Boulder Magazine Spring 2022

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Boulder LIVING YOUR BEST LIFE IN BOULDER COUNTY!

Bringing people together with

good food

GetBoulder.com Spring 2022

magazine

LOCAL PEOPLE PLACES EVENTS +MORE

Expanded Food+Drink Section Inside

Look inside!

HOME+GARDEN ISSUE INSIDE

hg BOULDER COUNTY

HOME+

GARDEN

SPA BATHS Local pros share tips and inspiration for creating your personal oasis

SPRING RESET

Renew your health habits

SPRING PLANTING GUIDE ARTS FOCUS

Local artist Marjorie Leggitt on her career as a botanical and science illustrator

BOULDERHG.COM

PEOPLE | EVENTS + LOCAL FUN | ARTS + CULTURE | BoCo’s BEST DINING

SPRING 2022


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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com



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SMALL TOWN. Osmosis Gallery photo is courtesy of David Besnette Photography

. T R A E H BIG

For a small town we have a lot of heart. We also have great independent stores, restaurants, coffee shops, art, sculpture, history, and an outstanding children’s park. Come let your heart experience our great little town.

LONGMONT

NIWOT ROAD

BOULDER

WY

LH

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NIWOT.COM/HEART


Help support the animals at

The World’s Largest Carnivore Sanctuary

WildAnimalSanctuary.org


Shopping

Dining

(150+ retailers)

(100+ restaurants)

The Boulder Alley Gallery Project

(Wednesdays - June 15 - Aug. 3)

Bands on the Bricks

People Watching (Buskers)

Explore

(Downtown Scavenger Hunt)

It’s time to step out and (re)discover all the things that made you fall in love with downtown Boulder. The OMG-worthy shops, chef-crafted bites, top-notch special events and more are waiting for you. Rediscover the magic of downtown Boulder!

VisitDowntownBoulder.com


ANN COOPER 303.517.0447 ANNCOOPER@BOULDERCO.COM

Boulder 1932 Pearl Street

Louisville 500 W Sycamore Circle


+WHAT ’S INSIDE + BoCo BUZZ 20

NEWS FROM AROUND THE COUNTY

Old Main Tree

Erie Home Rule Marshall Fire Memory Photo Project Boulder Public Library Skatepark

PUBLISHER Thomas W. Brock EDITOR Heather Shoning ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lisa Truesdale ASSISTANT EDITOR Sara Bruskin ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Nichole Greenley Julie Grimm Nicole Karsted ART DIRECTOR Peggy Doyle PUBLICATION DESIGNER Allison Gray

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ADVERTISING DESIGNER Hilary Stojak

+EVENTS

SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR + E-NEWSLETTER EDITOR Sara Bruskin

Highlights to plan your spring

EVENTS CALENDAR

PROOFREADING Nicole Karsted ACCOUNTANT Tom Tunner WRITERS Marsha Barancik Dell Bleekman Holly Bowers Sara Bruskin Kate Jonuska Courtney Tenz Lisa Truesdale

BOULDER MAGAZINE

EVENTS + LOCAL FUN

All the things to get out and do!

+DINING GUIDE

JD MANGAT

56

BOCO’S BEST DINING GUIDE

By Dell Bleekman

Local arts venues to enjoy

+PEOPLE

Meet Lafayette’s youngest-ever mayor

ARTS + CULTURE

64

Dining out has never tasted so good!

76

THE ART OF ASPARAGUS

By Lisa Truesdale

THEATER REVIEWER Beki Pineda

10

34

76

48

+EXPANDED FOOD+ DRINK SECTION GetBoulder.com

LEFT PHOTO BY PATRICK CAMPBELL/CU BOULDER; CENTER PHOTO COURTESY BOULDER COUNTY FARMERS MARKET; RIGHT PHOTO BY SHUTTERSTOCK/OLYA HUMENIUK

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+WHAT ’S INSIDE + BoCo LIFESTYLE 33

NO PACKAGING, NO PROBLEM

How local zero-waste stores change how we think about packaging

By Holly Bowers

44

By Lisa Truesdale

10

CONTRIBUTORS

18

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

80

ADVERTISER INDEX

EVENT TO LIST?

Events@Brockpub.com

ADVERTISING INFO?

303-443-0600 Info@Brockpub.com

36

WRITERS

If you have an idea for an article, let us know. editorial@Brockpub.com

+BOCO LIFESTYLE

READERS

Share a story idea with us! editorial@Brockpub.com LEGAL Copyright © 2022 by Brock Media Co. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material in this magazine or on the Boulder Magazine website, including publisher-produced advertising, is strictly prohibited without publisher’s permission. Boulder Magazine is published by Brock Media Co.

+COMMUNITY

THE TUMULTUOUS TALE OF ROCKY FLATS

Former nuclear site offers silver linings, ongoing dangers

By Kate Jonuska

ADDRESS 1021 E. South Boulder Rd., Suite J Louisville, CO 80027 Phone: 303-443-0600 Fax: 303-443- 6627 Subscription information: send $5 for one issue or $20 for one year (four issues) to the above address, or visit GetBoulder.com/ subscribe

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BOULDER MAGAZINE

28

GetBoulder.com

CENSORED

Challenges and rewards for artists whose works feature nudity

40

+GET OUT + ENJOY!

FIRST ON THE FIELD

Colorado Bears field hockey comes to Boulder

By Courtney Tenz

By Sara Bruskin

BONUS!

READ THE DIGITAL ISSUE ONLINE FOR MORE GREAT CONTENT.

More Articles Include: » BoCo Birding

LEFT PHOTO: COURTESY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY; CENTER PHOTO: COURTESY STEFFIE NOTION; RIGHT PHOTO: COURTESY THE COLORADO BEARS FIELD HOCKEY TEAM

BOCO BOOKSHELF

What locals are writing and we’re reading


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+PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Imagine. Our Magazines are ALWAYS Online! Virtual Editions Online at GetBoulder.com and BoulderHG.com

Boulder LIVING YOUR BEST LIFE IN BOULDER COUNTY!

Bringing people together with

good food

GetBoulder.com Spring 2022

magazine

LOCAL PEOPLE PLACES EVENTS +MORE

Expanded Food+Drink Section Inside

Look inside!

HOME+GARDEN ISSUE INSIDE

hg BOULDER COUNTY

SPRING 2022

HOME+

GARDEN

On 2/22/2022, the world looked great! The Omicron variant was fading and mask mandates were being lifted. We mourned, and then celebrated, as the Table Mesa King Soopers reopened. Community support for the Marshall Fire victims was incredibly strong and ongoing. The economy was robust and rebounding, with record employment numbers. Then, on 2/24/2022, Vladimir Putin—a Cold War relic with an unhinged worldview—decided to start a war. As of this writing, the war in Ukraine is raging and outrage to Putin’s action is global, with protestors filling Russian streets and cities around the world. Why do I mention Putin’s war in a local magazine’s publisher’s note? Because it’s symptomatic of an autocratic way of thinking and acting that no longer has a place in this world. I often hear the question, “Would you bring a child into today’s world?” My answer is a resounding “YES!” Sadly, there are still many of my generation who obstruct the roads to greater peace, climate change solutions, equality, and myriad other issues. Today’s youth seem to have a much better handle on what’s needed to solve global problems. They live in an interconnected world, where nationalism smacks of decadence. One can only hope that with the passage of time, the autocratic fossils will be gone, and the ability to address the planet’s future—and frankly, our survival—will gain greater immediacy. Maybe if we all work at it, John Lennon’s lyrics in “Imagine”—“And the world will live as one”—will come true.

SPA BATHS Local pros share tips and inspiration for creating your personal oasis

SPRING RESET

hg Renew your health habits

SPRING PLANTING GUIDE

ARTS FOCUS

Local artist Marjorie Leggitt on her career as a botanical and science illustrator

BOULDER COUNTY

SPRING 2022

BOULDERHG.COM

PEOPLE | EVENTS + LOCAL FUN | ARTS + CULTURE | BoCo’s BEST DINING

HOME+

GARDEN

SPA BATHS Local pros share tips and inspiration for creating your personal oasis

SPRING RESET

Renew your health habits

Boulder County Home+Garden takes you on a food journey as well, with tips for growing your own meals and improving your mental health while doing so. There are also super ideas to get your juices flowing for the spring planting season. To get inspired to create a spa-like bathroom in your home, find the latest fabulous looks starting on page 34.

SPRING PLANTING GUIDE ARTS FOCUS

Local artist Marjorie Leggitt on her career as a botanical and science illustrator

BOULDERHG.COM

Tell Your Friends!

It’s been said that one of the BEST ways to bring people together is with GOOD FOOD! Boulder Magazine is doing its part this issue to present creative options for dining, cooking, drinking and bringing fresh life to your culinary pleasures. And, as always, we introduce you to local people doing cool things, and HUNDREDS of events that offer something fun for everyone. Discover YOUR best life this spring inside these pages.

Boulder Magazine and Boulder County Home+Garden are our team’s labor of love for our local community. We hope that you, your family and your friends enjoy them. Stay Safe. Be Kind. Happy Spring.

PLEASE Support Our Local Businesses. THEY Support YOU! «

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@bouldermagazine @boulderhg


THAT MOMENT YOU

FIND CLASSES THAT FIT YOUR NEEDS.

Discover options and flexibility to help you stay on track. Own your journey. ce.colorado.edu • 303.492.5148


+BoCo BUZZ

Opening

Many interactions between city council members and local residents can be laced with frustration, leaving both sides feeling unappreciated and unheard. In an attempt to ease these tensions in Boulder, a group of locals began meeting in January 2021 to discuss strategies to facilitate more productive public input on council decisions. Calling themselves Dialogue Boulder, the group included people from a variety of political parties, ages, genders, ethnicities and backgrounds. To keep partisan issues from derailing the conversations, they maintained a strict ban on discussing particular council issues or people—no airing grievances about this policy or that councilperson or that other political party. After months of meetings and gleaning input from local boards, commissions and city council members, Dialogue Boulder compiled a list of recommendations. They include calls to make government research on proposed changes available to the public before relevant public hearings, encouragement for boards and commissions to gather public feedback before making recommendations to council, ideas for diversifying the membership of these boards, and much more. Read the full list of recommendations at getboulder.com/ dialogueboulder.

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New Skate Space

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

In an effort to create more free recreation resources in Boulder, the city is installing a new skateboarding area underneath the main branch of Boulder Public Library. The new design for the sheltered area south of Boulder Creek includes a skate box, rail and bank. Right next to the library’s playground, these skate features will make it easier for older kids and young adults to enjoy the space as well.

PHOTO BY LZF/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

a Dialogue


THE

BOULDER PROPERTY NETWORK

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+BoCo BUZZ

Felling a

Giant

Cultivating

Creativity Boulder’s Local Theater Company won a 2021 True West Award in the Local Works category, partially on account of their impressive staffing stats. Arts journalist John Moore who administers the True West Awards writes, “The company employed 231 union and non-union professionals in 2021, including 68 actors, 18 script adjudicators, 20 technicians, 16 playwrights, 16 stage managers and 15 directors.”

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

The company’s dedication to local arts is also evident in their Local Lab new play festival, which helps playwrights workshop and develop theater pieces with the help of audience feedback. Another program called LocalWRITES takes students at Casey Middle School in Boulder through the process of writing their own plays. This award comes just one year after BroadwayWorld named Local Theater Company the “Theatre Company of the Decade” in their 2020 regional awards.

TOP: PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER; BOTTOM: COURTESY LOCAL THEATER COMPANY.

The oldest tree on CU Boulder’s campus reached the end of its long life in January. More than 140 years old, the cottonwood in front of Old Main lived twice as long as expected and grew to be 110 feet tall. Due to its declining health and stability, the tree posed a safety risk, so Taddiken Tree Company was called in to lay it to rest. The university offered its wood to local artists for various projects, and the tree will also live on through its scions: cuttings taken to grow into new trees. Some of these scions were cut from the parent tree in 2014 and are ready to go in the ground this spring. One will be planted in the same area as the historical cottonwood to shade future generations of CU students and staff.


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+BoCo BUZZ

From mountains to plains, from ranches to large metro areas, Colorado is a wildly diversified state. Because its cities and towns have a wide range of local concerns specific to their own communities, the state offers them the option of becoming Home Rule municipalities. This means they can govern themselves—within limits— rather than following state statutes, on matters like lodging taxes, local sales taxes, zoning issues and guidelines for municipal elections.

More , Less Cash

Splash

This year, entry to the Boulder Reservoir will cost 25 percent less for visitors who arrive “by foot or non-motorized vehicle, or who have three or more people in a car.” So, walk, run or skate; ride your bike, unicycle or penny farthing; or carpool to the reservoir to save a few bucks!

24

The Town of Erie hopes to join cities like Boulder, Lafayette, Longmont and Louisville as a Home Rule municipality, which would make it a “city” rather than a “town.” Erie is collecting comments from residents through May, and then the committee will decide whether the issue should be put in front of voters in November. If you’re an Erie resident and want to offer your opinions or learn more about this possible change, visit erieco.us/ home-rule-charter.

Open Space Score Once completed, the ambitious Colorado Front Range Trail project will span the entire state of Colorado from Wyoming to New Mexico. Longmont made progress on their portion this winter when the City Council unanimously approved the acquisition of 130 acres southeast of Union Reservoir to preserve it as open space. Known as the Adam Farm Property, this land provides a link between the reservoir and St. Vrain State Park, which opens up possibilities for new trail connections. The $5.5-milliondollar price tag will be offset by a $2 million conservation easement with Boulder County. David Bell, director of Parks and Natural Resources in Longmont, says, “The city is actively working on a trail from Sandstone Ranch to the state park, on the southern border. This property will now allow for a loop back to Union Reservoir and the city’s Greenway trail system.” He adds that the acquisition will enable the city to protect threequarters of a mile of St. Vrain Creek and 83 acres of agricultural land.

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: PHOTO BY STEVEN WEINELL/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; PHOTO COURTESY TOWN OF ERIE: MAP COURTESY CITY OF LONGMONT

Erie: From “Town” to “City”?


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Eric Jacobson

303.437.0221 eric.jacobson@compass.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker in the State of Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.

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+BoCo BUZZ

Sharing and Caring in the Wake of Tragedy

Ring Up a Story

26

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Before prom 2009, Monarch High School

Monarch High School Volleyball Team 2009

Lots of good things can come out of hard times. When the pandemic shut down Boulder Public Library back in 2020, they still wanted to be there for their littlest patrons, so BPL rolled out the Dial-a-Story hotline. Kids could call up and listen to a recorded story at any time, day or night. While some in-person storytime sessions have resumed, the hotline is still a great resource for entertainment, comfort and helping young kids learn how to make phone calls. Catch a new story every week at 303-441-3102. ✷

TOP: PHOTOS BY MARILYN HUNT; BOTTOM: PHOTO BY DONOT6_STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

In the immediate aftermath of the Marshall Fire, community members from near and far stepped up to help meet the urgent needs of those directly affected, with items such as food, shelter, even diapers and pet supplies. The Louisville Historical Museum, meanwhile, tackled a longer-term, but just as crucial, need: helping to replace precious photo memories. They’re seeking community photos taken before the fire—specifically any images of homes, neighborhoods, public or school performances, or any other scenes that might bring comfort to those who lost everything. The museum has also set up two other projects related to the fire—workshops to help residents learn how to safely clean their fire-damaged items, and a forum for sharing experiences and emotions related to the tragedy. “The stories you share from evacuation, during the fire, and after the fire will help future generations of Louisville and Colorado residents understand the gravity and emotional spectrum of this event,” said the museum in a press release. If you have photos or stories to contribute to these projects, visit louisvilleco.gov for more information and to find the link for the online photo-sharing site.


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+COMMUNITY ROCKY FLATS

T U M U L T U O U S TALE OF

ROCKY

FLATS

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

PHOTOS COURTESY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

THE


Rocky Flats solar evaporation ponds in the plant’s heydey.

W

Former nuclear site offers silver linings, ongoing danger BY KATE JONUSKA

Facing page, clockwise from top: Building 771 burst into flames in 1957; leaking waste oil drums were discovered on the 903 Pad; worker in a test lab; The Denver Post reports plans to build the $65 million Rocky Flats plant on March 23, 1951.

When nuclear processing began at Rocky Flats in 1952, the United States was in the opening salvos of an atomically charged Cold War. The government didn’t inform the public they were bringing plutonium and other hazardous materials to the site 10 miles south of Boulder to make the triggers for nuclear bombs. They then covered up their radioactive mistakes in the public’s backyard for decades, creating a 70-year history of environmental disasters, revealed secrets, and attempts at remediating both land and public trust. “In 1957, they had their first major accident—a spontaneous fire in Building 771 that created an ‘infinity room,’” says Giselle Herzfeld, co-coordinator of the Nuclear Guardianship Collective at the Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center. The accident site was thus called because its radiation was off the meter on the detection equipment used at that time, and the decision to cover up the fire was the first brick in the public’s wall of distrust regarding Rocky Flats.

SPRING 2022

29


+COMMUNITY ROCKY FLATS

“The public was not informed at all,” says Herzfeld. “We weren’t aware of that first fire until their 1969 Mother’s Day Fire, which at the time, was the most expensive industrial fire [in the U.S.] to date and required two years of cleanup.” The next betrayal included a discovery in 1970 that plutonium waste drums had been known to be leaking on-site since 1959, and by that time, winds had already redistributed contaminated soil throughout the Denver metro area. That year, the Boulder Workshop in Nonviolence led a five-day protest against Rocky Flats and kicked off a wave of public activism that brought together protesters against both environmental injustice and nuclear weapons. The notoriety of the site grew nationally once poet Allen Ginsberg and writer Daniel Ellsberg joined a group of 3,500 folks protesting Rocky Flats in 1978. “That was the protest that culminated in people camping on the railroad tracks to stop the trains from coming in and out, and seventy-five people were arrested,” says Herzfeld, who notes that several of the Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center’s founders participated in those early protests before founding RMPJC to host their own large protest in 1983. “We hosted the Rocky Flats Encirclement where people joined hands to encircle the perimeter of the site, a very nationally known effort at the time,” she continues. “And it eventually was public pressure and protest that led to the site getting raided and shut down in 1989.” It was also declared an official Superfund site that year. Or at least, the area used for atomic materials production (aka the Central Operable Unit) was declared and continues to be a Superfund site. After cleanup efforts and governmental wrangling throughout the ’90s, the

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

5,000+ acres originally purchased as a buffer zone for nuclear operations was deemed “safe for unlimited use and unrestricted exposure” and opened as the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in 2007. While several governmental studies show that cleanup was done to the required standards, some think the standards should have been higher. “The site is really extraordinary. It remains one of the largest intact xeric grasslands left in the United States, which is tall grass and a type of prairie habitat that’s fairly rare now,” says Sarah Metzer, a biologist and visitor services manager at the refuge, which is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In addition to 11 miles of trails with opportunities for hiking, biking and horseback riding, the refuge includes habitat for the endangered Prebles meadow jumping mouse, more than 200 species of birds and a herd of elk.

TOP: PHOTO COURTESY ROCKY MOUNTAIN PEACE AND JUSTICE CENTER AND ALSO BY SIRI JODHA SINGH KHALSA; BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE.

Top photo: Drawing massive media attention, some 12,000 peaceful demonstrators showed up on October 15, 1983, but fell short of their goal to totally encircle the plant. Traffic on Colorado 93 was jammed for hours following the demonstration. Bottom photo: Today, Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge includes habitat for the endangered Prebles meadow jumping mouse, more than 200 species of birds and a herd of elk, in addition to 11 miles of trails.


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BearandLiz@BoulderCo.com


+COMMUNITY ROCKY FLATS “I think we’re lucky in a sense because if the site didn’t have this history, it would probably all be housing development right now,” says Metzer, who points to the transparent testing already done and says she believes the science. “Fish and Wildlife is a scientific organization. While [testing] is certainly not our expertise, we work in conjunction with other agencies, and in working with these partners, we trust the science that the testing has been done,” she says. “From the biologist’s perspective, it’s a stunning landscape that’s been deemed safe for us and for our visitors to recreate on, and safe for the animals, as well.” Her agency provides transparent release of testing results done in conjunction with the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency demonstrating a level of plutonium deemed safe for unlimited use and exposure. Yet, public distrust about the safety of the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge remains and centers around differing historical plans for decontamination. Namely, environmental cleanup of the area was originally estimated to cost $36 billion and take 65 years, but later, a new contract promised to complete the cleanup for $7.3 billion in only 10 to 15 years. The Department of Energy saved this time and money by what RMPJC calls “cutting corners,” meaning they agreed to clean the soil in the buffer zone down to 50 picocuries of plutonium per gram, but only to a depth of three feet. Any deeper soil, the new agreement

claimed, would be left intact unless it posed a reasonable chance of migrating to the surface or into the groundwater. At present, RMPJC and other environmental groups think the whole refuge should be avoided for safety and that hiking, biking and horseback riding could definitely disturb that deeper soil. They’re also fighting U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s plans to build a greenway path from its other property at Rocky Mountain Arsenal through the Rocky Flats refuge and eventually all the way to Rocky Mountain National Park. “A lot of the plans for the refuge and greenway are contingent on everything staying exactly the same when the reality of threats like climate change make it very unstable,” says Claire O’Brien, RMPJC administrator. She uses the example of a disaster like the Marshall Fire hitting Rocky Flats—the Superfund site or the refuge—and spreading old radioactivity into the atmosphere or the water supply. “That danger should be continuously talked about and brought up. The danger of Rocky Flats isn’t over.” ✷ To learn more, visit Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center at rmpjc.org, where you’ll find a documentary film called “The Encirclement.” Local podcast Changing Denver dedicated an entire season to Rocky Flats. Visit changingdenver.com to listen. For the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s coverage of Rocky Flats, visit fws.gov/refuge/rocky-flats.

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Simply Bulk Market

Zero Waste

303.678.7069

418 Main St.

Longmont, CO 80501 * We offer curbside and contactless delivery options


+BoCoLIFESTYLE

No Packaging, No Problem Zero-waste stores are changing how we think about packaging BY HOLLY BOWERS

PHOTO BY RESHETNIKOV_ART/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

W

hen you walk into Simply Bulk Market in Longmont, you’ll see barrels and gravity bins full of nuts, dried fruits, candy, grains, spices and more. What you won’t see is plastic packaging or bags. That’s because Simply Bulk Market is a zero-waste grocery store. Customers bring their own containers and fill them from the bulk bins. “No waste whatsoever,” says Heidi Quince, who took over Simply Bulk Market with her husband in 2016. While bulk shopping is nothing new—it’s been a staple at natural food stores for decades—its popularity has surged as the zero-waste movement has made consumers more aware of what they throw away. The average American tosses 4.9 pounds of trash per day. Containers and packaging make up almost 30 percent of that. In 2018, Americans threw away 82 million tons of containers. In light of that, consumers are placing more importance on waste reduction. In the 2021 PwC Global Consumer Insights Pulse Survey, 36 percent of U.S. consumers reported that they look at whether a company uses eco-friendly or biodegradable products before they make a purchase. That attitude has led to a proliferation of zero-waste shopping options, and major grocery chains have long since added bulk options to their stores. Nude Foods is Boulder County’s latest bulk grocery option, but Sprouts Farmers Market, Natural Grocers, Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, King Soopers and more offer bulk sections, and they all support a lowwaste agenda. Simply Bulk Market has certainly seen increased traffic over the last six years. “People come in, and they’re just so excited to find a place like this,” Quince explains. “That was wonderful for me to see that so many people care.” And she’s quick to point out that the benefits of zero-waste shopping extend beyond cutting out containers. Buying items in bulk can be cheaper—a Portland State University study found that customers could save as much as 77 percent by buying coffee and spices from bulk bins, and the products are often higher quality. If more people bought common items without packaging, we could cut out tens of millions of pounds of waste every year. While it’s difficult to quantify the exact environmental impact of zero-waste shopping, the benefits are clear to Quince. “We see so many people who have been bringing the same containers for as long as they’ve been shopping here. I just try to visualize the number of containers that are kept out of the landfill.” ✷

BY THE NUMBERS

1,788.5 27 million

Pounds of trash generated per year by the average American

Tons of plastic sent to the landfill in the U.S. in 2018

9%

Amount of plastic that gets recycled worldwide

82 million

Tons of packaging and container waste in 2018

SPRING 2022

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+PEOPLE JD MANGAT

lafayette’s

PHOTO COURTESY JD MANGAT

local leader

Born in Lafayette to immigrant parents, JD Mangat brings his unique perspective and vision to City Hall as he honors the past and looks toward the future. BY DELL BLEEKMAN

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com


Lafayette local Jaideep “JD” Mangat knows the American success story because he saw it as a child. His parents emigrated from Punjab, India, in the mid-1990s. “They were both highly educated, but upon arriving here, realized their degrees were simply less valuable.” JD’s father held a Ph.D., yet his first job in the U.S. was at a gas station, while his mother worked in the food industry. “Coming to a new country with a new language and culture was difficult for them,” JD recalls, noting that their hard work eventually paid off. “They were able to achieve a great amount with few resources. That gave me the confidence to know that I could do the same. I could make something great of my life even when the odds were stacked against me,” he says.

Born and Raised JD attended Lafayette schools—Alicia Sanchez Elementary, Angevine Middle School—and found his groove at Centaurus High School. As a freshman, he worked on a committee that created the Lafayette Skate Park (at Baseline and N. 114th), which proved to be a valuable lesson in local governance. “I felt I had done something that mattered,” he recalls. Being part of the process made an impact; that same year he got involved as a member of the Student Accountability Advisory Committee (SAAC), a student-led group that addressed issues like healthy eating and waste reduction in district schools. This passion for public service continued after Centaurus and on to CU Boulder, as JD attended classes and worked with the Lafayette Peer Empowerment Project, as well as Lafayette’s Communities That Care community board. He graduated from CU with a degree in business in 2017, and that desire to serve Lafayette never faded.

Committing to the Public Sector In a brash move, JD ran for Lafayette’s city council the year he graduated from college. “I found myself interviewing with companies and they would ask, ‘What excites you about our company?’ and the answer was: nothing.” So, fresh out of college with no political experience, going up against 15 other people, JD threw his hat in the ring for a city council spot. And he lost. JD worked in the private sector for a year, but he never lost sight of his goal. “I was still attending council meetings, taking notes,” JD recalls. “Sometimes I was the only one there.” That fortitude paid off when an elected member of the

city council moved, leaving a vacancy. In 2018, JD was appointed to the council. A whirlwind eight months later, he had to run for election—and this time he wanted to earn it. “We knocked on doors, we raised funds, we got out the vote,” he says. And it worked—JD’s campaign was a success.

City Council Duties One success JD points to is Lafayette’s 50/50 agreement with Erie in regard to defining urban growth boundary lines, developing the corner of Arapahoe Road and 287 and splitting development costs. “We worked together to make sure both communities benefited,” says JD. “The agreement with Erie is a huge accomplishment.” Another pressing concern facing Lafayette and other Front Range cities is affordable housing. Toward that end, the council is pushing ahead with Willoughby Corner, a neighborhood at the intersection of 120th and East Emma streets. “This will provide four hundred permanently affordable homes, duplexes, apartments and townhomes,” JD says, noting there are also plans for gardens, trails and open space. In December 2021, JD became mayor—Lafayette’s youngest ever at only 26 years old. Lafayette’s mayor is appointed by the city council for a twoyear term. JD is humbled and thrilled at the prospect of serving his term as mayor but knows it’s a team effort, saying, “I facilitate the meetings, but we all work together on the council.” And he knows the council has heavy lifting ahead. “The primary issues Lafayette faces are the same our regional communities are facing as well,” JD states. “Namely, affordable housing, oil and gas drilling, transportation, and growth.”

The Other Day Job JD hasn’t strayed far from his roots; he’s currently a social studies teacher at Angevine Middle School. “It’s the most diverse middle school in the district, and the students are just like me,” he says. His students may not yet vote, but they’re his biggest supporters. “They think it’s cool to have a personal connection with the mayor,” JD says,“but I tell them every day: One of you will be the mayor too!” Like a true politician, JD keeps his options open. “I’m finishing a master’s degree now and am focusing on being the best teacher I can be,” he states. “With my folks here, their business here, my job here, I know I want to be a part of Lafayette forever.” ✸

SPRING 2022

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+COMMUNITY ART

BY SARA BRUSKIN

N

ude figures have been featured in artistic works since the Stone Age, yet depictions of naked bodies are still controversial. Social media sites ban nudity, most stores won’t stock items that portray it, and many people argue that it’s crude or obscene. When an artist’s subject matter adds so many challenges to their career, what compels them to stick with it? We asked two local artists to share the motivation behind their themes.

Steffie Notion’s attitude toward nudity includes both

“To Lose Myself Inside This Soft World” Steffie Notion

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

loving reverence and simple practicality. “I do think bodies are temples and are precious, but they’re also just the tool we’ve been given for existing in this world,” she says. “It’s the one thing we all have in common, so it’s surprising to me how taboo nakedness is.” Notion is a Longmont-based embroidery artist whose work often depicts people or body parts with little to no clothing on. She ventured into risqué embroidery after her divorce as a form of art therapy, and many of her earlier pieces are self-portraits. Choosing that vulnerability of nakedness on her own terms was empowering for Notion. She also found that portraying her body as art discouraged the self-doubt and internal criticism we often face when looking at ourselves in the mirror. “When you look at art, there’s not that judgment of, ‘Is this body right or wrong?’ It’s more of, ‘Why did the artist choose to portray this body?’” Notion says. “That shift from seeing yourself in a mirror to seeing yourself as art is a huge change in self-perception.” While she receives a lot of positive feedback on her work, Notion has run into some difficulty promoting it. Instagram shut

TOP: PHOTO BY CECOP ALP/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY STEFFIE NOTION

Local artists who feature nudity in their work face limitations while promoting liberation.


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+COMMUNITY ART down her account soon after she began posting photos in 2018, but she got it back after the account had been reviewed. Notion figures that she doesn’t get censored as much as other artists depicting nudity because fabric and thread don’t come across as especially graphic. Some of her posts still get flagged though, and she’ll often post a content-warning image preceding her more explicit pieces. While she’s had trouble finding stores that will display her art, Notion does get invited to craft shows by organizers who know and love her work. She tries to curate her selection to be considerate of the public context, but she ran into some uncomfortable moments at a show which she anticipated being more adult-oriented but ended up attracting a lot of families instead. Kids would come over to her table and their parents would get flustered, unsure of how to discuss the content their kids were seeing. Notion says, “It was awkward, but I also feel like that’s a challenge to our society: How do we want to raise our kids? Do we want them to feel ashamed and embarrassed when they see bodies, or do we want to explain that they’re strong and beautiful?”

“Magic” Steffie Notion

asubtlenotion.com Instagram: @asubtlenotion

like this with young people. Her daughters and stepdaughters have been growing up around her nude artwork that hangs on the walls of their home. When she and her partner first moved in together, Coates says one of her stepdaughters (who was five at the time) walked into their bedroom one day and looked at a painting hanging over the bed. She crossed her arms in a huff and said, “This is very inappropriate. You need to paint them at least with underwear!” Laughing at the memory, Coates says, “It’s been beautiful to watch that evolution because now she’s very comfortable with it.” That process of familiarization with her daughters included discussions about sexuality, consent, when it’s okay to be naked around other people and when it’s not. Coates wants them—and all women— to have healthy relationships with their own bodies. “There’s so much shame and stigma in this society around nudity in the female form,” she says. “It’s either hypersexualized or it’s shamed, or both at the same time. I wanted to create something that was about embracing it and awakening to it.” Many women have certainly embraced her art, and Coates says some have broken into tears upon seeing it. Social media sites, however, have been less enthused. Facebook consistently

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

“Outer Dissolutions” Kyra Coates

TOP: PHOTO COURTESY STEFFIE NOTION; BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY KYRA COATES

Kyra Coates has a lot of practice discussing topics


PHOTO COURTESY KYRA COATES

rejected advertisements she tried to post, even those where the body angle showed no more than one would see of a person wearing a bikini. “It’s extremely frustrating,” Coates says. “I’ve given up on trying to market my artwork through social media.” Like Notion, Coates has found warm appreciation for her work among art show organizers and the people who attend those shows in Boulder County. In more conservative areas like Arizona and some Colorado mountain towns, the art show attendees have more mixed reactions. Coates says, “People will walk by and go, ‘Well I guess we know where the porn is!’ And I’m like, there’s nothing sexual in this image. But the immediate response to female nudity is sex.” The spectrum of responses to Coates’ art has been extreme, with a gallery owner in North Carolina loving her work so much that he had some shipped across the country and put one painting in pride of place in his front window. But the downtown council demanded that he remove it, and the ensuing fight eventually led to the gallery closing. Coates is determined to change that narrative around the female form being inappropriate or offensive. “There are so many social constructs and ideas around what it means to be a woman, and what it means to be nude, and what it means to have a body and what it means to be sexual—and we can shatter all of that. We can just let that go. We can be the authors of this.” ✷ “Breakthrough” Kyra Coates

kyracoatesart.com Instagram: @kyra_coates_art_infusegallery

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GET OUT

+ENJOY

Top photo: Colorado Bears team members scrimmage; Bottom photo: A summer camp attendee, Lily, is at the ready.

FIRST ON THE FIELD

F

The Colorado Bears bring field hockey to Boulder. BY COURTNEY TENZ

For a little over a year now, dozens of girls and young women have been meeting on turf fields around Boulder with one goal in mind: to learn the ins and outs of field hockey. Their hair pulled back, pale blue uniforms on, the girls wield their curved wooden sticks with confidence as they dribble and pass their way down the field, battling each other in seven-on-seven scrimmages. These young players are members of the Colorado Bears Field Hockey Club, the first (and only) club team in Boulder. The club got its start when Emma Bozek arrived in Boulder in August of 2020. She grew up playing field hockey in Westchester, New York, then played for UNC Chapel Hill and internationally for the U.S. National Team. When the pandemic struck, a coach from UC Berkeley reached out to Bozek to see if she could offer private lessons for one of their players stuck at home in Boulder due to the university’s shutdown. As word quickly got out about Bozek’s skills, those lessons snowballed into private training for 10 other individuals and Bozek realized there was an untapped market for field hockey training in Boulder. After running a few free clinics, she launched a winter training season in January 2021 and the

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com


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+ENJOY

club took off from there. In just over a year, the Bears have seen more than 100 youth players and 200 adult players join their summer and winter leagues, despite the constraints posed by the pandemic. “Our numbers dropped a bit in the winter as, understandably, not everyone is comfortable playing indoors, even with mitigation measures,” says Bozek. Still, that drop is only temporary, one from which the team will recover this spring as they head back to train outdoors on fields around Boulder. “We expect to double our club membership this year,” says Bozek, who notes that there’s a real demand for the club. Though she attributes the team’s current growth to wordof-mouth, she plans to hold free clinics throughout 2022 to further introduce the sport to the community. Long popular on the East Coast, field hockey is a rarity in Colorado, with interest in Boulder growing as more transplants have arrived. “I’ve always wanted my daughter to play field hockey,” says Colleen Bolls, who played a winning career through high school and college in Connecticut and was inducted into the Connecticut Field Hockey Hall of Fame in 2012. Bolls helps to coach the team, and says she’d had trouble finding clubs for the sport since moving to Boulder more than 12 years ago. “As soon as I heard there was a team practicing, we got involved.” Bolls’ daughter is on the club’s U12 team, members of which flew to Disney World in late January for the Sunshine Showcase—a tournament put on by USA Field Hockey that Bozek herself played in as a child. Though it’s one of the first big tournaments the team has taken part in, there are sure to be more in the future as the club grows. Plans are in the works for games

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Top photo: Colorado Bears team member, Hailey, leads the charge; Bottom photo: National Field Hockey Day Colorado Bears team photo.

against teams from Denver, Aspen and Colorado Springs, as well as a summer camp. Bozek’s ambition to bring field hockey to as many girls as possible seems to be working. The middle-school team members are so excited about the sport that they are petitioning Boulder Valley School District to create school teams. For now, though, with the start of spring and beautiful weather, the girls are regrouping, heading back out of the halls and onto the outdoor fields where they’ll take aim at growing their competitive skills. Because as the saying about both life and field hockey goes, “You can’t win without goals.” ✸ For more info, visit coloradobears.com.

PHOTOS COURTESY THE COLORADO BEARS FIELD HOCKEY TEAM

GET OUT


+LIFESTYLE BIRDING

BONUS CONTENT

Spring is a great time to spot migratory species BY MARSHA BARANCIK

BONUS

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

A juvenile Swainson’s hawk

Birding Resources

Scan the code to read the online article, where you’ll find links to local birding resources including the Boulder County raptor map, osprey nest live cameras, birding events and more.

PHOTO BY SUSAN HODGSON/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Naturalist Dave Sutherland consults an unlikely source when he’s birdwatching around Boulder County—a Costa Rica birding guidebook. That’s because many of our nesting songbirds winter in Central America before making their way here in spring to breed along our ponds and creeks, as the cackling geese that dominated our waterways in the winter get ready to move out. The beauty of birding is its unpredictability. Sutherland, who recently retired from Boulder’s Open Space and Mountain Parks after 25 years and now leads his own birding hikes (COVID permitting), says that even as the volume of migrants drops, rare sightings are always possible. “Every year is up for grabs,” he says. “You never know what kind of rarity might fly in,” based on storms, wind patterns and other variables. For example, unexpected numbers of hooded merganser ducks were prevalent in 2021, although rationale for their spike is unclear. “This is why we keep doing it; it’s always different,” explains Sheridan Samano, founder of the Birding and Beers Meetup and author of “Best Birding Hikes: Colorado’s Front Range.” To spot more birds, Samano and Sutherland say, take note of when species are most active. While waterfowl species are evident at any time of day, songbirds are most active in the morning as they look for food, and birds of prey are commonly seen hunting midday. Samano and Sutherland also remind birders to avoid peeping into nests: “Do nothing that could disrupt an eating or nesting bird,” says Samano.


COUNTERCLOCKWISE FROM TOP: PHOTO BY RICHARD SEELEY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; PHOTO BY KENEVA PHOTOGRAPHY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; PHOTO BY KENEVA PHOTOGRAPHY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Clockwise from right: yellow-headed blackbird, hooded merganser and three cute little burrowing owls taking over a prairie dog burrow.

Here are these experts’ favorite tips for BoCo spring birdwatching: d W aterfowl kick off the breeding season across Sawhill Ponds, Waneka Lake, Pella Crossing and area creeks early in the year. From shoreline trails, look for diving ducks, such as common goldeneye, buffleheads, mergansers and redhead species in the center of ponds. Find red-winged and yellowheaded blackbirds on shores and in cattails. Large migratory species such as the American white pelican and ospreys like to fish in local waters. l Colorful songbirds that feast on insects and fruit typically phase in during April. Usual suspects documented by local birders during the 2021

breeding season include tanagers, flycatchers, Western kingbirds, warblers and orioles. z Raptors often rebuild and reuse the same nests each year. April through June, it’s easy to find redtailed hawks, ospreys and bald and golden eagles breeding locally. Falcons nest in the Flatirons, while Swainson’s hawks seek open space and burrowing owls exclusively nest in abandoned prairie dog burrows. (Samano has also observed Swainson’s hawks breeding at Waneka Lake.) Keep in mind that not all raptor activity is obvious to the naked eye. For instance, kestrels, the smallest raptor species in the area, nest in woodpecker holes and wooden boxes. ✷ SPRING 2022

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+BoCo LIFESTYLE

BoCo Bookshelf What locals are writing and we’re reading

O

BY LISA TRUESDALE

ne day, on a long walk prompted by pandemic boredom, Karen Jacot spied a creatively pruned hedge in front of a Boulder home. Shaped like a racecar, darn near full size, it even had real tires and shiny hubcaps. She snapped a photo and added it to the growing collection of images she’d been sharing on Instagram during quarantine. She was walking daily, capturing everything and anything that caught her attention, whether quirky, mysterious, heartwarming or simply just beautiful. She photographed unique architecture, yard art and large murals; cats, birds, flowers and landscapes; funny signs, clever mailboxes and flamingoes… lots and lots of pink flamingoes. Wanting to see something different each day, Jacot never repeated a route. She soon realized that she could eventually hit every street in the city, so she started tracking her progress on the CityStrides app. Ten months after her first walk, she had covered all 955 streets in Boulder, taking multiple shots on every single one. Now, what to do with all those photos? Not content to only share them on

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Instagram, Jacot decided to publish a book. She raised enough capital on Kickstarter for a first print run and published “Rabbits in Driveway: A Different Boulder Photo Book” just before Christmas. It’s a beautiful hardcover book with 400 full-color photographs, worthy of any coffee table. With this book, which the longtime Boulder resident calls her “love letter” to the city, Jacot hopes to inspire others to view their surroundings through a different lens—whether that’s an actual lens or not. She borrows the words of a friend to explain: “It’s not people watching, it’s people imagining, because you don’t see the people, but you do see the marks they’ve left on our city.” It’s not intended to be a guidebook; in fact, Jacot intentionally leaves out any directions for finding the locations. (Some, like the vintage wavy roofline at the Community Plaza Shopping Center on Broadway, are instantly recognizable.) As for the meaning of the book’s title? The cover doesn’t give it away; you’ll have to flip through the book and solve that mystery for yourself. Or, perhaps figure it out during your own long walk. ✷ Learn more at karenjacot.com or on Instagram: @yeahkaren


More great local reads

THE BONE SPINDLE LESLIE VEDDER Vedder’s debut YA novel is an enchanting, “gender-bent, Sleeping-Beauty-meets-IndianaJones” story for teens, complete with a bookish treasure hunter, a mysterious witch, and a prince under a sleeping curse who’s been waiting 100 years for a magic kiss. leslievedder.com

THE TWELVE MONOTASKS: DO ONE THING AT A TIME TO DO EVERYTHING BETTER THATCHER WINE Wine, the founder of Boulder’s Juniper Books, draws on research in psychology, neuroscience and mindfulness to present his innovative plan for doing everyday tasks with renewed focus. With “monotasking,” you’ll be more productive, less stressed and much happier. thatcherwine.com

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YOU BETTER BE LIGHTNING ANDREA GIBSON This celebrated Boulder poet’s latest book is “a queer, political and feminist collection guided by self-reflection,” covering everything from love and illness to space and climate change. Gibson began their successful career with a breakup poem they recited at an open-mic poetry night in Boulder in 1999. buttonpoetry.com

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SPRING 2022

45


+ EVENTS

+LOCAL FUN

MARCH APRIL MAY

Our month-by-month listings below highlight just a handful of the in-person and virtual events happening around the county during the spring months. For more events and activities, see our category listings beginning on page 48.

Boulder Public Library Canyon Gallery

ONGOING

Hawaiian Dance Lessons

April 6-May 2 Artworks by students at schools throughout the Boulder Valley School District are on display in the library’s Canyon Gallery for nearly an entire month. The library is at 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder; boulderlibrary.org.

Ongoing (Sundays) Learn ancient and modern hula techniques and traditional oli (chant) at weekly sessions taught by Miriam Paisner. The sessions are open to teens, adults and seniors; Sundays 5-6pm at Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Drop-ins welcome, or purchase a punchcard and save. hulamaunakomohana.weebly.com.

“The Noteworthy Life of Howard Barnes”

Fly Fishing Film Tour

March 17

What happens when an average guy wakes up to discover that his life has become a musical—and he has never even seen a musical? It’s a wacky, mind-bending, emotional journey through the world of musical theater, and it’s playing at BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder; bdtstage.com.

Catch all the best new films related to fly fishing at this annual tour, now in its 16th year. Feel like you’re right in the middle of the action as you view films set in Australia, Costa Rica, Belize, the Pacific Northwest, and more. 7:30pm at Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder; bouldertheater.com.

“Washi Transformed”

Longmont Humane Society: Homeward Bound Fundraiser

“Washi Transformed: New Expressions in Japanese Paper,” a special exhibition at Longmont Museum, showcases more than 30 expressive sculptures, dramatic installations and two-dimensional works by modern Japanese artists using centuries-old techniques. Longmont Museum is at 400 Quail Road, Longmont; longmontmuseum.org.

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Boulder Opera: “Il Trovatore”

March 19-20 The mission of Boulder Opera is to make opera accessible and enjoyable for everyone. “Il Trovatore” by Verdi is an emotional melodrama set in 16thcentury Spain, complete with witchcraft, murder, vengeance and love. 7pm Saturday and 3pm Sunday at Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. boulderoperacompany.com.

MARCH

Through April 3

Through May 15

Plan your week, month and year with our complete daily events calendar on GetBoulder.com.

APRIL

March 19 Help raise funds to support the adoptable animals at Longmont Humane Society at this annual spring fundraiser. It includes delicious food prepared by local chefs; local craft beer, spirits and wine; and a silent and live auction, including the chance to win luxury travel experiences.

Opening Day for Boulder and Longmont Farmers Markets

April 2 The big day has arrived—the markets in Boulder and Longmont open for the season on Saturday, April 2, and these two markets have the longest market season


in the whole state! Find farm-fresh spring produce, gourmet foods, cheese, flowers, locally made products and more. Every Saturday, 8am-2pm in Boulder (13th Street between Canyon and Arapahoe) and 8am-1pm in Longmont (at Boulder County Fairgrounds, Hover and Boston streets). bcfm.org.

in Longmont; check coloradotartanday.com for more details.

Bluebird Music Festival

April 23-24 This weekend-long festival, held at Macky Auditorium on the CU campus, features afternoon and evening sessions each day. Scheduled performers include Colin Meloy of the Decemberists, Langhorne Slim, Waxahatchee, and Margo Price. Visit bluebirdmusicfestival.org for tickets and the rest of the lineup.

East Boulder County Artists (ECBA) Studio Tour

April 23-24

Conference on World Affairs

More than 30 EBCA members open their studios to the public for demonstrations, discussions and artwork sales during this annual spring tour. There’s also a preview exhibition at The Great Frameup, 430 Main St. in Longmont, April 8-May 7. ebcacolorado.org.

April 6-9

Self-Care Health Fair

The annual CWA is expected to be fully in-person this year, although many sessions will still be available via livestream. The speaker lineup was not set at press time, but topics cover any and every aspect of world affairs. Sessions (held on the CU campus) are free and open to the public. Check for schedule updates at colorado.edu/cwa.

Enjoy an entire afternoon of self-care services, including massage, reiki, yoga, reflexology and more. The admission price also includes food and drink, and a chance to win raffle prizes. 2-6pm at Prideful Wellness, 1823 Sunset Place, Suite F, Longmont; pridefulwellness.com.

April 24

MAY Community Plant Sales

May 7-8, 14-15 & 21-22 This sale is so big it takes up three weekends! Head to Growing Gardens, 1630 Hawthorn Ave. in Boulder, to shop for low-cost, organically grown, bee-safe heirloom tomato, vegetable and herb starts. All proceeds benefit Growing Gardens’ many education programs focusing on sustainable urban agriculture. 8am-4pm each day; growinggardens.org.

“Something Rotten!”

May 13-18 Longmont Theatre Company presents “Something Rotten!”, a musical comedy set in 1595 that follows the Bottom brothers, Nick and Nigel, who struggle to find success in the theatrical world because they’re competing with the success of a certain contemporary rival—William Shakespeare. Longmont Theatre is at 513 Main St., Longmont; check times and ticket info at longmonttheatre.org.

Cyclists 4 Community: Crank It Forward

May 20 Now in its fifth year, this event raises funds for C4C’s important work helping communities create “a positive experience for all users of our roads and bikeways.” 6-9pm at Boulder JCC, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder; c4community.org.

Boulder Creek Festival

May 28-30

Tulip Fairy & Elf Festival

April 24 Spring Fling Dance Party

April 8 Dance the night away at this big dance party, sponsored by Shine Living Freedom Movement and meant to help celebrate the coming of spring. It’s open to everyone but tickets are limited, so get them as soon as you can at shinelivingcommunity.com. 7-10pm at Vali Soul Sanctuary, 6717 Valmont Road, Boulder.

Colorado Tartan Day Festival

April 9-10 Don your favorite kilt and head to the Boulder County Fairgrounds for this free weekend celebration of Scotland’s cultural and historic contributions to the world. The family-friendly festival includes live music (and bagpipes of course), historical re-enactments, blacksmithing demos, vendor booths, food trucks and a Scottish pub. The fairgrounds are at 9595 Nelson Road

Adorable little ones dressed as fairies and elves can help the Tulip Fairy “wake up” the 15,000 tulips planted along Pearl Street Mall at this annual celebration. 1-5pm on the 1300 block of Pearl Street in Boulder; check for weather-related updates at boulderdowntown.com.

Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance + The Boulder Philharmonic

April 30 Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance joins the Boulder Phil for an “only in Boulder” collaboration that features concertmaster Charles Wetherbee as violin soloist in “The Butterfly Lovers’ Concerto.” It’s based on a Chinese legend related to rebirth. The program opens with a new work by Mason Bates that reflects our recent shared experience of “cocooning” during pandemic isolation. 7:30pm at CU’s Macky Auditorium; bouldersymphony.org.

This huge three-day festival is a beloved tradition, and organizers are hopeful that it will go on as planned this year. It includes dozens of live music and dance performances; food and drink booths; vendor and nonprofit booths, activities for all ages; and much more. The festival grounds are all along Boulder Creek in downtown Boulder, between Canyon and Arapahoe. Get more details at bouldercreekfest.com.

GET TICKETS EARLY! Boulder Environmental/Nature/ Outdoors Film Festival

July 14-17 This popular annual festival showcases the best in outdoorsy films, and the 2022 event will be a hybrid of virtual and in-person screenings (held at Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder). Check for the schedule and ticket info at boulderenoff.org.

Planet Bluegrass Festivals

July 29-31; August 12-14 The 50th-annual Rockygrass Festival (July 29-31) and the Rocky Mountain Folks Festival (Aug. 12-14), might already be sold out, since tickets for these popular music events always go quickly. But it's worth checking bluegrass.com to see if there are still spots available at Planet Bluegrass Ranch in Lyons. ✷ SPRING 2022

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EVENTS

+LOCAL FUN Erie Town Fair & Hot Air Balloon Festival

EVENTS Animal Affairs..........................48 Art Classes/Events.................48 Benefits + Fundraisers.........50 Bicycling...................................50 Business....................................50 Children + Teens....................50 Community + Cultural Festivals..................52 Food + Drink...........................52 Forums + Lectures + Workshops.............................52 Garden + Home.....................52 Health + Wellness..................53 Just for Fun..............................53 Literary......................................54 Nature + Outdoor..................54 Races + Walks..........................54 Seniors.......................................54 Social Meetups.......................54 Sports + Fitness......................54 Volunteering...........................55 ANIMAL AFFAIRS Butterfly Pavilion Butterfly Pavilion, now celebrating 25 years, is the first stand-alone, accredited, nonprofit invertebrate zoo in the world. Explore a lush tropical rain forest brimming with butterflies, then settle

48

FUN

in for a visit with Rosie, the center’s “famous” (and friendly) tarantula. Events include Rainforest Yoga and Beekeeping Bootcamps. Visits require timed tickets until further notice. 6252 W. 104th Ave., Westminster; butterflies.org. April 9: Beekeeping: Package Installation class, via Zoom

Denver Zoo Pinnacol African Penguin Point is a new habitat featuring the endangered African penguin. At Stingray Cove, you can touch and feed gentle stingrays and two species of peaceful sharks. See more than 3,000 other wild animals during your visit and enjoy one of the many daily talks and demonstrations. Tickets for timed entry must be purchased online until further notice. 2300 Steele St., 303-376-4800; denverzoo.org.

Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Greenwood rehabilitates sick, injured and orphaned wildlife for release into appropriate habitats, and it treats nearly 3,500 mammals, birds and waterfowl every year. The center offers educational programs, release-site programs and numerous volunteer opportunities, plus a thrift shop and consignment gallery at 3600 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder; greenwoodwildlife.org.

Humane Society of Boulder Valley The shelter cares for more than 8,000 animals each year, and more than 90% are successfully adopted or reunited with their families. Adoption services are again available on a drop-in basis.

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

2323 55th St., Boulder, 303-442-4030; boulderhumane.org. May, TBA: Puttin’ on the Leash annual fundraiser

Longmont Humane Society Besides caring for more than 4,000 adoptable animals every year, LHS offers dog training and low-cost veterinary services such as vaccinations, spaying, neutering and dentistry. 9595 Nelson Road in Longmont; longmonthumane.org. March 19: Homeward Bound fundraiser

Luvin Arms Animal Sanctuary Luvin Arms is a nonprofit animal sanctuary for abused or neglected farmed animals. The sanctuary offers virtual visits; in-person visits (with reservations) begin in April. They also host a number of programs including pet grief therapy sessions, vegan cooking classes, field trips and storytimes. Luvin Arms is at 3470 County Road 7 in Erie; luvinarms.org.

Medicine Horse Medicine Horse is a nonprofit that enhances the mental health and life skills people of all ages through therapeutic interaction with horses. Volunteers are always needed. MHP is at 8778 Arapahoe Road, Boulder; medicinehorse.org.

The Wild Animal Sanctuary Meander along the “Mile Into the Wild” elevated catwalk as you keep your eyes and ears alert for leopards, grizzly bears, lynx and hundreds of other large carnivores. The sanctuary is east of Boulder in Keenesburg, off Highway 52. Check online for ticket prices and

other info before going, especially if the weather is bad. 303-536-0118; thewildanimalsanctuary.org.

ART CLASSES/ EVENTS Art Parts Creative Reuse Center The nonprofit Art Parts accepts donations of reusable art, craft and school materials from individuals and businesses, and sells them at a discount to the public. Check donation info online before going. 3080 Valmont Road, Boulder; artpartsboulder.org.

The Art Underground/ The Arts Hub The Art Underground, 901 Front St. in Louisville, and The Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way in Lafayette, are nonprofit centers currently offering classes for all ages in dance, theater, music, photography, film and visual arts. artunder.org.

Boulder Art Association Rotating works by BAA members are on display year-round at businesses throughout the county; check the website for a schedule. The association

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EVENTS

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also holds monthly meetings and other events. boulderartassociation.org.

Boulder Small Business Development Center

exhibition at The Great Frameup, 430 Main St. in Longmont, from April 8-May 7.

The Boulder SBDC offers low-cost workshops (online and in-person) on a variety of topics in both Boulder (at Boulder Public Library) and Longmont (528 Main St., Suite A). Check the event calendar at bouldersbdc.com.

Boulder County Arts Alliance BCAA provides information and resources for and about the artists and art organizations in the area. The group also maintains an online calendar of countywide arts events and hosts Business of Arts workshops. bouldercountyarts.org.

Longmont Yarn Shoppe

Boulder Creative Collective: Warehouse

Louisville Art Association

BCC’s Warehouse is an event space and gallery offering art exhibits and artist residencies. 2208 Pearl St., Boulder; bouldercreativecollective.com.

Learn how to knit, crochet, weave, spin and do needle-felting at this store, 454 Main St., in Longmont. See the schedule of classes (in-person and online), plus special “Fiber Friday” sessions, at longmontyarn.com. The nonprofit LAA hosts members’ shows, student shows, meetings, demos, workshops and classes, including a weekly Drawing Study Group every Tuesday from 10am-noon (currently held via Zoom). Check louisvilleart.org for a schedule. LAA is at 801 Grant Ave., Louisville. April 20-22: Portraiture: The Art of Capturing Character

The Presser Foot This sewing and quilting store in Longmont offers in-person and virtual classes on a variety of topics, from beginning sewing to advanced embroidery and quilting techniques. Visit thepresserfoot.com for details. The store is at 2430 Main St., Longmont.

Boulder Digital Arts BDA offers workshops, classes (in-person and online), certificate programs and events for digital artists and creative professionals working in film/video, marketing, social media, photography and graphic design. Register at boulder digitalarts.com. BDA is at 1600 Range St., Suite 100. April 9-May 7: UI/UX Design Certificate Program May 25: Podcasting Hands-On Intensive

Boulder Metalsmithing Association BoMA is a jewelry-making and metal arts school in Boulder offering handson workshops for all skill levels, open studio events for members, and monthly open house demonstrations on second Saturdays that are open to the public. Upcoming workshops include Level I Metalsmithing (March 26-27) and Geometric Bezels (March 27) ; check the schedule at bouldermetalsmiths.com for more. 4919 Broadway, Unit 14, Boulder.

Tinker Art Studio This Boulder art studio hosts in-person classes for small groups as well as virtual sessions, plus after-school classes for all grade levels. The studio is at 693-B S. Broadway, Boulder; tinkerartstudio.com.

BENEFITS + FUNDRAISERS Autism Society of Boulder County: Grapes for Good Find updates about the 2022 fundraiser at autismboulder.org.

Boulder JCC: Reflections Find updates about the 2022 fundraiser at boulderjcc.org.

Chocolate Lovers’ Fling

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May 21: Help raise funds for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society when you take part in this annual walk; it’s held on the CU campus. Learn more and register at nationalmssociety.org.

BICYCLING Boulder B-cycle Boulder’s nonprofit bike-sharing system offers easy access to 300 bikes 24/7 at more than 45 stations around the city, including on the CU campus. Register at boulder.bcycle.com.

Boulder Roubaix Road Race April 16: Now in its 30th year, this annual race is an 18.7-mile circuit with both hilly, gravel roads and fast, smooth pavement. It’s for pros and amateurs alike, with 32 race categories. Find out more and register at boulderroubaix.com.

Cycling Without Age Cycling Without Age (CWA) is a nonprofit volunteer organization that takes seniors for free bike rides on specialty trishaws, seven days a week. It’s a national organization with chapters in both Boulder and Lafayette. Details: cyclingwithoutage.com.

Cyclists 4 Community: Crank It Forward! May 20: See listing under Benefits + Fundraisers.

BUSINESS Boulder County Arts Alliance

Cyclists 4 Community: Crank It Forward

BCAA hosts Business of Arts workshops for artists, with topics like grant writing and audience development. bouldercountyarts.org.

May 20: This annual event raises funds to help communities “create a positive experience for all users of our bikes and roadways.” 6-9pm at Boulder JCC, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder; find more details at c4community.org.

May, TBA: Find updates about the 2022 spring fundraiser at boulderhumane.org.

April 23-24: EBCA hosts their annual spring studio tour, featuring more than 30 artists throughout east Boulder County opening their studios to the public and selling their artworks. Find out more at ebcacolorado.org. There’s also a preview

Walk MS: Boulder

May 20: See ad on opposite page.

Humane Society of Boulder Valley: Puttin’ on the Leash

East Boulder County Artists Studio Tour

Colorado Green Building Guild

Longmont Humane Society: Homeward Bound March 19: LHS’s annual spring fundraiser includes silent and live auctions plus food from local restaurants and drinks from area breweries, distilleries and wineries. Find tickets and other details at longmonthumane.org.

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Boulder County Chambers of Commerce Boulder: 2440 Pearl St., 303-442-1044; boulderchamber.com. Erie: 235 Wells St., 303-828-3440; eriechamber.org. Lafayette: 1290 S. Public Road, 303-666-9555; lafayettecolorado.com. Longmont: 528 Main St., 303-776-5295; longmontchamber.org. Louisville: 901 Main St. #A, 303-666-5747; louisvillechamber.com. Lyons: In Sandstone Park, 720-340-1047; lyonschamber.org. Nederland: 4 W. 1st St., 303-258-3936. Superior: 122 E. William St., 303-554-0789.

CGBG is a nonprofit association of building professionals promoting healthier, resource-efficient homes and workplaces. See the events calendar at cgbg.org.

The Latino Chamber of Commerce of Boulder County This Longmont-based organization is the main voice for Latino businesses and the issues affecting them in and around Boulder County. Members have access to business training, professional development, networking opportunities and advocacy. The group’s office is at 332 Main St. in Longmont. thelatinochamber.com.

CHILDREN + TEENS CU Science Discovery Science Discovery hosts classes (in person, outdoor and virtual) for grades K-12, with hands-on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) activities. colorado.edu/ sciencediscovery.

CU Wizards Monthly Wizard shows for spring 2022 have been postponed due to COVID concerns. Check for updates at colorado. edu/cuwizards.

Firehouse Art Center Mondays: Art Sparks classes for ages 5-8 help children explore the arts while also learning about history, math, science and more. Find the details at firehouseart.org. FAC is at 667 4th Ave., Longmont.

Longmont Museum Discovery Days Discovery Days is a program for children ages 2-6 and their caregivers, with engaging hands-on activities. Check longmontmuseum.org for details about the spring schedule.

Ocean First Discovery Center The Ocean First Institute has a Discovery Center offering interactive marine science education classes (virtual and in-person) for grades 3-12. OFI is at 3015 Bluff St. in Boulder; oceanfirstinstitute.org.

Sunflower Farm Sunflower Farm in Longmont offers preschool and half-day kindergarten programs during the school year, and FarmFest family events. Reservations are required for all programs. Get all the details at sunflowerfarminfo.com. The farm is at 11150 Prospect Road in Longmont.


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51


EVENTS

+LOCAL FUN 9595 Nelson Road in Longmont; check coloradotartanday.com for more details.

Pearl St. #A; check foodlabboulder.com for updates.

Erie Town Fair & Hot Air Balloon Festival

Growing Gardens Cooking Classes

May 20-22: Big annual event features a balloon launch (arrive by 6:30am to see them inflate) and a town fair with food, drink, vendor booths and family activities. Find the schedule at eriechamber.org.

This Boulder nonprofit’s mission is to enrich the lives of our community through sustainable urban agriculture. It offers regular cooking classes for adults for reasonable fees, and sessions are online until further notice. The gardens are at 1630 Hawthorn Ave.; growinggardens.org. April 12: April Cool-Weather Plant Sale May 7-8, 14-15, & 21-22: Community Plant Sales

Longmont Cinco de Mayo Tinker Art Studio This Boulder art studio hosts in-person classes for small groups as well as virtual sessions, with instruction in pottery, drawing, painting, origami and more. 693-B S. Broadway, Boulder; tinkerartstudio.com.

Tulip Fairy & Elf Festival April 24: Downtown Boulder’s annual festival features little ones dressed up like fairies and elves, helping the Tulip Fairy “awaken” the 15,000 tulips along Pearl Street Mall. 1-5pm on the 1300 block of Pearl Street in Boulder. Check boulderdowntown.com for more details.

May 7: Annual event celebrates culture and celebrates culture with food, live entertainment, vendor booths and free family activities. Watch for updates at longmontcolorado.gov.

FOOD + DRINK The Art of Cheese Cheesemaking Classes Longmont’s artisanal cheesemaking school offers virtual, online classes and live classes covering everything from soft cheeses like chèvre to firm cheeses like cheddar and Jarlsberg. Find the full schedule and more details at theartofcheese.com.

University of Colorado Museum of Natural History

Moksha Chocolate This Boulder-based artisan chocolate company hosts periodic chocolate tastings and pairings at various locations around the county; see mokshachocolate.com for a schedule of upcoming events. You can also host a chocolate-tasting party at home with one of Moksha’s to-go party kits.

Piece, Love & Chocolate Boulder chocolate company PLC offers a variety of classes in chocolate-making, baking and pastry creation; check the schedule at pieceloveandchocolate. com. Private chocolate-making parties are also available for groups of 8-10.

The CU Museum of Natural History planned to reopen again by early spring; check colorado.edu/cumuseum for updates. The website also has a nice assortment of virtual programs in the meantime. In the Henderson Building on CU campus at 15th Street and Broadway; colorado.edu/cumuseum.

COMMUNITY + CULTURAL FESTIVALS Boulder Creek Festival May 28-30: Boulder’s annual three-day “welcome summer” festival is scheduled to be back on Memorial Day weekend this year, with live performances, vendor and nonprofit booths, activities for all ages, and delicious food and drink options. It all happens along Boulder Creek in downtown Boulder between Canyon and Arapahoe. Find updates at bouldercreekfest.com.

Colorado Tartan Day Festival April 9-10: Don your favorite kilt and head to the Boulder County Fairgrounds for this free weekend celebration of Scotland’s cultural and historic contributions to the world. The family-friendly festival includes live music (and bagpipes of course), historical re-enactments, blacksmithing demos, vendor booths, food trucks and a Scottish pub. The fairgrounds are at

52

Farmers Markets Find farm-fresh produce, gourmet foods, cheese, flowers, herbs and more at farmers markets around the county. The Boulder and Longmont markets have the longest market season in the state! Check each market’s website for more information as they get closer to opening. Boulder: Saturdays 8am-2pm beginning April 2 and Wednesdays 4-8pm beginning May 4 at 13th Street between Canyon and Arapahoe; bcfm.org. Erie: Thursdays 5-8pm beginning May 12 on Briggs Street between Wells and Moffatt; realfarmersmarketco.com. Longmont: Saturdays 8am-1pm beginning April 2 at Boulder County Fairgrounds, Hover and Boston; bcfm.org.

Conference on World Affairs April 6-9: The 74th CWA is planning for a fully in-person event as of press time; the annual conference will also include many livestreamed events. CWA is the premier for the discussion of world affairs, featuring panels, speakers and performers from all over the world. Every session is free. Find the full schedule at more details at colorado. edu/cwa.

Drop-In Tech Help Saturdays: Want to be more techsavvy? The Boulder Public Library offers drop-in help sessions every Saturday afternoon 1-3pm; just bring your device and your questions. 1001 Arapahoe Ave.; boulderlibrary.org.

Elevations Credit Union Seminars Elevations Credit Union offers dozens of free presentations each year on topics like Social Security, retirement, real estate, investing and wills. You don’t have to be a credit union member to attend. Visit elevationscu.com to RSVP and see the rest of the schedule. March 15: Retirement Income Planning March 24: When Should I Refinance My Home?

Boulder Garden Club Sur La Table Classes Sur la Table’s Boulder retail store offers in-store cooking and baking classes on topics like “Flavors of Italy,”“Cooking with Wine,” and “Classic French Croissants.” See the full schedule and registration details at surlatable.com. The store is at 1850 29th St., Boulder.

Taste of Pearl TBD: As of press time, the status of this annual event is unknown, so check boulderdowntown.com for updates.

FORUMS + LECTURES + WORKSHOPS Boulder Shambhala Center

Louisville: Saturdays 9am-1pm beginning May 14 at 824 Front St.; realfarmersmarketco.com.

This Tibetan Buddhist studio offers programs, meditation sessions and support groups, and many are still available online. boulder.shambhala.org.

Food Lab Cooking Classes

Chautauqua Forums

Boulder’s Food Lab offers a variety of cooking classes for adults, kids and private/corporate events, plus at-home cooking kits. The spring schedule was not posted at press time, but previous classes have included Plant-Based Thai, Risotto, and Fondue. Food Lab is at 1825

April 11: As part of Chautauqua’s Space Series, Tim Cichan and Marcella Yant present “Next Steps: Moon to Mars,” a discussion about current and future missions. At Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road in Boulder; check chautauqua.com for tickets and for the schedule of other upcoming talks.

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Intercambio offers free weekly classes around Boulder County that help participants learn English and give them information about the U.S. citizenship process and the citizenship interview. For locations and other details, call 303996-0275 or visit intercambioweb.org.

GARDEN + HOME

YMCA Children/Teen Activities The YMCA of Northern Colorado’s locations in Boulder, Lafayette and Longmont are all offering virtual and in-person programming, but some still require reservations due to limited space. Check ymcanoco.org.

Citizenship Classes

The Boulder Garden Club, established in 1923, always welcomes new members. Meetings are at members’ homes or at the Left Hand Grange in Niwot. Check bouldergardenclub.org for membership info and meeting details.

Denver Botanic Gardens Denver Botanic Gardens offers acres of plant displays, classes for all ages, lectures, plant shows, gardening certification and a great deal more. Until further notice, all entries require timed tickets, purchased online. The main gardens are at 1007 York St.; the Chatfield location is at 8500 W. Deer Creek Canyon Road in Littleton. botanicgardens.org. March 16, April 21: SCFD Free Days at both locations (get tickets starting the 15th of the previous month) March 21: Nature at Night: Spring Equinox Walk at Plains Conservation Center May 10-11: Spring Plant Sale (York Street)

Growing Gardens This Boulder nonprofit’s mission is to enrich the lives of our community through sustainable urban agriculture. Cooking and gardening classes have moved online until further notice; check


EVENTS growinggardens.org for updates. The gardens are at 1630 Hawthorn Ave.

Harlequin’s Gardens Classes Harlequin’s Gardens, 4795 N. 26th St. in Boulder, offers low-cost classes on a variety of garden topics; check harlequinsgardens.com in March for a schedule of upcoming classes.

Longmont Home Show March 25-27: Find inspiration for your home and garden at this annual show that draws local and national vendors in remodeling, design, security, outdoor living and more. Free. At Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road in Longmont; longmonthomeshow.com.

HEALTH + WELLNESS Boulder Community Health Free and low-cost health sessions and classes are held at BCH facilities across the county; topics include infant CPR, childbirth essentials and Aging Mastery. “Be Well” is a new virtual wellness series available to all. Check bch.org for a full schedule.

Boulder County Death Cafe Monthly community gatherings bring people together to discuss “all manner of fascinating things about the D word” in a safe (and sometimes a little silly) environment. See the group’s Facebook page for more information.

Three Leaf Farm Classes Three Leaf Farm in Lafayette offers garden-related classes and workshops on topics like herbal medicine and soap making. Check the full schedule at threeleaffarm.com. The farm is at 445 S. 112th St., Lafayette. April 16: Planting Your Garden Pharmacy May 14: Making Fairy Terrariums

castingforrecovery.org for more details on the dates listed below. March 25: Application deadline for June 3-5 retreat April 1: Application deadline for June 10-12 retreat July 29: Application deadline for October 7-9 retreat

clinics; just bring your military/veteran ID, and make sure to eat first. Drop in between 5-7pm at the Institute of Taoist Education and Acupuncture, 317 W. South Boulder Road, Louisville; itea.edu.

Grief Support Network

Sundays: The Boulder Comedy show is live (but socially distanced) each Sunday evening at the Rayback Collective, 2775 Valmont Road, Boulder. The lineup regularly includes nationally touring comedians and late-night talk-show headliners, and there are normally two shows each week. Find tickets and more info at bouldercomedyshow.com.

Processing your grief through ritual can help you move from agony to acceptance. Community rituals, led by Wendy Kaas, are meant to help those who are grieving feel less isolated and more connected. griefsupportnet.org.

Herb Walks/Herbalism Classes

Certified American Red Cross instructors teach first aid, CPR, babysitting and lifeguarding. Classes are held at various locations throughout Boulder County. 303-668-8079; bouldercpr.com.

Boulder-based herbalist, nutrition consultant and author Brigitte Mars offers a variety of herb-related workshops and classes, including short herb walks around Boulder. brigittemars.com. March 16-May 18: 10-Week Herbal Healing Class

Boulder Psychic Institute

Self-Care Health Fair

Boulder CPR & First Aid

BPI offers low-cost readings by the institute’s students, and both in-person and phone sessions are available. Check boulderpsychicinstitute.org for details.

Casting for Recovery Casting for Recovery hosts fly-fishing retreats for breast-cancer survivors on the Front Range and the Western Slope. The free retreats fill up quickly, so check

+LOCAL FUN

April 24: Enjoy an entire afternoon of self-care services, including massage, reiki, yoga, reflexology and more. The admission price also includes food and drink, and a chance to win raffle prizes. 2-6pm at Prideful Wellness, 1823 Sunset Place, Suite F, Longmont; pridefulwellness.com.

Veterans’ Acupuncture Clinics Wednesdays: Appointments and registration aren’t necessary for these free

JUST FOR FUN Boulder Comedy Show

Carousel of Happiness Head to Nederland for a ride on the restored 1910 Looff carousel with 36 whimsical hand-carved animals and 25 smaller animals keeping them company. The Carousel is a nonprofit organization, and rides are only $2; it’s

Want to know a local secret? The easiest way to get around Boulder is by BCycle! Download the free BCycle App and get unlimited 60-minute e-bike trips with the Monthly Pass for just $20. Use promo code: EASYROLLING. Enjoy the ride!

Start Riding!

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EVENTS

+LOCAL FUN

also wheelchair- and walker-friendly. Open every day at 20 Lakeview Drive in Nederland, right beside the train cars. carouselofhappiness.org.

Strawberry Festival Vintage & Antique Market May, TBA: Details about this popular annual festival weren’t available at press time, so please check stvrainhistoricalsociety.com for updates.

LITERARY Boulder Book Store Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., offers book clubs, literary workshops and author events. See the schedule at boulderbookstore.com.

Public Libraries Boulder: Main Branch: 1001 Arapahoe Ave.; Meadows Branch Library: 4800 Baseline Road; George Reynolds Branch: 3595 Table Mesa Drive; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway; 303-441-3100; boulderlibrary.org. Lafayette: 775 W. Baseline Road. 303-665-5200; cityoflafayette.com/ library. Longmont: 409 4th Ave. 303-651-8470; longmontcolorado.gov/library. Louisville: 951 Spruce St. 303-335-4849; louisvilleco.gov/library. Lyons: 451 4th Ave.; townoflyons.com. Nederland: 200 Highway 72. 303-258-1101; nederland.colibraries.org.

So, You’re a Poet… Mondays: Weekly open-mic poetry sessions hosted by Tom Peters are 9-11pm at Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St. in Boulder. Sign up by 8:45pm if you want to read your work. Check boulderpoetrytribe.com for more local events for poets.

watching events, classes and camps all year long. Check cityoflafayette.com/ openspace for updates.

Ocean First Discovery Center See listing under Children + Teens.

REI Boulder Classes The Boulder REI store, 1789 28th St., offers classes and workshops on a number of outdoor topics, plus halfday and day-long guided hiking trips. Register at rei.com/boulder. April 2, 16: Intro to Map & Compass Navigation May 7, 22: Wilderness Survival

Boulder’s Story Slam Put your name in the hat, and when you’re called up, tell a 5-minute story related to the monthly theme. At the end of the night, the audience votes on the best story. Story Slam also offers storytelling workshops and story slams for teens. Find out all the details at storyslamboulder.com.

Wild Bear Mountain Ecology Center

BCAS offers nature programs, field trips, bird counts and other events around the county. Check boulderaudubon.org for the updated schedule. March 22: Impact of Climate Change Shifts on Small Mammals in the Rockies April 26: Shorebirds in Grass May 23: Insects in Boulder County

Wild Bear is a nonprofit nature center offering affordable kids’ camps, after-school programs and adult and family workshops. It maintains an information center at 20 Lakeview Drive in Nederland, and also has property at Mud Lake. wildbear.org.

Boulder County Parks & Open Space offers free nature programs, hikes and cultural-history events; check bouldercounty.org for a calendar of activities.

City of Boulder Open Space & Mountain Parks Natural Selections is the city’s ongoing series of free educational programs on wildlife, ecology, local history and children’s programs. Check the event calendar at naturehikes.org.

Lafayette Birds! First Sunday Bird Watching

Firehouse Art Center Firehouse Art Center, 667 4th Ave. in Longmont, hosts Writer’s Workshops every third Friday and open-mic poetry readings of original works on the last Friday of each month. Find out more at firehouseart.org.

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1st Sundays: Boulder County Audubon Society sponsors these free bird watching sessions the first Sunday of every month, from 1-3pm at Greenlee Wildlife Preserve, 1660 Baseline Road, Lafayette. Seasoned bird watchers are on hand to assist participants with binoculars, spotting scopes and learning tools. boulderaudubon.org.

Lafayette Open Space Lafayette Open Space offers a number of public programs, hikes, bird-

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Cultivate helps seniors thrive by reconnecting them to their communities. Programs include grocery delivery, transportation, YardBusters and SnowBusters. cultivate.ngo.

Cycling Without Age

Boulder County Audubon Society

Boulder County Parks & Open Space Programs

Cultivate

Boulder-based Thorne has been connecting youth to nature through hands-on experiences for nearly 60 years. Check info about classes and community programs at thornenature.org.

For more outdoor events, see listings under Sports + Fitness. BoulderReads offers literacy programs for all ages, like literacy tutoring and conversation groups for adults and “Reading Buddies,” a program for children that pairs them with a CU student for help with reading, writing and literacy skills. See boulderlibrary. org/boulderreads for details.

Circle of Care is an enrichment program that provides seniors with free transportation, companions and tickets to community arts and cultural events. Visit circleofcareproject.org, call 303-449-8884 or email office@ circleofcareproject.org.

Thorne Nature Experience

NATURE + OUTDOOR BoulderReads

Circle of Care

Cycling Without Age (CWA) is a nonprofit volunteer organization that takes seniors for free bike rides on specialty trishaws, seven days a week. It’s a national organization with chapters in both Boulder and Lafayette. Details: cyclingwithoutage.com.

Via Mobility Services

RACES + WALKS

Via is a “mobility manager” offering transportation for older or disabled travelers, travel training, information on mobility options, referrals and a range of other community resources. viacolorado.org.

BOLDERBoulder 10K

SOCIAL MEETUPS

May 30: This huge annual Boulder race is back for 2022, and they’re expecting 50,000 racers and 100,000 spectators. Finish inside Folsom Field (to the roar of the crowd), then enjoy a special Memorial Day tribute. Register at bolderboulder.com.

Colorado Brewery Running Series March 19 & April 30: The Colorado Brewery Running Series is a series of 5K fun runs held at local breweries. March 19 is at Longmont’s Wibby Brewing and April 30 is at Oskar Blues. Find out more at breweryrunningseries.com.

SENIORS Active Minds Active Minds offers dozens of free programs and events for seniors in Boulder and Longmont, at a variety of venues, both online and in person. Find more info at activeminds.com. March 23: Eleanor Roosevelt, 1pm April 7: India in Crisis, 2:30pm May 14: California (webinar), 10am

Boulder Area Singles BAS is a meetup group of men and women 40+ who go on hikes, organize book clubs, attend social hours, bowl, go dancing and more. bcn.boulder. co.us/community/bas.

Boulder Newcomers Club The nonprofit BNC hosts monthly activities like hikes, book clubs, wine tastings, potlucks and game nights. All ages welcome. bouldernewcomers.org.

Mountain Peak Life Nederland-based social club allows residents to socialize with other area couples and singles; all adults are welcome, but most participants are 50+. mountainpeaklife.org.

SPORTS + FITNESS For more sports events, see listings under Bicycling Events and Races/Walks.

Boulder County Bombers Boulder County Bombers is a flat-track roller derby league based in Longmont;


EVENTS check bouldercountybombers.com for a bout schedule.

+LOCAL FUN

Where did you get that?!!

Casting for Recovery See listing under Health + Wellness.

Colorado Wilderness Rides and Guides Professional tour guides lead participants on small-group adventures like backpacking, bike tours, rock climbing, skiing and snowshoeing. 720242-9828; cwrag.com.

Recreation Centers

VOLUNTEERING The following Boulder County organizations regularly seek out assistance from dedicated volunteers, but some are still operating at reduced capacity due to the pandemic. If you’re interested in volunteering in the future, check websites for updates.

Boulder: East Boulder Community Center, 5660 Sioux Drive; North Boulder Recreation Center, 3170 Broadway; South Boulder Recreation Center, 1360 Gillaspie Drive. 303-413-7270; boulderparks-rec.org. Erie: Erie Community Center, 450 Powers St. 303-926-2550; erieco.gov. Lafayette: Bob L. Burger Recreation Center, 111 W. Baseline Road. 303-6650469; cityoflafayette.com/recreation. Longmont: The main rec center is at 310 Quail Road. Classes are also offered at the St. Vrain Memorial Building, 700 Longs Peak Ave., and at Centennial Pool, 1201 Alpine St. 303-774-4800; longmontcolorado.gov/rec.

Louisville: 900 W. Via Appia Way. 303666-7400; louisvillerecreation.com. Nederland: Nederland Community Center, 750 N. Highway 72, 303-2589721; nederlandcommunitycenter.org.

Boulder County Parks & Open Space: bouldercountyopenspace.org Boulder Philharmonic: boulderphil.org Circle of Care: circleofcareproject.org Colorado Horse Rescue: chr.org Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center: ctrcinc.org Cycling Without Age: cyclingwithoutageboulder.com Emergency Family Assistance Association: efaa.org Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center: greenwoodwildlife.org Humane Society of Boulder Valley: boulderhumane.org Imagine! imaginecolorado.org Lafayette Cultural Arts Commission: cityoflafayette.com/joinlcac Longmont Humane Society: longmonthumane.org Medicine Horse Program: medicinehorse.org Mile High United Way: unitedwaydenver.org Moving to End Sexual Assault (MESA): movingtoendsexualassault.org OUR Center: ourcenter.org Safe Shelter of St. Vrain Valley: safeshelterofstvrain.org There With Care: therewithcare.org Thorne Nature Experience: thornenature.org ✷

1334 Pearl Street Boulder 303-447-2047

Alpaca Connection Alpaca Sweaters & Unique Clothing

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ARTS + C U LT U R E Dance....................................56 Film........................................56 Music.....................................58 Theater.................................58 Galleries...............................60 Museums.............................62 DANCE Avalon Ballroom The Avalon Ballroom calendar is loaded with dance classes and social events during the winter months. Some events are listed below, but check the full calendar at avalonevents.org, as new events are always being added. Sundays: Boulder Israeli Dance, 7pm Tuesdays: Egyptian Belly Dance, 5:30pm Fridays: Argentine Tango, 6:30pm

Boulder Ballet May 19-22: “Masterworks” features excerpts from “Raymonda,” originally choreographed in 1898, and a selection of more modern works, like Amy Seiwert’s “The Devil Ties My Tongue.” At Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder; boulderballet.org.

Centennial State Ballet Check centennialstateballet.org for more details about this Longmontbased youth ballet company, including info about upcoming performances.

Cindy Brandle Dance Company Find performance updates for this Boulder-based troupe at cindybrandledance.com.

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University of Colorado Department of Theatre & Dance

Danse Etoile Ballet

3rd Law Dance/Theater

Danse Etoile’s next scheduled performance is the first weekend in June; see danseetoile.org for updates.

Check 3rdlaw.org for updates about the latest season.

Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance April 30: The Frequent Flyers Professional Company joins the Boulder Phil at CU’s Macky Auditorium for a special presentation called “Butterfly Lovers’ Concerto.” Check frequentflyers. org for more details and for information about the other dates listed below. April 15-17: New production by the Professional Company May 6-7: New productions by the Youth & Teen and Adult companies

Hawaiian Dance Lessons Sundays: Learn ancient and modern hula and oli (chant) at classes taught by Miriam Paisner, are starting up again. The weekly sessions are open to teens, adults and seniors; Sundays 5-6pm at Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Drop-ins welcome, or purchase a punchcard and save. hulamaunakomohana.weebly.com.

Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema See listing under Film.

Spring Fling Dance Party April 8: Shine Living Freedom Movement presents a “portal to a space of pure joy, connection and freedom from the inside out.” This dance party is open to all ages but tickets are limited, so get them early at shinelivingcommunity.com. The event is 7-10pm at Vali Soul Sanctuary, 6717 Valmont Road, Boulder.

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

University of Colorado Department of Theatre & Dance BFA and MFA students and faculty members in the University of Colorado’s dance program present a number of free and low-cost performances throughout the school year. Find out more at colorado.edu/theatredance. April 7-10: The Current: Dance works by faculty and guest artists April 22-23: Fresh: Works by grad and undergrad dance students

Elevations Classic Film Series

FILM

Elevations Credit Union presents a Classic Film Series that’s open to all, in-person at various local branches or online. The movies are free, but registration is required. See the schedule at elevationscu.com.

Backdoor Theatre

Fly Fishing Film Tour

This nonprofit venue screens films inside the Nederland Community Center most Friday and Saturday nights at 7pm and Sunday matinees at 2pm. See the full schedule and sign up for email updates at thebackdoortheatre. org. 740 Highway 72 North, Nederland.

Boedecker Theater The “Boe” is a plush, 60-seat art-house theater at Dairy Arts Center, outfitted with stadium seating and surround sound. It screens high-quality cinema several nights per week, including “Friday Night Weird,” a weekly cult film series. The Dairy is at 2590 Walnut St., Boulder; thedairy.org.

March 17: Now in its 16th year, this film tour showcases fly fishing films featuring Costa Rica, Hawaii, Belize, Australia and more. 7:30pm at Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St. Tickets: bouldertheater.com.

International Film Series This popular art-house film festival— Boulder’s oldest—is now in its 80th year, screening more than 100 films every school year at CU. In-person events are back on the schedule, so check internationalfilmseries.com for the full schedule and to sign up for email updates.

Lyons International Film Festival April 23: This annual festival celebrates films ranging from environmental documentaries to adventure films and recreational shorts. Find more details and the film schedule at coloradofests.com.



ARTS

+CULTURE

Phipps IMAX Theater at Denver Museum of Nature and Science Movies shown in 3D on DMNS’s huge IMAX screen make the action and adventure more realistic and spinetingling. The theater is open as of press time with safety guidelines in place including advance ticketing, timed entry and physical distancing. 2001 Colorado Blvd. in Denver. dmns.org. Through March 23: Great Bear Rainforest; Wings Over Water

Broadway stage, plus other old and new favorites. At Mountain View United Methodist Chursh, 355 Ponca Place, Boulder; find more details about this and the performances listed below at boulderchorale.org. April 30-May 1: Brahms’ Requiem May 22: Colorado MahlerFest XXXV (see separate listing below)

Boulder Concert Band May 21: The Boulder Concert Band hopes to present a concert called “A Little Night Music” on May 21, but they’ll continue to monitor the county’s recommendations for public gatherings, so check boulderconcertband.org for updates as it gets closer.

Boulder Friends of Jazz Monthly Jams

Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema Sans Souci Fest is an ongoing series that includes not only dance-related film screenings but also artist discussions, filmmaking workshops and more. Screenings are virtual or at Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Find more info at sanssoucifest.org. March 25-April 2: Women’s History Month Virtual Screenings

MUSIC Ars Nova Singers April 2: Boulder’s nationally acclaimed a cappella ensemble presents “Made Fragile,” a program that honors the uncertainty of our shared experiences and the trust we place in one another. 7:30pm at First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder; there’s also a performance on April 1 in Denver. Check arsnovasingers.org for more info including venue details. June 3-4: Made Real

Bluebird Music Festival April 23-24: This weekend-long festival, held at Macky Auditorium on the CU campus, features afternoon and evening sessions each day. Scheduled performers include Colin Meloy of the Decemberists, Langhorne Slim, Waxahatchee, and Margo Price. Visit bluebirdmusicfestival.org for tickets and the rest of the lineup.

Boulder Bach Festival May 12-15: Festival Week is a celebration of J.S. Bach’s music alongside contemporaries and later composers. Performances are at Boulder’s historic First Congregational Church, where the wood floors and tiered stage offer a warm and clear acoustic to experience Bach’s complex counterpoint. Find the Festival Week schedule and ticket info at boulderbachfestival.org.

Boulder Chorale April 24: The Boulder Children’s Chorale presents a broad selection of music from the history of the

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1st Sundays: BFJ is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation, promotion and performance of traditional Dixieland jazz. Monthly jam sessions are the first Sunday of the month from 1-4pm at the Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder. Everyone who signs in is guaranteed to play. boulderfriendsofjazz.org.

Boulder Opera March 19-20: “Il Trovatore” by Verdi is an emotional melodrama set in 16th-century Spain, complete with witchcraft, murder, love and vengeance. 7pm Saturday and 3pm Sunday at Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Learn more and find tickets at boulderoperacompany.com.

Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra April 30: The Boulder Phil welcomes Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance for this performance, which also features Charles Wetherbee on violin. 7:30pm at Macky Auditorum on the CU campus. Tickets: boulderphil.org. May 14: Enigma Variations & Violinist Richard O’Neill May 28: Jake Shimabukuro

Center for Musical Arts The Center for Musical Arts offers a wide variety of music lessons, workshops and performance opportunities for all ages and abilities, and is also the home of the Colorado Music Festival. 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette; centerformusicalarts.org. March 18: Faculty & Friends Concert: Yay! Cello! April 8: Rebecca Folsom and Liz Barnez

Chautauqua Concerts

Planet Bluegrass

Colorado MahlerFest XXXV

The Wheel House Open Mic Night

May 17-22: This year’s event features Mahler’s Symphony No. 3; Opera Underground: Bartók’s “Bluebeard’s Castle”; plus chamber music, master classes and a free symposium. Check for ticket and venue information at mahlerfest.org.

CU Artist Series March 16: CU hosts Danú, “an authentic, fiery and wholehearted traditional Irish ensemble.” 7:30pm at Macky Auditorium on the CU campus; cupresents.org.

CU College of Music Students and faculty in the CU College of Music present a number of performances during the school year, and many are free. A few highlights are listed below, but check colorado.edu/ music/events for more. March 17: Guest Recital: Claudia Anderson, flute March 29: Faculty Tuesdays: Jeremy Reger and friends

Boulder Theater

Fox Theatre

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Tickets for this summer’s festivals at Planet Bluegrass in Lyons might still be available, so visit bluegrass.com for all the updated details.

St Julien Hotel Catch live music on the terrace or in the lovely lobby at St Julien Hotel, 900 Walnut St. in Boulder. See the entire spring lineup at stjulien.com.

Every Other Wednesday: Sign up starting at 5:30pm, then get on stage between 6 and 8 to show your stuff! Each week also showcases a featured local artist. There’s also live music every Sunday from 4-6pm. In Niwot at 101 2nd Ave.; check the event calendar at niwotwheelworks.com.

THEATER BDT Stage BDT Stage has been entertaining theatergoers since 1977 with Broadwayquality shows, live accompaniment and dinner before the show. BDT Stage (formerly Boulder’s Dinner Theatre), at 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, is back to a regular schedule of performances. Find more details at bdtstage.com. March 4-April 3: The Noteworthy Life of Howard Barnes Opens May 27: The SpongeBob Musical

eTown Hall

April 8: Join BSO for “Light,” featuring musical light from across the spectrum, including Brahms’ Concerto No. 2. 7:30pm at Grace Commons Church, 1820 15th St., Boulder; bouldersymphony.org. May 6: El Corazon, featuring dances from all over the Americas Boulder Theater hosts a number of concerts and other special events most nights of the week at 2032 14th St. A few are listed below, but check bouldertheater.com for more. March 21: Colbie Caillat with Nick Davidson March 31: Grateful Web presents Dead Floyd April 9: Chelsea Cutler April 19: Lucinda Williams and Buick 6

April 23: “Soundings: Past and Present” includes the world premiere performance of “Ancient Echoes” by Michael Udow, with percussionist Anthony DiSanza. 7:30pm at Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View, Longmont; check ticket info and more details at longmontsymphony.org. May 7: Waltz Into Summer!, a pops program for everyone

The historic Chautauqua Auditorium and Community House draw popular performers from all over the world, and most sell out, so get your tickets early. See chautauqua.com for a full schedule and ticket information. 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. April 7: Sasha DiGiulian April 29: Peter Bradley Adams Save the Date: Get tickets now for An Evening with Kenny G, July 9

eTown Hall is a live-music venue in downtown Boulder that also has a full-service recording studio and is the setting for most tapings of the “eTown Live Radio Show.” See etown.org for information about the center and a schedule of shows. eTown Hall is at 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. March 25: eTown Presents: Emily Scott Robinson

Boulder Symphony Orchestra

Longmont Symphony Orchestra

The Fox Theatre on the Hill in Boulder has a number of live events on the schedule; some are listed below, but check foxtheatre.com for more, as new shows are added often. The theater is at 1135 13th St., Boulder. March 17: The Brothers Comatose & The Sweet Lillies March 22: Indigo DeSouza April 23: The Dirty Knobs

Butterfly Effect Theatre of Colorado Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company is now known as Butterfly Effect Theatre of Colorado, and they’re based at Dairy Arts Center in Boulder. Check betc.org for updates about spring and summer performances.

CenterStage Theatre Company Louisville-based CenterStage offers classes and camps for kids that culminate in public performances; find more details at centerstagetheatrecompany.org.


Waneka Lake,

F

UN

Lafayette

4:30-10pm

KS

IND

AY

NDENCE E D EP

& FIR E W O R

Presenting Sponsor: BV Builders

Lafayette Fireworks are happening this year for our Independence Day Fun & Fireworks!

INDEPENDENCE DAY FUN & FIREWORKS

Time: 4:30pm–10:00 pm Location: Waneka Lake, 1600 Caria Dr., Lafayette

Saturday, July 2nd • 4:30pm to 10pm

4:30-8:30 pm — Music by Chris Daniels and the Kings • Kids’ Activities This wonderful celebration is FREE to the public! including Free Face Painting, Bungee Trampoline, Bounce House and more Food Trucks and Beer Garden featuring A Craft Brewery, Stem Ciders & Wine Due to a shortage of fireworks and technical (fees apply for some activities, food trucks and beer garden)

9:20-9:45 pm — Fireworks will begin at dusk. Bring your family and friends and enjoy the festivities. Be sure to bring your insect repellent and your lawn chairs/blankets/flashlights to enjoy the fireworks.

crews to do the show, this was the only day we could do this event.

303-666-9555 lafayettecolorado.com

SPRING 2022

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Coal Creek Theater May 6-22: Locusts, plagues and divas, oh my! “Epic Proportions” by Larry Coen and David Crane is a “laugh-out-loud comedy set in the 1930s during the filming of the epic biblical film “Exeunt Omnes.” Performances are at the Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant St., Louisville; cctlouisville.org.

Denver Center for the Performing Arts DCPA is offering mostly virtual content at press time, but check for updates (and streaming links) at denvercenter.org. The complex is at Speer Boulevard and Arapahoe Street in Denver. Through May 1: The Other Josh Cohen March 29-April 10: Tootsie April 15-17: Jersey Boys

GALLERIES NOTE: Always check hours and other details with galleries before going. Some are still operating with reduced hours and other restrictions.

Art + Soul Gallery 1615 Pearl St., one block east of Pearl Street Mall, Boulder, 303-544-5803; artandsoulboulder.com. Contemporary gallery shows national and international jewelers and artists working in paint, sculpture, ceramics, art glass and wood.

Art Source International 1237 Pearl St., on Pearl Street Mall, Boulder, 303-444-4079; rare-maps.com. Antique and rare maps, globes, classic posters and prints including botanicals, and vintage Colorado photographs.

Boulder Public Library

Jesters Theatre Jesters Theatre in Longmont is staging dinner theater productions with some COVID-related protocols in place. Show-only options are available. The theater is at 224 Main St. in Longmont; jesterstheatre.com. March 18-May 29: Guys & Dolls

Local Theater Company April 22-24: The Spring Local Lab is a weekend festival with new plays, workshops and parties. Find out more at localtheaterco.org.

Longmont Theatre Company May 13-18: “Something Rotten!” is on stage at Longmont Theatre, 513 Main St. in Longmont; longmonttheatre.org.

Public Works Theatre Company Check publicworkstheatre.com now for updates about Public Works’ popular summer Clown Camp for kids, as it often fills up quickly.

Theater Company of Lafayette TCL stages productions at the historic Mary Miller Theater, 300 E. Simpson St., Lafayette. See tclstage.org for upcoming productions.

The Upstart Crow Theatre Company Upstart Crow stages its productions at Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. See the calendar and ticket details at theupstartcrow.org.

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1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-4414397; boulderlibrary.org. The Canyon Gallery and Corridors show national touring exhibits and changing works by Colorado artists. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, hosts local artists, and Carnegie Branch Library for Local History, 1125 Pine St., features historic Boulder photographs. Through March 28: Maker Made (Canyon Gallery) Through April 28: The Continuous Line (Arapahoe Ramp) April 6-May 2: Boulder Valley School District (Canyon Gallery)

The Collective— Community Arts Center 201 N. Public Road, Lafayette, 303-6611261; lafayetteco.gov. The Collective is the city of Lafayette’s clearinghouse for arts and culture, with rotating exhibits, historical displays, lectures and special events, including networking opportunities for artists.

Creative Framing Art Gallery 916 Main St., Louisville, 303-684-0043; creativeframingartgallery.com. This frame shop showcases the rotating works of local and national artists.

Crystal Galleries 1302 Pearl St., on Pearl Street Mall, Boulder, 303-444-2277; crystalgalleries. com. Mother Nature’s most exquisite artworks in a gallery-like setting. Dazzling crystals, polished minerals, museum-quality fossils and shells, and Boulder’s finest, most eclectic collection of René Lalique glass.

15th Street Gallery 1708 15th St., Boulder, 303-447-2841; 15thstreetgalleryboulder.com. Specialty framing studio also features gallery exhibits of contemporary works, with an emphasis on paintings and works on paper by American artists.

Firehouse Art Center 667 4th Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787; firehouseart.org. FAC offers rotating exhibitions plus art classes, lectures and workshops for aspiring artists and art appreciators of all ages. Through April 24: Mixed Grit

The Great Frame Up 430 Main St., Longmont, 303-772-7293; longmont.thegreatframeup.com. Artists’ Gallery hosts monthly receptions and rotating exhibits of new Colorado artists. April 8-May 9: East Boulder County Artist Spring Studio Tour Preview

The HUB Gallery at The Arts Hub 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 303-229-1127; artunder.org. The HUB Gallery at the nonprofit Arts Hub in Lafayette features an 80-foot-long hall for displaying a variety of gallery showings throughout the year.

Little Bird 112 2nd Ave., Niwot, 303-652-0512; littlebirdniwot.com. Botanically inspired boutique features local artists and gifts like jewelry, photography, pottery, glass, fiber arts, organic body care and clothing.

Longmont Museum Gallery 400 Quail Road, Longmont; longmont museum.org. The work of local and national artists is regularly on display in the museum’s Portal Gallery.

Louisville Art Association 801 Grant Ave., Memory Square Park, Louisville, 303-666-8668; louisvilleart. org. Renovated circa-1904 brick schoolhouse displays works by local artists and offers art classes for all ages. LAA members exhibit their works at businesses around town on two-month rotations; see schedule online.

Fastframe of Boulder 2327 30th St., Boulder, 303-448-1000; boulderfastframe.com. Local framing store houses Art Den Gallery, featuring rotating exhibits of works from local artists.

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Mercury Framing 4692 Broadway, Boulder, 303-938-0123; mercuryframing.com. Quality framing for artists and art lovers, plus a gallery featuring up-and-coming local and national artists.

NCAR Galleries 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303497-1000; scied.ucar.edu/exhibits. The National Center for Atmospheric Research has a Community Art Program that selects hundreds of artists each year for individual and group exhibitions in the cafeteria’s exhibit space. There are also two art-science galleries with rotating exhibits.

NoBo Art District Galleries The NoBo Art District maintains two small galleries in north Boulder, one at the Bus Stop Apartments and one at Thistle Communities. NoBo artists also display their works at businesses around Boulder; see the calendar at noboartdistrict.org.

Nomad & Adorned Bead Merchants 1909 9th St., Boulder, 303-786-9746; nomadbeads.com. Unusual beads, gold and silver jewelry, and folk art from Asia, Africa and the Americas. The Adorned section offers finished jewelry pieces from local artists. Check online for info about small in-person classes, virtual demos and sales.

Osmosis Gallery 290 2nd Ave., Niwot, 303-652-2668; osmosisartgallery.com. Contemporary fine art from more than 40 Colorado artists, including paintings, sculpture, jewelry and one-of-a-kind gifts, plus a sculpture garden.

pARTiculars Art Gallery & Teaching Studio 401 S. Public Road, Lafayette, 720-890-7888; particularsart.com. pARTiculars is an artist-owned gallery and teaching studio in the heart of Old Town Lafayette. Classes for adults and children include painting, photography, bookbinding and jewelry.

R Gallery + Wine Bar

Dairy Arts Center 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-4407826; thedairy.org. The Dairy’s four art spaces host more than two dozen exhibits per year.

the 1700s and covers a wide range of subject matter, and expert framing is available for projects of any size.

Mary Williams Fine Arts 5311 Western Ave., Suite 112, Boulder, 303-938-1588; marywilliamsfinearts. com. This gallery, a presence in Boulder since 1996, specializes in the representation of some of America’s finest painters, printmakers and sculptors. The gallery’s collection of antique prints and maps dates back to

2027 Broadway, Boulder; 303-4444146; rgallery.art. This fine-art gallery showcases emerging and established local artists working in a variety of mediums, from painting and metalwork to jewelry and mixed-media pieces. The wine bar serves wine, beer and snacks, and also hosts a variety of arts-related events. A few are listed below, but check the online calendar for more. 3rd Tuesdays: Poetry Night, 6-8pm (open mic, 7:15pm) 3rd Wednesdays: Dance Night, 6:30pm lessons; social dancing 7:30-9:30pm March 26: Three Year Anniversary Party



ARTS

+CULTURE

Red Canyon Art 400 Main St., Lyons, 303-823-5900; redcanyonart.com. Open daily, this gallery features fine art, jewelry, stained and blown glass, pottery, weaving and home accessories by more than 100 Colorado artists.

SmithKlein Gallery 1116 Pearl St., on Pearl Street Mall, Boulder, 303-444-7200; smithklein.com. Gallery of traditional and contemporary paintings, sculpture, handblown art glass, jewelry, and a collection of old and new fetishes.

University of Colorado Museum of Natural History Changing Gallery Henderson Building, Broadway at 15th Street, Boulder, 303-492-6892; colorado.edu/cumuseum. The museum’s Changing Gallery and BioLounge showcase a variety of rotating art exhibits.

The Walnut Gallery 364 Main St., Longmont, 505-7979239; thewalnutgallery.com. Gallery in downtown Longmont features fine oils, acrylics, photography, glass art, jewelry and wearables.

MUSEUMS NOTE: Always check hours and other details with galleries before going. Some are still operating with reduced hours and other restrictions.

Agricultural Heritage Center 8348 Ute Highway 66, west of Longmont, 303-776-8848; bouldercountyopenspace.org. Offering a glimpse into the history of agriculture in Boulder County, this site focuses on the years 1900-1925, when families prospered as farmers and witnessed the coming of the modern age. Hours are seasonal.

1125 Pine St., Boulder, 303-441-3110; boulderlibrary.org. Boulder’s original library building houses historic Boulder County photographs and manuscripts. Research assistance currently available remotely only.

1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122; bmoca.org. Check the website for updates on upcoming exhibits and other museum events like lectures, demonstrations, classes and the Young Artists at Work program.

Broomfield Museums The mission of the Broomfield Depot Museum, 2201 W. 10th Ave., Broomfield, is to collect, preserve and interpret the history of Broomfield. The Broomfield Veterans Memorial Museum, 12 Garden Center, showcases permanent and temporary exhibits honoring those who have served in the armed forces. broomfield.org.

Colorado Railroad Museum 17155 W. 44th Ave., Golden, 303-2794591; coloradorailroadmuseum.org. CRM’s sprawling 15-acre grounds offer railroad cars and equipment, a main building in the style of an 1880s depot, a reference library, a general store and a picnic area.

CU Art Museum & Visual Arts Complex 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8003; colorado.edu/cuartmuseum. This free-admission art museum on the CU campus is open to all and “strives to serve as a generator and incubator of

RACHMANINOFF 3 & MYSTERIOUS MOUNTAIN SAT, MARCH 19, 7:30 PM

THE FIREBIRD & FREQUENT FLYERS SAT, APRIL 30, 7:30 PM

ENIGMA VARIATIONS & VIOLIST RICHARD O’NEILL SAT, MAY 14, 7:30 PM

Terrence Wilson, piano CINDY MCTEE Circuits HOVHANESS Symphony Sympho No. 2, “Mysterious Mountain” RACHMANINOFF Piano Concerto No. 3

Claude Sim, violin Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance MASON BATES Undistant Z HE ZHANHAO/CHEN GANG The Butterry Lovers’ Violin Concerto RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Russian Easter Overture STRAVINSKY Firebird Suite (1919)

Richard O‘Neill, viola ANNA CLYNE Sound and Fury WALTON Viola Concerto ELGAR Enigma Variations

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

artistic inquiry.” Currently open to the public with shortened hours. Through July 16: LaMont Hamilton: To Hear the Earth Before the End of the World

CU Heritage Center Third floor of Old Main, CU campus, Boulder, 303-492-6329; colorado. edu/alumni/heritage. Located in the University of Colorado’s original building, the Heritage Center preserves CU history in nine themed rooms.

Denver Art Museum

Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art

Tickets available now starting at $18; Youth & Students $10

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Carnegie Branch Library for Local History

100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, on 13th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock, Denver, 720-865-5000; denverartmuseum.org. Check online for information on lectures, tours, family activities, films and more. Through June 19: Curious Visions (abstract photography) Through July 17: ReVisión: Art in the Americas

Denver Museum of Nature & Science 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, 303370-6000; dmns.org. DMNS features outstanding permanent exhibits like “Expedition Health,”“Space Odyssey” and “Egyptian Mummies,” plus popular touring exhibits, an IMAX theater and the Gates Planetarium.

Dougherty Museum 8306 N. Highway 287 (107th St.), Longmont; bouldercounty.org. This

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

WITH THE BOULDER PHIL

SAT, MAY 28, 7:30 PM

All concerts at Macky Auditorium Check our website for Livestream Photo by Jamie Kraus Photography

BoulderPhil.org | 303.449.1343 SeiSolo

Foundation


ARTS museum houses a collection of beautifully restored antique automobiles, including models powered by electricity and early internal combustion types. Many of the cars date back 100 years and are still in running order. Open in the summer months only.

History Colorado Center 1200 Broadway, Denver, 303-866-3682; historycoloradocenter.org. History Colorado’s hands-on, high-tech exhibits include “Living West” and “We Love Rocky Mountain National Park.” Check online for special events and rotating exhibits, plus links to other historic sites operated by the Colorado Historical Society.

James F. Bailey Assay Office Museum

Exhibit (a photographic reflection one year after the tragic King Soopers shooting)

spaces encourage visitors to explore Longmont’s history and culture. The Longs Peak Room is an interactive gallery with hands-on history games and other activities. The Stewart Auditorium hosts theater, film, music and other events. Through May 15: Washi Transformed: New Expressions in Japanese Paper

National Center for Atmospheric Research

Louisville Historical Museum 1001 Main St., Louisville, 303-665-9048; louisvilleco.gov. Owned and operated by the city of Louisville, this museum features three historic buildings with an extensive collection of coal-mining artifacts and old photographs. Pick up a map of the Louisville Downtown Historical Walking Tour.

6352 Fourmile Canyon Drive, west of Boulder, 303-776-8848; bouldercounty.org. At the turn of the 20th century, this is where prospectors would take their ore samples to find out if they’d struck it rich. Open third Saturdays, June through October.

Lyons Redstone Museum

Lafayette Miners’ Museum

Museum of Boulder

108 E. Simpson St., Lafayette, 303-6657030; lafayetteco.gov. Refurbished 1890s coal miner’s home with displays of mining equipment and period household items. Open Wed.-Sat.

2205 Broadway, Boulder, 303-449-3464; museumofboulder.org. The Museum of Boulder is a state-of-the-art facility that explores the roots of the community and the accomplishments of today that will be history tomorrow. Check the website for a full schedule of exhibits, programs and events. Through April 10: Still Strong: Anniversary

Longmont Museum 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-6518374; longmontmuseum.org. An outdoor courtyard and four exhibit

338 High St., Lyons, 303-823-5271; lyonsredstonemuseum.com. Gift shop and regional genealogy displays, housed in an 1881 redstone schoolhouse. Open in the summer months only.

1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-4972408; scied.ucar.edu/visit. NCAR houses a Smithsonian-affiliated museum. Its Visitor Center, in a magnificent building designed by I.M. Pei, features exhibits that teach all ages about weather, climate and atmospheric research.

+CULTURE

Spirit of Flight Center At Erie Municipal Airport, 2650 S. Main St., Erie, 303-460-1156; spiritofflight. com. Hundreds of rare aviation items and artifacts that represent the past, present and future of flight.

University of Colorado Museum of Natural History

200 Bridge St., Nederland, 303-2580567; bouldercounty.org. A glimpse into the world of hard-rock mining days in Boulder County. Open June through October.

Henderson Building, Broadway at 15th Street, 303-492-6892; colorado.edu/ cumuseum. Permanent, temporary and traveling exhibits include Southwestern pottery, textiles, fossils, rare plants and beetles. The museum hosts regular programming, workshops and other events, but check online for updates, as the museum only reopened again recently after another closure.

Sandstone Ranch Visitors & Learning Center

Wise Homestead Museum/ Erie Historical Society

Nederland Mining Museum

3001 E. Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 303-774-4692; longmontcolorado.gov. Historic homestead property includes hands-on displays inside the circa-1880 house, plus educational exhibits in the icehouse, toolshed and barn. There’s also a nature trail with a scenic overlook. Visitor’s Center open limited hours beginning in May.

Shelby American Collection 5020 Chaparral Court, Gunbarrel, 303516-9565; shelbyamericancollection. com. Features 40 prized sports cars, plus a reconstructed shop. Open Saturdays only.

11611 Jasper Road, Erie, 303-828-4568; eriehistoricalsociety.org. Artifacts, equipment, photographs and displays related to the history of the Erie area, plus a restored farmhouse dating back to the mid-1870s. Hours are seasonal.

WOW! (World of Wonder) Museum 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424; wowmuseum.com. Nonprofit children’s museum offers interactive science and art exhibits, classes, performances, workshops, yoga sessions and sensory-friendly playtimes for children ages 1-11 and their families. ✷

Now open daily! Exhibits for all ages in English and Spanish! Always free! For hours and official campus holidays, visit:

colorado.edu/cumuseum

SPRING 2022

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+DINING GUIDE

BOULDER’S

BEST DINING GUIDE NEW AMERICAN

AMERICAN

24 CARROT BISTRO

BUSEY BREWS

578 Briggs St. | Erie | 303-828-1392 | 24carrotbistro.com The farm-to-table fare at this chef-owned, rustic-chic establishment is as elegant as it is charming. Start with a craft cocktail at the 25-foot-long antique bar and nosh on a fried calamari appetizer with greens, basil aioli and romesco, or dip house-made sweet-potato chips into a hot, bubbling Parmesan and kale dip served in a cast-iron crock. For dinner, urban meets country comfort in the crispy duck confit resting atop beluga lentils with apricot jam and pickled jicama. Find bold and fresh flavors in the local pork belly with creamy polenta, sweet potato purée and sage maple mustard. For dessert, indulge in a lemon sumac tart or try a piece of 24 Carrot Cake, layered with cardamom-cream-cheese icing, coconut coulis and fried basil. Open for lunch Tues- Fri 11am-2pm, brunch Sat-Sun 9am-2pm, and dinner Tues-Thurs 4:30-9pm, Fri-Sat 4:30-9:30pm and Sun 4:30-9pm. Closed Monday. Dine-in, takeout and outdoor seating available. Reservations recommended. >Please see ad on page 75.

70 E. First St. | Nederland | 1-855-NED-BREW | buseybrews.com Locally owned and operated, Busey Brews is the perfect stop for house-brewed beer and barbecue in a picturesque mountain setting. The ambience is warm and family friendly, and conveniently located only 18 miles from Boulder. With 16 house-brewed beers ranging from crisp ales and IPAs, to rich, malty browns and stouts, there’s something for every palate. Pair your beverage with the one-of-akind smoked wings (never fried!) and house-made sauces. The St. Louis-style pork ribs are another favorite—dry rubbed with savory spices, glazed, smoked to perfection and served with sides such as garlic mashed potatoes and creamy mac ‘n cheese. The on-site smokers run non-stop to make fresh batches of meats and tofu. Vegetarian, vegan and gluten-friendly options are available, along with wine, cocktails and a variety of non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy happy hour food and drink specials Mon-Fri from 3-6pm, and live music on Sunday afternoons throughout the spring and summer. Check Facebook and Instagram for specials and event listings. Open seven days a week. >Please see ad on page 79.

THE BOULDER DUSHANBE TEAHOUSE 1770 13th St. | Boulder | 303-442-4993 | boulderteahouse.com Handcrafted in Tajikistan, the Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse is an architectural marvel with vibrantly painted ceilings, carved cedar columns and a sculpture fountain. Begin with an appetizer such as Indian samosas with cucumber yogurt and mango chutney. Entrees include Persian chickpea kufteh (vegetarian chickpea croquettes), Peruvian chicken, and the Tajikistan plov—a traditional dish of rice with veggies, spices and grilled beef, served with a tomato cucumber salad, dried fruit and house-made naan bread. Finish with the English sticky toffee pudding or the honey mascarpone poached pear with pistachio, caramel and house-whipped cream. Enjoy a selection of more than 100 premium loose-leaf teas, gourmet coffees, chai, beer, wine and cocktails. Reservations required for traditional afternoon tea. In-house and off-site catering available. Open Tues-Fri 11am-9pm and Sat-Sun 9am-9pm. Serving brunch on weekends. >Please see ad on page 67.

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AMERICAN

THE CORNER BAR 2115 13th St. | inside Hotel Boulderado | Boulder | 303-442-4880 cornerbarboulderado.com Friends, locals, travelers, professionals and more belly up to the bar at Boulder’s best people-watching corner. Located inside Hotel Boulderado on the corner of Spruce and 13th streets, The Corner Bar is the ideal location for a quick lunch, a lively happy hour, a great late-night meal or the perfectly poured martini. The Corner Bar is well-known throughout the city as the place to soak up the sun on its beautiful, sprawling patio in the prime of summer or cheer on the Buffs inside its warm, cordial pub in the throes of winter. A wide variety of local craft beers, including a rotating tap, plus an exclusive selection of local spirits guarantees guests will enjoy a truly Boulder experience. Open daily from 11am-midnight, with happy hour daily from 3-6pm. >Please see ad on opposite page.

PHOTO BY SYDA PRODUCTIONS

CONTINENTAL


SPRUCEBOULDERADO.COM

2115 13th St. Boulder, CO 303-442-4880

CORNERBARBOULDERADO.COM

2115 13th St. Boulder, CO 303-442-4880

LICENSE1BOULDERADO.COM

2115 13th St. Boulder, CO 303-442-4560

FRANKSCHOPHOUSEBOULDER.COM

921 Walnut St. Boulder, CO 303-444-1295


+DINING GUIDE AMERICAN

FRANK’S CHOPHOUSE 921 Walnut Street | Boulder | 303-444-1295 frankschophouseboulder.com Frank Day started his restaurant career in the 1970s in Boulder. Together with his wife Gina, they have created dining experiences focused on bringing their guests together with fun and interesting food and drinks. In that same tradition, Frank’s Chophouse brings you classic fare with a twist. They source only the finest meats, produce and seafood available, and offer one of Boulder’s best happy hours from 3-6pm daily. Frank’s Chophouse features one restaurant with two dining experiences. The Tavern, open from 3-10pm daily, offers a refined-casual experience that everyone can enjoy. Perfect for a special occasion or night out in Boulder, The Chophouse, open from 5-10pm daily, offers a variety of chef-prepared steak and seafood dishes. >Please see ad on page 65. AMERICAN

THE GREENBRIAR INN 8735 N. Foothills Highway (U.S. Highway 36) at Lefthand Canyon Drive | Boulder | 303-440-7979 | greenbriarinn.com Nestled at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, The Greenbriar Inn is an elegant restaurant, tavern and private event space located in the north Boulder countryside. The surrounding 20 acres feature two ponds, striking woodland and thriving produce, herb and flower gardens. The cuisine focuses on seasonal American classics and is complemented by a 900-label, award-winning wine cellar. Dinner menu items include chilled oysters on the half shell, seared sea scallops, Caesar salad, beef Wellington, pan-roasted halibut, seared duck breast, Colorado lamb chops, and house-made raviolis. On the bistro menu, enjoy the GBI deluxe burger, prosciutto and porcini pizza, lobster and shrimp mac n’ cheese or PEI mussels Provencal. Decadent desserts include the freshly baked seasonal galette for two, tiramisu, key lime tart, and crème brûlée. For brunch, try the butter-poached-crab eggs Benedict, Monte Cristo, bananas Foster, Belgian waffle or pan-seared salmon. The Greenbriar Inn offers two floors with four spacious dining rooms as well as three outdoor patios (seasonal). Open for dinner Wed-Sun from 5-9pm with happy hour from 5-6pm, and brunch every Sunday from 10am-1pm. Closed Monday and Tuesday. >Please see ad on page 73. JAPANESE

HAPA SUSHI GRILL & SAKE BAR 1117 Pearl St. | Boulder | 303-473-4730 | hapasushi.com Step into Hapa Sushi Grill & Sake Bar and enter a distinctive atmosphere where Tokyo meets New York. Hapa is for sushi and non-sushi lovers alike. Appetizers include tuna taro poke (tuna, salmon, or yellowtail poke over a seared taro cake, with cucumbers and yuzu sour cream) and Wagyu bao buns (steamed bao buns with Wagyu beef, pickled daikon and carrot, cucumber, Sriracha hoisin and kimchi). Entrees include the Bonfire Bowl (shrimp tempura, California mix, spicy tuna, cucumber, avocado, tempura asparagus, Sriracha aioli, tempura crunch, slaw and sweet soy), and the Booty Call Roll (whole lobster tail over a roll filled with snow crab salad, tempura asparagus and shiso, drizzled with a garlic sake butter). More than 44 types of nigiri sushi—including vegetarian—and 50 types of sushi rolls are available. Luscious desserts, like mochi ice cream or banana bread pud-

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

ding with bourbon caramel sauce, complete your meal. Hapa features more than 40 different sakes, an extensive wine list and Hapa’s own rice beer. Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm and Fri-Sat 11am-11pm. >Please see ad on page 75. JAPANESE

JAPANGO SUSHI RESTAURANT 1136 Pearl St. | on Pearl Street Mall | Boulder | 303-938-0330 boulderjapango.com Japango, located in a historic landmark building in the heart of downtown Boulder, has been the go-to destination for exceptional sushi and globally influenced Japanese food for more than 20 years. The popular restaurant includes an atmospheric bar and lounge area (with a mesmerizing jellyfish tank) and extended outdoor patio seating right on the Pearl Street Mall. A back patio bar with a fireplace welcomes the outdoor happy-hour crowd year-round. In addition to a thoughtfully curated menu of cocktails, mocktails and wine, Japango offers the largest selection of sake in Boulder and an extensive selection of Japanese whiskey and bourbons. With master chef Iwasa Yukiji at the helm, you’re guaranteed to find something delicious to eat. Japango is Boulder’s choice for a quick lunch, a relaxing dinner for two, a night out with family or friends, or all of the above. Open for lunch, afternoon happy hour and dinner every day from 11am-10pm. >Please see ad on page 69. MEXICAN

JEFES TACOS & TEQUILA 246 Main St. | Longmont | 303-827-3790 | jefeslongmont.com With extreme sports and viral videos on the TVs and hip-hop on the sound system, Jefes is not your average taco joint. Embrace the unexpected, starting with carne asada fries—crispy, hand-cut fries smothered in your choice of Jefes’ famous sauces (queso blanco, Ancho red chile or pork green chile), choice of meat, guacamole, pico de gallo and Mexican crema. The bacon-wrapped jalapeño appetizer features five roasted jalapeños stuffed with smoky cheeses and Mexican spices, and wrapped in crispy bacon. Take your pick of award-winning tacos, like the Squashacado—diced butternut squash roasted in Mexican spices with fresh avocado, cilantro crema, pico de gallo and roasted pepitas, or the Chorizo & Egg with Buckner Family chorizo, fried potatoes and cilantro-lime crema, all topped with a sunny-side-up egg and green onions. Choose from more than 80 tequilas and mezcals, and desserts like churros and gluten free chocolate cake made by their own pastry chef, Shelley Katz. One more reason to love Jefes: They donate 10 percent of all profits to Colorado Kids Belong, an organization that helps families in the process of adoption and fostering. Happy hour daily from 3-5pm with $1 tacos and $4 award-winning margaritas. Open Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm and Fri-Sat 11am-10pm.

Check out our complete listing of Boulder County restaurants ONLINE!


1710 Pearl Street | Boulder | Colorado 303-442-1485 | leafvegetarianrestaurant.com a Three Leaf Concepts Restaurant


+DINING GUIDE AMERICAN

AMERICAN/BBQ

JILL’S RESTAURANT

LULU’S BBQ

900 Walnut St. | Boulder | 720-406-7399 | stjulien.com/dining Located inside Boulder’s four-star, four-diamond St Julien Hotel & Spa, Jill’s Restaurant features an award-winning wine list complemented by a unique classic and contemporary blend of seasonal menu offerings with a local focus. Jill’s Restaurant is home to a full bar, an outdoor patio and one of the city’s most beautiful private dining rooms, the Honey Onyx room. The adjacent T-Zero Lounge, one of Boulder’s more upscale night spots, makes for a convenient after-dinner stop. Both locations also offer one of Boulder’s top happy hours, with many cocktails that feature liquors from local distillers and herbs from the hotel’s on-site garden. Check website for hours. >Please see ad on page 1. VEGETARIAN/VEGAN

701-B Main St. | Louisville | 720-583-1789 | lulus-bbq.com LuLu’s is a relaxed, casual and family-friendly gathering place, and if the weather is nice, open-air seating adds to the experience. Start with dry-rubbed, smoked wings, fried pickles or sweet potato fries with cheese dipping sauce. Then get your smoked BBQ meat of choice in a sandwich on a homemade bun or on a platter with two of the 12 available sides, including beans, coleslaw, cornbread, fried okra and mac ‘n cheese. Meats include chicken, ribs, pulled pork, beef brisket and smoked sausage. Be sure to try LuLu’s signature Texas Slush, which is half LuLu’s Mexican-style lager (made down the street at Crystal Springs Brewery) and half house-made frozen margarita. Finish your meal on a sweet note with a cornbread sundae with raspberry sauce, or a slice of homemade key lime pie. With a full bar and eight TVs, it’s a great place to catch the big game. Catering available. Open noon-8pm daily or until sold out. >Please see ad on page 73.

LEAF VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT

AMERICAN

1710 Pearl St. | Boulder | 303-442-1485 leafvegetarianrestaurant.com Enjoy a variety of seasonal menu items prepared with fresh, local produce and served in a casual ambiance. Start off with an avocado tartare with marinated mushrooms, endive and cucumber, or our famous cauliflower tacos, battered in spicy buffalo sauce with housemade vegan blue cheese. For a main course, consider Jamaican jerk tempeh served with forbidden black rice, coconut-plantain sauce, sautéed greens and fruit salsa, or try a bowl of udon noodles in a rich kombu and mushroom stock with seasonal veggies and marinated tofu. Save room for the vegan carrot cake or a rotating selection of locally made vegan ice creams. The wine and cocktail list features primarily eco-friendly producers and local liqueurs, inventive nonalcoholic beverages, a delicious espresso program with several non-dairy milk alternatives, fresh juices and full bar offerings. In-house and off-site catering available. Open Tues-Fri 11:30am-9pm and Sat-Sun 10am-9pm. >Please see ad on page 67. AMERICAN

LICENSE NO. 1 2115 13th St. | inside Hotel Boulderado | Boulder 303-442-4560 | license1boulderado.com License No. 1 offers a unique experience, like no other. This underground speakeasy-style cocktail lounge, located inside Hotel Boulderado, is a tribute to the elegant charm of the early 20th century. Step back in time with classic, handcrafted libations, chef-prepared small plates, and a lively atmosphere when you enter this hidden gem in the heart of downtown Boulder. Open from 5pm-close, Thurs-Sun, with happy hour from 5-7pm. Enjoy live music every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday starting at 9pm. >Please see ad on page 65.

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ORGANIC SANDWICH COMPANY 1500 Pearl St., Suite F | Boulder | 720-639-3986 459 S. McCaslin Blvd. | Louisville | 720-598-5931 organicsandwichco.com Organic Sandwich Company’s two beautiful locations are open daily for guests in need of a quick, healthy bite. Stop in to check out their new menu which features hearty grilled sandwiches and more vegetarian and vegan options. The grilled cheese and peppers sandwich is sure to warm you up on a cold day as they grill white cheddar, smoked gouda, garlic roasted bell peppers, avocado, and sriracha aioli on French country bread. You will notice many local, Colorado companies represented in the form of drinks, sweets, snacks, meats, produce and bread. Any sandwich can be made gluten free with their locally baked, gluten-free demi baguette. House-made salads, soups, and baked goods are not to be overlooked. Open daily. Delivery, catering and contactless pickup are available. >Please see ad on page 79. ITALIAN

PASTA PRESS 1911 11th St., Suite 203 | Boulder | 720-778-0532 pastapress.com When you open the door to Pasta Press, you’ll see a corner of modern Italy right here in Boulder. Pasta Press is bringing a fresh view of Italy to Boulder as well as true Italian dishes. Imported meats, cheeses and flours create genuine Italian flavors. For starters order a dinner roll and an arugula, pear and walnut salad. Entrees include classic flavors like a simple but far from trivial tomato sauce tossed with freshly made pasta and sprinkled with parmesan cheese (aged 24+ months) as well as the classic pesto pasta made with ground pine nuts and fresh basil. For dessert, try the panna cotta topped seasonally with berries. Familyfriendly pricing invites everyone to enjoy Italy one bowl at a time. Open Mon-Thurs 11:30am-9pm and Fri-Sat 11:30am-10pm. Closed Sundays. >Please see ad on page 79.


Hello, Spring! We can’t wait to welcome you this spring! Our four Pearl Street patios, fireside back patio and cozy dining room ensure there is a perfect space for everyone to enjoy. Prefer to indulge in the comfort of your home? All your favorites are available for curbside pickup too. No matter how you choose to dine, you wont want to miss our gorgeous new specials, delicious seasonal cocktails or our latest rare whiskey acquisitions. We hope to see your smiling face soon! R E S E RVATI O N S & C A R RYO U T

+1 303 938 0330 BoulderJapango.com H O U R S & LO C ATI O N

Sun - Thurs 1 1 am – 10pm Fri & Sat 11am – 11pm 1136 Pearl St. Boulder, CO JapangoRestaurant JapangoBoulder


+DINING GUIDE AMERICAN

THE ROOST 526 Main St. | Longmont | 303-827-3380 | theroostlongmont.com The Roost is a local favorite with its fun atmosphere, two seasonal rooftop patios and seven bigscreen TVs to ensure you’ll catch all the games. Start with the Bangin’ Cauliflower (highlighted on Food Network) fried in crispy rice flour tempura and tossed in a citrus-Sriracha sauce. The beef totchos feature Rooster Tots smothered in chipotle queso, Buckner Family beef, guacamole and pico de gallo. For your entrée, try steak frites with candied bacon and brown butter sauce or the grilled ahi torta—grill-seared rare tuna with guacamole, roasted green chile, pico de gallo, chipotle aioli and fresh cabbage with cilantro-lime crema on talera bread. For dessert, indulge in the bourbon s’mores mousse or a slice of warm carrot cake with cream cheese frosting, candied pecans, house caramel sauce and vanilla ice cream. Your delicious meal will also support a great cause, as The Roost donates 10% of all profits to Colorado Kids Belong, an organization that helps families in the process of adoption and fostering. Enjoy BOGO deals on Whiskey Wednesday with more than 100 whiskey options, and happy hour Sun-Thurs 3-6pm. Open Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm and Fri-Sat 11am-10pm.

Food+Drink

INTERNATIONAL

SMOKIN BOWLS 449 Main St. | Longmont | 720-815-2875 smokinbowlsrestaurant.com Find fast, fresh fare from around the world at Smokin Bowls, a recently reopened eatery with an emphasis on high-quality, local ingredients. Signature Bowls start with a base of rice, red quinoa, lettuce, rice noodles, cauliflower rice or fries. Featured flavor combinations include the Hawaiian, with seaweed salad, edamame, basil, cucumber, jalapeño, tobiko, sesame seeds and a tamari-ginger poke sauce; the Italian, with heirloom tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, artichoke hearts, cucumber, roasted garlic, croutons and vegan basil pesto; and the Mexican, with avocado, pico de gallo, black beans, cotija, jicama, roasted corn, jalapeño and cilantro-lime crema. Each bowl is topped with a choice of ahi sashimi, braised beef, smoked pork, roasted shrimp, grilled chicken or tofu. Smokin Bowls’ ramen is the perfect choice for a chilly day, and their mac & cheese is a rich and savory treat—both can be customized with added protein and toppings. Most of the menu is gluten-free, and every dish can be made vegan upon request. Feel great about your meal because Smokin Bowls donates 10% of all profits directly to local nonprofit organizations. Signature bowls only $5 on Fridays. Open Tues-Sat 11am-2pm. Continued on page 80➤

Mix It Up! Watch for interactive cocktail classes coming to Japango in April. Beverage director, Stanley, will cover the restaurant’s beverage program philosophy, his approach to creating new cocktails and how you can recreate them at home.

Japango • boulderjapango.com

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+DINING GUIDE

➔ Not Potter’s Potion 24 Carrot Bistro just launched its new Signature Cocktail “Too Old for Harry Potter.” It’s not your average butter beer! This potion includes bourbon, cognac and Colorado’s own Grove Street amaretto liqueur served over hand-carved ice cubes and finished with an orange twist.

24 Carrot Bistro 24carrotbistro.com

Since lilacs bloom for such a short time, at your first sighting, head to The Greenbriar Inn so you don’t miss the Lilac Spritzer. They use fresh lilacs grown on their property to make a sweet, spring-flavored simple syrup, then mix it with Tito’s vodka, lemon juice and soda water. You couldn’t ask for a more refreshing cocktail! The Greenbriar uses fresh ingredients from their farm for many of their seasonal dishes. Be sure to watch for rhubarb grown on their farm making its spring appearance on the menu.

The Greenbriar Inn • greenbriarinn.com

Bring Your Friends! Not only does Avanti have one of the best rooftops in Boulder County with a slew of food options, but it’s also become more than just a restaurant. Grab a group of friends and head over for Tuesday Night Smarty Party trivia night every week at 7:30 p.m. to get in on the drink specials and prizes—some fantastic, some mediocre and some that don’t feel like prizes at all! If trivia is not your thing, maybe comedy is. Avanti hosts the Flatiron Funnies Comedy Extravaganza 2022 on March 23 and April 20. Five comics, each with a 10-minute set, perform from 9 to 11 p.m. Drinks from New Belgium Brewing and Mythology Distillery and special bites from New Yorkese.

Avanti F&B Boulder • boulder.avantifandb.com SPRING 2022

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+DINING GUIDE

South of the Border

BEER LuLu’s recently released a new Mexican lager crafted just for them by Crystal Spring Brewing. This crisp, refreshing lager is available by the glass, can and is available in six packs. Take some home, along with their award-winning barbecue.

LuLu’s BBQ • lulus-bbq.com

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Art+Alcohol

If you haven’t stopped by R Gallery + Wine Bar to enjoy perusing local artists’ works with a boozy treat, it’s time to go! They’ve added wine cocktails to their already exceptional offerings of fine wine and Colorado craft beers. Stop in after dinner on Pearl Street for a delectable dessert—the new adults-only ice cream float made with a Colorado stout.

R Gallery + Wine Bar • rgallery.art


Enjoy an unforgettable meal in our elegant dining rooms, cozy bar or beautiful patios.

Dinner WED-SUN 5pm-9pm Offering our Bistro and Classic Dinner Menus Happy Hour WED-SUN 5pm-6pm Brunch SUN 10am-1pm To-Go Orders Available

8735 North Foothills Highway, Boulder | greenbriarinn.com | 303.440.7979

E S T

BBQ

2 0 1 1

SPRING 2022

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+DINING GUIDE

Head to Ned

Busey Brews is prepping for a busy spring with two new beers brewed in collaboration with Lumpy Ridge Brewing in Estes Park: Doozy of a Day IPA and If Looks Could Pilz Pilsner. Watch for a Boxcar Coffee Roasters coffee lager to come. In addition, Busey Brews is expanding their outdoor dining space to include a covered area with double the seating, a fire pit and a staircase leading down to the dog-friendly beer garden near the creek. Head up the canyon for trivia night fun every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Happy hour specials apply during trivia, and prizes are awarded to winning teams! Regular happy hour is Monday through Friday from 3 to 6 p.m.

Busey Brews • buseybrews.com

Go Underground

The underground, speakeasy-style cocktail lounge License No. 1 has re-opened! Visit this hidden gem of Boulder every Wednesday through Sunday from 5 p.m. to 12 a m. Here’s the entertainment lineup: George Nelson Band, Wednesdays, starting at 9 p.m. The Underground Comedy Showcase, Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Live music, Fridays and Saturdays, starting at 9 p.m. Open Mic Night, Sundays, talent sign-ups at 6 p.m., show starts at 6:30 p.m.

License No. 1 • license1boulderado.com

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Boxed Dinner Have you heard about the new pizza joint in Lafayette? Ghost Box stems from (pun intended) Stem Ciders’ Acreage Cider House. After a test run as a ghost kitchen operating out of Acreage, the concept proved so popular, they opened a standalone restaurant. They offer plenty of choices for “goblin” up including salads, sandwiches, flatbread, shareable starters, a full kids’ menu and an extensive to-go program, but the main gig here is Detroitstyle and woodfired pizzas. A favorite is the Potato Rosemary with potatoes, melted onion, garlic, mascarpone, rosemary and pecorino.

Ghost Box • ghostboxpizza.com


S I M P L E | L O C A L | FA R M T O TA B L E

w

EAST COUNTY’S BEST KEPT SECRET!

578 Briggs Street Erie, CO 80516 303.828.1392

www.24carrotbistro.com

BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 2 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-2PM

DINNER

TUE-THR F R I & S AT S U N DAY 4:30P M - 9 P M 4:30PM- 9 : 3 0 PM 4 : 3 0 PM- 9 PM

SPRING 2022

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GUIDE +DINING GUIDE

The

art of Asparagus A

sparagus is known as “queen of the vegetables,” perhaps for the way it instantly fancies-up any meal. Or it might be because kings and queens throughout the ages have cherished and revered it. Egypt’s Queen Nefertiti declared it “the food of the gods,” and King Louis XIV of France reportedly had 6,000 asparagus plants in the kitchen garden at the Palace of Versailles. Yet those two had nothing on the Roman emperor Augustus, who so loved his asparagus that he had an entire “Asparagus Fleet” of ships that existed only to source as much of the green vegetable for him as possible. What’s so special about asparagus? Well, for one, it’s considered to be an aphrodisiac, and that may or may not have anything to do with its popularity. It’s also “royally” good for you, since it’s packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber, plus it’s low in calories. Although you can find asparagus yearround, the freshness, crispness and taste are at their peak in the spring. Find it at farmers markets, farm stands and grocery stores beginning in early April. To stand alone, grill it, roast it, sauté it or steam it. As an accent flavor, toss it into salads, soups, stir fries or pasta.

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SELECTION

PREP

FLAVOR COMBOS

The thickness of an asparagus stalk has nothing to do with age; a thin stalk will not mature into a thicker one. Choose the thickness based on cooking method: For grilling, roasting or broiling, you’ll want the thicker stalks that can stand up to the heat and not shrivel. Thin spears, which cook quickly, are ideal for stir–frying or tossing into pasta or salads.

The bottom ends of asparagus spears are woody and tough. Before cooking, either snap them off (where they naturally break) or, to save every precious bit, trim the ends and use a peeler to remove a few of the outer layers from the bottom half of the spear.

Although asparagus is delicious when simply roasted with a little olive oil, salt and pepper, it also pairs well with eggs, parmesan cheese, citrus (particularly lemon), garlic, bacon, tarragon, mushrooms and balsamic vinegar.

BOULDER BOULDER MAGAZINE MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com GetBoulder.com

TOP: PHOTO BY YARUNIV STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; BOTTOM: PHOTO BY PHOTOSYNC/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BY LISA TRUESDALE


Asparagus Entrees

At his two Boulder restaurants, Blackbelly and Santo, Chef Hosea Rosenberg says he always—always— features asparagus in the spring. “However,” he says, “our menus are hyper-seasonal, and they change often and as quickly as our farmers bring new items to market.” Check back in late March or early April to see what he’s cooked up to take advantage of the veggie’s spring freshness and abundance.

Louisville, the Grilled Asparagus & Egg antipasti, featuring parmesan and truffle oil, has been one of the most popular offerings for a long time, says co-owner Sara Martinelli.

Many BoCo restaurants also have asparagus on their menu all year long. At Zucca Italian Ristorante in

24 Carrot Bistro, Erie

Look for asparagus-forward dishes at these other area restaurants: Spruce Farm & Fish, Boulder Jax Fish House, Boulder Sugarbeet, Longmont Jill’s Restaurant & Bistro, Boulder The Greenbriar Inn, Hwy 36 north of Boulder

TOP: PHOTO BY PHUCHAYHYBRID/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; BOTTOM: PHOTO BY OANDERSON/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Asparagus Benedict Eggs Benedict, a beloved brunch dish, also makes a fancy (but low-maintenance) weeknight dinner. This classic recipe features asparagus. For an even heartier dish, you can also include Canadian bacon, ham, shredded lump crab, smoked salmon or lox. Complete your meal with a fresh fruit salad.

INGREDIENTS (for 2 servings) 8 fresh asparagus spears, trimmed and cut in half 1 envelope hollandaise sauce mix 4 large eggs 2 English muffins, split and toasted 1/3 cup shredded Swiss or Gruyère cheese paprika and fresh chopped parsley for garnish (optional) DIRECTIONS 1. Add 1 inch of water to a large saucepan. Insert a steamer basket and place asparagus inside. Bring to a boil, then cover and steam for 3–4 minutes until crisp-tender. Set aside. 2. Prepare hollandaise sauce according to package directions. (Of course, if you’re feeling ambitious, you can also make yours from scratch.) 3. In a large skillet, bring 2–3 inches of water to a boil. Reduce heat to a gentle simmer. Break

For an upgrade to the classic asparagus Benedict, use your favorite bread and top with microgreens.

cold eggs, one at a time, into a ramekin. Holding the ramekin close to the water’s surface, slip each egg into the water. 4. Cook eggs, uncovered, for 3–5 minutes or until the whites are completely set and the yolks are starting to thicken. Lift eggs gently out of the water, one at a time, with a slotted spoon, and drain on paper towels. 5. Lightly toast the English muffins. 6. To assemble: Place four pieces of asparagus on each muffin half. Top with a poached egg. Sprinkle with cheese. Top each with 3–4 tablespoons of hollandaise sauce. Garnish with paprika and/or parsley. Serve immediately. ✷ SPRING 2022

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+DINING GUIDE

D If you’re not quite ready to shed the warm comfort foods of winter, you’ll want to head to Frank’s Chophouse for the decadent oyster mushroom fondue. This warm-your-belly goodness includes havarti, manchego and parmesan cheeses with Italian and blue oyster mushrooms, and it comes with French bread for dipping. Be sure to watch for more new, inventive dishes coming to the menu— the kitchen is now under the direction of Executive Chef Dan Haislet. He’s worked in kitchens across the country, from Arizona to Portland to Colorado, and his passion is experimenting with inspirational flavors.

Frank’s Chophouse • frankschophouseboulder.com

on’t you just love the first picnic of spring? It might be a a bit chillier than you expected, but the sun feels amazing on your face and offers the promise of warmer days to come. Heat up your outdoor meal with some new HOT sandwiches from Organic Sandwich Company. Try the grilled cheese and peppers with white cheddar, smoked gouda, garlic roasted bell peppers, avocado and Sriracha aioli. Also new on the menu is the grilled beef and peppers sandwich with prosciutto and apple on a baguette.

Organic Sandwich Company organicsandwichco.com

Susan Loriho was a child in South Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War between the central Sudanese government and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. At age six, she moved to a refugee camp in Kenya, where she learned to cook. Next, she moved to an orphanage in Nairobi, where she also helped in the kitchen. Years later, when Loriho was 18, she came to the U.S. as a Lost Girl, and found her way to Boulder. Determined to make the most out of her life, she attended college and began a career in early childhood education. Then COVID-19 struck, and she found herself jobless and a single mother with a young son to support. The very day she lost her job, a friend sent a text to check in on her. Upon hearing the news, her friend asked if Loriho would make samosas, and said she would buy them. Loriho made $72 that day, and her friend spread the word. “I did what I always do, since I was a little girl—I persevered!” she says. “I made lemonade out of lemons or, in my case, delectable samosas.” Since that time Loriho has sold more than 10,000 samosas locally.

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BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

“I intend to share the food I love with the world I love!” she says. “And by doing so, I have been able to send support back home to the poverty-stricken nations of Kenya and South Sudan, to my family, and to my people.”

Susan’s Samosas • susansamosas.com


SPRING 2022

79


+DINING GUIDE ➤Continued from page 70 AMERICAN

SPRUCE FARM & FISH 2115 13th St. | inside Hotel Boulderado Boulder 303-442-4880 | spruceboulderado.com Fresh, straightforward, honest, approachable and inspired food every time. Always keeping with the seasons, Spruce Farm & Fish showcases the best our region and nature have to offer. From creative cuisine to familiar flavors, they strive to provide nothing but the freshest and most interesting dishes with exceptional service. An extensive wine and beer selection from near and far and exquisite craft cocktails are also sure to please. Open for brunch from 7am-2pm and dinner from 5-10pm daily. >Please see ad on page 65.

ADVERTISER INDEX 24 Carrot Bistro..................................................75

Hotel Boulderado.............................................65

Acme Fine Goods............................................ 43 Alpaca Connection..........................................55

Eric & Alex Jacobson Compass Realty.................................................25

Anspach’s Jewelry............................................23

Japango................................................................ 69

Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts.......................................................... 2

Lafayette Chamber..........................................59

Barbara & Co........................................................23

License No. 1........................................................65

Karen Bernardi/The Bernardi Group Coldwell Banker.............................................. 4,5

Little Bird...............................................................37

BioLife Plasma Services................................32

Leaf Vegetarian Restaurant........................67

LuLu’s BBQ...........................................................73

PACIFIC ISLAND

BlueBird Windows & Doors....Back Cover

McDonald Carpet One Floor & Home.......................................................15

SWAYLO’S TIKI RESTAURANT & BAR

Boulder B Cycle.................................................53

Mike’s Camera......................................................11

Boulder Centre for Orthopedics & Spine.......................................27

Mile High Gliding / Journeys Aviation.......51

1315 Dry Creek Drive | Longmont | 303-827-3380 swaylostiki.com Swaylo’s has sailed into southwest Longmont and infused it with laid back, tiki spirit! Escape into this tropical paradise, bedecked with Polynesian and nautical ambiance, from blowfish lights and tiki statues to a bar that is built inside a 1,000-square-foot pirate ship. Colorful and delicious cocktails are the stars of the bar, and the cuisine represents delicious nuances from various Pacific islands: Start with the pu-pu platter, which includes pork grio sliders, smoked octopus tostadas, poisson cru, fried calamari, pacific crab rangoon, fried plantains, coconut jasmine rice, mango-cucumber salad, furikake fries, taro chips and gochujang aioli. Entree platters include the Opakapaka—a crispy-skinned Hawaiian pink snapper with edamame and vanilla bean puree, papaya rice fritters, mango-cucumber salad and fried mung bean threads. Try the Hawaiian fried rice with wok-fried spam, pineapple, chilies, carrot, scallions, basil, smashed egg and steamed rice with tamari. Your meal will support the community too, as Swaylo’s donates 10 percent of profits to local fundraisers. Don’t miss the big annual luau in July! Open Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm and Fri-Sat 11am-11pm. >Please see ad on inside front cover. ✷

Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse....................67

Ocean First........................................................... 41

Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra............62

Organic Sandwich Co....................................79

Brown’s Shoe Fit.............................................. 45

PakMail of Boulder......................................... 43

Busey Brews........................................................79

Barb Passalacqua Boulder Property Network...........................21

Chipeta Solar Springs Resort.....................59 Colorado Animal Specialty & Emergency (CASE)...........................................25

Pasta Press...........................................................79

Ann Cooper & Associates RE/MAX of Boulder............................................ 9

Pettyjohn’s Liquors & Wine.........................37

Corner Bar............................................................65 Cronin Jewelers................................................... 3

80

BOULDER MAGAZINE GetBoulder.com

Pedestrian Shops.............................................37 R Gallery..................................................................12 The Ritz...................................................................51

CU Continuing Education............................19

David & Amy Scott Colorado Landmark Realty..........................17

CU Museum of Natural History................63

Simply Bulk Market.........................................32

Downtown Boulder Partnership...............8

Snow Apparel.................................................... 43

Duane & Timmy Duggan Boulder Property Network...........................21

Snyder Jewelers................................................57

Eric Olson Master Jeweler...........................27

Spruce Farm & Fish.........................................65

Flatirons Terrace.............................................. 45 Fox Hill Country Club......................................61 Frank’s Chophouse..........................................65

Check out our complete listing of Boulder County restaurants ONLINE!

Niwot Business Association......................... 6

Barry & Liz Friedlander RE/MAX of Boulder...........................................31 Game-Set-Match Inc..................................... 49 The Greenbriar Inn..........................................73 Hapa Sushi...........................................................75 Hazel’s Beverage World.................................16

SPAN Chocolate Lovers’ Fling....................51 St Julien ................................................................... 1 Starbuds................................................................39 Super Rupair....................................................... 41 Swaylo’s Tiki Restaurant & Bar ................................................ Inside Front Cover Wild Animal Sanctuary................................... 7 WK Real Estate...................................................13 Woodley’s Fine Furniture ................................................. Inside Back Cover


hg BOULDER COUNTY

HOME+

GARDEN

SPA BATHS Local pros share tips and inspiration for creating your personal oasis

SPRING RESET

Renew your health habits

SPRING PLANTING GUIDE ARTS FOCUS

Local artist Marjorie Leggitt on her career as a botanical and science illustrator

BOULDERHG.COM

SPRING 2022


Beautiful f loors. Naturally.

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CONTENTS SPRING 2022

34 H O M E F E AT U R E S 16 Allergy Adventure Season BY SARA BRUSKIN

18 Tips for Eco-Friendly Spring Cleaning BY HOLLY BOWERS

What to clean and how to do it in an eco-conscious way.

26 Bountiful Bridal Bouquets BY AMANDA MCCRACKEN

Spring is a time for love, and brides are thinking about blooms.

32

arts focus

Meet Artist Marjorie Leggitt

26

From a family that encouraged outdoor immersion, sprouted a love of art and nature.

34

feature

Serene Soaks BY HEATHER SHONING

Spa baths to inspire your next private space. 6

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

42 Reset Your Body and Mind BY LISA TRUESDALE

Spring is the perfect time to refresh your health habits.

PHOTOS: BATH COURTESY RODWIN ARCHITECTURE + SKYCASTLE CONSTRUCTION; BOUQUET BY JANTSARIK/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Local remedies to fend off seasonal allergies.



Spring is coming back around. Your carpets are not.

You should call Carpet Masters.

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Carpet | Hardwood | Tile/Stone | Laminate | LVT | Area Rugs


Celebrating

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design [build] green 303.413.8556

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CONTENTS SPRING 2022

PUBLISHER Thomas W. Brock EDITOR Heather Shoning ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lisa Truesdale ASSISTANT EDITOR Sara Bruskin EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR Karen Sperry PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Peggy Doyle ADVERTISING DESIGNER Hilary Stojak WRITERS Holly Bowers Sara Bruskin Janine Frank Kate Jonuska Amanda McCracken Lisa Muschinski Lisa Truesdale

12

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Nichole Greenley Julie Grimm Nicole Karsted

G A R D E N F E AT U R E S 12 Growing for Community Good BY LISA TRUESDALE

Local organizations help small farmers overcome hardship and fight food insecurity.

22 Hügelkultur: Mounds of Potential BY SARA BRUSKIN

Low-maintenance, no-till garden beds that save water and extend the growing season.

30 Spring Planting Guide 44 Cutting Edge

22 46 Grow Your Way to Better Mental Health

BY JANINE FRANK

BY LISA MUSCHINSKI

Create crisp, clean borders in your garden with these types of edging.

Three ways gardening can help your psychological state.

Copyright © 2022 Brock Media, all rights reserved. Reproduction of any material in this magazine or on the Boulder County Home+Garden website, including publisher-produced advertising and videos, is strictly prohibited without publisher’s permission. Boulder County Home+Garden is published by Brock Media, 1021 E. South Boulder Road, Suite J, Louisville, CO 80027. Phone: 303-443-0600; fax: 303-443-6627. Subscriptions: Send $20 for an annual subscription to the above address.

10

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

PHOTOS: CHILDREN BY RAWPIXEL/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; HUGELKULTUR BY NAYADADARA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

COVER ART Botanical illustration by Marjorie Leggitt E-NEWSLETTER & WEBSITE EDITOR/ SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Sara Bruskin BOULDER COUNTY HOME & GARDEN WEBSITE BoulderHG.com BOULDER COUNTY HOME & GARDEN EMAIL ADDRESS homes@brockpub.com FOLLOW US


We all need a little love, so do your trees.... Contact us to have an arborist come out to consult with you about your trees (and other plant life). Pest/disease diagnosis and treatment Tree planting Local mulch Tree and shrub pruning Tree removal Stump grinding Tree preservation taddikentree.com • hello@taddikentree.com • 303.554.7035

BoulderHG.com

11


GROWING FOR COMMUNITY GOOD Grow Your Own Meal and four other nonprofits making a difference locally

A

Photo above: Ollin Farms in Longmont is just one of the many local farms working with Grow Your Own Meal to advance the benefits of local regenerative agriculture practices. 12

fter fleeing from New York City following 9/11, ­Marion Murphy was inspired to make a difference in the world. Once she landed in Boulder County, she knew it would be easier to do so in a small community rather than in a huge city. She just wasn’t sure how to do it until she read journalist Michael Pollan’s now-famous essay from October 2008, asserting that if the U.S. didn’t make the reform of the entire food system a high priority, we would never be able to “make significant progress on the health care crisis, energy independence or climate change.” Prompted by Pollan’s words, Murphy founded Grow Your Own Meal in 2010. Her nonprofit’s mission is to help Boulder County’s small farmers overcome the hardships they face because of the damage caused to our air, water and soil due to industrial farming practices, and recent challenges like s­ upply-chain disruptions and inflation.

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

“We need to keep the soil viable,” says Murphy. “We don’t have that right now, and we have a lot of work to do to get it back.” Grow Your Own Meal helps small farms with their marketing efforts and works to help farming policy move forward on county and state levels. Murphy is putting together a citizens’ advisory board specific to farming, “as a way for citizens to have a voice and to improve communication between business, government and community.” “Food is the most fundamental need we have, besides water,” Murphy says. “If we don’t have those, we aren’t here.” We are fortunate in Boulder County to have dozens of nonprofits working to help increase our access to fresh, healthy, affordable food. Read on to learn about four of those organizations, and visit ­growyourownmeal.org for more information about Grow Your Own Meal.

PHOTO COURTESY OLLINFARM

BY LISA TRUESDALE


*************************** ***************************

Garden Center, Nursery & Gift House

www.theflowerbin.net

BoulderHG.com

13


TATEVOSIAN YANA|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

WEHA|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

MILLION GARDENS MOVEMENT

GROWING GARDENS

Co-founded by Boulder County restaurateur Kimbal Musk, Million Gardens Movement has the lofty goal of mobilizing a million people in North America to grow their own food. The nonprofit aims to “pave the way to a more resilient food system” by teaching people how to garden and by providing gardening kits to families in need. milliongardensmovement.org

For more than 20 years, Growing Gardens has been reconnecting people with their local food systems through community gardens at seven county locations. They offer cooking, gardening and nutrition classes for all ages, and donations of produce, plants, seeds and nutritious meals to low-income community members. growinggardens.org

spring

m ay 6 & 7 Shop a huge variety of Grown at the Gardens, Rock Alpine, Plant Select®, herbs, veggies and more! Our horticulturists will be onsite to give expert advice. Free Admission • Online Reservations Required Want the best selection? Get tickets to the preview party! Enjoy limited crowds and first choice of plants. Thursday, May 5, 4-8 p.m. • Tickets Required

10% member discount | shop early for best selection Helianthus annuus by Lynn Bruskivage, 2017, watercolor. Denver Botanic Gardens School of Botanical Art & Illustration

1007 York Street botanicgardens.org

14

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

ASSOCIATE SPONSORS


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GROW & GIVE

FED BOULDER

If you’re an avid home gardener who always has more fresh-grown produce than you can eat, check out Grow & Give. This program, created by Colorado State University Extension to address ­ food insecurity in the state, connects home gardeners with local organizations where they can safely donate their excess. growgive.extension.colostate.edu

FED (Farm Eats Direct) connects local farmers to the community by purchasing surplus produce from local farms and serving nourishing organic meals out of the FED food truck. If there’s any food waste, it goes back to the farms to feed the animals. The truck, which can also be rented for private dinners, travels to different BoCo locations, with a menu that changes often based on the ingredients available. FED also held several recent “pay what you can” meals for those affected by the Marshall Fire, funded by contributions from local businesses and by financial donations from the community. fedboulder.com

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15


ALLERGY ADVENTURE SEASON Don’t let seasonal allergies keep you inside

Try these local products and natural remedies to stay sniffle-free so you can head out for any adventures you choose this spring.

1

6 4

5

3 1

Quercetin

2

Kick-Ass Allergy Seasonal Rescue

3

Bromelain

Preventing allergic reactions is even better than treating them, and an air purifier can keep your space free from allergens. Make sure you pick one that uses a HEPA filter so it’s sure to catch those tiny pollen particles.

An enzyme found in pineapples, bromelain fights inflammation and can help ease the sinus pressure that comes with seasonal allergies. Bromelain can also be purchased as a supplement, but it’s often better to get it straight from the source.

Find it at McGuckin Hardware.

Find pineapple at your local grocery store.

Utilizing nettle’s antihistamine properties, the decongestant herb yerba santa, echinacea and orange peel, this herbal tonic by Louisville-based WishGarden Herbs is a local favorite. They offer allergy blends formulated for kids and pregnant women.

Nasal irrigation is far from glamorous, but there is evidence that flushing out the sinuses can help relieve seasonal allergies. Be sure to use either distilled or boiled water for the saline mix, and clean the Neti pot regularly to prevent infection.

Find quercetinrich foods and supplements at most grocery stores.

Find it at most local grocery stores or online at wishgardenherbs.com.

Find one at Natural Grocers or Sprouts Farmers Market.

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

5

Air Purifier

Studies have shown that the micronutrient quercetin inhibits the release of histamines that cause allergy symptoms, and it’s in certain foods such as elderberries and red onions. Elderberries need thorough cooking to be safe to eat, so supplements are often more convenient.

16

4

Neti Pot

6

Allergy Aid Organic Tea This blend by The Boulder Tea Company includes nettle, peppermint, echinacea, sage, eucalyptus, orange peel, rosemary, yerba santa, and licorice root. Nettle is a natural antihistamine, and this blend pairs it with other plants that also help respiratory health. Find it at the Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse or online at boulderteaco.com.

PHOTOS: ONIONS, NETI POT AND PINEAPPLE BY SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; PRODUCTS COURTESY THE MANUFACTURER

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TIPS FOR ECO-FRIENDLY

SPRING CLEANING BY HOLLY BOWERS

W

hile you’ve probably got a cleaning routine already, spring can be a good chance to tackle some of those places you might not think about normally. It’s also a good time to re-evaluate how you clean. There are plenty of eco-friendly alternatives to harsh chemical cleaners that are kinder to your home, your health and our planet.

HIGH-TOUCH SURFACES: Cabinet and drawer pulls, your car’s steering wheel, credit cards, your computer keyboard and mouse, remote controls, video game controllers, and other tech accessories could all do with a good disinfecting.

MATTRESSES AND SOFAS: Sprinkle these soft surfaces with baking soda, leave for about an hour to absorb odors and then vacuum up the baking soda.

OUTSIDE SPACES AND TOOLS: Don’t forget about the great outdoors! Wipe down porch railings and patio furniture. Get your gardening tools ready for spring: Remove the rust, sharpen, sanitize and oil any moving parts. Be sure to disinfect them and kill any bacteria or fungi that can affect your plants.

VENT COVERS:

Give your vent covers a good wipedown to remove all the dirt and dust they collect (and blow through your home). While you’re at it, you might replace your HVAC filter, particularly if you’ve been running your heat frequently. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that replacing your filter can reduce your HVAC system’s energy consumption by up to 15 percent.

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h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

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Lists of spring cleaning tasks abound. Here, we’re going to focus on some of the places that may not be on your radar:


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You have several options to make your spring cleaning more eco-friendly. If you want to hire someone, Boulder County is home to a number of eco-focused cleaning companies, including Clean Conscious, Holistic Home and 2Buckets Cleaning. If you’ll be cleaning your own space, look for ­products from eco-conscious brands. ­Companies like Blueland, Grove Collaborative and locally based Boulder Clean create cleaners from nontoxic and plant-based ingredients, and use low- or zero-waste packaging. For other cleaning 20

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

products, look for the Safer Choice label from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which ­designates products as safe and sustainable. Or you can make your own cleaning supplies. Most DIY cleaning recipes use ingredients that you probably have at home already, such as vinegar, baking soda, castile soap, lemon juice, hydrogen peroxide, essential oils and borax. You can use these to make effective replacements for all your traditional cleaners, from disinfectant sprays to all-purpose cleaners to toilet scrub.

PHOTO BY TAB62/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

You can tackle all these tasks with eco-friendly cleaning products. Sustainable alternatives don’t contain harsh chemicals or toxins that can irritate your skin or respiratory system, so they’re better for you than traditional cleaners. They’re better for the environment, too, because they don’t contain pollutants or volatile compounds. Many also come in recycled or low-waste packaging.

Happy cleaning! Pace yourself and remember that you’re doing something good for your home and the planet. Scan the QR code for our complete spring cleaning checklist.


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HÜGELKULTUR

MOUNDS OF POTENTIAL How to create a low-maintenance, no-till raised garden bed that improves every year

N

ot only is “Hügelkultur” (pronounced “hoo-gul-culture”) fantastically fun to say, it’s the name of a permaculture technique that’s gaining popularity among eco-conscious gardeners. Translating to “mound culture,” this German term describes an agriculture method that steeply decreases the need for supplemental watering, extends the growing season and sequesters a lot of carbon.

How It Works Creating a hügel bed starts with digging a shallow trench and placing large pieces of untreated wood at the bottom, like thick tree branches or entire trunk segments. You then layer on medium-sized branches, smaller branches, twigs, grass clippings, straw, leaves or any other biomass free of pesticides and herbicides. Next, top the resulting mound with a thick layer of compost and soil to create a rich growing surface. This top layer will feed and anchor your plants in the beginning while the serious magic brews belowground. All that wood acts as a giant sponge, so hügel beds retain moisture extremely well. Because they require less watering, The wood in a hügel bed acts as a giant sponge, so hügel beds retain moisture extremely well. 22

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

this makes the beds more sustainable and lower maintenance. As the wood and other compostable materials break down, the decomposition process generates heat, so the raised bed will warm up earlier in spring and allow for continued growing later in the fall. And of course, compost enriches soil, so the biomass adds nutrients to the bed as it decomposes.

Which Wood to Use? Many growers prefer to use softwood in their beds because it breaks down faster and adds more nutrients to the bed at an earlier stage. Conversely, hardwood

will last longer and give your bed more sustained nutrient enrichment, albeit more slowly. Using some hardwood at the bottom of your hügel bed with softer wood on top is considered ideal, but it’s fine to use whatever you have on hand. (Refer to “Killer Wood” on the next page for possible exceptions). If it’s available, use deadwood that has already started to decompose a bit, as it will require less nitrogen to break down.

Patience and Planting Many people familiar with hügelkultur say it’s best to leave a fresh bed fallow for a

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PLANNING AND PLANTING Find a place with good sun exposure for your hügel bed. 1 Convince your mom and brother-in-law that it will be fun to dig a trench in clay-heavy soil. (Miriam the dog did not need any convincing.) 2 Line the bottom of the trench with large pieces of wood. Even entire trunk segments can be used. 3 Layer on progressively smaller pieces of wood and other biomass in a large mound. 4 Cover the mound with a thick layer of soil and compost. Mulching is also helpful for water retention.

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h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

Killer Wood After a ridiculously windy day in Boulder County, I became the proud owner of several black walnut branches that had been forcefully liberated from their tree. I was digging my own hügel bed and in search of biomass, but black walnut is considered a notorious garden villain due to its allelopathic properties (meaning it can kill or harm other plants near it because of a biochemical it leaches into the soil). Black walnut trees purportedly contain a toxic chemical called juglone, which can disrupt respiratory pathways in other plants. Because of this, it has developed a reputation for damaging the flora growing around it. This has been regarded as gardening gospel for centuries, but a 2019 report by Washington State University Extension called it into question. According to the report, “Juglone is not found in intact tissues of black walnut trees. Instead, living tissues contain a nontoxic precursor called hydrojuglone, which is transformed in the soil to make juglone. Most hydrojuglone is contained in the roots and shells of walnuts. There is little in the leaves and virtually none in the wood.” In light of this information, I decided to risk placing black walnut wood on the very bottom of my hügel bed, where it wouldn’t be too close to the plants growing on top. One season in and my plants have been fine so far. Other trees are considered allelopathic for different reasons, so be sure to research the wood available to you before using it. If you’re not sure what kind of tree it came from, use a plant-­identifier app that can determine the species based -S.B. on photos of the bark.

PHOTOS: PLANNING AND PLANTING BY SARA BRUSKIN; WOOD BY NAYADADARA|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

year, especially if you used wood from a living tree. When wood initially starts to decompose, it needs a lot of nitrogen, so the first year of a hügel bed’s life may present a difficult time for plants. Some gardeners have reported great success growing potatoes during their hügel bed’s first season because potatoes are not heavy nitrogen feeders. After that first crop, however, it’s better to plant perennials, as hügel beds function best without any tilling. You can also offset the wood’s nitrogen use by adding fertilizer or building your bed with lots of nitrogen-heavy biomass, like coffee grounds, composted manure or fish emulsion. These amendments can help balance the nutrient needs of your bed and crops. Planting a cover crop like clover, beans, barley or rye will also help set the soil up for success. Once you start using your bed, it’s important to arrange the plants thoughtfully. Those that require lots of water should be planted closer to the bottom of the mound, while plants needing less water and more drainage should go near the top. The hill-like shape of a hügel bed creates some built-in shade, so plants that get scorched easily will be happy on the north side, and sun-hungry plants will get full exposure on the south side. As seasons pass, your hügel bed should need less and less water while yielding better and better crops. Of course, the biomass in your bed won’t break down forever, but growers have reported decades of soil benefits from a single hügelkultur project. Between the rich soil and the environmental boons of growing in a hügel bed, all that digging is definitely worth it.


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BOUNTIFUL BRIDAL BOUQUETS Love is in the air, and wedding flowers are on brides’ minds

olorado weddings are gorgeous in any season, but spring is when we turn our eye toward planning. There are so many details—the dress, the venue, the photos and more—but the flowers can really set a colorful (or monochromatic) tone for the wedding palette. Here, local experts weigh in on the top trends

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in wedding flowers. Oh, wait, you’re not getting married? These ideas will look just as amazing in tabletop arrangements for your home! Forget scrolling through thousands of ­Pinterest pics. Consider wandering through a flower farm, filling a bucket with flowers that match your dream wedding vision. You can do that at Helen Skiba’s Artemis Flower Farm (recently known as Farmette Flowers), an ecology-focused flower farm in Longmont. Skiba concentrates on growing unusual, delicate flowers that can’t be shipped, like cosmos, dahlias and zinnias. She tends to see brides looking for locally grown, organic flowers and a local designer committed to sustainability and waste-free practices. Skiba says dried flowers like sea lavender are trending. She adds, “We do a lot of foraging of milkweed pods and grasses to create bouquets with more texture and wildness than a more ­formal, tighter bouquet.” Sabia Magurn, owner and lead designer at Longmont’s Painted Primrose, echoes the driedflower trend and adds that Italian bleached products are increasingly popular. Terracotta palettes—burnt oranges, neutrals, rusts—are big.

PHOTOS: BRIDE BY APRILANTE/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; BOUQUET BY JANTSARIK/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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Left: The pros agree a blush and burgundy palette is still popular.

For that palette, Magurn tends to use cappuccino garden roses, bronze amaranthus and coffeebreak roses. A blush and burgundy palette is still a popular choice, she says. Wildflower styles are always in demand among Colorado brides, but Magurn often reminds brides that it’s illegal to cut columbine and Indian paintbrush. Skiba encourages her clients to pick a place, a piece of art or a person who really inspires them to be the basis for a color palette or a theme. Some of the most memorable themes she’s designed floral arrangements around include a national parks theme and a Midsummer Night’s Dream theme. Boho and lush garden style themes are still popular, Magurn says. As for unusual combinations, she’s seeing a resurgence of reflexed roses paired with orchids, a combination popular in the ’80s. 28

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PHOTOS: TOP BY HELEN SKIBA, COURTESY ARTEMIS FLOWER FARM; BOTTOM BY VIACHESLAV BOIKO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Above: A wedding bouquet created by Nelson Esseveld of Artemis Flower Farm featuring foraged milkweed pods and grasses.


PHOTOS: TOP COURTESY PAINTED PRIMROSE; BOTTOM BY ALEX GUKALOV/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Sabia Magurn, owner and lead designer at Longmont’s Painted Primrose, says terracotta color palettes as well as foraged grasses and dried elements are on-trend.

Both florists agree you can be as creative as you want with table arrangements in water (unless they’re baking in the sun for hours). It’s the bridal bouquet you have to carefully consider. Roses and carnations are durable staples Magurn turns to for bouquets. But for brides who fall in love with Pinterest flower arrangements, she warns them: “That flower had to stay alive for three minutes for a styled shoot, not for a six-hour event.” If they really love a flower she knows is not going to hold up in a bouquet, she tells them, “It’s going to look great in photos for the first hour or two, and then it’s going to die.” Some florists will even insist on brides ordering two bouquets, one for the first half and one for the second half of the day, depending on the length of time between photos, the ceremony and when you’ll throw the bouquet. For local flowers that hold up well in a bouquet, Skiba recommends dahlias, lisianthus, coxcomb, raspberry greens and sunflowers. BoulderHG.com

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ZONES 5 & 6

PLANTING AND HARVESTING CHART PLANTING HARVESTING CROPS

This chart lists the planting and harvesting dates in the Mountain States region for annual plants cultivated outdoors in the garden without protective devices. The dates in the chart are approximate. Soil and air temperatures in your particular garden will affect germination and maturity dates of edibles. APR

MAY JUNE

JULY

AUG SEPT OCT

CROPS

APR

MAY JUNE

JULY

AUG SEPT OCT

CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES

ROOT VEGETABLES BEETS

BROCCOLI

CARROTS

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

PARSNIPS

CABBAGE

POTATOES

CAULIFLOWER

RADISHES

KOHLRABI

GREENS

RUTABAGAS ARUGULA

TURNIPS

FRUIT AND SUMMER VEGETABLES

ASIAN GREENS

CANTALOUPE

CHARD

CORN

COLLARDS

CUCUMBERS

KALE

EGGPLANT

LETTUCE

PEPPERS

MUSTARD GREENS

PUMPKINS & WINTER SQUASH

SPINACH

ONIONS AND GARLIC

SUMMER SQUASH GARLIC

TOMATOES

LEEKS

WATER­MELONS

LEGUMES

ONIONS, BULB

BEANS

ONIONS, GREEN

PEAS

SHALLOTS

ZONES 5 & 6 CHART TAKEN FROM “THE TIMBER PRESS GUIDE TO VEGETABLE GARDENING IN THE MOUNTAIN STATES” © COPYRIGHT 2013 BY MARY ANN NEWCOMER. PUBLISHED BY TIMBER PRESS, PORTLAND, ORE. USED BY PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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ARTS FOCUS

MEET ARTIST

MARJORIE LEGGITT

M

arjorie Leggitt grew up amongst artists, gardeners and teachers in a household where creativity and outdoor exploration were part of everyday life. She and her family spent summers away from their Colorado home at her grandmother’s ranch in New Mexico, enjoying lessons in ceramics, horseback riding and exploring nature. “The pastures and rose and perennial gardens provided great hideaways for insects, spiders and snakes, which we captured, studied and released,” she says. “We learned about nature in a very organic and tactile way.” Frequent trips to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and elementary school science teachers who taught by going outside piqued her nascent desire to be a “science illustrator,” Leggitt says. “I remember wanting to work as an artist in a natural history museum or make art like I saw in my science textbooks. Both wishes came true!”

Q: Why are you drawn to illustration? In the classes I teach, I use the following definitions: Art evokes and provokes, illustration informs. I’ve always had a science-based aptitude towards art and enjoy the challenge of teaching through the visuals I create. Q: Some might consider botanical art a dying art. What do you say about that? Botanical art has been around for thousands of years. The early Egyptians, Greeks and Romans portrayed the floral world on murals, frescos, jewelry and vessels. Illustrated herbal books record horticultural crops as far back as 120 B.C. Since the 1400s, selftaught artists, working independently or employed by nobility or institutions, studied and painted flowers and plants. As essential team members on scientific voyages in the late 1700s through the mid-1800s, botanical artists collected and illustrated exotic species of the New World. In 2001, Shirley Sherwood introduced the world to botanical art as a respected art form in her book “A Passion for Plants: Contemporary Botanical Masterworks from the Shirley Sherwood Collection.” Botanical art may lose some of its current popularity, but it will never “die.” Q: Scientific illustration seems highly specialized. How did you learn this art? I am mostly self-taught. I graduated from college in 1977 with a degree in Art Studio. In 1974, I began illustrating my first book, “Trees and Shrubs of Colorado” by Dr. Jack Carter. My senior project, “Scientific Illustration,” was composed of illustrations created in my biology and botany courses. But it was the book “Scientific

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©MCLEGGITT

Q: What types of clients need botanical and scientific

illustrations? Commercial clients and the scientific communities use botanical illustration. Illustrations are often used in lieu of photographs. An illustrator has the ability to clarify, simplify, highlight, unravel and define information while adhering to botanical accuracy. Throughout my career, I have worked with botanists, paleobotanists, publishers, nature centers, government nature and wildlife divisions, botanic gardens, commercial magazines, and seed packet companies. Each client has different specifications and requirements for what they want and how they utilize the artwork, but all require a certain level of botanical accuracy. Q: Since you’re also an educator, what’s the most

important advice you give your students as it relates to drawing and getting the details “just right”? Draw what you see, not what you know. Q: What’s the second most important piece of advice

you give your students? Nature is an excellent composer—follow her lead. Q: Thinking back on all the work you’ve done, is there

a favorite project that comes to mind? The Prehistoric Journey exhibit at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, collaborating with the paleobotanist to develop graphic visuals of prehistoric flora. For five years, I collaborated with Dr. Kirk J­ohnson, curator of Paleontology (now, director of the Smithsonian Natural History Museum) to create ­ life-size pen and ink illustrations of plant life from the mid-Paleozoic through the Cenozoic Era. Working with impression leaf fossils and an occasional modern-day relative, my challenge was to create reconstructions of the prehistoric flora. My illustrations were not only used as plant “models” for the background painted murals and the foreground sculpted landscapes, but continue to be the most current reconstructions of several prehistoric plant species. Q: What is your favorite thing about creating art?

Developing a piece of art that helps connect the bridge between science and understanding. Q: What is your greatest challenge about creating

art? Being creative and coming up with my own ideas. Q: What inspires you?

Articles about new science discoveries; nature’s patterns and sounds; observing a new type of plant, insect or animal for the first time; the act of drawing a ­3-dimensional plant on a 2-dimensional piece of paper. Q: What artists do you admire?

Maynard Dixon, Doug Henderson, Robert Motherwell, Lee Krasner, Gustave Baumann and James Gurney. Q: What do you want your art to say?

I want my art to be as informative as possible so as to make words unnecessary.

PHOTOS COURTESY MARJORIE LEGGITT

Illustration” by Phyllis Wood, published in 1979, that officially introduced me to the field, methodology and techniques of scientific illustration. In February 1979, I began my work at the Field Museum of Natural History to illustrate Australian land snails’ reproductive organs. Many hours were spent studying the pen and ink plates of the previous snail illustrator to learn how to apply ink lines and stipples. At that time, I was introduced to the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators—an association of individuals who communicate science visually and clarify scientific ideas. Through the Guild connections, collaborations and workshops, I was able to develop my then-­amateur skills and learn the tools of the trade.

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SERENE SOAKS Creating a private spa space you’ll never want to leave BY HEATHER SHONING

I

t’s been long week—oh, who are we trying to kid; it’s been a long two years! There’s work, laundry piling up, grocery shopping, kids, pets, dinner to make. The list goes on. Now imagine having a special spot to relax at the end of the day and release the tension, tame the stress. Imagine taking a long soak in the tub with a glass of wine and a good book or some relaxing music and candlelight. A beautiful spa-like bath is within your reach. We’ve got tips from local experts for planning your serene space.

Plan the Palette Color affects your mood and behavior. Some colors are geared toward energy and happiness, while others create a sense of peacefulness and calm. If you’re looking for a spa-like, relaxing bathroom, you’ll likely gravitate toward peaceful blue-green hues, grays or warm, rich browns. White offers a clean, peaceful ambience.

Details Matter Whether it’s the texture of a tile or the sexiness of a fixture, the devil is in the details, as they say. The supple feel of leather drawer pulls, the elegance of delicate glass and brushed brass light fixtures or contemporary matte black accents—they all count toward the style that makes you cry “comfort!”

Let’s face it—in a bathroom, the primary design components are the bathtub, cabinetry and tile. You might opt for a warm, natural wood tone with lots of grain showing for an earthy element and pair it with a patterned tile and organic elements. Or you might choose dark, sleek cabinetry and crisp white tile. Other considerations to think about include wall-mount cabinetry versus traditional, countertopto-ceiling backsplash versus a shorter style, or a freestanding tub versus built-in. Do you want an enclosed shower with floor-to-ceiling tile, or a glass surround open to the rest of the room? No answer is wrong, of course. It’s all about your preferred spa experience. Woodsy and natural? Sleek and sophisticated? Modern and minimalist? You choose. 34

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PHOTO BY EMILY MINTON REDFIELD

Main Materials


See this project information on the next page.

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PHOTO BY EMILY MINTON REDFIELD

This project was a collaboration by:

Organic Oasis The layered textures and patterns give this space its organic feel, from the porcelain floor tile and small-format version in the shower, to the decorative wall tile and even the capiz shell chandelier. A plant in the corner and warm, woven wood accents are perfect finishing touches. Mixed metals—black and brushed gold—add even more dimension to the space. “Creating your own spa bath is all about color and what makes you feel relaxed,” says interior designer Helly Duncan of Design Matters Home. Because a bathroom is really all hard surfaces, Duncan suggests adding softness through texture, which can include different sizes of tiles and tile patterns (even if they are monochromatic). 36

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

Velocity Built LLC velocitybuilt.com Helly Duncan, Design Matters Home Beth Chisholm, Beth Chisholm Kitchen Architecture Macy Rutledge, Flatirons Kitchen and Bath Hillcrest Glass


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PHOTO COURTESY ARCADEA ARCHITECTURE

Open, but Still Private Transom-like windows capture the essence of nature outside, while ensuring privacy from nearby neighbors. Even dark wood cabinetry feels light thanks to its floating style. The glass shower surround and bright white tile are fresh and clean, while the tile texture creates a soothing sense of ocean waves. Homeowner Julie Cohen worked closely with Arcadea Architecture while designing the space and has since started her own design firm. She wanted a calm, restful feeling—a place to relax at the end of the day, and when she fell in love with a largeformat glass tile, she designed around that. “I call it ‘the color of water,’” she says, “and it was the launching point for the design.” Cohen suggests that an easy way to create a spa-like, calming bathroom is by eliminating clutter. An easy way to accomplish that is with a vanity with ample storage so nothing needs to be out on the counter. “Sometimes clients like the look of vanity with open areas,” she says. “In this case, rolled up towels can lend to the spa-like feel.” 38

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

This project was created by: Arcadea Architecture arcadea.com Julie Cohen, Cohen Creative Design


THE DIRECTION OF REMODELING

Through our knowledge & experience, we’ll translate your dreams into a practical design that adds value to your property & quality of life. See our 5 star customer reviews at www.HOUZZ.COM/pro/velocitybuilt/__public

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303.506.1844 VelocityBuilt.com

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PHOTO COURTESY RODWIN ARCHITECTURE + SKYCASTLE CONSTRUCTION

This project was a 50/50 collaboration by:

Modern and Not This tub on its teak pedestal takes center stage in this primary bathroom, behind it a bold patterned white tile reminiscent of a midcentury design. The warmth of the wood pairs perfectly with the stone blue backsplash hue in a modern textured tile, while the walnut cabinetry harkens to prairie style in its simplicity. Streamlined fixtures in polished silver take a backseat to the rest of the details in this space. “This bathroom needed to be a bit of an escape, where the homeowners could regroup and refresh themselves in order to face the busyness of their typical day,” says Cecelia Daniels, lead designer at Rodwin Architecture + Skycastle Construction. “We accomplished this with soothing, natural color schemes paired with more fun and interesting shapes. And, of course, all of the natural light we could muster.” 40

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

Rodwin Architecture + Skycastle Construction rodwinarch.com Kimball Modern Design + Interiors


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41


RESET YOUR BODY AND MIND Spring is the perfect time to refresh your health habits.

A

lthough habits are the cornerstone to so many areas of our lives, it’s possible that your “healthy” ones are actually working against you. Here are tips for new habits to start, and how to reset the ones you currently have to ensure you’re making the most of them for optimal health.

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h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

Resetting Your Body Your eating, sleeping and exercise habits can all affect your physical health. Dr. Damiana Corca, a Boulder-based acupuncturist and sleep specialist, ­ says that getting a good night’s sleep is crucial for your overall health, and that what you eat—and how and when you exercise—can affect your sleep. “There are foods that help you sleep, though it’s not a list of individual foods,” she explains. “It’s more about a diet that lowers inflammation, regulates blood sugar and provides you with nutrients your body needs to thrive.” For improved overall health as well as better sleep, Corca suggests filling half of your plate with vegetables (“in all the colors of

PHOTO BY SOLOVIOVA LIUDMYLA|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BY LISA TRUESDALE


improving your diet

creating a bedtime routine

FOUR KEYS TO A SPRING RESET

the rainbow”) and splitting the other half between healthy carbs and lean protein. Spring, when things are finally starting to grow again and farmers markets are reopening, is the perfect time to add new veggies and fruits to your diet. Corca cautions against having a big meal within three hours of bedtime. Even though exercise is important, doing it at the wrong time might not be the best habit. Corca says any strenuous exercise should be completed well before 5 p.m. “If you want to do any type of activity in the evening, keep it mellow and light,” she advises, “like yoga, walking or a brief bike ride.”

Resetting Your Mind How the body feels naturally affects your mental health. It’s a vicious circle: Prolonged sleep deprivation, a poor diet and lack of exercise can all make you moody and irritable. This can impair your ability to focus on everyday tasks, which can lead to a heightened stress response in the body. This in turn can affect the immune, digestive and cardiovascular

exercising early in the day

systems and exacerbate the symptoms of chronic health conditions like heart disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, depression and anxiety—which can all cause you to toss and turn at night when you should be getting a good night’s sleep. Corca is adamant about creating a bedtime habit to wind down and prepare the mind and body for sleep: “This is when we’re communicating with our nervous system that it’s safe to let go and sleep uninterrupted for many hours.” She suggests turning off any screens and resisting the urge to snack. After you get ready for bed, just sit quietly, simply feeling your body and breath and observing your thoughts. “This time of meditation may unravel feelings, thoughts and emotions,” she explains, “and you’ll have time to gradually let go of them so that when you lie down to go to sleep, they won’t come flooding back and keep you up.” This is also a good time to journal, or to read until you feel groggy. Simple habits and routines like these can greatly improve your health—both mental and physical. They are, after all, inextricably linked.

PHOTOS: CANDLES BY MORROWLIGHT|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; FOOD BY SEA WAVE|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; SLEEP BY GORODENKOFF|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; EXERCISE BY GP PIXSTOCK|SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

getting a good night’s sleep

BoulderHG.com

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CUTTING EDGE Create crisp, clean borders in your garden with these edging options. BY JANINE FRANK

D

etermining what type of edging to put in your landscaping can be more than a matter of optimal function. Personal aesthetic, cost and ease of installation may also weigh into your decision. Here are five types of hardscape borders to add interest and function to the distinct sections of your yard.

Concrete borders have a tidy, conforming look and can make mowing easier. The nearly indestructible custom curbs need to be poured by professionals, but individual pavestone blocks are also available for DIYers.

Natural Boulder Large rocks create a striking natural aesthetic. Getting these in place will take some effort, but they won’t be going anywhere once they’re settled. You can go big or small with this approach to fit your artistic vision or functional needs.

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h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

Smaller Rock

Wood Keep an ultra-natural look with a simple cut-wood

border. To achieve this effect, saw short sections of logs or thick branches and align them side by side. Or purchase these pre-made in varying lengths from a hardware or garden store. Another wooden edging option is simply boards embedded into the ground or heavy landscaping timbers.

There are endless possibilities for variety with this type of border, from pebbles to river rock or any size in between. You can also choose your favorite hue to complement existing landscaping. Make the border as wide or narrow as needed.

Metal For a minimalist look, metal

edging is a good space-saving choice. If you choose this option, make sure to get a rounded top so pets and children don’t catch an edge. Many of these products can be pounded into place.

PHOTOS: CONCRETE BY TOPSELLER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; WOOD BY DEAN CLARKE/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; NATURAL BOULDER BY CINDYLINDOWPHOTOGRAPHY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; SMALLER ROCK BY THREEDICUBE/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; METAL BY JEN PETRIE/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Concrete


Plant Sale

Shop for plants, fantastic starts, and gardening supplies. All proceeds benefit KGNU Community Radio. Sunday, June 5, 2022 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 4700 Walnut Street Boulder, CO 80301 KGNU.ORG

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SPRING 2022

HOME+

GARDEN

Complete virtual editions always online!

SPA BATHS Local pros share tips and inspiration for creating your personal oasis

SPRING RESET

Renew your health habits

SPRING PLANTING GUIDE ARTS FOCUS

Local artist Marjorie Leggitt on her career as a botanical and science illustrator

BOULDERHG.COM

Watch For Our Summer Issues! Available on June 1!

Now accepting advertising, and ideas for articles Contact Brock Media: 303-443-0600 | Info@Brockpub.com

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GROW YOUR WAY TO

BETTER MENTAL HEALTH Three ways gardening can help your psychological state

46

BY LISA MUSCHINSKI

The Community Behind a Cabbage

With the arrival of spring, Michael Morris, hard goods manager at The Flower Bin in Longmont, is preparing for another busy season. Over his 23 years at ‘the Bin,’ he’s noticed a considerable uptick in gardeners, which he attributes to the pandemic. “More people are staying home and are interested in growing their own food,” Morris says. “We want to help them bring a sense of control to their lives.” We could all use a mental reset after a long winter and another year of COVID-19. Gardening offers a perfect avenue to do so. While on the surface we spot green sprouts and peeping buds, indicating a fruitful garden to come, more than just roots and tubers grow beneath the topsoil. As we garden, we can develop a sense of community, bolster our self-esteem and foster a relationship with nature as well.

No one grows a garden on their own. Maybe your neighbor offers you some extra seeds from their harvest, or a stranger at Sturtz and Copeland recommends his go-to cabbage moth repellent. Either way, community cultivates healthy gardens, and gardening creates a colorful community. This is especially true at community-run gardens. The Sugarloaf Gateway Garden defines the entrance to the Sugarloaf community, says Susan Hofer, one of Sugarloaf’s residents who helps sow and maintain it. Boasting daffodils in the spring, The Gateway Garden not only brings joy to the whole community and adds color to residents’ daily commutes but serves as a training location for Sugarloaf’s fire department. At the base of the mountain, the fire department volunteers learn how to use the fire trucks. “What a perfect way to do it,” says Hofer, “to water the garden.”

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022


Sprouting Self-Esteem and Agency Gardening comes with a slew of activities—tending to soil, watering, weeding and pest-management are among the many tasks a garden requires. Yet, all the hard work pays off when those actions yield flourishing plants. Gardening fosters “a sense of agency,” says Jodi Alieksaites, a psychotherapist and Naropa alumna. “That helps build up positive self-worth and selfesteem.” When we feel in control over the actions that lead to a thriving garden, that translates to the rest of our lives—a sense of agency and self-esteem starts to develop. In a world where so much is out of our control, a garden can offer a refuge.

Diggin’ the Dirt Some sunlight and fresh air can do us all good, especially after a long winter. Studies show vitamin

D bolsters mood, and many agree that the simple tactile pleasure of the earth between your fingers helps soothe a restless psyche. Gardeners just love getting their hands dirty, as both Hofer and Morris note. But it goes beyond that. Gardening connects you to nature, the land and your produce. “There’s nothing that compares to being outside and in nature for the human nervous system,” says Alieksaites. She adds that being outdoors helps with sleep, relaxation and attunement. Gardening also provides us with “the opportunity to nourish our own food and for it to nourish us back,” she says. It’s one thing to get food fresh, but to know exactly what goes into your produce, to nurture and tend the plants that will later fuel you? It’s the epitome of healthy eating—both for the body and the mind. So maybe you’re looking to rejuvenate your mental health or perhaps you’re just ready to try out a new hobby—your community can help you learn the ropes.

PHOTOS: COUPLE BY SIRTRAVELALOT/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; SPINACH STARTS BY PROXIMA13/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; EGG CARTONS BY T.SABLEAUX SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; PARENT AND CHILD BY IRYNA INSHYNA SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

There’s nothing that compares to being outside and in nature for the human nervous system. –Jodi Alieksaites

BoulderHG.com

47


ALPHABETIZED ADVERTISER INDEX

CATEGORIZED ADVERTISER INDEX ARCHITECTS Arcadea Architecture 303-449-6605; arcadea.com

1

Caddis Collaborative 303-443-3629; caddispc.com

5

Rodwin Architecture 303-413-8556; rodwinarch.com

9

BOTANIC GARDENS/GARDEN TOURS Denver Botanic Gardens 720-865-3500; botanicgardens.org

14

Garden to Table Garden Tour 303-564-0133; gardentotable.org

19

CARPETING/RUGS/FLOORING Carpet Masters of Colorado 303-651-2407; carpetmastersofco.com

8

INSURANCE PROVIDERS Rick Baker Insurance 303-444-3334; rickbakerinsurance.com

19

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS & DESIGNERS Changing Landscapes 720-849-8031; changinglandscapes.com

25 15

Garden Art Landscaping 303-440-0605; gardenartlandscaping.com

31

ORGANIC FARMS/EVENT SPACES/WORKSHOPS Lyons Farmette 41 303-746-6266; lyonsfarmette.com

CIVIL RIGHTS ORGANIZATIONS NAACP Boulder County naacpbouldercounty.org

39

PATIO FURNITURE Fruehauf’s 303-449-9551; fruehaufs.com

27

CLEANING SERVICES Merry Maids 303-530-7085; merrymaidsboulder.com

19

45

COMMUNITY SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS Growing Gardens 303-443-9952; growinggardens.org

RADIO STATIONS KGNU Community Radio 88.5 FM/1390 AM 303-449-4885 (main office) 303-442-4242 (Boulder Studio); kgnu.org

41

Velocity Built 303-506-1844; velocitybuilt.com

39

DECKS/PORCHES Squareroot Construction 303-517-8742; squarerootconstruction.com DOORS/WINDOWS BlueBird Windows & Doors 303-810-2888; gobluebirdco.com

9

41

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RESTORATION/MOLD, FIRE & WATER DAMAGE 24-7 Restoration 21 303-485-1730; 247restoration.com ROOFING J&K Roofing 303-425-7531; jkroofing.com

7

Valor Roof and Solar 303-770-7663; valorroofandsolar.com

37

SHOPPING Front Range Mercantile Indoor Flea Market 17 303-776-6605; frontrangeindoorfleamarket.com Indochine Home & Garden 303-444-7734; indochinehomeimport.com

21

TRANSPORTATION SERVICES & ASSISTANCE Via Mobility 25 303-447-2848; viacolorado.org

GARDEN SUPPLIES/NURSERIES/FLORISTS Farm Tub 303-449-5633; farmtub.com

TREE SERVICES/TREE REMOVAL Berkelhammer Tree Experts Inc. 303-443-1233; berkelhammer.com

Harlequin’s Gardens 303-939-9403; harlequinsgardens.com

41

Lafayette Florist 27 303-665-5552, 800-665-0771; lafayetteflorist.com

Taddiken Tree Co. 303-554-7035; taddikentree.com WINDOWS/DOORS BlueBird Windows & Doors 303-810-2888; gobluebirdco.com

37

23 11

Back Cover

HOME FURNISHINGS Front Range Mercantile Indoor Flea Market 17 303-776-6605; frontrangeindoorfleamarket.com

WINDOW TREATMENTS/SHADING SOLUTIONS Innovative Openings 2 303-900-4878; innovativeopenings.com

Indochine Home & Garden 303-444-7734; indochinehomeimport.com

WOOD FLOORING & REFINISHING/ CARPET & TILE Meyer Skidmore & Co 303-444-1174; meyerskidmore.com

Woodley’s Fine Furniture 303-651-1015; woodleys.com 48

21

Inside Back Cover

h o m e + g ar d e n magazine | spring 2022

Caddis Collaborative Carpet Masters of Colorado Changing Landscapes

5 8 25

Denver Botanic Gardens

14

Ecoscape Environmental Design

15

Farm Tub The Flower Bin Front Range Mercantile Indoor Flea Market Fruehauf’s

41 13 17 27

Garden Art Landscaping Garden to Table Garden Tour Growing Gardens

31 19 41

E F

H Harlequin’s Gardens

41

Hello Garage

4

I

Indochine Home & Garden Innovative Openings

21 2

J&K Roofing

7

J

KGNU Community Radio 88.5 FM/1390 AM

45

Lafayette Florist Lyons Farmette

27 41

L

McDonald Carpet One Floor & Home Inside Front Cover McLean Forge & Welding 37 Merry Maids 19 Meyer Skidmore & Co 3

N

NAACP Boulder County

39

Rick Baker Insurance Rodwin Architecture & Skycastle Construction

19

Squareroot Construction

41

Taddiken Tree Co. 24-7 Restoration

11 21

Valor Roof and Solar Velocity Built Via Mobility

37 39 25

R

S T

V

W

3

23

Back Cover

C

M

GARAGE FLOOR COATING & STORAGE SYSTEMS Hello Garage 4 303-521-9161; hellogarage.com

13

BlueBird Windows & Doors

K

SOLAR SYSTEM INSTALLATION Valor Roof and Solar 303-770-7663; valorroofandsolar.com

The Flower Bin 303-772-3454; theflowerbin.net

Berkelhammer Tree Experts Inc.

G

FLEA MARKETS Front Range Mercantile Indoor Flea Market 17 303-776-6605; frontrangeindoorfleamarket.com

41

1

D

37

McDonald Carpet One Floor & Home Inside Front Cover 720-432-2916; mcdonaldcarpetoneboulder.com

CONTRACTORS/BUILDERS/REMODELING/ DESIGN BUILD Skycastle Construction 720-407-8010; skycastleconstruction.com

Arcadea Architecture

B

Ecoscape Environmental Design 303-447-2282; ecoscapedesign.com

METALWORK/ CUSTOM RAILINGS, GATES & DOORS McLean Forge & Welding 303-442-0786; mcleanforge.com

A

Woodley’s Fine Furniture

9

Inside Back Cover


COLORADO COLORADO MADE MADE

COLORADO COLORADOSPRINGS SPRINGS CENTENNIAL CENTENNIAL

LAKEWOOD LAKEWOOD

NORTHGLENN NORTHGLENN

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LONGMONT LONGMONT FORT FORTCOLLINS COLLINS


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