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BRITTANY SCHROEDER


Buckeye Village, Columbus, Ohio

REVISUALIZING THE VILLAGE Buckeye Village is a housing complex 2 miles north of the Ohio State University campus. The village is home to graduate students as well as non-traditional students and their families. For this project, we developed an RFP to relocate the village closer to campus. My team relocated the village to an under-utilized agricultural field adjacent to the campus. Part of the RFP process included analyzing the site and suggesting programming that met the needs of the residents. In my analysis, I paid close attention to the underlying vegetation and water system. I redesigned the site to emphasize water movement and relied on using vegetation that would thrive in this space. The new plan for Buckeye Village is all about creating spaces within the landscape that bring people together. The studio allowed me to imagine a variety of spaces and plan at varying scales. I was heavily inspired by the landscapes that surround Columbus and tried to incorporate multiple landscape experiences across the site.


EXISTING SITE ANALYSIS

Access road for farm equipment

Emergent wetland floods surrounding trees

Existing asphalt trail connector maintained by city

Farmland harvested annually by college farm

HARDSCAPE

GROUND TYPE

TOPOGRAPHY

WATER MOVEMENT

TREE CANOPY


REITERATION AND TESTING

PHASE 1

FINAL PLAN

PHASE 2

PHASE 3


3 Pond Overlook

1 Knoll Theatre 2 Open Lawn

5 Central Bus Stop

7 Sunken Nook

6 Hammock Grove

4 Climbing Complex

9 Forest Play Park/Daycare 8 Wetland Boardwalk

3

4 2

5

6 7

1

HARDSCAPE 8

9

PUBLIC/PRIVATE

REGRADED TOPOGRAPHY

EMPHASIZED WATER MOVEMENT

INCREASED TREE CANOPY


KNOLL THEATRE SITE PLAN

ADA accessible viewing area 1:12 slope Sidewalk around backside shielded by concrete wall

60’ of lawn for lounging & movie viewing 1:20’ slope

The Knoll Theatre acts as a gathering & entertainment space for non-traditional students and their families.

movie images project on screen via specialized LED panels


POND OVERLOOK SITE PLAN

20’ of semi-tolerant marsh grasses - rarely inundated 8’ concrete sidewalk

40’ of marsh grasses - seasonally inundated

native bird habitat

The Pond Overlook highlights the existing water body on site. The depth of the pond has been extended & wetland plants have been added to promote a healthier ecosystem

8’ of raised water-sealed wooden boardwalk


POND OVERLOOK SITE PLAN

Tallgrass helps break up public & private spaces

Stairs allow for easy access to space - 5’ below grade of sidewalk

Multiple private seating areas

35’ Permeable pea-sized gravel compacted along path to allow for wheelchair to move across area easily

The Sunken Nook is a space where students can relax on a hot summer day. It’s a great space to study in the shade or spend time with friends.

Raised walls create a safety barrier between people walking on sidewalk & access to sunken area


A

B

A

CLIMBING COMPLEX

-bouldering wall open to the students & public -rubber mat base to help brace falls

BUS STOP PLAZA

-for students, families, & the larger public -utilizes campus bus system

CENTRAL ROAD

-high traffic roadway that connects Buckeye Village to campus & Upper Arlington

OUTDOOR CAFE

-barrier protects area from the road -students can grab a cup of coffee before getting on bus

TREE BUFFER

-barrier between cafe & residential area

B

HAMMOCK GROVE

-open to the students during daylight -quiet space further away from dense traffic

HOUSE WALKWAY

-sidewalk for families to use to get from apartment complex to village

APARTMENT COMPLEX

-3 apartments, 2 stories - for non-traditional students with families

BACKYARD

-private lawn shared by families within apartment complex

TALLGRASS

-tall prarie grasses allow families to be sheltered from public -part of larger system of wetland/ prarie grasses


Marble Cliff Limestone Quarry, Columbus, Ohio

EXCAVATING FOR EDGE Quarried landscapes present a unique design challenge. Once parent material is removed, the landscape cannot be restored to its prior form. Limestone operations are expansive and call for hallowing out craters with only a fraction of the extracted material being of market value. I designed a new excavation strategy that allows for continued use machinery with less surface impact. This method allows for habitat corridors to remain intact along edges throughout the quarrying process. Additionally, quarrying stops just below the just Edge habitats constitute encourage species movement and create species-rich zones. Additionally, other sources of seed dispersal were identified to predict what kind of landscape could exist after limestone excavation ceases.


POTENTIAL SOURCES FOR SEED DISPERSAL

Residential

Water

Wind

Animals

Vehicles

Excavated materials are collected inside pits to reduce impact in surrounding landscape DURING QUARRYING 1”=62.5’

Animal corridors border sides of pits allowing for fauna to introduce species into pits AFTER QUARRYING

Site inundates seasonally allowing for wetland species to thrive


BRITTANY SCHROEDER schroeder.763@osu.edu 419.890.9298

Profile for Brittany Schroeder

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