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of the gateway-centric star configuration however, it is not possible for a corporation to operate its own hub in its own facilities. Instead, the hub must be hosted in the gateway of the satellite operator. If the network spans across multiple spot beams addressed by different gateways, the network must also include the terrestrial connections among the gateways. Depending on the size of the private network and the type of infrastructure, two different business models can be applied for this kind of application. * The corporate user could operate its own VSAT hub infrastructure, hosted in the gateway of the satellite operator. The hosting services would include the management of the RF part of the hub. The VSAT hub would need to be fully certified by the satellite operator in order to ensure adequate integration in the closed star network configuration and avoid any interference with the functioning of other systems on the same satellite capacity. The integration and operation of different systems from different vendors on the same spot beam network could therefore prove very challenging. * The satellite operator could have a multi-ISP ground infrastructure. In this case the corporate user can rent a virtual private network on this infrastructure, and manage it as independently as possible from an IP access and user provisioning point of view (the management of the RF part being handled transparently by the satellite operator or service provider). Terrestrial connections among gateways could be part of the virtual network or taken care by the corporate user. This multi-ISP approach requires a higher initial ground infrastructure investment

“The main challenge in implementing high speed communication links on a Ka system will be to cope with fading� for the satellite or service operator, but a much easier and more flexible way to sell services to professional users of various natures and sizes. From a financial point of view, the investment in a multi-ISP ground infrastructure remains modest compared to the investment in the space segment, while ensuring a quicker return on investment on the total infrastructure.

2 - IP and Voice Trunking Satellite trunking is certainly one of the main challenges in the satellite communications industry. There is a constant battle between the increasing demand for bandwidth, limited capacity availability and high pressure on prices. The availability of Ka capacity could solve all of these problems at once, if the specific nature of its ground segment infrastructure can adapt to the application. The star configuration of the Ka network fits nicely with the requirements of point-to-multipoint trunking networks, provided there is a backbone access at the gateway, and/or if gateways are inter-connected via fibre (if the trunking

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network spans across multiple gateways). Here also, the trunking network could be implemented by hosting high speed equipment in the gateway or by providing access to a shared platform operated by the satellite or network operator. Unless one of the end-points is at the gateway, Ka-band networks are less suitable for point-to-point trunking links, since the connection can only be established by a double satellite hop via the gateway, or via two separate gateways connected by fibre. The main challenge in implementing high speed communication links on a Ka system will be to cope with fading while maintaining sufficient availability and throughput for this kind of services. Some of the techniques used to counter fading can result in making the throughput vary over time. Since most IP trunking customers are used to buying fixed-rate capacity, the shift to Ka-band could require some changes in the business model of trunking services, such as the introduction of committed and best effort capacity in the service contracts.

BroadcastPro Middle East - June 2011 Issue  

Broadcast Pro Middle East is a monthly publication covering television and radio broadcasting technology as well as filmmaking trends in the...

BroadcastPro Middle East - June 2011 Issue  

Broadcast Pro Middle East is a monthly publication covering television and radio broadcasting technology as well as filmmaking trends in the...

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