expressed an interest in taking on this volunteer role. The interview process was designed to recruit volunteers who were empathic and understanding and who recognised the importance of confidentiality and anonymity. A decision was taken to organise residential training for the 12 volunteers. The aim of the training was fourfold: 1. To make clear the parameters of the role, which were to be first and foremost an empathic and understanding listening ear for peers 2. To be able to distinguish between low level distress and diagnostically significant anxiety and depression 3. To use a range of skills level interventions to help people manage low-level distress 4. To know when to refer on to either occupational health so that people can be directed to Kind Minds or to the GP. The Wellbeing Team members were trained to use a range of CBT skills, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) skills and emotional regulation strategies

to help people cope with mild distress. All of these approaches can be learnt and applied at a skills level. The training was evaluated very positively and has been supplemented by ongoing action learning sets led by Mike and Sonya. Action learning is a well-evidenced approach that enables individuals to consolidate and build upon learning (Norman and Powell 2004). Jim Dorrill, who works as a Group Manager within the service and is a WBST member, said, “The Wellbeing Support Team plays a crucial role in promoting mental health support in the workplace and signposting individuals to professional help when necessary. Going forward we are looking to expand their role to include other interventions such as psychological debriefing after difficult incidents.”

The Pathway to support The Wellbeing Support Team has been advertised across the fire and rescue service. All employees have received an informative promotional flyer that makes clear how staff can access help from the Wellbeing Support Team.

Emotional Health Checks Kind Minds and NFRS have also looked at how the wellbeing support team could shift to a more proactive way of meeting the emotional needs of the workforce. Kind Minds has developed an evidence-based emotional health check and trialled this with fire and rescue staff members who universally recognised the value of the 20-minute intervention. Shaun Hallam expressed his opinion that, “If we can catch emotional difficulties early and help staff to be happier and healthier then we are taking important steps in the right direction.” Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service have illustrated that with close collaborative working a cost effective pathway to psychological resilience that harnesses the empathy, warmth and experience of the workforce can be developed and utilised by all staff within the fire and rescue family.

wwww.northamptonshire.gov.uk/en/ councilservices/fire/fireandrescue/ pages/default.aspx References Moffitt, J. Bostock, J. and Cave, A. (2014) Promoting well-being and reducing stigma about mental health in the fire service. Journal of Public Mental Health 2014 13:2, 103-113 Norman, C. Powell, A. (2004) Using action learning to consolidate coaching skills. Action Learning: Research and Practice.1,1, 91-99

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ESTCOMPANY PROFILE | 41

PBI: a global force in protection PBI fabrics are renowned for their unique combination of flame resistance, durability and comfort, which is why they are first choice in protection for the most extreme conditions, from NASA’s astronauts, to emergency responders, the military and formula one drivers. Today, PBI is a global force in personal protection in USA, Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Australasia. Over recent years, there has been incredible progress through innovation in the creation of garments designed to be more flexible to protect the wearer in different environments.

First line of defence The development process always has to take account of the potential compromise between comfort and protection. That is why PBI has developed a wide range of fabrics that meet the need of every solution and work effectively as an integral part of every garment design. Each fabric has different properties and applications but every PBI fabric provides the required protection from heat and flame that an outer fabric must deliver. Whatever the garment design, it must incorporate a fabric that will deliver that first line of defence against heat and flame. If the outer fabric fails then potentially so does the whole garment.

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PBI fabrics offer the combination of thermal protection that will not become brittle, shrink or break open, along with high levels of comfort, flexibility, and durability. They deliver excellent tensile strength. PBI’s thermal protection from exposure to heat and flame has been proven over many years of independent testing and performance in the field.

Continuous innovation PBI Gold was the first fabric developed by the company that was specifically designed to protect firefighters and was instantly recognisable due to its distinctive golden colour. Since its introduction in recent years, PBI Matrix is extending the success achieved by PBI Gold. A durable matrix of high strength para-aramid filaments is woven into PBI Gold fabric to enhance its resistance to wear and tear, while at the same time retaining superior flame and heat protection. The result is a fabric that is lightweight and flexible, but incredibly strong and resists dangerous chemicals and acids. PBI Triguard®, a lightweight fabric that offers high levels of flame, heat and arc flash resistance, is now the standard in providing value and performance in the petrochemical, gas and electricity industries. The fabric remains supple after exposure to heat and flame and retains more than 85 percent of its tensile strength after 10 hours contact with hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, acetone or petrol. PBI Baseguard™ has been specifically engineered to be worn as a base layer. It is incredibly light and soft, creating garments that are cooler, drier and absorb perspiration better than any other knit fabrics on the market. The fabric wicks eight times more sweat from the body than cotton and 1.5 times more than other

aramid fabrics. Garments made with the fabric will not shrink or alter their shape with wear, unlike other more conventional next to skin clothing. Ian Callaghan, Director of International Sales and Marketing at PBI, said, “We never rest on our laurels and are continuously driving forward, working closely with fire services and the supply chain to enhance protection and comfort for the wearer.”

www.pbiproducts.com

YPO: helping emergency services buy better for over 40 years YPO has over 40 years’ expertise in public sector procurement and the company works hard to always provide best value for all its customers – making them significant savings and freeing up their time and resources. It negotiates with the country’s leading suppliers and ensures that customers are given the best selection without ever having to compromise on quality. YPO makes sure customers are provided with peace of mind at every stage of the process by proactively managing their frameworks and working closely alongside suppliers. All of the company’s frameworks fully comply with EU procurement regulations and its dedicated team of specialists are on hand to support customers every step of the way. YPO has put frameworks in place to meet requirements as well as respond to customer demand, doing whatever it can to help customers successfully run their organisations.

Collaborative procurement Collaboration is key to achieving continued cost savings. YPO’s wide range of frameworks supports the aim of collaborative procurement on common goods and services through bulk buying for public authorities.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Only recently has the announcement been made regarding new legislation to enable police, fire and ambulance services to join forces on procurement functions to create greater time and cost savings. Historically, YPO has seen joint procurement work well for everyday items such as stationery products but the company also recognises the need for emergency services to be able to collaborate when procuring high cost items. For example, fleet managers are able to work together to procure specialist vehicles such as fire appliances, ambulances and rapid response vehicles, which are essential for emergency services. They benefit from being able to consider all the different options and make decisions that are beneficial to all parties. Across all available categories YPO has generated huge savings through collaboration and aggregating demand to generate best value for a range of high volume product and service areas. The company regularly works together with other public sector buying organisations to bring to market frameworks, which offer further volume based savings.

Five key ways YPO can help you buy better Emergency services can benefit from accessing support whenever it is needed without having to pay fixed overhead costs. This procurement advice can be tailored but the key ways YPO can help include: 1. Advice and support: providing expert, reliable support as and when you need it 2. Full compliance: all of YPO’s products and services are fully compliant with the latest procurement legislation, providing you protection and peace of mind 3. Options appraisal: assessing current public sector arrangements that may be available to you 4. Effective procurement: ensuring the products and services purchased are the most suitable for your requirements 5. Implementation: making sure that new arrangements are put into place correctly.

www.ypo.co.uk For more information on how YPO can help you, please contact Sarah Sesum on Tel: 01924 836992 or e-mail: sarah.sesum@ypo.co.uk

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42 | ESTCOLLABORATION

“The Shoreham Airshow disaster is above and beyond the scale of any incident a firefighter would expect to respond to during their career.” The Shoreham Airshow crash has been described as the biggest peacetime disaster Sussex has ever seen. Eleven people lost their lives when a Hawker Hunter hit the main A27, next to the air show site. Those who were killed included drivers and passengers travelling past the show, and enthusiasts watching the planes taking part from the side of the road. West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service (WSFRS) had a number of staff at, or near, the airfield when the plane came down. Throughout the rest of the afternoon of 22 August, and in the following weeks, the service played a key part in the recovery operation.

“These teams undergo regular training for major incidents. However no amount of training could possibly prepare them for the horror of what they witnessed at Shoreham.” When a major incident was declared Sussex Police took the strategic lead in control of all first responders. That included the 10 pumps from WSFRS. WSFRS has an integral role at the heart of West Sussex County Council and while firefighters worked at the scene colleagues from social services were providing support to affected families at Worthing Hospital.

This photo reached 511,988 people via social media and received 16,700 ‘likes’ via Facebook.

that I reflect on the enormity of the task faced by all our emergency services in the hours and days after the crash. “These teams undergo regular training for major incidents. However no amount of training could possibly prepare them for the horror of what they witnessed at Shoreham. Amid scenes of true devastation and horror they worked valiantly, selflessly and with total dedication to the task in hand.”

Extremely challenging Chief Fire Officer Sean Ruth, who is also the county council’s Executive Director for Communities and Public Protection, said, “The Shoreham Airshow disaster is above and beyond the scale of any incident a firefighter would expect to respond to during their career. “The initial stages of the incident were extremely challenging and the scene for the first responders was truly appalling. Our colleagues at the Sussex Control Centre also had a particularly difficult role. “In the following days we assisted the police and Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) with the removal of the aircraft and in gathering evidence, which involved meticulous searching of large areas of undergrowth for some weeks after the crash. “As we entered the recovery phase our Communities and Resilience and Emergencies teams continued to play a crucial role ensuring support was available for all of those in need.” The scale of the operation and the amount of teamwork involved is well understood by Council Leader Louise Goldsmith. She said, “It is with a mixture of humility and pride

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Work to rebuild still ongoing She added, “Work to rebuild is still ongoing. Initially there were practicalities around re-opening the road, the major arterial route across our county, but the greater focus has always been in supporting the family lives shattered by those horrific events, helping those who saw that appalling crash come to terms with their memories and supporting our staff who worked so tirelessly in its aftermath.”

Chief Fire Officer Sean Ruth, is also West Sussex County Council’s Executive Director for Communities and Public Protection.

Firefighters and other first responders, including police and ambulance crews, along with volunteers who set to work in the immediate aftermath of the crash, were thanked by the Prime Minister, David Cameron, when he made a private visit to Shoreham and Lancing. Mr Cameron visited the nearby Shoreham Tollbridge, which became the focal point for the community after the disaster, with hundreds of floral tributes and personal notes left along its length. He then spent time talking to emergency crews away from the media.

Memorial service On 22 November, three months after the crash, representatives from all three emergency services joined the families of those killed for an official memorial service at Lancing College Chapel. The service paid tribute to the 11 men who died and recognised the role of the emergency services who responded to the tragedy. The service also included personal reflections on the rescue effort from all three emergency services, including one read by CFO Sean Ruth. He said, “Nobody in the service will ever forget the events of that afternoon – our hearts go out to all of those grieving for loved ones whose lives were lost that day. “We all continue to work together to ensure all of those affected receive the help and support they need.”

www.westsussex.gov.uk

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ESTCOLLABORATION | 43

Closer working: the fire perspective The Government received over 600 responses to its recent consultation, Enabling closer working between the Emergency Services. This England-only consultation sets out some radical proposals to change the governance of fire and rescue services and their relationship with the police. Words: Catherine Levin This consultation is part of a wider policy agenda to meet the Government’s ambitions for more effective and efficient services for the public. Developing the role of the Police and Crime Commissioners is one element of this, with a sharp focus on the fact that they are elected and accountable. To assist this ambition, the Government has set out a new duty to collaborate. Collaboration between the emergency services is certainly nothing new. The proposal to place this on the statute books simply puts a legislative framework around what already exists and because it’s about delivering efficiencies does not come with any new burdens funding. The Local Government Association (LGA) sets out in its response to the consultation that it does not agree a new duty is required; indeed they ask for further transformation funding to assist collaboration between, for example, fire and ambulance services. The Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) goes into much more detail and argues that the duty is too narrow in scope and seeks assurances that this duty won’t inhibit collaboration with other non-emergency service organisations. CFOA goes on to argue that mergers between fire and rescue services may deliver greater efficiencies and better services.

Police and Crime Commissioners There is a proposal for further legislation relating to the duties of Police and Crime Commissioners. Building on the point about local accountability, the Government proposes to expand the remit of the Police and Crime Commissioners. Giving them powers to take on the responsibilities of fire and rescue authorities in their area ‘to drive ambitious reform of their local fire and rescue service and collaboration with police to improve services and deliver value for money’. This is a radical proposition and despite the checks and balances described in the consultation around business cases and local consultation, ultimately the Secretaries of State can intervene and overturn local decisions. Neither the LGA nor CFOA are supportive of this centralised approach that seems to contradict the locally driven approach that flows through this consultation. It is worth noting that, in 2012, when the Police and Crime Commissioners were first elected, only 15 percent of the electorate took part. However, looking to 2016, the elections will be held at the same time as the local elections and in the more traditional month of May rather than on a cold, dark day in November. In a new world order where Police and Crime Commissioners are elected on more traditional levels of turn out for local elections, around 30 percent, the Government’s arguments about the need for fire and rescue services to have more accountable locally elected governance start to make sense. However, the governance structures are causing concern.

Combined back office functions One model would see the Chief Fire Officer and the Chief Constable each report to the Police and Crime

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Commissioner and all their staff would be employed by the Police and Crime Commissioner as well. Efficiencies can therefore be made through combining back office functions such as HR, IT and estates.

“The fire and rescue service faces the biggest shake up of its governance for decades.” The proposal for a single employer allows the Police and Crime Commissioner to be fully accountable to the public for both services. The consultation paper notes, ‘The important distinction between operational policing and firefighting will be maintained’. The LGA is not so sure and argues in its response, ‘Any merger of the management of two services could put at risk their individual identities and lead to a blurring of the professional boundaries between the two services’. Interestingly the chief officer under this arrangement can be either a senior fire or senior police officer. Currently a Chief Constable must have served as a constable to be considered for this role, but this statutory requirement will be removed to enable a suitable fire officer to take the role (having had access to training). And of course should a Chief Constable have come through a police route, they too must receive training to understand the fire and rescue service. CFOA urges caution about the role, stating, ‘The individual leader will need to be able to rely on appropriate professional support, particularly in services with which they are less familiar and will need to retain the confidence of all operational staff, politicians or the public’.

rescue services to achieve the same policy goal of economy, efficiency and effectiveness.

Police and Crime Panels The Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011 not only created the post of the directly elected Police and Crime Commissioner but also created Police and Crime Panels. These are bodies made up of local elected councillors and independent members with the responsibility to scrutinise and support the work of the Police and Crime Commissioner. The consultation paper asks whether this panel should have its remit extended and its membership refreshed to reflect new responsibilities for the fire and rescue service. On the face of it, this does seem logical. However, Police and Crime Panels are still quite new and like all organisations have teething problems. CFOA makes an interesting reference in its response. It cites the recent report, Tone from the Top by the Committee for Standards in Public Life. This ‘recognised that PCCs are not currently held to account sufficiently by Police and Crime Panels, and urged a number of changes to ensure accountability was improved’. Where all this change takes time to work itself out, the Government suggests that in the meantime the Police and Crime Commissioner might be invited to join the fire and rescue authority. The LGA says a firm no. But CFOA highlights two key challenges that arise from this suggestion. First, why not then have a fire representative on the Police and Crime Panel? Second: what about the boundaries? The former may not be too difficult to resolve, but the latter could be quite problematic. There is a proposal to legislate to abolish the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority. In its place the Mayor of London would take on direct responsibility for fire and rescue. The consultation offers some suggestions about how that might work in practice.

Devolution proposals Barriers to merging In England there are currently 46 fire and rescue services. Fourteen of the 46 fire and rescue services exist within a county council. There are 37 Police and Crime Commissioners but only 20 of them share the same geographical space as the respective fire and rescue service without straying into the county council. These numbers don’t work well for a merger of functions. Merging fire and rescue services has long been seen as one way to drive efficiencies. In 2007, Devon and Somerset merged and in April 2016 Dorset and Wiltshire will also merge. It is not a frequent occurrence. In the consultation paper, the Government doesn’t rule it out but says fire and rescue services ‘should consider whether the aims of economy, efficiency and effectiveness, or public safety, are best achieved through a merger or by transferring their functions to the Police and Crime Commissioner and collaborating with their local police force’. It is noteworthy there is no question in the consultation paper about the issues with coterminosity and the alternative of merging fire and

The consultation paper looks briefly at the implications for civil contingencies and resilience. It also looks at how devolution proposals set out in the Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill will enable directly elected mayors to take on the role of the Police and Crime Commissioner. In the case of Manchester this will, subject to legislation, lead to the abolition of the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority in 2017.

Government response The consultation closed on 23 October and the Government’s response is unlikely before the end of the year. Wading through 600 responses takes time and some of the proposals are controversial and not universally welcomed. Any subsequent legislative change will require Parliamentary time and a vehicle, such as the Policing Bill, to go anywhere. These are interesting times for the fire and rescue service as it faces the biggest shake up of its governance for decades, let’s hope the Government is really listening to its concerns.

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Do the Government’s proposals represent new thinking in the way the emergency services should work together? As with other areas of the public sector, the emergency services are going through a period of change. The Government’s consultation, Enabling closer working between the Emergency Services, has met with mixed reviews in the solutions that it proposes for helping emergency services organisations work together. Words: Nathan East, Partner, Weightmans LLP. In theory the consultation is designed to formalise the push towards collaboration between emergency services. However, many of the provisions appear to be aimed at delivering changes in the organisational arrangements between fire and police authorities with an aim to deliver greater democratic accountability. There does not appear to be great public clamour for this, with the consensus being for the maintenance of an independent fire and rescue service and police force. To what extent therefore do the proposals represent new thinking in the way the emergency services should work together? On a practical level the proposals do not provide for any substantial innovation. Closer working between emergency services has been evolving organically between ambulance trusts, fire and rescue services and police organisations over recent years, and has by and large been determined by local demands and to meet specific service pressures. In operational terms, the closest service collaboration projects have to date been between ambulance and fire and rescue services. In particular, ambulance trusts and fire and rescue authorities have created co-responding initiatives in a number of areas that have been shown to be working with great success and appear to have widespread support both from the public and within the respective services.

More cohesive approach In addition, the integration of health and social care services has seen fire and rescue and ambulance services coordinating and contributing to deliver a more cohesive approach to the wider safeguarding and prevention agenda. Demand for each of the services tends to overlap significantly in some communities due to socio-economic or urban conditions. For example, in terms of cross over, a large majority of fire deaths are among the over 70s who have pre-existing health issues. Furthermore, emergency services are also playing a role in some of the NHS Vanguard projects, which aim to coordinate the delivery of health and social care across designated localities, and the participation in many of these projects has developed independently of any direction from the centre. Co-location and real estate projects have also begun to feature prominently. Mapping exercises being undertaken by authorities such as Royal Berkshire Fire and Thames Valley Police, and Derbyshire Fire and Rescue have shown the extent to which there is duplication in the location of the estate of fire and police, which is often replicated by the location of ambulance trusts. These forward thinking organisations have pushed forward projects to deliver co-location and

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estate rationalisation, which is helping these authorities deliver capital savings.

Estate opportunities Existing estate opportunities are not confined to operational sites but also combining administrative, training and office facilities. Each individual property incurs maintenance costs and service charges, which can be reduced by co-location to deliver revenue savings. Co-location is also helping authorities realise locked up capital in redundant property. There are suggestions that there could be a relaxation in the way capital receipts can be used to deliver revenue benefits for frontline services, but these details are not contained within the consultation.

“In reality the consultation does nothing more on a practical level than to encourage emergency service providers to do more of the same or to consider such projects if they have hitherto not been involved.” In reality therefore the consultation does nothing more on a practical level than to encourage emergency service providers to do more of the same or to consider such projects if they have hitherto not been involved. In organisational terms, while the consultation paper is in broad terms aimed at all three emergency services, most of the specifics relate to the operation of fire and rescue and police services. This is consistent with the fact that fire authorities have previously had the opportunity to apply to a Transformation Fund for collaboration projects and police have an ongoing Innovation Fund to encourage the development of collaboration initiatives. Notably, similar funding has not

Nathan East, Partner, Weightmans LLP.

been provided to ambulance trusts, which in many cases are under even greater financial pressures than fire and police authorities. The governance changes proposed are confined to police and fire. No far reaching proposals for governance changes are put forward for ambulance trusts so trusts are unlikely to face any immediate organisational change.

PCCs and FRAs The greater synergy between the governance of police and fire has contributed to the marquee measure proposed enabling Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) to take on the duties and responsibilities of fire and rescue authorities (FRAs). Transfer is not mandatory but is anticipated where it is in the ‘interests of economy, efficiency and effectiveness or public safety’. As such consultation would be needed on a local basis to prepare a business case for transfer and the PCC will require the agreement of the relevant fire authority. If the fire authority were not to agree then an application can be made to submit the business case to the Home Secretary and Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government for an independent assessment to be made. The intention appears that the PCC would take no direct responsibility for operational aspects of the fire and rescue service that would continue to be directed by the Chief Fire Officer. This would likely be essential as due to the specifics of the operational services being carried out it is unlikely any PCC would want to take operational responsibility. The only organisational proposal in this respect is that ambulance Foundation Trusts consider Police and Crime Commissioner representation on their council of governors.

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ESTCOLLABORATION | 45 One of the key drivers is to make reforms such as integration of back office functions and estates easier. However, it would not be accurate to suggest that these reforms could not be achieved without a change in governance responsibility. Shared services projects using a separate corporate entity in Hampshire and other areas show this is already being achieved organically. Back office and property collaboration involving ambulance trusts, may need greater flexibility in the powers of trusts than current NHS legislation provides. The powers for collaboration will differ for ambulance trusts depending on whether they are a foundation trust or not. Ultimately, what can be achieved by ambulance trusts will continue to depend on the existing powers they have to collaborate in the absence of additional legislation. Traditional contractual forms of collaboration by contract only go so far. Where budgets and, in particular, capital is to be shared or organisational joint governance needed contractual collaboration is often insufficient. A more integrated approach through separate organisational vehicles is often more effective but there are limitations on ambulance trusts participation in such vehicles. Though Foundation Trusts (FTs) have greater flexibility certain forms of collaboration may need Monitor approval. By comparison, non FTs have more limited statutory powers to, for example, establish and invest in limited liability companies for joint service delivery. Some legislative powers to collaborate already exist for specified purposes. In all cases little mention has been made of the different pensions and other pay and conditions that currently exist across the services. In most other respects the proposals requiring further emergency service collaboration are fairly generic. The Government intends to introduce a new statutory duty on the three emergency services to collaborate with each other to improve efficiency and effectiveness. This duty is intended to be broad to allow for local discretion as to how this is implemented but it doesn’t identify how it will be enforced.

Historical barriers In addition, it doesn’t identify or tackle a number of the historical barriers to collaboration such as the vast cultural and organisational differences between ambulance trusts and fire and police organisations. Culturally ambulance services are closely aligned to the wider NHS in terms of governance, their statutory powers, regulation and funding. In most cases, the sizeable differences in the geographical areas covered by ambulance trusts compared to fire and police inevitably means that collaboration projects for any trust will not necessarily cover their whole territory and will be on a piecemeal basis with different fire and police authorities within its geographical area. The types of collaboration with fire and police will vary across the territory of ambulance trusts and may require separate agreements with a number of organisations so that one cohesive policy for the type of service collaboration that will be pursued by a trust may not be possible. While flexibility around local solutions is welcome, in reality most emergency service providers are already pursuing the more straightforward forms of collaboration. In practical terms the consultation does not propose any ground breaking new initiatives.

www.weightmans.com

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Co-responding trials begin in Surrey and Kent A potentially life-saving Co-responder scheme, which will see firefighters from Surrey and Kent fire and rescue services attend certain medical emergencies, has gone live. Similar to South East Coast Ambulance Service’s Community First Responder scheme, the scheme will see firefighters respond to life-threatening emergencies such as cardiac arrests, chest pains and breathing difficulties. In the same way Community First Responders are always backed up, qualified ambulance crews will be assigned at the same time as the firefighters who will respond in fire appliances or in fire and rescue service fleet cars. Initially the pilots, which run until April 2016, will operate in Leatherhead, Reigate, Farnham, Horley, Chobham, Redhill, Cranleigh and Caterham, in Surrey, and in Sittingbourne, Larkfield, Sevenoaks, Herne Bay, Sheppey, Margate and Tunbridge Wells, in Kent. From April 2016 it is expected that the scheme will roll out with all wholetime crews across the two counties. Firefighters involved in the pilots have all undertaken the immediate emergency care responder training. Developed by SECAmb, the training will enable firefighters to provide treatment to patients in the moments before ambulance crews arrive. The new schemes are among a number of similar pilots, which are taking place elsewhere in the country. SECAmb Paramedic and Immediate Emergency Care Responder (IECR) project lead Dave Wells said, “This is all about saving more lives. When someone is in cardiac arrest, with every minute that passes their chances of survival diminish significantly. This great scheme will give us up to an extra 100 defibrillators out there in communities across Surrey, which has to be a good thing. “We’ll always assign an ambulance response to the call at the same time but if the firefighters reach the scene of an emergency before ambulance crews, they will be able to begin vital life-saving treatment.”

Firefighters will also, if necessary, be able to use the defibrillator, which they will carry as part of their clinical equipment, to attempt to restart a patient’s heart. Kay Hammond, Surrey County Council's Cabinet Associate for Community Safety Services, said, “Firefighters are dedicated to saving lives in whichever way they can and already carry equipment such as defibrillators to give the best possible care at the scene of fire and rescue emergencies. By going a step further and providing urgent care at a medical emergency when they can be on the scene before an ambulance they are aiming to save even more lives. “Fire and rescue emergencies will always come first but when there are crews and vehicles available firefighters who are part of this pilot scheme will be able to start giving medical help to patients in life-threatening situations while an ambulance is on its way. It's another example of emergency services in Surrey working closely together to better serve their communities.” In Kent the scheme builds on the existing co-responding work that Kent Fire and Rescue Service (KFRS) has been doing on behalf of SECAmb for over 10 years. During that time fire crews have attended more than 8200 medical incidents on behalf of the ambulance service. In addition to this new scheme, KFRS has put defibrillators on all of its blue light vehicles, including fire appliances and officer response cars. David Escudier, KFRS Operational and Development Manager, said, “We have been responding to medical emergencies on behalf of SECAmb in some areas since 2004 and have had a lot of public support for this work. We are therefore delighted to be able to work with SECAmb to extend this potentially life-saving work. “It makes sense that if an equipped and trained firefighter can get to a medical emergency first, or is already on the scene of an incident, that they provide appropriate medical assistance while an ambulance is on its way. We hope that this pilot will prove a success and we can roll it out to other wholetime stations next year.”

www.secamb.nhs.uk www.kentfire-uk.org

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JESIP…the journey continues JESIP is now widely accepted, supported and is being applied more and more at incidents. However, recent world and national events have bought into sharp focus the need for continued JESIP training for all those involved in emergency response until JESIP just becomes the way we work together. Words: Joy Flanagan, JESIP Communications & Engagement Manager.

Image courtesy of London Fire Brigade

Sadly over the course of 2015 the world has seen some unprecedented events. Air disasters, civil war in Syria, the refugee crisis and the growing terrorist threat that is ISIS. Closer to home we have also seen a number of major incidents. The multiple fires at the council buildings in Oxford; the awful events at Alton Towers theme park; the accident involving both military and public sector services on Salisbury Plain; the cable fire near Holborn Underground station in London, which caused power loss and disruption for thousands of homes and businesses; the explosions at Bosley Mill in Cheshire; the Shoreham air crash and the recent horrendous flooding being experienced in Cumbria and the North West. Of course there are also emergencies that happen across the country, which we may not get to hear about in the national press. These more localised but still serious events do happen and in many cases change people’s lives forever. All of this is why JESIP is so important!

Ambitious goals In 2012 JESIP set out some ambitious goals and managed to do a lot with limited time and money. Many will be aware that an independent review, commissioned by Ministers, was carried out by a tri-service team in Summer 2015, the purpose of which was to understand how well JESIP had become embedded in the emergency services across the country and really see if we have made a difference to our joint emergency response. The final report has yet to be published by Government but the initial findings and recommendations are being shared with services and have provided a focus for the JESIP team.

Tri-Service Review Findings Here we can share the headlines with you and the plans the JESIP team have for the future. The tri-service review found that: • The formation of Joint Doctrine has provided the three services with an agreed structure and framework within which to work • The tri-service approach in delivering the training is considered hugely beneficial and facilitated a change in culture

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• Each service now has a greater appreciation of the others’ roles, capabilities and operational demands • There were positive results when local partner agencies had been included in training and this was expressed as greater engagement from key partners, improved working relationships and a better understanding of partner capabilities. In terms of the future: • All three services were unequivocal in their view that future JESIP training should continue to be triservice to ensure the continued sharing of expertise and understanding of capabilities. One of the main conclusions from the review was, ‘It is imperative that services view JESIP training as a continual requirement, not as having been delivered as part of a programme which has now been completed’.

“It is imperative that services view JESIP training as a continual requirement, not as having been delivered as part of a programme which has now been completed.” Continued support Against that backdrop, there is continued support for JESIP at the highest levels. However, there are challenges currently as we wait for the dust to settle after the announcements made in the recent Comprehensive Spending Review. Agreement has been reached about what needs to be achieved. Summarised below are our strategic objectives: • Joint Doctrine fully embedded • Specialist capabilities based on JESIP doctrine • JESIP models used routinely • Effective JESIP training • Joint Organisational Learning (JOL): – The standard for multi-agency learning – Supported by local multi agency debriefing processes • Appropriate assurance processes • Align JESIP strategy to collaboration and new emergency services technology changes.

The incident scene at the Shoreham Airshow crash site.

Much more to do We need to continue to support services as they integrate JESIP into local procedures and training programmes; complete the initial review of the Joint Doctrine; and, ensure we have appropriate training products for the future. Even more important is the continued learning of lessons when things do go wrong. The Joint Organisational Learning (JOL) arrangements were launched in 2015. The goals now are to increase awareness about JOL as well as bridging the gap between local debriefing procedures and submitting learning onto the JOL App. We have already seen some excellent learning come through, which has led to some positive improvements, including how other agencies can identify police commanders at public order events, improved joint working at Counter Terrorism environments and in general the improved sharing of notable practice. As JESIP matures, we know it is essential for JESIP to be better understood by all emergency service staff and by the broad range of wider responders who are involved with both response and recovery of emergencies. That is why we are delighted to announce that the ‘JESIP App’ will be coming soon. It has been designed to work on both mobile phones and tablets and will be launched very soon. Watch this space! The need to embed JESIP is considered as essential by both Ministers and emergency services. Despite all of the competing priorities, both local and national, we cannot afford to stop now. What we do need to achieve is a sustainable beneficial change to multi-agency working. To conclude, services must now understand that JESIP is not something that they can consider as done or another ‘ticking the box’ exercise. It is paramount that services continue the excellent work started in integrating JESIP fully into their worlds and, in the future, JESIP will just be the way joint working is done so we are all ‘working together – saving lives’.

www.jesip.org.uk

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ESTCOLLABORATION | 47

Rapid response to falls A pioneering new scheme has been launched involving Humberside Fire and Rescue Service, City Health Care Partnership CIC (CHCP CIC), Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust and Humber NHS Foundation Trust working together to provide a rapid 24/7 response for falls patients in Hull. Hull FIRST (Falls Intervention Response Safety Team) is part of the Hull 2020 transformation programme, which has nine public services working together for a healthier, safer city. NHS Hull Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is supporting a six-month pilot, which is unique in its approach to responding to people in need. Yorkshire Ambulance Service (YAS) will provide the initial clinical triage for calls via 999 and NHS 111 where

(From L to R): Paul Wray (City Health Care Partnership CIC), Chris Blacksell, (Deputy Chief Fire Officer Humberside Fire and Rescue Service), Emma Latimer, (Chief Officer, Hull Clinical Commissioning Group) Dr Steven Dykes, (Yorkshire Ambulance Service) and Julia Petty, (Humber NHS Foundation Trust) with the Falls Rapid Response vehicles.

a patient has fallen. Clinical advisors working in the YAS Clinical Hub, which is run from its Emergency Operations Centre, will provide a robust clinical assessment to ensure patients are provided with the most appropriate care for their needs. Where appropriate, the multi-skilled falls response service, involving fire officers and emergency care practitioners (ECPs), will then aim to support nonemergency patients within one hour. Hull FIRST’s holistic approach to patient care involves Humberside Fire and Rescue Service officers following through from picking people up safely, to quickly assessing their needs and, in partnership with the Hull Falls Prevention team, resolving any instant problems that might have caused the fall. City Health Care Partnership CIC has provided the clinical input of the ECPs and has trained the 10 fire officers involved in the Hull FIRST pilot. If a clinical assessment or medical treatment is needed, ECPs or ambulance clinicians will provide this on scene where possible to help avoid an unnecessary transfer to hospital. Dr Steven Dykes, Deputy Medical Director at Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust, said, “This is a great example of a number of organisations working together effectively and using the skills of their staff to benefit residents in the local area by providing the most appropriate care for their needs. The pilot is a good opportunity to explore how we can further develop partnership initiatives with our NHS and emergency service colleagues.”

www.hull2020.org

Property partnerships Police and the three fire and rescue services across the Thames Valley region have strengthened their partnership by making a formal commitment to work more closely together. The agreement focuses on sharing property and the co-location of police and fire and rescue services, wherever such arrangements will benefit the local community. The police and the three fire and rescue services currently have a substantial collective property portfolio, with buildings spread over a total of 202 sites across the Thames Valley. Sharing property and colocating will have several advantages, including enabling all four organisations to reduce the costs of maintaining fit-for-purpose buildings in the face of increasing financial pressure. It will also enable the services to take advantage of other opportunities for greater collaboration that may arise, which will be made easier by staff working from the same locations. Anthony Stansfeld, Police and Crime Commissioner for the Thames Valley, said, “Working effectively with partner organisations plays a significant role in improving performance and decreasing costs. With continued cuts in public sector spending it is more important than ever that all public sector bodies investigate cost saving options and work collaboratively with their partners. “I hope that by working together and co-locating we can both reduce costs and create opportunities for further collaborative work.”

Hampshire police begin move to fire headquarters EFR scheme launched www.thamesvalley.police.uk

Chief Constable Andy Marsh and more than 100 Hampshire Constabulary staff have begun to move in with their Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service colleagues at the fire headquarters in Eastleigh. Force staff started to join their blue light colleagues on 17 November 2015, the first time in the country that a senior police team has moved into a fire headquarters. The moves come as the first phase of the building development is completed, with more work being undertaken over the coming months, including the development of plans for a conference centre in the current fire appliance bay. The building on Leigh Road in Eastleigh has been redeveloped over the last six months to accommodate the police officers and staff, who will join fire staff already located at the headquarters. The project is due for final completion later in 2016. This move is part of the Police and Crime Commissioner’s wider Estate Strategy to replace out of date police premises with modern fit for purpose buildings at no extra cost to the taxpayer. This is the third significant estates development for Hampshire Constabulary in recent months, with the start of construction of a new Police Investigation Centre for the North of the county in October and police staff and police station front office recently moving to a new Operational Headquarters in Winchester.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Chief Constable Andy Marsh said, “This relocation into a shared headquarters reinforces the already strong partnership we have with our colleagues in Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service and we are proud to be the first police force to do this in the country. This is one of many moves and developments across the police estate where we are moving into shared locations with partners, which is helping us to continue working in the heart of the community in a more efficient way.”

Dave Curry, Chief Officer for Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service, said, “Working side by side with the police will allow us to strengthen our excellent working relationship and I am delighted to be welcoming them to Eastleigh. Working in collaboration with our colleagues across other agencies is a fundamental part of how we now work and how we will continue to keep residents safe across Hampshire.” Chris Carter, Chairman of the Hampshire Fire and Rescue Authority, said, “Hampshire continues to take a pioneering approach to joint agency working. Despite the financial challenges we face, innovative solutions such as this arrangement allow us to carry on delivering the best value services to our communities.”

A joint initiative between South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue (SYFR) and Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust (YAS) will see firefighters being called out to certain life-threatening incidents at the same time as an ambulance. Firefighters at Stocksbridge station will be the first in South Yorkshire to take part in the Emergency First Responder (EFR) scheme. Training has included basic life support, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and oxygen therapy. They are equipped with a kit, which includes oxygen and an automated external defibrillator (AED), to help patients in a medical emergency such as a heart attack, collapse or breathing difficulties. An EFR will be despatched at the same time as an ambulance and will not replace the usual emergency medical response from YAS. However, their location within the local community could mean they are nearer to the scene in those first critical minutes of a medical emergency, delivering life-saving care until an ambulance arrives. Emergency First Responders are only available for dispatch when staffing levels at their fire station allow and the scheme will not impact fire cover.

www.hantsfire.gov.uk

www.syfire.gov.uk

Strengthening relationships

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Latest NARU guidance reflects JESIP principles The National Ambulance Resilience Unit (NARU) has launched its latest guidance documents, which have all been updated to reflect the JESIP principles of operation. Since the publication of the first edition of the NARU Command & Control Guidance, in 2012, the JESIP programme has been introduced and embedded within the three blue light services. The principles brought by JESIP have now been reflected throughout the new edition of the NARU Command & Control Guidance and these now set the standard for multi-agency working during the preparedness and response phases. The new version of the NARU Command & Control Guidance takes into account lessons learned from previous major incident responses in England during recent years, as well as best-practice models from ambulance colleagues in police and fire and rescue services. The aim of the guidance is to assist the ambulance and NHS Commanders to take the most appropriate and consistent decisions during the incident, based on sound risk assessment. NARU Ambulance Advisor Robert Flute says, “This represents a significant step towards enhancing the quality and capability of each ambulance service provider across national pre-planned and mutual aid requirements. The new guidance also assures our multiagency partners of our commitment to learn from the lessons of previous responses, and to ensure that the NHS, through its ambulance service providers, remains crucial in civil protection capabilities across England.”

National Major Incident Action Cards NARU National Major Incident Action Cards have become an extremely useful source of information, prompts and guidance for all NHS ambulance services since their inception two years ago. Developed in collaboration with the national Emergency Preparedness Resilience and Response Group (EPRRG) – made up of key expert EPRR staff in all UK ambulance services – the cards are available in two printed formats: shorter A6 versions and also full versions contained in bound A5 folders. NARU Ambulance Advisor Robert Flute has led the development of the cards from day one. He says, “In

Motorways) is a new document and has been designed to outline best practice for UK ambulance services when responding to incidents on the motorway network. The guidance is the culmination of 12 months of work commencing with a national workshop hosted jointly by Highways England and NARU and then a task and finish group to produce the completed document. Although the key principles are based on the motorway network in England (operated by Highways England) the guidance can equally be applied in the devolved administrations of Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The document will supplement local agreements and standard operating principles in place across the various ambulance trust regions. In addition, work currently nearing completion includes a revision of the NARU Log Book (again revised with JESIP principles) and Guidance for Preparing an Emergency Plan (originally released in 2012).

www.naru.org.uk

launching version 2 of the Action Cards, NARU has worked hard with all the ambulance services and partners such as CFOA and COP (to embed JESIP doctrines and terminology within the cards) and we are proud to now make them available. Version 2 has additional sections – such as Railway Incidents, where we worked closely with Network Rail and train operating companies, and Motorway Incidents – where our partner was Highways England. “By their nature, major incidents cause significant challenges and pressures for the emergency services so it is extremely valuable to have detailed aide memoires and guidelines to hand in the form of these robust Action Cards. They help ensure that ambulance services play their part as effectively as possible and save as many lives as possible during the incident response.”

Motorway incident response NARU Guidance for Ambulance Service Response to Incidents on the Motorway Network (including Smart

Community collaboration

(From L to R) Steve Ashman, Chief Constable, Northumbria Police; Vera Baird QC, Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner; Councillor Tom Wright, Chair, Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Authority; Tom Capeling, Chief Fire Officer, Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

A new collaboration initiative between Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service (TWFRS) and Northumbria Police was launched on 23 October as Neighbourhood Police Team officers moved in to share Sunderland Central Community Fire Station. Five community fire stations in total will house Neighbourhood Police Teams (NPTs) under the scheme, with police officers sharing separate offices within the TWFRS facilities. Chief Fire Officer Tom Capeling said, “This initiative is about a lot more than sharing buildings. Working in this way will lead to better sharing of intelligence and joint responses to tackle anti-social behaviour and fire

setting. We anticipate that working more closely will lead to reductions in incidents and result in safer local communities.” The sharing agreements followed extensive consultation between both services and securing planning permission from the relevant local authorities to enable some alterations to be made to TWFRS buildings. Funding for the initiative has come from the Government’s Fire and Rescue Authority Transformation Funding Scheme.

www.twfire.gov.uk

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ESTCOMPANY PROFILE | 49

Supporting women in the workplace, from recruitment to retirement Knowing first hand and from friends and associates the barriers working women face on a daily basis as they are pulled from one place to another in work and at home, female entrepreneurs Jenny Pollock and Emma Shute are delighted with the impact their women’s development initiatives and coaching and mentoring programmes have brought to women across the Sheffield region through their inspirational with profits social enterprise Women to Work.

Development programme Emma comments, “We recently ran a highly successful women’s development programme with South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue (SYFR). The programme had a two stranded approach; to support individual women within the organisation to develop a mind-set, network, toolkit and set of resources to use positively to manage their personal development and work life, both in the immediate and longer term; and to support the development of the organisation itself to identify organisational and personal barriers, enablers and solutions to women’s development in the service.” The programme was delivered over four months and resulted in a research report disseminated at the Women’s Development Conference, in February 2015, attended by over 85 men and women from 28 different fire and rescue services. Opening the conference, CFO James Courtney of South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue said, “We believe that this is the first event of its kind and dare I say it, possibly, the most important gender focused event ever to have been held in the UK fire sector.”

Hibou Drusden, HR Manager at SYFR at the time, said, “Working creatively and using co-production approaches they [Women to Work] helped women at SYFR and me, as HR professional and project lead, to design a Women’s Development Programme, which successfully empowered 32 diverse female employees, firefighters and managers to boost their confidence and achieve more from their working lives. “The active learning approach within the programme was extended to an action research strand, which has allowed the women delegates to conduct and publish research and a programme for action for women’s development within the fire and rescue sector.”

Flexible approach Women to Work is now in its second year and going from strength to strength. Jenny and Emma know they have the capabilities and knowledge to provide a service, which meets the needs of both the individual women and the organisations they work with, with the aim of improving gender balance and enabling women to be fully engaged, motivated and fulfilled in their working life either independently or within an organisation. Jenny says, “The bespoke nature of our work and our flexible approach means we will work closely with an organisation to meet their individual organisation’s purpose and objectives.” Delegates on the SYFR women’s development programme utilised the tools and development workshops in a variety of ways personal to each of them as individuals, from areas such as direction, evaluating options and decision making, career planning, sharing

Emma Shute and Jenny Pollock.

experiences and network, to motivation and confidence, support through change, reviewing strengths and skills, understanding the barriers and issues women face, and to help with a maternity return plan. Women to Work is leading the way in effective change management for sustainable engagement of women in the workplace. Organisational programmes can be bespoke in nature, designed to meet the individual needs of the organisation and their female workforce. In addition, Women to Work also has three new ‘ready to go’ women’s development programmes due to be announced shortly – supporting women from recruitment to retirement.

www.womentowork.co.uk

Interactive centre offers ‘learning for life’ Warning Zone is an exciting, interactive centre in the East Midlands offering schools and other organisations a high quality, high impact ‘learning for life’ resource. To date, over 40,000 children have benefited from the Warning Zone experience. Each year in England and Wales, around 300 children under 15 die from accidental injury, 120,000 need extensive treatment for injuries and approximately 10,000 suffer a permanent disability (Child Accident Prevention Trust). The involvement of young people in anti-social behaviour and offending also continues to cause concern in all our communities. The primary aim of Warning Zone, first launched in October 2006, is to support the social and personal development of children (and other vulnerable groups) through the teaching of vital life skills. Not only is this a positive step towards the prevention of avoidable injury and death, additionally, at 10 years of age, children are beginning to make decisions that not only affect their safety but their actions can also affect the lives of other people. The young visitors to Warning Zone learn that

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they are responsible for their actions under criminal law and can be arrested for unlawful behaviour and acquire a criminal record.

Stimulating experience This safe and interactive experience brings together information and expertise from Leicestershire Fire and Rescue Service, Leicestershire Police and the private sectors and combines them in a single stimulating contextual experience. Although Year 6 pupils are its core target group, the centre is looking to develop programmes in partnership

with other agencies and organisations, eg care leavers, behavioural support pupils, early intervention and remedial work with the local Youth Offending Services and discrete disability groups. Warning Zone offers the opportunity to do something really practical in helping young people understand the risks and challenges they face; practical help that people assume is given to every child as a matter of course but which so often isn’t. The centre has proved that it fills a gap by providing young people with ‘learning for life’ in a way that even most parents cannot. By experiencing ‘risky’ situations at Warning Zone, young people are engaged in thought, decision making and discussion about matters important, not only to their own futures, but for the future of communities across the region.

New to Warning Zone On 5 October 2015 the new interactive E-Safety zone, teaching key messages about internet safety, was opened by the Leicestershire Police and Crime Commissioner, Sir Clive Loader.

www.warningzone.org.uk

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50 | ESTPRODUCTS

identiFINDER R200 – FLIR Systems Inc www.flir.com/r200 FLIR Systems Inc has launched the identiFINDER® R200, the latest addition to its industry-leading identiFINDER R-Series handheld radiation detection and identification tools. The wearable identiFINDER R200 delivers American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.48 compliant identification and enables more first responders to perform immediate frontline detection and response during a radiological event. The lightweight unit is fully compliant with the ANSI N42.32 Personal Radiation Detector (PRD) standard and boasts a compact and rugged design to wear on a belt without burdening the responder. Using the latest advancements in Bluetooth® and web server technologies, the OneTouch Reachback™ feature provides users large-scale situational awareness and enables instant notifications to help improve communications with command and control.

Magni SV Flow WW – Helly Hansen Workwear

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www.hhworkwear.com Helly Hansen Workwear redefines professional workboots with the introduction of the Magni SV Flow WW, a highly technical shoe ideal for hot working environments. The Magni SV Flow WW utilises SafeVent Technology, which provides a full protective composite plate in the sole and uses air channels to create incomparable breathability in the midsole. The upper is designed with Helly Wear® Protection reinforcements, reflective details and removable PU foot beds with perforations for better breathability. Alongside the SafeVent technology, the Magni SV Flow WW is built with a lightweight composite toe protection and a shock absorbent non-metallic nail penetration sole, which is abrasion and slip resistant. Helly Hansen Workwear is the first company in Europe to incorporate SafeVent technology into its products, having provided professionals with innovative apparel made for rugged environments for almost 140 years. The Magni SV Flow WW comes in Black/Dark Lime and Black/Blue colourways and will be available in stores starting March 2016.

Atex range – Nightsearcher

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Hazard, Barrier and Emergency Service Tapes – Centriforce Products www.centriforce.com/barriertapes These Centritape™ non-adhesive barrier tapes from Centriforce Products are made from polyethylene polymers for high visibility warning and protection. Designed to provide cost-effective perimeter warnings around dangerous or controlled areas, Centritape is available, as standard, with black-yellow or red-white diagonal stripes in 500m x 70mm rolls in dispenser boxes. Centriforce is also able to offer tapes printed with standard police, fire and other emergency service designs as well as bespoke tapes to customers’ own designs, with specific warning messages.

Ex-HT180 Head Torch (Zone 0) 180 lumens full power.

www.nightsearcher.co.uk The much-awaited Solaris Ex-3500, part of Nightsearcher’s new range of Atex products, is a high powered rechargeable LED portable floodlight, producing a very impressive 3500 lumens light output and a running time of 10 hours. It has three light settings: High (3500 Lumens), Medium (2300 Lumens) and Low (1150 Lumens), which have 10 hours, 14.5 hours and 29 hour running times respectively. Charging time is eight hours. Designed for situations where you need maximum light in remote hazardous locations and powered by a high capacity rechargeable Li-ion battery for greater portability and low maintenance, the Solaris EX-3500 is manufactured in a robust stainless steel housing, with adjustable pivot head and battery status indicators. Nightsearcher’s Atex range will also include: Ex-270 Right-Angled Torch (Zone 0) 270 lumens full power – 6.5 hours running time; Ex-HT180 Head Torch (Zone 0) 180 lumens full power – 2.5 hours running time; Ex-160 Flashlight (Zone 0) 160 lumens full power – 6 hours running time; and Ex-125 Flashlight (Zone 0) 125 lumens full power – 42.5 hours running time.

2780R rechargeable head torch – Peli Products (UK) Ltd

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Ex-270 Right-Angled Torch (Zone 0).

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www.peliproducts.co.uk Peli Products (UK) Ltd has launched the new 2780R rechargeable head torch with three light levels, four light modes and USB charging. The Peli 2780R torch has three power settings; high provides 558 lumens from the LED light source and 127m beam distance. The rechargeable lithium ion battery supplies up to 11 hours of light and the head pivots for a directional beam. Four light modes offer main beam, main beam/downcast, downcast and flashing. A red LED on the rear battery pack can be set constant or flashing mode. The head torch is also waterproof to 1m (IPX7). The 2780R is the latest addition to Peli’s range of professional head torches and carries the company’s legendary ‘You break it, we replace it’ lifetime guarantee.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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ESTCLASSIFIED | 51 ADVERTISE IN CLASSIFIED Ë SAVE - BUY 5 ADVERTS AND GET ONE FREE! Ë 6,000 CIRCULATION Ë 1 YEAR FREE SUBSCRIPTION TO EST WITH EVERY SERIES BOOKING. TO BOOK PLEASE CONTACT Ë David Brown | 01737 824010 | davidbrown@brodenmedia.com or Carol Fox | 01737 824010 | carolfox@brodenmedia.com

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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Are firefighters ‘fit’ enough to wear a respirator? Historically, the fire and rescue service is associated with tackling building fires and using breathing apparatus (BA) as their means of respiratory protection. Times have changed, however, and the modern firefighter may have to contend with collapsed buildings, chemical spillages or toxic emissions, cutting through vehicles in road traffic collisions or tackling woodland fires. Many of the activities described above do not require the higher protection levels afforded by a BA, but may call for some form of respiratory protection to mitigate the risks of exposure to harmful materials since some, such as asbestos or silica, can eventually lead to respiratory illnesses including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, silicosis or lung cancer. Many fire and rescue services now use negative pressure respirators for these activities when BA is not required. In times past, the key question asked of a firefighter was whether or not they were sufficiently physically fit to carry out BA duties. Today, the question fire and rescue services must consider is, ‘Have our firefighters been fit tested to wear a negative pressure respirator?’ The question regarding fit testing of negative pressure respirators is also relevant to the police and ambulance services that may also need respiratory protection against hazardous substances.

Fit testing is vital to assess RPE suitability The law requires that Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE), when used at work, must be adequate and suitable for its intended use. Selecting a

form of RPE that offers adequate protection for a particular task is often the easy part, but demonstrating its actual suitability is less straightforward and typically requires a detailed assessment. This assessment will address a range of aspects relating to the nature of the task being carried out, the environment in which the wearer will be working and the characteristics of the wearer themselves. Fit testing is one of the most important aspects of assessing the suitability of RPE: to comply with the law, any tightfitting RPE, such as filtering facepieces, half masks and full facemasks, needs to be correctly selected and fit the wearer. Negative pressure respirators, for example, rely on a good seal to the wearer’s face to ensure optimum protection. People have different sizes and shapes of face and it is unlikely that one single design and size of facepiece will fit all users within a workforce. A respirator fit test matches the right size and model of facepiece to the wearer, helping with the selection of a facepiece that is the best fit and which is also comfortable for the wearer. This ultimately leads to enhanced protection and therefore reduced ill health. Recent research by the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) on filtering facepieces (FFP3) indicates that, without fit testing, up to 50 percent of wearers may not be achieving an adequate fit. Fit testing is a key component of an effective RPE programme and should be incorporated into the selection process, but it can also be used to enhance training in the use and maintenance of RPE. Ideally, fit testing should be carried out during the initial selection process and should be repeated if the RPE being used is changed, if the facial characteristics of the wearer change (for example as the result of dental surgery or weight loss/gain) or when health and safety policy requires it.

HSL and the development of fit testing HSL is the laboratory of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and, in collaboration with manufacturers and industry, was instrumental in the development of effective fit testing techniques. HSL also contributes to the guidance and policy issued by HSE and additionally helped with the development of the British Safety Industry Federation’s

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‘Fit2Fit’ accreditation scheme. This scheme sets out minimum standards for fit testing, with the aim of promoting greater competence and quality, and is helping to address concern within the RPE community about the standard of fit testing being carried out. There are now more than 300 accredited fit testers in the UK. Through the development of the Fit2Fit accreditation scheme, and with eight members of staff who are experienced and accredited fit testers, HSL has acquired in-depth technical knowledge and practical experience of fit testing. Over the years, HSL has conducted a variety of research into fit testing, including recent studies of the effect of facial stubble on the fit of RPE, and also of the variability of fit testing.

“Fit testing of negative pressure respirators is also relevant to the police and ambulance services that may also need respiratory protection against hazardous substances.” Expert training for RPE users HSL shares this extensive knowledge by offering fit test training courses at two levels. The introductory course is aimed at people with little or no experience. This covers the importance of fit testing and the common fit testing methods with practical sessions covering pre-use checking and donning. There is also an advanced course aimed at the experienced fit tester seeking to gain Fit2Fit accreditation. HSL’s Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) team also provide training courses on RPE and PPE Essentials, which are aimed at anyone who has the responsibility for, or is involved with, the selection, use and maintenance of RPE/PPE in the workplace. These courses cover the range of RPE and PPE, their capabilities and limitations, the legal requirements, wearer training, correct selection, and the management of an effective RPE/PPE programme.

www.hsl.gov.uk/training For further information on the fit testing, RPE/PPE Essentials courses or any other course HSL offers, please visit www.hsl.gov.uk/training.

December2015


16.6 EST - December 2015.qxp_– 09/12/2015 16:49 Page 53


16.6 EST - December 2015.qxp_– 09/12/2015 16:49 Page 54

EST December 2015  

The December 2015 issue of Emergency Services Times featuring review of ESS2015 and a focus on ICT and Collaboration. Issue features Nation...

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