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PROREVIEW

The Epic revolution Alchemy Films recently took delivery of the UAE’s first EPIC camera. RED camera specialist Andrew Clemson takes the camera through its paces

Ted Schilowitz (centre) with Nick Davidson (r) at the production of a TVC for Jumeirah Group.

The EPIC is the successor to the original RED ONE digital cinema camera, and offers many features that overshadow those of its predecessor. Due to their planned EPIC production schedule being hit hard by the events in Japan, camera manufacturer RED offered a limited edition, hand-built EPIC-M (Machined) to customers they felt could offer feedback on the system before its official release. We had the opportunity to use the EPIC a few months ago to shoot the TVC The Diver for Jumeirah Group at the Burj Al Arab, when RED spokesperson Ted Schilowitz visited Dubai. He was kind enough to let us use the camera on set at that time. We were astounded at the compact size, performance and image quality, and as such, when we were offered the chance to buy one of the early cameras, we grabbed the opportunity. The EPIC is capable of shooting RAW video at resolutions of up to 5K (5120x2700) at speeds between 1fps and 120fps. The cool thing about the EPIC though is that to reach the 120fps mark, the camera does not need to be dropped down to a lower resolution, instead it is available at full 5K. However, this is not to say that lowering the resolution will not equate to higher frame rates however, as future firmware builds are promising speeds of up to 360fps at 720P. This is more than

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enough for the average project. 5K slow motion recording can produce smooth, creamy, shallow Depth of Field (DOF) sequences that far surpass those available at 2K on the existing RED camera, which seems flat by comparison due to the sensor crop. At the moment, however, the EPIC is still limited to recording at 5K, albeit at various aspect ratios. The touchscreen LCD is intuitive and incredibly easy to use. Simply touch the function you wish to change, and a drop down menu appears with an iPhone style selection wheel. Touch the value you want, and it is automatically dialed into the camera. Alternatively, the cameraman can control the camera via the optional DSMC side handle. The side handle mimics the appearance and functionality of the traditional SLR. It adds multiple user programmable function keys, as well as two scroll wheels, an SLR style shutter release Nick Davidson, owner and DoP, Alchemy Films.

BroadcastPro Middle East - June 2011 Issue  

Broadcast Pro Middle East is a monthly publication covering television and radio broadcasting technology as well as filmmaking trends in the...

BroadcastPro Middle East - June 2011 Issue  

Broadcast Pro Middle East is a monthly publication covering television and radio broadcasting technology as well as filmmaking trends in the...

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