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GCSE Options Guide 2015 - 2017


CONTENTS Introduction Overview of the GCSE Curriculum Higher Education and Careers Coursework and Controlled Assessment Revision Mathematics English and English Literature Separate Science and Double Award Science MFL: French MFL: Spanish MFL: Mandarin MFL: Bahasa Art and Design Business Studies Economics Drama Geography History ICT Computer Science Graphic Design Music Physical Education

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INTRODUCTION The time is approaching for your son or daughter to select their GCSE courses. This booklet explains the principles to bear in mind when discussing alternatives. I hope you will take time to consider these carefully and that pupils will not be swayed too easily by what their friends are doing or their reaction to courses they have taken in Year 9. It is important at this stage to look forward and not back. The core curriculum studied by all pupils consists of English, English Literature, Mathematics, and Science, so these subjects are compulsory. Now is the time to consider the range of other subjects on offer and select four options to complement the core curriculum. The pupils will also have a number of sessions with tutors to discuss their options. At BSKL we give the pupils a ‘free choice’ of subjects (i.e. we don’t ask them to choose from predetermined option columns). In our view this system allows more pupils to study all of their first choice subjects. However, we cannot guarantee that all pupils will be able to study all four of their first choice subjects (this is why we also ask for a reserve choice); where this is the case we will take steps to contact you and your son/daughter, and advise you accordingly. The final deadline for submitting GCSE Option Choices is Friday 20th March 2015. This information is used to draw up ‘best fit’ option columns, and we will contact you at the beginning of the Summer Term if we have not been able to accommodate all of your son or daughter’s first choices. THE GCSE CURRICULUM AT BSKL The majority of our pupils will take 9 GCSEs. We believe that this number provides the right balance between academic breadth and being able to take advantage of the other opportunities available at BSKL. Most subject departments are offering the IGCSE (International General Certificate of Secondary Education): this qualification is the equivalent of a GCSE (and recognised around the world as such) but syllabuses generally have a more global perspective. These courses are offered by Cambridge and Edexcel examination boards. However, we are keen that we select the syllabuses that best suit our pupils, and some departments have opted to choose GCSE syllabuses (those more commonly used in the UK). The GCSE and IGCSE qualifications are recognised as being synonymous. The three core subjects are English, Mathematics and Science. English counts as two GCSEs with Literature as a separate subject. Science is offered as a dual award (two GCSEs, although all three sciences are studied), and there is the option for more able scientists to take separate GCSE Science subjects in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. We agree with the prescriptions of the National Curriculum that a pupil should try to study a Humanity – Geography, History, Business Studies or Economics - and a practical or creative subject such as Art, Music, Physical Education or Drama. Additionally, pupils should consider taking a foreign language, as some of the more academic universities value the study of a foreign language, even at GCSE level (although none require it for entry). However, we recognise that pupils possess different talents and abilities, and a broad compulsory foundation (Maths, English, Science) should ensure that pupils do not ‘burn bridges’ at this stage. A particularly artistic child, for example, may wish to choose Art, Drama and Music: this would be perfectly acceptable.

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CAREERS It is never too early to start thinking about what you might do when you leave school. The combination of subjects that you choose to study at GCSE has more influence on admissions tutors at colleges and prospective employers than is often given credit. In general, at this level, it is advisable to retain a broad range of arts and science subjects, but you must be aware of the following guidelines:

1.

English and Mathematics GCSE are required for most higher and further education courses, as well as by most employers.

2.

A GCSE in a foreign language is becoming increasingly valuable as business operations take on a more international flavour within the European and Global Community.

3.

If you intend to pursue a course in architecture or design, then GCSE Art and/or Graphic Design is very useful.

4.

GCSE Geography is accepted by universities as bridging the arts and sciences.

5.

The minimum number of GCSEs required to enter most degree courses is five (including English and Maths). There are a number of ways to access degree courses however, and advice on this will be given in the Sixth Form.

6.

The grades obtained at GCSE are very important as these are seen as a significant indicator of your ability, and admission tutors for Colleges of Further Education use these indications to help decide whether to offer places. These grades are likely the only objective academic evidence that university tutors see. The quality of grades at GCSE is more important than the number taken.

In Year 11, all candidates complete an interest-based questionnaire and this, together with an academic forecast from the school, produces a computer-generated report. This report provides a whole series of career ideas which seem most suited to the candidates’ profiles and is used in close consultation with professional careers interviewers and the Year 11 tutors to try and focus on a possible route to follow into the Sixth Form and beyond.

HOW CAN PARENTS MAKE A DIFFERENCE? Many parents feel at a loss when their children enter their examination years, known in schools as Key Stage 4 (Years 10 and 11, or 4th and 5th Year to those as old as me), confused by the complicated systems of choosing subjects and courses (GCSEs, vocational GCSEs, GNVQs, BTECs, VRQs – just some of the options available), controlled assessments, coursework, entry tiers, modular exams and practical assessments. If you feel like this you are not alone! The exams system has changed greatly over the past few years, and is continuing to change, and sometimes it feels as if it is best just to let the ‘experts’ at your child’s school get on with it.

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But your involvement during these crucial years can make an enormous difference – the difference between success and failure or between ‘D’ and ‘E’ passes and ‘A’s and ‘B’s. New demands on your child are likely to include: •

• • • • • • • • •

Being more self-motivated and taking more responsibility for their own learning – this can be a big change from earlier years, with most teachers viewing it as the pupil’s responsibility to attend and make the most of lessons once they get to Year 10. Asking when they do not understand. (This requires confidence and can be difficult) Developing their abilities to overcome frustrations, and strategies for persisting when they are learning material that they find challenging. Organising themselves, notes, handouts and information for different subjects, and different topics within these. Completing more work at home, independently. Organising and planning their time over longer periods, for example to complete a coursework project. Understanding the exam structure and the relative importance of each piece of work to their final grade. Preparing for controlled assessments. Planning and carrying out revision. Perfecting their ‘exam technique’.

Perhaps the hardest demand on Year 10 and 11 pupils is that of understanding the longterm importance of doing the best they can, and learning to shelve short-term fun at times in the interest of long-term benefits (not easy even for adults). Your role may include some or all of the following: •

• • • • • •

Attendance officer – making sure your child goes to lessons and understands the importance of making the most of lesson-times. Most topics will only be taught once, and a pupil who misses that lesson will not be as prepared as he could be if that topic appears in the exam. Partner with school and child – attending Parent Consultations, asking questions and finding out how you can best help your son or daughter at home. Provider of the tools for prep and revision – quiet space, a ‘workbox’ of pens, paper and other necessities. Banker – paying for the tools, files and revision guides they need. Study buddy – showing an interest in the subject, helping with prep (but not doing it for them), testing them when they ask you etc. Entertainments officers – finding out about TV programmes, theatre productions, films, exhibitions relevant to your child’s learning and enjoying them together. Sounding board and adviser – helping your child to break tasks down so that they are manageable, keeping a subtle eye on progress and celebrating achievements, and seeing a positive way forward when things go badly.

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Project manager – agreeing the rules for prep or revision (they won’t work if they’re imposed), helping them to make a realistic timetable, balancing work against the ‘fun stuff’ and revising the plans as necessary.

Tips for Parents •

• •

• •

Your most important role, as always, is to encourage and praise your child. Show an interest by talking to them about what they are learning in different subjects and in their homework and research – but trust the school: we will provide pupils with enough guidance to fulfil their potential. The most important thing is that your child attends lessons. Sometimes just missing one lesson means that they miss out on key information or the introduction or introduction to a topic – starting out behind often results in a vicious circle of not understanding, falling further behind, disagreements with teachers, an increasing dislike of the subject and giving up. Encourage your child to see the relevance of every lesson to their end results – two years seems like an endless time to a teenager but help them to put it in context by breaking the time available for each subject over the year. Put key dates and deadlines in your own diary so that you can support before the ‘panic stage’. For some children who are not well-organised you may need to have more knowledge about specific GCSE requirements in order to be able to support your child fully. This knowledge might include how many assessments there are, if there is coursework, how many marks are awarded for each question etc. Subject teachers will often provide this information to pupils, but if you haven’t seen it, don’t hesitate to ask for a copy for yourself if you feel your child needs this level of support. Make copies for yourself of syllabus descriptions and mark-schemes etc. as many children lose this vital information, only realising they don’t have it when it’s too late. Find out if there are any television programmes, museums, exhibitions or theatre productions relevant to any of the GCSE courses your child is following which they could visit. Books or plays on CD or tape can be listened to together. Help your child to use the internet to search for relevant materials and information. The internet is a great resource, but the information it offers can be unselective and overwhelming. Support can be given by finding appropriate websites or helping them to do so. The school will be willing to offer guidance in most areas. Essay-banks of GCSE essays, sample assessments and coursework can be a good source of motivation and ideas for structure and key points, but warn your child about the dangers of copying out chunks of text – examiners and schools have sophisticated methods of detecting plagiarism and it is usually punished by disqualification. Note that some sites are free, while others charge a fee (some are listed in ‘further information’ below). Finally, NEVER use services which offer to write essays for you.

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Further Support www.projecteducation.co.uk offers links to GCSE chat forums. (Please read notes on the use of the following essay banks in ‘Tips for Parents’.) • www.coursework.info (small subscription payable) • www/studentcentral.co.uk (subscription payable) • www.essaybank.com • www.sparknotes.com (free downloadable information and study guides in many areas)

COURSEWORK AND CONTROLLED ASSESSMENTS: Advice for Pupils • •

• •

• •

Go to all your lessons: ‘catching up’, even with the help of the teacher, is no substitute for being taught at the same time as the rest of the group. Listen extra-carefully to any information about controlled assessments or coursework, write it down, and ask if you are not completely clear about what you need to do and by when. File information, notes and handouts immediately or at the end of the day. Keep on top of your preparations for controlled assessments or coursework – know what is due in when, and schedule in time to do it – it usually takes longer than you think. Make sure you know exactly what is expected for each assessment and how marks are awarded – if you don’t have a guidance handout or mark-scheme, ask for one. It is too easy to waste hours on the wrong thing because you didn’t ask what you were supposed to be doing. Don’t leave your preparation until the last minute – having six weeks to prepare for a controlled assessment or complete a piece of coursework may seem like forever, but it passes quickly. Make a plan of the work to be covered, dividing it into smaller sections. Aim to tackle sections one at a time and reward yourself for each small step completed. Use the tips for revising and sitting exams. They apply just as much to assessments! Up your work by two grades the easy way. No-one likes going over work they have done, but allow some time for discussing your preparation and research with your teacher before the assessment – it really does make a difference. Keep a balance between social life, work commitments and studying – if you have done the studying you will feel much better when you go out – you CAN do both! Remember that controlled assessments COUNT towards your final grade. Work as hard for these as you would for an exam. Think of it like this: it’s like having access to the exam paper before the exam! If your GCSE includes coursework you will find that there are many GCSE coursework banks which you can access to help you with your studies. They can be useful for ideas about structure and key points and help to motivate you but

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DON’T think you will get away with plagiarism (copying out chunks of someone else’s text) – all exam boards and schools also have access to them and teachers are very good at spotting cheating – the consequences for you can be severe. REVISION: Advice for Pupils What is revision? It means, literally, ‘re-looking’ at information you have learnt previously. The aim is that you know the information you will be tested on and can remember it for the exam. Knowing something depends on understanding it. The aim of revision. The aim is to reduce the amount of information relating to a subject to a series of key-points, any of which you can expand upon in an exam answer. The key point, phrase or word prompts your brain to retrieve the information stored in it. At the end of your revision for each topic or sub-topic, aim to end up with a card or A4 sheet with the KEY points for that section. The Structure of Revision Sessions Good revision techniques always include: ! An aim for the sessions. e.g. ‘By the end of this one hour revision session I will understand and be able to answer questions on photosynthesis’. ! Thinking about what you know already and identifying the bits you need to spend more time on (usually by doing some sort of self-testing – many revision aids include opportunities for self-testing). ! Breaking down each topic into ‘do-able’ chunks. Revise each session – do not just read the information but do something active with it (see below.) ! Complete past exam questions and review answers using mark schemes. ! Producing notes (shorter each time you revise a particular area) noting key points, phrases or words. ! Testing yourself to see what you have learnt. ! Ticking off the subject on your ‘overall list’ so that you can see regular progress. ! Revisiting your notes briefly after one day, one week and one month, as well as just before the exam – THIS REALLY WORKS! The Key to Effective Revision Useful revision involves DOING SOMETHING with the information you are trying to learn and remember. This is ESSENTIAL to allow your brain to learn, make connections and remember. Different people find different activities useful, and you need to find out how you revise best. Some ideas are: • Drawing ‘spider maps’ on large pieces of paper – to show how different parts of a subject hang together. • Use pictures and big flip-chart sheets and colour to make posters with key points and display these on the walls or where you will see them regularly. • Put revision aids up around the house – especially for any ‘rote learning’ – chemical or mathematical formulae, French verbs – read them when sitting on the loo, brushing your teeth or eating your breakfast! • Record yourself making 10 key points about a particular topic, then play it back when you are travelling, running etc.

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• • •

• • •

Highlight key areas of notes or books (if yours), picking out the key points or summaries. Listen to tapes of e.g. books and plays and discuss them with another person. Watch revision DVDs but don’t just sit back passively – pause them and make notes of key or difficult areas, test yourself or get someone to watch with you and test each other. Read a page and shut the book – what can you remember? Tell someone about what you have learned – explain how the heart works over a meal (or perhaps stick to something less gory). Get people around you to test you on ‘rote knowledge’ – have a family quiz.

Memory Techniques Find out what helps you to remember stuff. Some ideas are: Acronyms (using the first letter of each word to make a word to prompt your memory) e.g. you may find it hard to remember this sentence. ‘Wholly Inadequate Needless Damned Outrageous Waste of Space’. However, turn it into an acronym and it becomes much easier: WINDOWS. Picture stories thinking of a strong visual image to associate with each word and linking them together in an unlikely and silly story) e.g. you may find it hard to remember the facts in this sentence, simply by reading it through, ‘The great Plague struck London in 1666, starting in the shop of the baker to King Charles II in Pudding Lane’. Try this out: get a picture (for example) of a large rat (the plague) running around before being burnt (plague year before fire) in a bread oven (bakers shop) with the flames curling up around it like the curls of the numbers 666 (1666), and then being put into a pudding eaten by two King Charles spaniels. Go through the picture sequence a couple of times, then see if you can remember the 7 facts in the sentence. Ask someone to test you, and see if it works for them. It’s magic! Mnemonics are also useful – make up a silly sentence to help you remember the order of something e.g. Never Eat Shredded Wheat (North, East, South, West). Review. Take time occasionally to ask yourself how well your revision techniques are working for you. How much have you covered? Have you stuck to your timetable? Are you ending up with notes you can use for last minute revision? Congratulate yourself for all the subjects you have covered. Change your timetable plan if necessary. Later on. When you have revised and revisited each topic, have a go at some old exam questions. Make sure you set the appropriate time limit, and try to work under exam conditions. Don’t do this too early (although it’s worth looking at them early on to get an idea of the sort of question you will be answering – essays, multiple choice etc.). Do these in plenty of time so that your teacher can mark them.

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Quick Tips for Revising • • • • • • • • • • • •

Make yourself start however much you don’t want to – the hardest bit is over with then! Build in short breaks. Do frequent short exercises – stretches, neck and shoulder rolls, walking around etc. Drink water and get fresh air. Keep the temperature cool. Eat ‘brain food’ – avoid sugar and have lots of healthy snacks around to eat little and often. Take a day off and do something completely different. Don’t leave the difficult bits to the end. Do something relaxing between revising and bedtime. STOP and take a break if you start feeling frustrated, angry, overwhelmed. Make a note of the problem to take to your next lesson, and move on to something else. Focus on what you have done, not all the things that you haven’t – every little helps. Promise yourself little rewards after each session – a favourite TV programme, reading a trashy novel or going out with friends. At the end of each session, file away your notes and clutter so that your work-area is clear for the next session.

Tips for Parents - Supporting your Child in Setting Themselves up for Revision • •

Talk to your son or daughter about how you can support them and what they would find helpful. The simplest things often get in the way of starting revision – weeks can be lost while pupils ‘are going to get some folders soon..’. Get around these by simply providing the files, dividers, wall-charts etc. your child will need for the revision period. Support your child by choosing one good revision guide for each subject – it’s the best investment you will make. There are lots around so check with the teacher yourself if you are not sure which is best. Help your child to plan their revision timetable. They will have received a template from school, which can be adapted. It will take an investment of your time (probably several hours), but it is the single thing that will make the biggest difference to the effectiveness of the revision, and therefore, the outcome. Children vary in the amount of support they need at each stage of the process.

Supporting your Child in Doing the Revision •

Support your child in sticking to their revision plan and keeping to the start and finishing times they have agreed. Praise them when it is complete, and if necessary agree a reward structure. Don’t make treats dependent on certain results – it will only add to the feeling of disappointment if they don’t do as well as expected. Quietly top-up the ‘workbox’ with pens, rulers, paper pads etc. Don’t get wound up about lost items if you can help it – motivation is hard enough to find for revision, and arguments about a RM1 pen just aren’t worth it!

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• • •

Provide favourite snacks and water for revision periods. Be flexible - if they want to go out to a party on a revision night, agree when the time will be made up. Be sensitive to the pressure your child is feeling – let them know that if they are really not up to it on odd days, it isn’t the end of the world – It’s the big picture that will count in the end. Keep up with regular ‘check-ins’ and don’t nag in between times. Show an interest in how the revision is going, talk through any difficulties and be prepared to help them reschedule planning as necessary.

Exam Boards www.cie.org.uk Cambridge International Exams www.edexcel.org.uk Edexcel

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MATHEMATICS Edexcel IGCSE 4MA0 Mathematics (Specification A) Why Study Mathematics? Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that has been developed over centuries, providing the solution to some of history’s most intriguing problems. It is a universal part of human culture. It is essential to every-day life, critical science, technology and engineering, and necessary in most forms of employment, and in public decision making. It helps us recognise patterns and to understand the world around us. Mathematics allows students the necessary skills to calculate; to reason logically, algebraically, and geometrically; to solve problems and to handle data. Mathematics is important for students in many other areas of study, particularly Science and Technology. It is a subject that is highly valued by universities and employers. Mathematics at Key Stage 4 is essentially composed of four main strands of study: Number; Algebra and Graphs; Shape, Space and Measures; and Data Handling. These areas are by no means mutually exclusive. What Will I Learn? The International GCSE in Mathematics (specification A) aims to give students a foundation in mathematical skills and develop their knowledge and understanding of how to use and apply mathematical techniques and concepts to solve problems. The overall aims of the Key Stage 4 Mathematics Curriculum at are: • • • •

To develop a knowledge and understanding of mathematical concepts and techniques; To give students a foundation of mathematical skills for further study in the subject or related areas; To enable students to enjoy using and applying mathematical techniques and concepts, and become confident in using mathematics to solve problems; To give students an appreciation of the importance of mathematics in society, employment and study.

How Will I Be Assessed? There are two tiers of entry that allow students to be entered for the appropriate level. The levels are equivalent to Edexcel’s UK GCSE in Mathematics. The exam will be sat May of Year 11. For selected students, it may be possible to sit the Higher Tier at the end of Year 10 with a view to studying for the Additional Maths qualification in Year 11. Papers 1F and 2F (Foundation Tier) TARGETED AT GRADES C - G

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2 written papers; each paper 2 hours long; Total marks = 100; each paper weighted at 50% of the qualification. Papers 3H and 4H (Higher Tier) TARGETED AT GRADES A* - D 2 written papers; each paper 2 hours long; Total marks = 100; each paper weighted at 50% of the qualification. Assessment Objectives and Weightings: Assessment Objective Demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills in number and algebra

Overview of Topics " numbers and the numbering system " calculations " solving numerical problems " equations, formulae and identities " sequences, functions and graphs

Demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills in shape, space and measures Demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills in handling data Total

" "

"

geometry vectors and transformation geometry statistics

Weighting 55%

25%

20%

100%

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FURTHER MATHEMATICS 4PM0/01 and 4PM0/02 Edexcel IGCSE Further Pure Mathematics Why Study Further Mathematics? This course is intended for high ability learners who can achieve an A* or A grade in the Edexcel IGCSE Mathematics in one year. In Year 11 these students will follow the 2-year course in Pure Further Mathematics and sit the exam at the end of Year 11. The course has been constructed to broadly extend knowledge of, and emphasise the importance of, a common core of Pure Mathematics. It allows our most mathematically able and motivated students to extend their mathematical skills, knowledge and understanding that they have previously developed in their IGCSE course and apply these skills to more advanced techniques. This course will be offered to students by invite only and is not required to be able to access the A-level course in Mathematics. What Will I Learn? The overall aims of the Further Pure Mathematics Curriculum at are: • • • •

To develop a knowledge and understanding of mathematical concepts and techniques; To develop mathematical skills for further study in Mathematics or related areas; To develop an enjoyment in using and applying mathematical techniques and concepts, and confidence in using mathematics to solve problems; To develop an appreciation of the importance of mathematics in society, employment and study.

How Will I Be Assessed? " " " "

The qualification is offered through a single tier. There will be two externally assessed examination papers of 2 hours each. The students will sit the examination in June of Year 11. Questions are targeted at grades in the range A* to D; there is a ‘safety net’ grade E for students who narrowly fail to achieve grade D.

Assessment Objectives Overview of content in both papers: 1. Number • Students should be able to apply their numerical skills in a purely mathematical way and to real-life situations.

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2. Algebra and Calculus • Students should be able to use algebra and calculus to set up and solve problems; • develop competence and confidence when manipulating mathematical expressions; • construct and use graphs in a range of situations 3. Geometry and Trigonometry • Students should be able to use properties of shapes, angles and transformations; • use Vectors and rates of change to model situations; • use Coordinate geometry; • use trigonometry.

Each paper will address all of the Assessment Objectives and will have approximately equal marks available for each of the targeted grades.

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ENGLISH Cambridge IGCSE 0500 Students will be studying for their IGCSE English language following the Cambridge International GCSE specification. Learners develop the ability to communicate clearly, accurately and effectively in both speech and writing. They learn how to employ a wideranging vocabulary, use correct grammar, spelling and punctuation, and develop a personal style and an awareness of the audience being addressed. Learners are also encouraged to read widely, both for their own enjoyment and to further their awareness of the ways in which English can be used. Cambridge IGCSE First Language English also develops more general analysis and communication skills such as synthesis, inference, and the ability to order facts and present opinions effectively. Candidates will be following a program of coursework and study in response to a variety of texts. Therefore, students should already be reading widely from a selection of good quality fiction and non-fiction in order to gain the fluency of expression, vocabulary and synthesis skills necessary to succeed with the highest grades for this IGCSE. How Will I be Assessed? Unit

Method of Assessment

Weighting %

1

Paper 2 – Examination - Candidates answer three questions on two passages of 600-700 words each, linked by a common theme. These passages are printed on the question paper. The questions test students’ understanding and ability to summarise as well as writing skills. Component 4 – Coursework Portfolio– reading and writing. Candidates submit three assignments, each of 500-800 words. a) Informative, analytical and/or argumentative b) Imaginative, descriptive and/or narrative c) Response to a text (non-fiction)

[50%]

2 hours

Summer Year 11

[50%]

On-going

Spring Year 11

None Level 1 (high) to 5 (low) are awarded

On-going

Spring Year 11

2

3

Component 6 – Speaking and Listening Candidates take part in at least one individual activity, at least one pair-based activity and at least one group activity. This component is assessed by the teacher and moderated by Cambridge.

Length

When Sat

Almost all students will be entered for IGCSE English as first language with learners following the extended paper option. This covers grades A*-E. At some point on the course, if a teacher feels a student should sit the core option (grades C-G or an English as a second language option), this decision will be made by teachers in consultation with individual students and parents.

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ENGLISH LITERATURE Edexcel IGCSE 4ET0 Students will be studying for their IGCSE English literature following the Edexcel International GCSE specification. Over the two years, students learn to respond to texts critically, sensitively and in detail. They also learn to explore comparisons between texts and experience a range of literary traditions and trends. The Edexcel International GCSE in English Literature enables students to: • engage with and develop the ability to read, understand and respond to a wide range of literary texts from around the world ; • develop an appreciation of the ways in which authors achieve their literary effects and to develop the skills needed for literary study; • explore, through literature, the cultures of their own and other societies; • find enjoyment in reading literature and understand its influence on individuals and societies. How Will I Be Assessed? Unit

Method of Assessment

1

Paper 1 – Examination - Drama and Prose Students will be analysing a range of extracts over the two year period to develop their appreciation of a broad range of literature. They will be examined on two texts to demonstrate their critical appreciation. a) Drama Students will be examined on one of the following texts: Arthur Miller A View from the Bridge Or J B Priestley An Inspector Calls b) Prose Students will be examined on one of the following texts: John Steinbeck Of Mice and Men Or Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird Paper 3 – Poetry Coursework Students will study sixteen poems from the provided Edexcel anthology. They will be required to write an extended comparative essay in response to six of the poems.

2

Weighting % [60%]

[40%]

Length

When Sat

1 hr 45min

Summer Year 11

On-going

Spring Year 11

Our intention is that most students will take both the IGCSE English and IGCSE Literature course.

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SCIENCE Edexcel IGCSE Separate Sciences: Biology (4BIO), Chemistry (4CH0), Physics (4PH0) Why Study Separate Sciences? Studying IGCSE Separate Sciences enables pupils to develop a wide variety of lifelong skills such as creative thinking and problem solving. The Separate Sciences provide a platform for pupils to understand the world around them in more detail as they gain the necessary knowledge and understanding about the individual subjects. They learn how science is studied and practised. They recognise the advantages and disadvantages of scientific method, and how to apply this to other disciplines and in everyday life. They will develop relevant attitudes, such as a concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, enquiry, initiative and inventiveness. They will understand the influence and limitations placed on scientific study by society, economy, technology, ethics, the community and the environment. A pupil should choose the separate Sciences if they have a keen interest in the subjects or are considering taking Science at A-Level. Some pupils may already be thinking of a career or Degree in which separate Science may be an advantage. What Will I Learn? The Separate Sciences test pupils on their ability to understand concepts fully, interpret information and communicate knowledge of processes: so learning doesn’t just involve knowing a lot of facts. The new exams involved in each Science will be difficult and will challenge the pupils’ overall skills that have been learned throughout Key Stage 4. You will be advised as to whether or not you are a suitable candidate for the Separate Sciences. The Separate Sciences will prepare the pupils and provide them with the necessary skills to progress to A-Level in each Science, although pupils who opt for Double Award Science can still successfully pursue Science A-Levels. How Will I Be Assessed? The three assessment objectives in Edexcel IGCSE Separate Sciences are: A: Knowledge and understanding B: Application of knowledge and understanding, analysis and evaluation C: Investigative skills Paper Biology Paper 1 Biology Paper 2 Chemistry Paper 1 Chemistry Paper 2 Physics Paper 1 Physics Paper 2

Weighting (of 3 IGCSE’s) 22.2% 11.1% 22.2% 11.1% 22.2% 11.1%

Length

When sat

2 hours 1 hour 2 hours 1 hour 2 hours 1 hour

Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11

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DOUBLE AWARD SCIENCE Edexcel IGCSE in Science (Double Award) (4SC0) Why Study Science? Studying IGCSE Double Science enables pupils to develop a wide variety of lifelong skills such as creative thinking and problem solving. Pupils learn about the basic principles of each subject through a mix of theoretical and practical studies, while also developing an understanding of the scientific skills essential for further study. They learn how science is studied and practised, and become aware that the results of scientific research can have both good and bad effects on individuals, communities and the environment. They will understand the technological world they live in, and take an informed interest in science and scientific developments. If a pupil chooses to take Double Award Science then they will gain two GCSEs at the end of the course. Double Award still offers many opportunities such as being able to study Science at A-Level and apply for many jobs and courses involving Science. What Will I Learn? Pupils will study a core or extended curriculum covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. They will become aware of the relevance of the concepts studied to everyday life, and to the natural and man-made worlds and: • The finite nature of the world’s resources, the impact of human activities on the environment, and the need for recycling and conservation. • The economic considerations for agriculture and industry, such as the availability and cost of raw materials and energy. • The importance of natural and man-made materials, including chemicals, in both industry and everyday life. How Will I Be Assessed? The assessment for the Edexcel IGCSE in Science (Double Award) comprises of Paper 1 from each of the IGCSEs in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The table gives you an overview of the assessment for this course. Paper Biology Paper 1 Chemistry Paper 1 Physics Paper 1

Weighting 33.3% 33.3% 33.3%

Length 2 hours 2 hours 2 hours

When sat Year 11 Year 11 Year 11

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MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES - FRENCH Cambridge IGCSE French 0520 Why Study French? Knowledge and understanding of foreign languages is an increasingly important asset in today’s global society and a precious added value in many careers. Furthermore, the skills acquired when learning languages are readily transferable in many other academic subjects. Learning a language also opens your mind to other cultures and increases your chances of studying and working abroad. This is why the ability to speak foreign languages is highly valued by universities and employers. With more than 220 million people speaking French in 40 different countries around the world, French language and culture remain very attractive. What Will I Learn? The syllabus content is organised around five broad topic areas which provide contexts for the acquisition of vocabulary and the study of grammar and structures. Through the study of these topic areas, candidates gain insight into target language countries and communities. The topic areas are: • Everyday activities • Personal and social life • The world around us • The world of work • The international world How Will I Be Assessed? French IGCSE comprises four papers, assessing respectively listening, reading, writing and speaking skills. Skill Paper 1 Listening 45 marks Paper 2 Reading 45 marks Paper 3 Speaking 100 marks Paper 4 Writing 50 marks

Method of assessment

Weightin g

length

When

Candidates listen to a number of recordings and answer questions testing comprehension.

25%

45 min

June

Candidates read a number of texts and answer questions testing comprehension.

25%

1 hour

June

25%

15 min

May

25%

1 hour

June

Candidates complete two role plays, a topic presentation/conversation and a general conversation. Candidates respond in the target language to three tasks.

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MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES - SPANISH Cambridge IGCSE 0530 Why Study Spanish? Studying a foreign language presents several benefits at different levels: it helps to expand the view of the world by facilitating the discovery of other cultures and communities. This advantage extends to leisure activities such as travel, cinema or reading. On another level, learning a foreign language helps to understand, and improves the knowledge of, the native language and develops the intellect. It improves the functionality of the brain by recognising and negotiating meanings, and communicating in different language systems. All of these practical skills may be used in other disciplines. A foreign language will also open up job opportunities in different careers e.g. education, travel and tourism, finance, journalism, medicine, and education. Spanish is the third most spoken language in the world. Almost 500 million people speak Spanish worldwide and it is the mother tongue of 388 million people in 21 countries. It is an official language of the UN and its organisations, and of the European Union. What Will I Learn? This syllabus is designed for students who are learning Spanish as a foreign language. The aim is to develop an ability to use the language effectively for practical communication. The course is based on the linked language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, and these are developed as students progress through the Key Stage 3 years. The syllabus also aims to offer insights into the culture and civilisation of countries where the language is spoken, thus encouraging positive attitudes towards language learning and towards speakers of foreign languages. The topics covered on the IGCSE course are: • Everyday activities: Home and school life (daily routine, food, health and fitness) • Personal and Social Life: Self, family and personal relationships (house and home, leisure, eating out), holidays and special occasions (festivals, accommodation) • The World Around Us: Home town and local area (shopping, weather, transport) • The World of Work: Continuing education, careers and employment • The International World: Tourism at home and abroad (world events and issues, life in other countries and communities) How will I be Assessed? Paper 1 2 3 4

Skill Listening Reading Speaking Writing

Weighting 25 % 25% 25% 25%

Length 45 mins 1 hour 15 mins 1 hour

When Sat Summer Term Summer Term Summer Term Summer Term

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MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES - MANDARIN Cambridge IGCSE 0509 Cambridge IGCSE 0547 Why Study Mandarin? Mandarin is a wonderful language that one should not miss learning. Mandarin has gone through many changes since the civilisation in China. Tried and tested, it is still being used by many and widely, which has proven the resilience of this language. Every Mandarin word is made up by the perfect combination of image, sound and meaning. The language itself is expressive so that even a short description can easily give a sense of meaning. Learning Mandarin allows students to obtain sufficient training on visual and listening, which enhances the connection between “feelings”. Hence, learning Mandarin is definitely a feast for the visual and aural senses! What Will I Learn? When learning Mandarin, one should not leave behind the history of the language, so the IGCSE Mandarin course does not only consist of training in grammar and lexicals, but also in Chinese cultures and sinology. The IGCSE Mandarin syllabus encourages students to develop lifelong skills, including: - The ability to use a foreign language as a means of practical communication - Insight into the culture and civilisation of countries where the language is spoken - A positive attitude towards language learning, towards the speakers of other languages, and towards other cultures and civilisations - Techniques which can be applied to other areas of learning, such as analysis and memory skills In IGCSE 0509, students will undertake extensive reading of modern Chinese literature and develop writing skills in articulating experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined. In IGCSE 0547, students are required able to use the language effectively based on the linked language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing through the five topic areas as listed below: Area A

Area B

Area C

Area D

Area E

Everyday activities - Home life and school - Food, health and fitness Personal and social life - Self, family and personal relationships - Holidays The world around us - Home town and local area - Natural and made environment - People, places and customs The world of work - Continuing education - Careers and employment The international world

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-

Tourism at home and abroad Life in other countries

How Will I Be Assessed? IGCSE 0509 Unit 1 2

Method of Assessment Paper 1 Reading Paper 2 Writing

Weighting % 60%

Length

When Sat

2 hours

Summer Year 11

40%

1 hour 15 min

Summer Year 11

Weighting % 25%

Length

When Sat

35 min

25%

1 hour 15 min 15 min

Summer Year 10 or Year 11 Summer Year 10 or Year 11 Summer Year 10 or Year 11 Summer Year 10 or Year 11

IGCSE 0547 Unit 1 2 3 4

Method of Assessment Paper 1 Listening Paper 2 Reading Paper 3 Speaking Paper 4 Writing

25% 25%

1 hour 15 min

On advice from a teacher, pupils may be considered for early exam entry in Year 9 or 10.

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MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES – BAHASA MALAYSIA (Foreign Language) Cambridge IGCSE Why Study Bahasa Malaysia? Bahasa Malaysia is a language that is spoken daily by more than 215 million people in South East Asia. It is also the national language of Malaysia, Brunei and Indonesia, as well as one of the four languages spoken in Singapore. Learning the language helps students to communicate more effectively in a local context, in addition to developing an understanding of the culture in countries where the language is widely used. It also offers students a better insight into the lives of people living in South East Asia, thereby encouraging positive attitudes towards the language and the speakers of the language. Cambridge IGCSE Bahasa Malaysia is also a qualification that is recognised by universities and employers in Malaysia as evidence of the ability to use and comprehend the language effectively. It is a good foundation for students to progress in their employment and further studies within countries where Bahasa is spoken, as learners can benefit in areas that involve business, services, translation, education etc. What Will I learn? Students will: • Develop the ability to use the language effectively for purposes of practical communication within the country of residence, where appropriate, and in all countries where the language is spoken. •

Form a sound base of the skills, language and attitudes required for further study, work and leisure.

Be able to offer insights into the culture and civilisation of countries where the language is spoken.

Encourage a fuller understanding of the local community, where relevant.

Develop a fuller awareness of the nature of language and language learning.

Encourage positive attitudes toward language learning and towards speakers of other languages as well as a sympathetic approach to other cultures and civilisations.

Experience enjoyment and intellectual stimulation.

Complement other areas of study by encouraging skills of a more general application (e.g. analysis, memorising, and drawing of inferences).

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How Will I be Assessed? Paper Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4

Content of Paper Reading and Directed Writing – 1 ½ hours: Sections 1, 2 and 3 Speaking (Role Play Cards) – 15 minutes Continuous Writing – 1 ¼ hours

Weighting 35% 30% 35%

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ART AND DESIGN Cambridge IGCSE 0400 Why Study Art and Design? The Cambridge IGCSE Art and Design syllabus aims to encourage a personal response by stimulating imagination, sensitivity, conceptual thinking, powers of observation and analytical ability. Learners gain confidence and enthusiasm as they develop technical skills in two and three dimensional form and composition, and are able to identify and solve problems in visual and tactile forms. They also learn how to develop ideas from initial attempts to final solutions. An ideal foundation for further study, Cambridge IGCSE Art and Design also develops a greater awareness of the role played by the visual arts in society and in history, broadening cultural horizons and individual experience. What Will I Learn? Students will have opportunities to gain a greater understanding of the role of the visual arts in the history of civilisations, and so widen and enrich their cultural horizons. The syllabus has been designed to combine a breadth and depth of study, to accommodate a wide range of abilities and individual resources, and to provide opportunities for learners to explore both. The broad areas of study are: • • • • • •

Panting and related media Printmaking Three-dimensional studies Photography, digital and lens-based media Graphic communication Textile design

How Will I Be Assessed? All candidates take two components: Component 1 and one of Components 2, 3 or 4. Components

Requirement

Component 1 Broad-based assignment 100 marks Externally assessed Component 2 Design-based assignment

Supporting Studies Unlimited preparatory period during which time candidates produce their supporting studies Controlled test Candidates take an eight-hour test Supporting studies Unlimited preparatory period which time candidates produce their supporting studies. and the Controlled test Candidates take an eight-hour test

100 marks Externally assessed Component 3

Weightin g

50%

50%

Folder

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Critical and historical assignment 100 marks Externally assessed Component 4 Coursework assignment 100 marks Internally marked by teachers and externally moderated

Candidates produce folder of 1500-2000 illustrative material (maximum A2).

words

with

50%

Supporting folio Candidates produce a portfolio of up to four sheets (eight sides) of A2 and the Final Outcome Candidates produce a final outcome in a chosen medium

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BUSINESS STUDIES Cambridge IGCSE 0450 Why Study Business Studies? IGCSE Business Studies is accepted by universities and employers as proof of an understanding of business concepts and techniques across a range of different types of businesses. Successful Business Studies learners will be able to: • understand different forms of business organisations, the environments in which businesses operate, and business functions such as marketing, operations and finance • appreciate the role of people in business success. They will also gain lifelong skills, including: • the ability to calculate and interpret business data. • communication skills needed to support arguments with reasons • the ability to analyse business situations and reach decisions or judgements. What Will I Learn? Students beginning this course are not expected to have studied Business Studies previously. They will learn to classify different types of business and come to understand how businesses develop and grow in size. The views of different stakeholders (workers, management, shareholders) will be examined alongside the impact on profits of recruitment, and marketing and operations. External forces, such as the role of government, the environment, and ethical issues will also be considered. Students will also gain a basic awareness of financial decision making at company level. How Will I Be Assessed? Unit 1

2

Method of Assessment Written exam: four questions, mix of short answers and structured data questions. Written exam: four questions based on case study provided as an insert within the paper.

Weighting % 50%

Length

When Sat

1 hour 30 min

Summer Year 11

50%

1 hour 30 min

Summer Year 11

Components Weighting

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ECOMONICS Cambridge IGCSE 0455 Why Study Economics? Cambridge IGCSE Economics is accepted by universities and employers as proof of knowledge and understanding of economics. Successful Cambridge IGCSE Economics candidates gain lifelong skills, including: • an understanding of economic theory, terminology and principles • the ability to apply the tools of economic analysis • the ability to distinguish between facts and value judgements in economic issues • an understanding of, and an ability to use, basic economic numeracy and literacy • the ability to take a greater part in decision-making processes in everyday life • an understanding of the economies of developed and developing nations • an excellent foundation for advanced study in economics. What Will I Learn? Candidates beginning this course are not expected to have studied Economics previously.The Cambridge IGCSE Economics syllabus develops an understanding of economic terminology and principles and of basic economic theory. Students study the economics of developed and developing nations and how these interrelate. They also learn to handle simple data and undertake economic analysis, evaluate information and discriminate between facts and value judgements in economic issues. A foundation for further study at AS and A-Level, the syllabus also encourages a better understanding of the world in which students live, and helps them play an active part in the decision-making process, whether as consumers, producers or citizens of the local, national and international community. How Will I Be Assessed? Unit 1 2

Method of Assessment Paper 1 Multiple Choice: 30 multiple choice questions Paper 2 Structured Questions: one compulsory question and three optional questions from a choice of six.

Weighting % 30 % 70%

Length

When Sat

45 min

Summer Year 11

2 hours 15 min

Summer Year 11

hoic5

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DRAMA Cambridge IGCSE 0411 Why Study Drama? Drama enhances and develops skills for life: speaking well, communicating well, gaining confidence and presence in career and social situations. Drama is a superb complimentary subject to go alongside the traditional academic subjects, addressing the holistic side of education and personal development. The subject opens the door to self-expression, creativity and analytical thinking skills, and gives students the opportunity to develop technical skills such as sound, lighting and set building. What Will I Study? Through practical and theoretical study, students develop an understanding and enjoyment of drama, developing group and individual skills and studying ways to communicate ideas and feelings to an audience. They learn how to discover the performance possibilities of a text and other stimuli, and devise dramatic material of their own. Students also develop their performance skills, the demonstration of which is reflected in the coursework requirements. How Will I Be Assessed? 40% Coursework (Practical performance skills: includes monologue, an individual and group response to stimuli: poetry, prose or extract) 60% Written exam (Responses to a range of questions on dramatic techniques, conventions and their understanding of the text for performance)

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GEOGRAPHY Cambridge IGCSE 0460 Why Study Geography? IGCSE Geography provides a natural bridge between the arts and sciences, and links well with many other subjects including Mathematics, Science, History and ICT. It will help students to develop a sense of place and an appreciation of the increasingly fragile environment in which they live. Geography is a global and contemporary subject that is constantly in the news – think of immigration, climate change, conflict, and world water shortages. Completing this course should enable pupils to respond to these issues in an informed and responsible way. Geography will provide a range of knowledge and skills that will help pupils understand more fully the complex world that surrounds them, as well as stimulating interest and excitement. Geography is highly valued by universities and employers. What Will I Learn? Students will develop a 'sense of place' by looking at the world around them on a local, regional and global scale. You will examine a range of natural and man-made environments, and study some of the processes which have affected their development. You will also look at the ways in which people interact with their environment, and the opportunities and challenges an environment can present, thereby gaining a deeper insight into the different communities and cultures that exist around the world. The content for the written papers is divided into three themes: • Theme 1 Population and Settlement: Population Dynamics and Settlement. • Theme 2 Natural Environment: Plate Tectonics, Landforms and Landscape Processes, Weather, Climate and Natural Vegetation, Inter-Relationships between Natural Environments and Human Activities. • Theme 3 Economic Development and the Use of Resources: Agricultural Systems, Industrial Systems, Leisure Activities and Tourism, Energy and Water Resources, Environmental Risks and Benefits (Conservation and Management) How Will I Be Assessed? Unit 1 2 3

Method of Assessment Written exam testing physical and human geography Written exam testing geographical skills Coursework Teacher assessed (based on fieldwork in Malaysia)

Weighting % 45 % 27.5% 27.5%

Length

When Sat

1 hour 45 min 1 hour 30 min 1 hour 15 min

Summer Year 11 Summer Year 11 Autumn Year 11

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HISTORY Cambridge History IGCSE Syllabus 0470 Why Study History? The History syllabus offers students the opportunity to study some of the major international issues in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as looking in greater depth at the history of a particular region or regions. Taking IGCSE History is as much about acquiring historical and transferable skills as it is about acquiring knowledge. Students will gain valuable skills including an understanding about the past and an understanding of historical concepts such as cause and consequence. They will form an appreciation of historical evidence and how to use it, and how to present clear and logical arguments. History compliments a number of subjects including English, Geography and Economics. It will also broaden the outlook of students intending to study the Sciences or Law at A level or as a degree. A traditional subject, History is valued by universities and employers around the world. What Will I Learn? Students will gain a greater 'sense of place' in the world by studying some of the most significant political, economic and social events in World History in the 19th and 20th century. Themes include the Revolutions of 1848, the unification of Germany and Italy, the modernisation of Japan to 1914 and the causes of the First World War. The Depth Study will be on Israel and Palestine 1945-1994. The course is divided into three sections: Core content: The 20th Century: International relations since 1919 (Option B) Depth Study: Israelis and Palestinians, 1945-c1994 Source-work: Changes every year. Why did the Gulf matter c1970-2000 (2016) How Will I Be Assessed? Paper

Method of Assessment

Weighting

Length

Examined

1

Written examination on Core and Depth Study

40%

2 hours

Summer of Year 11

2

Written examination on a prescribed topic from Core Content based on source material

33%

2 hours

Summer of Year 11

27%

1 hour

Summer of Year 11

4 (alternative Written paper on the Depth Study to course work)

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INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT) Cambridge IGCSE (ICT - 0417) Why Study ICT? A course in ICT offers a unique opportunity for students to identify and solve real problems by designing information and communication systems in a wide range of contexts relating to their personal interests. ICT develops students’ interdisciplinary skills and their capacity for imaginative and innovative thinking, creativity, and independence. What Will I Learn? The course aims to develop; Knowledge of ICT including: new and emerging technologies; autonomous and discerning use of ICT; skills to enhance work produced in a range of contexts; skills to analyse, design, implement, test and evaluate ICT systems; skills to consider the impact of current and new technologies on methods of working in the outside world and on social, economic, ethical and moral issues; ICT-based solutions to solve problems; the ability to recognise potential risks when using ICT; safe, secure and responsible practice. Progression Cambridge IGCSE syllabuses are general qualifications that enable candidates either to progress directly to employment, or to proceed to further qualifications. Candidates who are awarded grades C to A* in Cambridge IGCSE Information and Communication Technology are well prepared to follow courses leading to Cambridge International AS and A-Level Applied Information and Communication Technology, or the equivalent. How Will I Be Assessed? For Cambridge IGCSE Information and Communication Technology, candidates take three components: Paper 1 Theory; Paper 2 Document Production, Data Manipulation and Presentations and Paper 3 Data Analysis and Website Authoring. Component

AO1

AO2

AO3

Paper 1 Theory Paper 2 Document Production, Data Manipulation and Presentation Paper 3 Data Analysis and Website Authoring

70% 5%

15% 90%

15% 5%

Weighting of component in overall qualification 40% 30%

5%

90%

5%

30%

Weighting of AO in overall qualification

30%

60%

10%

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COMPUTER SCIENCE Cambridge IGCSE (0478) Why Study Computer Science? Computer Science is the study of the foundational principles and practices of computation and computational thinking and their application in the design and development of computer systems. Computational thinking includes expressing ideas through programming, (writing computer code). What Will I Learn? The course aims to develop: computational thinking, including consideration of data required; understanding of the main principles of solving problems by using computers; understanding that every computer system is made up of sub-systems, which in turn consist of further subsystems; understanding of the component parts of computer systems and how they interrelate, including software, data, hardware, communications and people; skills necessary to apply understanding to solve computer-based problems using a high-level programming language. Progression Cambridge IGCSE Certificates are general qualifications that enable learners to progress either directly to employment, or to proceed to further qualifications. Candidates who are awarded grades A* to C are well prepared to follow courses leading to Level 3 AS and A Level GCE Computer Science/Computing, Cambridge International AS and A Level Computer Science, or the equivalent.

How Will I Be Assessed? • • •

AO1 Recall, select and communicate knowledge and understanding of computer technology AO2 Apply knowledge, understanding and skills to solve computing or programming problems AO3 Analyse, evaluate, make reasoned judgments and present conclusions.

Unit

Paper 1

Paper 2

AO1 AO2

32% 16%

8% 24%

Weighting for qualification 40% 40%

AO3

12%

8%

20%

Total

60%

40%

100%

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DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY: GRAPHIC PRODUCTS Edexcel GCSE 2GR01 Why Study Graphic Products? A course in Graphic Products offers students the opportunity to explore the realms of graphic and product design. This course will appeal to those who feel they have creative design and making abilities or who are interested in being involved in a career where the capability to communicate graphically is important. Through studying Graphic Products students will develop their ability to:• Think innovatively, and combine skills with knowledge and understanding in order to design and make quality products of the future. • Solve problems and develop decision making skills through individual and collaborative work. • Analyse products and produce practical solutions to meet the needs and wants of consumers. • Develop skills of creativity and critical analysis through making links between the principles of good design, existing solutions and technical knowledge. What Will I Learn? The course covers an exciting range of products including packaging, point-of-sale display and 3D product (concept) design. Over the course of the two years students will develop a whole range of creative designing and making skills, technical knowledge and understanding relating to graphic products. These skills include; drawing, presentation and modelling techniques, opportunities to explore, develop and communicate their designs both by hand and through the use of computer-aided-design and computer-aided-manufacture (CAD/CAM). These skills are learnt through focussed design and make activities. Students will develop a knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in the field of design and technology. They will learn about industrial and commercial practices, product analysis, technology, sustainability and ethical design and manufacture. Students will apply their knowledge and skills to produce a controlled assessment (coursework) task; a creative design and make activity selected from a range of tasks. Students will create a design portfolio and a 3D product demonstrating their skills in researching, designing, reviewing, planning, making, testing and evaluating. How Will I Be Assessed? Unit Unit 1: Creative Design & Make Activity Unit 2: Knowledge & Understanding of Graphic Products

Method of Assessment Controlled Assessment (Coursework) Exam

Weighting

Length

When Sat

60 %

Approx. 40 hours

During lessons in Year 10 & 11

40%

1 hour 30 mins

Summer Year 11

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MUSIC CAMBRIDGE IGCSE 0410 Why Study Music? Music contributes to the personal development of students and to the school curriculum by providing a powerful and distinctive form of communication and expression. Music can change the way children feel, think and act. It develops thinking, increased perception, imagination, creativity and physical co-ordination; skills which can be transferred to other areas of experience and learning. It also develops creativity, risk-taking, intuition, sensitivity, perseverance and a sense of achievement and enjoyment. Anyone who is passionate about music making, interested in discovering more about music from other times and cultures, or who can perform to the equivalent standard of Grade 2 (instrument or vocal) would be a suitable candidate for Music IGCSE. What Will I Learn? The aims of the syllabus are to: • enable candidates to acquire and consolidate a range of basic musical skills, knowledge and understanding, through the activities of listening, performing and composing • help candidates develop a perceptive and critical response to the main historical periods and style of Western music • help candidates to recognise and understand the music of selected non-Western traditions, and to form an appreciation of cultural similarities and differences • provide a foundation for the development of an informed appreciation of music • provide a foundation for further study in music at a higher level. How Will I Be Assessed? UNIT AO1 LISTENING

ASSESSMENT WRITTEN EXAMINATION 40%

CONTENT Section A Unprepared Western repertoire Section B World music Section C Skeleton score Section D Set works

World music will cover Arabic and African music. The set works are either Rodrigo” Concierto de Aranjuez” Movements 1 & 2 or Mendelssohn “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Opus 1 UNIT AO2 PERFORMING

ASSESSMENT COURSEWORK 30%

CONTENT Solo performance Ensemble performance

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UNIT AO3 COMPOSING

ASSESSMENT COURSEWORK 30%

CONTENT Composition 1 Western tonal style Composition 2 Candidate’s choice

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION Edexcel GCSE 2PE01 Why Study Physical Education? GCSE PE has a very exciting course design, specification and content. It is often one of the most popular KS4 courses at schools due to its variety and depth, and it enables students to relate theoretical concepts to sporting examples. The contemporary concepts in the ever growing sports industry are covered and discussed. Students will also have opportunity to further develop their leadership skills through coaching, analysis, and communicating feedback, opinions and ideas. The course is assessed in three parts: 40% theoretical knowledge, 50% practical performance and 10% analysis of performance. Students who are not particularly ‘sporty’ could still achieve a very good grade if they demonstrate good leadership potential and a sound theoretical knowledge. The subject develops both practical and theoretical abilities and also leadership qualities which can be utilised during life. What Will I Learn? There are two sections of theoretical content which are assessed through a written examination. The practical part of the assessment consists of being observed in four performances as a participant, official or leader. There is a vast range of sports and activities to choose from, including pursuits outside of school. These must be chosen from at least two different categories including games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor activities, fitness and health. The final part of the assessment is an Analysis of Performance where students must demonstrate their understanding of one sport in detail, including rules, refereeing/umpiring, use of terminology, understanding and demonstrating tactics, and setting specific training methods and practices. How Will I Be Assessed? Unit

Method of Assessment

1

Written exam on theoretical sections 1 and 2 Practical performance assessments (performer, coach or official) Coursework (PEP) and performance analysis Teacher assessed

2

3

Weighting % 40 %

Length

When Assessed Summer Year 11

50%

1 hour 30 min n/a

10%

n/a

Term 1 and 2 of Year 11

On- going/ Summer Year 11

Coursework: a school-based assignment to create a Personal Exercise Programme (PEP) and complete an oral analysis of performance interview.

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BSKL GCSE Options Booklet 2015 - 2017  

BSKL GCSE Options Booklet 2015 - 2017

BSKL GCSE Options Booklet 2015 - 2017  

BSKL GCSE Options Booklet 2015 - 2017