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CURRICULUM Key Stage Four THE KEY STAGE FOUR CURRICULUM AT THE BRITISH INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL PUXI SECONDARY CAMPUS

The British International School Shanghai, China

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A BALANCED CURRICULUM The IGCSE provides a broad study programme by drawing subjects from a number

of areas: languages, humanities, social sciences, mathematics, creative, technical and vocational. Within the curriculum there is a mix of practical experience and theoretical knowledge.

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CURRICULUM KEY STAGE FOUR

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MISSION STATEMENT To provide a high-quality British education in an international context. Our commitment at BISS Puxi is to create and maintain a safe, happy and child-centred environment in which children are inspired to become purposeful life-long learners. We provide an education, based upon the English National Curriculum, in an international context for pupils with a wide range of abilities; where all pupils are supported in reaching their highest level of personal achievement through good learning habits, self-discipline and a strong sense of responsibility; with a strong emphasis upon the importance of kindness, courtesy, and consideration for others; where recognition is given for hard work and commitment in all areas of school life; where all pupils are encouraged, through a broad curriculum, to develop their individual strengths and interests, as well as the skills and enthusiasm for life-long, independent learning; where the school makes a positive contribution to the local community; with a learning environment that promotes a knowledge and understanding of diverse cultural backgrounds, belief systems and global issues. Our aim is that upon leaving BISS Puxi pupils are confident, well-rounded individuals who are well prepared for the next stage of their education and their role in a challenging, demanding and rapidly changing world. Floreat Nostra Schola


Building a brighter and better future for young pupils in

THE KEY STAGE FOUR

CURRICULUM The school offers a stimulating and supportive setting, defined by its sound balance of academic excellence and opportunities for personal development. This is achieved through our highly proficient delivery of the English National Curriculum. We foster a learning environment in which respect for the individual, as well as diverse cultural backgrounds and belief systems, are of equal importance. In addition to this social awareness, we aim to engender in our students a broad understanding of global issues; ultimately, both will be vital in establishing a fairer and more peaceful world.

THE BRITISH INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL, SHANGHAI SEEKS TO PREPARE ITS STUDENTS TO PLAY THEIR PART AS RESPONSIBLE CITIZENS IN AN INCREASINGLY CHALLENGING AND RAPIDLY CHANGING WORLD.

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AN INTRODUCTION In keeping with our mission statement, our curriculum prepares our students for their role in an increasingly challenging, cosmopolitan and rapidly changing world. This is done in a stimulating and caring setting where academic excellence is balanced with opportunities for personal development. In a school comprising young people from some 45 nationalities, respect is a key theme – from and for the individual pupil and for diverse cultural backgrounds and belief systems. We aim for our pupils to develop as enquiring, creative, reflective and motivated learners. Our high-calibre teachers tailor their teaching to individual needs, to encourage all children to flourish, grow in self-confidence and, above all, to fulfil their potential. This booklet is designed to help pupils and their parents to prepare carefully for Years 10 and 11, also known as Key Stage 4 by providing an outline of the compulsory subjects and the optional subjects from which pupils may choose. Our programme for students in Years 10 & 11 is based on the University of Cambridge Local Exams Syndicate (UCLES) and by the Edexcel Examination Board both of which have offered IGCSE subjects as an integral part of their international provision for many years. The International General Certificate of Education (IGCSE) has been designed for pupils aged 14-16 years and aims to prepare students for further academic success. IGCSE is equivalent in standard to the British GCSE and is recognised as evidence of ability by academic institutions and employers around the world. Grading is on an 8 point scale (A*-G). Grade C in IGCSE 1ST Language English satisfies the English proficiency requirements of many universities in the UK and other Anglophone countries. You may care to visit the following websites for further information: http://www.cie.org.uk/CIE/WebSite/home.isp http://www.edexcel.org.uk/subjects/ Many subjects at Key Stage 4 are the same as those followed at Key Stage 3. Pupils do, however, have some choice over which courses to study. This booklet is only part of the guidance we provide. It is important to listen to the advice of subject teachers, form tutors and our careers advisor, Ms Sarah Burgess, who is available to discuss choices with pupils.

An Overview of Year 10 & 11 IGCSEs are studied over a two year programme, starting in year 10 culminating with external examinations at the end of year 11. The subjects are divided into core and optional subjects.

The Core Subjects In this first group there are certain subjects which all pupils have to study. These are: • • • • •

English Language and Literature OR English as a Second Language Mathematics Science – Dual Award, equivalent to two IGCSEs Physical Education (non-examination) Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education (non-examination)

The Optional Subjects These subjects are divided into four option blocks which pupils will study one subject from each 8

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block. Our options process requires pupils to make a first and second choice from each option block by completing the option’s form. Option Block 1 Business Studies EAL/IELTS Geography History Option Block 3 Art Economics Music Physical Education

Option Block 2 French German Mandarin Spanish Option Block 4 Geography ICT Mandarin Media Science – opportunity for Triple Award

Subject Selection Please take your time to think things through carefully. There are many things to consider when you are making your choices: • • • • • • •

Am I good at that subject? Do I enjoy it? Will that subject give me good opportunities when I leave school? Do I need to study a particular subject in order to follow a later course? Do I fully understand what is expected of me if I take that subject? Am I prepared to work hard at that subject and show commitment for the next two years? How is the subject assessed? Mainly coursework or mainly exams? Which of these will I be most successful at?

At this stage it might be worthwhile for pupils to think about their educational goals which can be broken down as follows: • • •

Short–term goals: e.g. achieving a high (realistic but aspirational) grade in Mathematics Medium-term goals: e.g. choosing and setting specific targets in IGCSE subjects Long-term goals: e.g. planning what to do on completing Year 12 & 13; what courses to study at university and where to study.

Please note that goals, especially long term goals, can be adjusted as interests change with maturity but it is worth remembering the saying “if you aim at nothing you will reach it everytime”. Pupils should always have good reasons for making a particular choice. There are some bad reasons which should be avoided: • • • •

I want to take that subject because all my friends are doing it. I like the teacher this year. I haven’t really thought about it much, but I’ll put it down anyway. I can always swap it later! I won’t have much work to do in that subject.

The courses studied in the next two years will lead pupils towards important qualifications that will, in turn, lead to a range of opportunities in the world of work and further education. We promise to do our best for our pupils. All we ask in return is that they do their best for themselves. These are important decisions for you to make. Think carefully, read this booklet thoroughly and ask questions if you are unsure. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 9


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ENGLISH Why? In Years 10 and 11 all students with demonstrated ability will have the opportunity to study two related English courses. These will include IGCSE Language and IGCSE Literature. Each of these syllabuses is designed as a two-year course for examination at age 16-plus. As English Language and Literature will be studied concurrently it is expected that students will be able to transfer and apply knowledge and skills across both courses. Throughout their study of Language and Literature, students will examine closely a range of works from the genres of poetry, prose and drama. Students will have access to a range of literary and language texts, extracts and other resources as required. These courses will enable students to communicate accurately, appropriately and effectively in speech and writing while exploring areas of universal human concern, thus leading to a greater understanding of themselves and others.

Course outline A wide range of texts from different genres, and writting for various purposes, will be encountered throughout the course. These will include genres such as Drama, Poetry, Novels and Non-Fiction from around the world, both classic and contemporary. Contemporary texts including media, journalism, autobiography, persuasive speeches, advertising, and even ‘info-tainment’ may be considered. This will enable students to understand and respond appropriately, and imaginatively, to what they hear, read and experience in a variety of media. Students will be encouraged to enjoy and appreciate a variety of language and develop skills to enhance their understanding and appreciation of English. The courses will complement students’ other areas of study by developing skills of a more general application (e.g. analysis, synthesis, drawing of inferences) and promote students’ personal development and an understanding of themselves and others. Hopefully, they will enjoy the reading of literature and appreciate its contribution to aesthetic and imaginative growth. In the first term, students gain an overview of the course and have the opportunity to practise and develop key skills and core knowledge. Specifically, they focus on reading, writing, speaking and listening skills such as reading for gist and detail, communicating with an audience, using topic sentences and choosing the right word, editing and revising a draft, talking in groups, writing in different genres, note taking and highlighting and using websites and the library. Genre studies: in preparation for coursework in both Language and Literature, students will focus on popular genres such as crime, gothic horror or fantasy and science fiction and/or topic areas such as ‘betrayal’, ‘freedom’ and ‘oppression’.

Assessment Students will complete coursework portfolios over the whole course, and will sit written and spoken examinations. Active participation in class and involvement in discussions and activities are essential parts of the course through which students may deepen their understanding of the material. It is expected that students will prepare thoroughly for all set tasks by carefully reading and rereading the set texts in full. Students are encouraged to develop breadth and depth in their reading and may refer to websites such as www.cie.org.uk for further information.

Where next? Good grades in IGCSE Language and Literature will provide ample evidence that students are well able to commence further study in the International Baccalaureate and / or A-Level programmes at BISS or other IBO-approved schools. Furthermore the content - with a focus on internationalism and styles of assessment, including coursework, examinations and oral presentations - will ensure that students are well-equipped to confidently succeed in any good Pre-University course. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 11


ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE Why? In Years 10 and 11 students who require further assistance, and more time, to develop a high level of English fluency and competence, across all areas of study, will be advised to enrol in the IGCSE ESL course. Active participation in class, and involvement in discussions and activities, are essential parts of the course through which students may deepen their understanding of, and confidence in using, the English language. The course is largely skills-based with equal focus and weighting given to Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening. The vocabulary, grammar and assessment tasks are designed to be of the most immediate and practical use to senior students preparing for further work and study using English as the medium. Therefore, their successful progress in this course should also greatly assist their preparation for all other subjects.

Course outline The course content will vary depending upon student needs and interests and will allow them to make links to materials from other academic subjects including Sciences, Business, Arts and Humanities. Issues in the world around them – including news and current affairs – and experience in their own daily lives will also be drawn upon. Such content will always be directly linked to essential skills, for example, the ability to extract relevant specific information from forms, letters, brochures and examples of imaginative writing considered likely to be within the experience of young people, from varied cultural backgrounds. When reading, they will be taught how to demonstrate the ability to recognise key points, scan for particular information, organise the relevant information and present it in a logical manner. More capable students will soon be able to extract relevant information from a wider range of texts. 12

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In writing, they will be required to carry out simple writing tasks, such as completing forms, writing postcards or short letters in an appropriate and accurate form of English in response to a written stimulus. Pupils will need to demonstrate the ability to describe, report, give personal information and, when more advanced, will carry out longer writing tasks on a wider range of topics. Listening and speaking are equally important skills in this course requiring students to understand specific details, information and semi-formal announcements, such as news, weather, travel, and interviews, dialogues and telephone conversations. They will be able to identify the important points or themes of the material they hear, including attitudes. When speaking, they will need to demonstrate competence in a range of speech activities, respond to questions on topics within a defined range such as past and present schooling, future plans and current affairs and conduct . Most importantly, they will need to conduct sustained conversations.

Assessment Students will be assessed on all of the skills mentioned above in examinations and in class/ homework set throughout the course. Although knowledge of grammar and vocabulary will need to be demonstrated through short quizzes and tasks, the final examinations will award grades based upon overall performance when completing tasks such as short-answer questions, summary writing, informal and formal extended writing. Oral exams will assess their ability to engage in and direct formal conversations, while listening exams will require attention to specific details and recall.

Where next? Upon successful completion of this course, particularly with a grade ‘C’ or above, students would have demonstrated their ability to access further study – such as at IB or A-Levels – or to work with English as the main medium of communication. Many universities in the UK, and other English-speaking countries, will recognise this Certificate as evidence of the applicants ability to work in English. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 13


MATHS Why? Mathematics is one of the core subjects in Y10 and 11 and therefore is taken by every student. The most important reason for studying it is that it helps to develop logical reasoning skills which are essential for success in any field. There are also many applications of Mathematics in everyday life. Mathematics is seen as one of the most important school subjects by all schools and universities. It is also highly valued by employers and is essential for many careers.

Course outline The IGCSE in Mathematics builds upon the basic skills that have been taught in the four areas of the National Curriculum of England and Wales: Number; Algebra; Shape & Space and Statistics & Probability. Students will be encouraged to develop their mathematical knowledge and skills in a way which will improve confidence and provide satisfaction and enjoyment. They will develop a feel for numbers and for patterns and relationships in Mathematics. There will be a strong emphasis on problem solving as well as presenting and interpreting results. Students will be encouraged to communicate clearly and reason logically using mathematical concepts. The Mathematics syllabus aims to encourage students to make use of Mathematics in other subjects and to provide a firm foundation for the further study of Mathematics. Some students will get the opportunity to sit their IGCSE at the end of Year 10 which will enable them to take the Additional Mathematics course in Year 11.

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Assessment Students will enter the Edexcel Mathematics IGCSE examination which can be taken at either Higher or Foundational level. The vast majority of students here will take the Higher course. Assessment is through two exam papers, each two hours long. There is no coursework element.

Where next? For students going on to take IB in Year 12, there are three Mathematics courses on offer: Mathematics Studies, Mathematics Standard Level and Mathematics Higher Level. Maths can also be studied at degree level and there are also elements of Mathematics in many other degrees such as Engineering or Economics.

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DOUBLE AWARD SCIENCE

Why? Science engages learners at many levels and it is a spur to critical and creative thought. Students link major scientific ideas to technological change – impacting on industry, business and medicine and improving quality of life. They learn to discuss Science-based issues that may affect their own lives, the direction of society and the future of the world. Why IGCSE Double Award Science? This subject allows students to keep their IB [or A level] science options open, while allowing them to study all three sciences in the curriculum time of two. The IGCSE Double Award Science is equivalent to two IGCSEs.

Course outline The specific units of work to be addressed will fall into the traditional scientific disciplines of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. IGCSE Biology covers the major animal and plant systems in a traditional way, but also introduces the students to important breakthroughs of recent years, such as cloning and genetic engineering. The topics covered are Cells, Energy in Living Organisms, Transport and Coordination, Reproduction and Genetics, Organisms and their Environment. IGCSE Chemistry is comprehensive and relevant to modern life and covers the three branches of Chemistry: inorganic, organic and physical. It aims to give students a sound knowledge base, as well as industrial and practical applications of chemistry. The topics covered are: Fuels and Polymers, Periodic Table, Formulae, Equations, Metals and Non-metals, Acids, Bases and Salts, Chemical Reactions, Atomic Structure and Bonding. 16

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IGCSE Physics provides students with a thorough knowledge of the subject and develops their understanding through the use of examples taken from a modern everyday context. Topics covered are: Measurement and Motion, Energy, Electricity, Radioactivity, Waves, and Heat.

Assessment Each discipline has a separate examination paper lasting 2 hours and is worth 120 marks per paper. They each have the same weighting i.e. 33.3%. All questions are structured and compulsory. Questions become more difficult as they progress through the paper.

Where next? The choice of Double Award will allow students to make the choice of a single science at IB level but it would not be a recommended choice for someone wishing to study two Sciences at higher level. The Triple Award allows students to keep their IB [or A level] science options open by studying all three sciences. The IGCSE Triple Award Science provides three single awards and is suitable for those considering a science based career. It is more suitable for the stronger science students (see over for full details).

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TRIPLE AWARD SCIENCE Why? Science engages learners at many levels and it is a spur to critical and creative thought. Students link major scientific ideas to technological change – impacting on industry, business and medicine and improving quality of life. They learn to discuss Science-based issues that may affect their own lives, the direction of society and the future of the world. Why IGCSE Triple Award Science? This subject allows students to keep their IB [or A level] science options open by studying all three sciences. The IGCSE Triple Award Science provides three single awards and is suitable for those considering a science-based career. It is more suitable for the stronger science students. They will need to demonstrate they can meet this requirement by their earlier work in the sciences.

Course outline The specific units of work to be addressed will fall into the traditional scientific disciplines of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. These are identical topics to the Double Award covered in the core science but the Triple Award topics have extension material. This is worth 33% of the total towards a single award in each science with the remainder coming from the Double Award course. IGCSE Biology covers the major animal and plant systems in a traditional way, but also introduces the students to important breakthroughs of recent years, such as cloning and genetic engineering. The topics covered are Cells, Energy in Living Organisms, Transport and Coordination, Reproduction and Genetics, Organisms and their Environment.

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IGCSE Chemistry is comprehensive and relevant to modern life and covers the three branches of Chemistry: inorganic, organic and physical. It aims to give students a sound knowledge base, as well as industrial and practical applications of chemistry. The topics covered are: Fuels and Polymers, Periodic Table, Formulae, Equations, Metals and Nonmetals, Acids, Bases and Salts, Chemical Reactions, Atomic Structure and Bonding. IGCSE Physics provides students with a thorough knowledge of the subject, and develops their understanding through the use of examples taken from a modern everyday context. Topics covered are: Measurement and Motion, Energy, Electricity, Radioactivity, Waves, and Heat.

Assessment The Papers from the Double award form 66.6% of the total for each of the three single awards. The extension material studied in each award is then assessed in a second paper and is worth the remaining 33.3% of the total and is marked out of 60.

Where next? Students can use the single awards to gain access to higher level study in up to two sciences at IB level. They also provide a sound platform for studying at higher level and help allow access to sciencebased careers.

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MEDIA STUDIES Why? It is recognised that the mass media play an increasingly important role in contemporary society, providing us with information and entertainment, and communicating social values. This course, which follows the OCR GCSE syllabus for Media Studies, aims to develop a critical understanding of the role of the mass media in society. We aim to encourage students to develop a broad knowledge of the industrial and commercial nature of media production and to enable you to analyse and interpret its products.

Course outline Children’s Charity Advertising Charity adverts such as Barnardo’s will be studied and the students will look at producing their own adverts for a fictional Children’s Charity. The adverts seek to create empathy with the audience and to persuade them to donate or to be informed of the children’s plight. The images that have been used are in some cases expected to shock the audience, exposing the fragility of a child’s position in society. This involves the understanding and manipulation of digital photography using Adobe Photoshop.

The Music Industry Following a close study of the music industry, in particular how the Retail Industry markets and sells different music genres and artists, students will produce a CD cover featuring the release of a new album for a specific audience. This unit will involve some challenging theories such as the User Gratification Theory and theories of audience ownership. Students will also need to have a good understanding of the way a Media Industry operates from pre-production, design through to sales and marketing. 20

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Documentary Video A major project for all IGCSE students. In groups, students will be asked to produce a 3 minute News Report. Armed with an understanding of the conventions of the documentary film, students will plan and organise the shooting of the video and then edit the footage using professional software. The students will have to be creative in editing a story for impact, writing a voiceover and then to create a structure and feel for a documentary which can be used to report in a subjective or objective way. Other Elements Students will hone textual analysis skills and advanced production skills (including storyboarding, camera angles and sound design) throughout the course.

Assessment The student’s understanding of key media concepts is assessed through practical construction projects, written evaluations and finally a textual analysis exam paper. The four key Media concepts are: audiences, institutions, media language and representations.

Where next? Media Studies is ideal preparation for higher education in the fields of Media, creative arts, photography/cinematography, and especially IB Film (Group 6). It also shares strong links with English (writing to analyse and evaluate), Theatre Studies (acting and adopting roles), and Business Studies (through research into marketing and demographics).

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IGCSE HISTORY Why? History is essentially about people, how and why they interact with one another and the impact of these liaisons. Topics are selected to complement an appreciation of the successes and failures of individuals, groups and nations in the past, to enhance knowledge and understanding of our current world and provide a background for future study. Year 10 will follow the Cambridge IGCSE History Syllabus. This is a demanding academic course that is worthwhile, interesting and informative in itself and additionally provides excellent preparation for the IB Course in Years 12 + 13. Also, it is a natural extension of the skills and material studied in Key Stage 3. Thus it is a bridge to the subject at higher levels.

Course outline The 20th century topics studied are a mixture of prescribed and options. They are selected to complement the content of the previous Key Stage 3 course and subsequent IB material. We begin with the aftermath of World War l, the Peace Settlements in general and Versailles in particular. This is followed by the Establishment, Successes and Failures of the League of Nations. Serious study is made of an option topic ‘Inter War USA.’, i.e. the Roaring Twenties and the following Depression. World wide conflicts of the 1930’s in Manchuria, Abyssinia and China and then the Causes of World War ll are examined. The post World War ll Cold War (e.g. Berlin Airlift and Wall, Hungary 1956, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Prague Spring, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, the Nuclear Arms Race and Detente) covers a number weeks. Apartheid South Africa is an option and then we will conclude with the Establishment and Work of the United Nations. Characters who will be scrutinized include Lloyd George, Woodrow Wilson, Hoover, Roosevelt, Al Capone, Hitler, Chamberlain, Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Mao, Stalin, Truman, Khrushchev, Kennedy, Castro, Reagan, Gorbachev and Nelson Mandela.

Assessment The Assessment Objectives (tested by 3 examination papers in Year 11 – there is no Coursework) fit perfectly with those of the History Department. Consequently, all History Key Stage 3 students will thus be familiar with these and should feel comfortable in tackling them. Candidates will be expected to recall, select organize and deploy knowledge of the syllabus content; demonstrate an understanding of terminology and show empathy with motives and, finally, comprehend, interpret, evaluate using a range of sources as evidence in their historical context.

Where next? Success at IGCSE can lead to IB, which, in turn, can take one to university. History graduates are valued and can find employment and careers in a wide variety of professions - e.g. law, research and resources, archaeology, librarianship, architecture, the civil service, politics, economics, finance and accountancy, personnel management, education, the military, the print and electronic media.

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IGCSE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Why? IGCSE Physical Education will appeal to you due to the following reasons. Firstly, if you have a keen interest in sport and recreation and always look forward to your PE lessons. Secondly, if you are keen to take part in school sports’ teams and recreational sport outside of class time, and if you are interested in following a course that develops knowledge and understanding through practical involvement. Lastly, if you are considering a sports-related career or have an interest to develop your knowledge when in higher education.

Course outline Practical (60%) The course is practical-based and involves participating in a range of practical activities. These include the sports from the following areas of invasion games, such as football, basketball, rugby, field hockey; the net and wall games such as volleyball, badminton and table tennis; the striking and fielding Games such as cricket and softball as well as the swimming and water safety course; dance, gymnastics, and athletics. If the students can offer an activity we at school do not offer at present in our curriculum we can still run this activity in conjunction with the students’ coach, for example, snow boarding, horse riding, Martial arts. The students will learn during the course how to analyse and evaluate a performance. Theoretical (40%) In the theoretical side of the course the students will cover the following topics; analysis of performance, factors affecting participation and performance, health and diet, anatomy and physiology, safety and risk assessment, how training and fitness affects the body, the differing training 24

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programmes and how they affect the body. This area of the course helps the students to better understand how the body works through exercise. The students will gain greater knowledge of the training programmes and how they can improve our performance. How previous experiences help in this course: The students will have already been taught a variety of different activities in their PE lessons. This course will help the students to build upon these basic skills. They will develop the students’ analytical skills necessary to look at and improve their own performance.

Assessment The GCSE PE course is assessed over two units. Unit 1 is externally assessed through a written examination paper of 90 minutes. This will contribute a maximum of 40% towards your total marks. Unit 2 is assessed in two sections. Section 1 is 4 practical performances in the role of either player/ participant, leader or official. You can achieve 48% of the marks from your 4 performances Section 2 is analysis of performance in one of the chosen activities. This is worth 12% of the marks and should include planning, performing and evaluating a Personal Exercise Programme.

Where next? The course is an ideal preparation for the IB Sports Science course and allows progression into sport and Exercise Sciences. The course develops the transferable skills and key skills that employers are looking for and can lead to a wide variety of employment opportunities. This can include further training in such areas as recreational management, leisure activities, coaching, officiating, the fitness industry, the armed forces and the Civil Service. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 25


ECONOMICS Why? Economics IGCSE is an academic course focusing on the developments of national economies across the world. The course enables students to develop their skills of interpretation of graphs, analysis and evaluation of data. IGCSE Economics is recognised as a high-quality and well-respected qualification.

Course outline The Economics course is divided into four main units. The Market System unit focuses on the concept of Supply and Demand and its role in determining the price of goods in the market. Students learn about elasticity of demand, types of economy and the use of the labour market. In the Business Economics unit, students learn about production and wealth creation in the world. Students investigate competitive industry, the public and private sector of the economy and are able to make comparisons between China, the UK and their home country. The Government and the Economy unit teaches students about economic growth, inflation and unemployment, enabling students to make judgements and recommendations on improving the economy in their chosen country, The final unit studies the Global Economy. Students investigate the world-wide significance of exchange rates and international trade, as well as the impact of globalisation.

Assessment Students will each take 2 external exams at the end of Year 11, one core paper and either a higher or foundation paper depending on their ability level.

Where next? IGCSE Economics is the ideal starting point for studying either Business and Management, Economics or Information Technology in a Global Society at IB or A Level. Many IGCSE Economics students go on to study this field at undergraduate level.

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BUSINESS STUDIES Why? Business Studies IGCSE presents students with an introduction to the world of business. It provides an insight to the functional areas of a business and the range of activities that different types of organisations undertake. This is an interesting and exciting course which enables students to design new products and develop marketing strategies, whilst considering the financial and operational implications of their ideas.

Course outline The course is divided into units which focus on the main functional areas of business activity. The first main unit investigates the different types of business ownership. Here students learn how to categorise businesses by size, turnover and accountability. They also research the level of privatised and nationalised industry in their home country compared to China. The Marketing unit allows students to design their own product and the full marketing mix to surround it. Students will undertake market research to identify a gap in the market and then create a product to meet the needs of their target audience. At the end of this unit, students have the opportunity to present their work to an outside business representative and experience leading a formal business meeting. In the Human Resources unit, students undertake the job application process. They each create a CV and write a letter of application for a job, culminating in a formal job interview with a local company. In Year 11 students study the financial side of a business management. They learn how to create and interpret balance sheets and profit and loss accounts, as well as analyse financial performance ratios.

Assessment Students will each take 2 external exams at the end of Year 11, one core paper and either a higher or foundation paper depending on their ability level.

Where next? IGCSE Business Studies is the ideal starting point for studying either Business and Management, Economics or Information Technology in a Global Society at IB or A Level. Many IGCSE Business Studies students go on to study this field at undergraduate level, particularly focusing on International Business, Human Resources or Marketing majors.

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GEOGRAPHY Why? Geography provides opportunities through fieldwork, for first-hand investigation of places, environments and human behaviour. It builds knowledge and understanding of current events from local to global, develops skills for the future, including literacy, numeracy, ICT, problem solving, team work, thinking skills and enquiry. It also, more importantly, values your views when making decisions about difficult issues. Geographers can: make a concise report, handle data, ask questions and find answers, make decisions about an issue, analyse material, organise themselves and think creatively and independently. Geographers are: good communicators, spatially, socially, economically and environmentally aware, problem solvers, good team players, and computer literate, well-rounded, flexible thinkers.

Course outline Pupils cover many different and exciting topics including ‘Plate Tectonics’ where you will study earthquakes (Kashmir in Pakistan, Kobe in Japan), and volcanoes (St Helens, USA) and the formation of fold mountains (The Alps). Or ‘Coasts’ where you will study erosion, transport, deposition, landforms, coastal management, the Great Ocean Road, Australia, and the Holderness coastline in Yorkshire. Pupils also will study ‘Settlement’ by looking at the growth of cities, how we regenerate cities, how cities grow at their edges, and their problems and solutions. Pupils will classify ‘Industry’, by looking at factors affecting industrial location, Globalisation, Multinationals, and how industry affects the environment. When studying ‘Rivers’ pupils will look at erosion, transport, deposition, and how different landforms are created from source to mouth. Pupils will look at the causes, effects and management of floods, by examining the River Nile, Angel Falls, River Mississippi, and the River Ganges. 28

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Pupils will also learn how to measure ‘Development’, and look at the ever widening development gap. Pupils will study problems and issues related to food and water supply, unfair trade, fair trade, and International aid. Moving on to look at ‘Agriculture’, pupils will study the large-scale system of commercial farming; small-scale subsistence farming and also recognise the causes and effects of shortages of food and describe the possible solutions to this problem. Pupils will also study ‘Leisure Activities and Tourism’ and describe and account for the growth of leisure facilities and tourism in relation to the main attractions of the physical and human landscape. You will describe the significance of fuel wood, non-renewable fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas), and also renewable energy supplies (geothermal, wind, solar and biogas).

Assessment Pupils will sit three different exam papers as outlined below: Paper 1 will last 1 hour 45 minutes and will make up a total of 45% of the final mark. Paper two will last for 1 hour 30 minutes and will make up a total of 27.5% of your final mark. Paper 3 will last for 1hour 30 minutes and will make up a total of 27.5% of the final mark.

Where next? How would you like to work in one (or more) of the following careers - air traffic controller, archaeologist, architect, cartographer, civil engineer, conservationist, estate agent, environmentalist, farm worker, financial adviser, foreign correspondent, geologist, geophysicist, GIS technician, graphic designer, hotel manager, hydrologist, landscaper, meteorologist, outdoor pursuits supervisor, peacekeeper, town and country planner, social worker, surveyor, teacher, or transport manager.

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FRENCH Why? French is an international language spoken by sixty million people in France and a further 10 million in Europe. French is the first language of six and a half million people in Canada and the language of government in twenty-two countries in Africa. It is an important language of communication in South Asia, the Middle East and the Pacific. French influence has long been present in our community in the arts, commodities, fashion and design.

Course outline Students studying French will achieve GCSE or IGCSE level at the end of the course and will follow either the Edexcel or Cambridge syllabus. Lessons draw mainly on the textbook Encore Tricolore 4. The course book will be supplemented with additional material to cover all relevant vocabulary and linguistic structures. We deliver the syllabus through a variety of different teaching styles with the emphasis on extending knowledge in all four language skills: Listening, Speaking, reading and Writing. There are final examinations in listening, speaking, reading and writing. For the listening exam, students need to be able to understand authentic spoken language. Most responses will be in the target language but there are also questions and answers in English. Students are also expected to speak in French and give their own opinions on a variety of topics. There is emphasis on fluent, accurate, language, showing a good range of vocabulary and structure. In the reading exam, students must read and understand texts of different lengths and complexity and respond to comprehension questions. In writing, students must show knowledge of a wide range of vocabulary and grammar points as well as more complex linguistic structures if they are to achieve higher GCSE/IGCSE grades. The aim is to prepare students to meet the requirements of GCSE/IGCSE and develop their ability to use the target language effectively both within and outside of the classroom.

Assessment The assessment with both exam boards; Edexcel or Cambridge, is by exam. These exams cover the four language areas: Reading, Speaking, Listening and Writing. Each area is equally weighted – 25% of the final score.

Where next? Students who remain at BISS after Year 11 will move into the Sixth Form where they will begin their IB studies. For the IB, students must study a foreign language and the GCSE and IGCSE courses help prepare them for further study at this higher level.

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GERMAN Why? German is more important than ever as it is the first language of business, diplomacy and tourism in Eastern Europe. Knowledge of German is very important if business men and women want to compete in the emerging Eastern European market. More Europeans (approximately 93 million) are native speakers of German than of English, French, Italian or Spanish. In addition to being the second most common language on the Internet, German is the third or fourth most popular foreign language world-wide; even in Japan, 68% of all students learn German.

Course outline Students who choose to study German will achieve GCSE or IGCSE level at the end of the course and will follow either the Edexcel or Cambridge syllabus. Lessons draw mainly on the textbook Na Klar 3. This is supplemented with additional material to cover all relevant vocabulary and linguistic structures. We deliver the syllabus through a variety of different teaching styles with the emphasis on extending knowledge in all four language skills: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. There are final examinations in listening, speaking, reading and writing. For the listening exam, students need to be able to understand authentic spoken language. Most responses will be in the target language but there are also questions and answers in English. Students are also expected to speak in German and give their own opinions on a variety of topics. There is emphasis on fluent and accurate language, showing a good range of vocabulary and structure. In the reading exam, students must read and understand texts of different lengths and complexity, and respond to comprehension questions. In writing, students must show knowledge of a wide range of vocabulary and grammar points as well as more complex linguistic structures if they are to achieve higher GCSE/IGCSE grades. The aim is to prepare students to meet the requirements of GCSE/IGCSE and develop their ability to use the target language effectively both within and outside the classroom.

Assessment The assessment with both exam boards; Edexcel or Cambridge, is by exam. These exams cover the four language areas: Reading, Speaking, Listening and Writing. Each area is equally weighted – 25% of the final score.

Where next? Students who remain at BISS after Year 11 will move into the Sixth Form where they will begin their IB studies. For the IB, students must study a foreign language and the GCSE and IGCSE courses help prepare them for further study at this higher level.

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MANDARIN Why? Mandarin Chinese is spoken by 873 million speakers, making it the most widely spoken first language in the world. One fifth of the planet speaks Chinese. China has now become the second largest economy in the world. The study of Chinese language and culture will help you bridge the cultural gap, better understand the Chinese people, and create a platform of knowledge and understanding with them that is crucial for effective communication. Each year more and more students around the world whose mother tongue is not Mandarin are studying it with enthusiasm and success. If they all can learn it, so can you!

Course outline Mandarin Department provides four courses at this stage: GCSE Chinese, IGCSE Mandarin Foreign Language, HSK Course and IGCSE Mandarin First Language. The aim of GCSE Chinese course is to enable the students to communicate effectively in Mandarin, both in speaking and writing with a basic knowledge of the grammar and the understanding of China and Chinese Culture. Candidates at this level can be beginners in learning Mandarin or those with a similar learning background. The aim of IGCSE Mandarin Foreign Language is to enable the students to understand and express themselves effectively for purposes of practical spoken and written communication, both in imaginative and creative ways, with a deeper understanding of Chinese culture. Candidates must have prior exposure to Mandarin and would have followed a formal taught course for non-native speakers for at least one year. The aim of HSK Course is to prepare students for the HSK Elementary-Intermediate Test, which is a standardized test at the state level designed and developed by the HSK Center of The Chinese Ministry of Education to assess the Chinese proficiency of non-native speakers. Candidates should have a minimum of 400 hours of regular modern Chinese learning. The aim of IGCSE Mandarin First Language is to enable students to appreciate classic and modern literature, construct and convey meaning accurately, effectively in writing, with a sense of cultural identity. Candidates must have a very effective command of Mandarin, in addition to having followed courses for native speakers in their previous years in education.

Assessment All GCSE Chinese, IGCSE Mandarin Foreign Language and HSK exams cover four language areas: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. IGCSE Mandarin First Language exam covers two language areas: Reading and Writing.

Where next? Students who complete GCSE Chinese course successfully can continue Mandarin study either at IB Mandarin Ab initio or B level in KS5. Those who complete IGCSE Mandarin Foreign Language or HSK course successfully are likely to do IB Mandarin B course in KS5. Those who complete IGCSE Mandarin First Language successfully will do IB Mandarin A1 course in KS5.

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SPANISH Why? Spanish is spoken by at least an estimated 350 million people around the world and is currently the 4th most commonly spoken language worldwide. Knowing Spanish opens the door for you to communicate with 1/3 of a billion speakers worldwide! If you can learn Spanish, you’ll have a head start in learning the other Latin-based languages. Spanish is one of the easiest foreign languages to learn.

Course outline Students who choose to study Spanish will achieve GCSE or IGCSE level at the end of the course and will follow the Edexcel syllabus. Lessons draw mainly on the textbook Edexcel GCSE Spanish. This is supplemented with additional material to cover all relevant vocabulary and linguistic structures. We deliver the syllabus through a variety of different teaching styles with the emphasis on extending knowledge in all four language skills: Listening, Speaking, reading and Writing. There are final examinations in listening, speaking, reading and writing. For the listening exam, students need to be able to understand authentic spoken language. Most responses will be in the target language but there are also questions and answers in English. Students are also expected to speak in Spanish and give their own opinions on a variety of topics. There is emphasis on fluent, accurate, language, showing a good range of vocabulary and structure. In the reading exam, students must read and understand texts of different lengths and complexity, and respond to comprehension questions. In writing, students must show knowledge of a wide range of vocabulary and grammar points as well as more complex linguistic structures if they are to achieve higher GCSE/IGCSE grades. The aim is to prepare students to meet the requirements of GCSE/IGCSE and develop their ability to use the target language effectively both within and outside the classroom.

Assessment The assessment covers the four language areas: Reading, Speaking, Listening and Writing. Each area is equally weighted – 25% of the final score.

Where next? Students who remain at BISS after Year 11 will move into the Sixth Form where they will begin their IB studies. For the IB, students must study a foreign language and the IGCSE and GCSE courses help prepare them for further study at this higher level.

SECONDARY CURRICULUM 33


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ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE Why? The acquisition of academic language can take considerably longer to develop than social language. This advanced level of proficiency in the language for learning is crucial to the attainment of pupils for whom English is an additional language in all subjects of the curriculum. The EAL/IELTS course is designed to give pupils the necessary academic skills to access the wider curriculum. The integration of IELTS (International English Language Testing System) means that pupils are able to gain a recognised qualification at the end of the course. IELTS measures ability to communicate in English across all 4 language skills - listening, reading, writing and speaking - for people who intend to study or work where English is the language of communication. IELTS is the preferred English language assessment for universities in English-speaking countries worldwide.

Course outline Students require sound academic study skills when preparing for further study, whether for professional or vocational training programmes, or for further study at a UK college or university. The programme, therefore, includes academic study skills within the IELTS examination preparation elements of this course and the topics and skills covered include effective writing ability; listening comprehension and note-taking; the ability to transfer information in note form to essay format; understanding the conventions of bibliographies, footnotes & quotations; classroom, self-study and personal organisational skills; and effective research techniques. Students are tested and interviewed on arrival at the school and are then placed in a class at a language level to suit their needs. The teaching methods are functional and practical and a wide range of effective methods are utilised to suit different types of learner. Our interactive techniques stimulate interest, inspire motivation, increase the efficiency of the learning process and achieve the highest possible levels of retention. The course concentrates mainly on nonfiction texts. Using a variety of texts, students are taught to read for meaning, recognizing inference and a variety of styles and purposes; identify a writer’s viewpoint and distinguish between fact and opinion. In the reading and listening exercises, students are required to skim for overall meaning and to scan for detail. Students are given a clear purpose and audience in all writing tasks, and are taught to write clear, well-structured texts in an appropriate style; be able to recognize key points; expand and develop points of view and arguments; write in a range of styles for different purposes and audiences; write longer texts on a variety of subjects; and summarise information. Students are taught to express themselves fluently and appropriately in a range of speaking contexts.

Assessment At the end of each term pupils are assessed by completing a full mock IELTS test and, at the end of the course, pupils attend a test centre and are tested by an external examiner. Results are received by the end of term and pupils receive a certificate accepted by all major colleges and universities worldwide. In addition, pupils must complete a writing portfolio, submitting 5 written assignments at the end of the course and a 1,500 word dissertation on a topic of their choice.

Where next? Upon completion of the course pupils will attend an IELTS examination. Pupils will be expected to achieve an IELTS Band Score of 6 or above, demonstrating their ability to study on the IB course. The certificate is also recognised by universities worldwide. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 35


MUSIC Why? Music is a subject that is available to all students, whether you play a musical instrument or not. There is a broad range of study areas and options for students to perform on any instrument OR use music technology via state-of-the-art sequencers and recording/editing suites instead. This broadens the appeal of the course. The three units of performing, composing and listening are stand-alone, so poor performance in one unit won’t heavily penalise the final mark. Music is always a subject that welcomes the student that has prior practical and theoretical knowledge and will allow such students to flourish, using their already highly-developed musical talents.

Course outline There are three units in the music course which cover four areas of study: Western Classical Music 1600 – 1899; Music in the Twentieth Century; Popular Music in Context and World Music. In Unit One, Performing Music, students develop their performing skills both in a solo and ensemble context. They are given the opportunity to rehearse and refine performances in their chosen discipline or genre, developing technical control, expression and interpretive skills. In Unit Two, Composing Music, the emphasis is on the creative aspect of music allowing students to appreciate the process of creating music. Students will be encouraged to explore a range of compositional starting points and investigate a range of techniques for developing and manipulating ideas and turn them into completed pieces of music. In Unit Three, Listening and Appraising, students develop their listening and appraising skills through the study of music across a variety of styles and genres. The content for the unit is grouped into four areas of study, each of which contains three set musical works.

Assessment Performing Music (30%) is internally assessed under controlled conditions. Students will perform one solo and one ensemble piece. In Composing Music (30%) students develop musical ideas in the form of compositions and/or arrangements. In the Listening and Appraising unit, students will complete a 1 hour 30 minute written paper relating to set works from the four areas of study.

Where next? The music course helps students develop broader life skills and attributes, including critical and creative thinking, aesthetic sensitivity, emotional awareness, cultural understanding, self-discipline, self-confidence and self-motivation. These are all valuable life skills that will be of use no matter what career path the students decide to follow.

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Why? The course should appeal to students who enjoy practical problem solving and are interested in computers, as well as students who want to develop practical computing skills and problem-solving. The aim of the course is to help students to develop and consolidate their knowledge, skills and understanding in Information and Communication Technology and to encourage students to develop further as autonomous users of Information and Communication Technology. ICT will provide opportunities for students to analyse, design, implement, test and evaluate Information and Communication Technology systems, to encourage students to consider the impact of new technologies on methods of working in the outside world and on social, economic, ethical and moral issues.

Course outline The course will enable learners to make the leap from passive consumers to active producers of quality digital content within the course. It helps the students to develop the ability to organise themselves and their work and encourages them to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT. Students in Year 10 will work towards the AiDA certificate (Award in Digital Applications equivalent to one GCSE). The AiDA course is work-based and 100% internally marked and then moderated to meet the standards set by the exam board Edexcel. It offers students the ability to express themselves in ICT. The skills that students will learn will be valuable and practical skills which are directly transferable to other subjects within the school and will prepare them well for life in the future. In Year 11, students will study for the Cambridge IGCSE. There are three papers that will cover Practical Skills and students Knowledge and Understanding of ICT. The Practical Skills that students will learn will involve the use of word processing facilities to prepare documents; the use of spreadsheet and database packages to manipulate data to help in different problems solving issues arising from their results. With these separate skills students will be able to integrate data from these different packages into a single document or report. In the section on Knowledge and Understanding of ICT, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the functions of the main hardware and software components of computer systems; the networking of information processing systems and the ways in which information and communication technology is used today and the way it affects society globally.

Assessment For Year 10 students the AiDA course is course-work based and 100% internally marked and then moderated to meet the standards set by the exam board Edexcel. Year 11 students will study for the Cambridge IGCSE. Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) is a written paper of 120 marks assessing students ICT skills. Paper 2 and Paper 3 (2 hours 30 minutes each) will consist of two practical tests and will each comprise a number of tasks to be taken under controlled conditions.

Where next? The course will provide a firm foundation for those students who wish to pursue ICT or related courses at IB or A Level, for example, Information Technology in a Global Society. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 37


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ART Why? If you are serious about developing your creative and expressive abilities, IGCSE Art is a good place for you. In IGCSE Art, you will be involved in creative experiments with various media such as oil, pastel, colored pencil, tempera paint, acrylic paint, collage, and charcoal. You will also choose a direction based on a provided theme and research artists related to your direction. Writing is an important part of ICGSE Art, especially analysis of artworks, including description, formal analysis, interpretation, and evaluation. You will also be making observational drawings of your chosen subjects. Putting your plans into action will yield final coursework results.

Course outline IGCSE Art aims to prepare you with experience, knowledge and understanding, and practical skills that you can use for further study at the IB level and possibly a future career in the visual arts. Each piece of coursework consists of an exam paper which will specify a theme for the project. You will have six weeks to conduct the necessary preparatory studies and ten hours, under exam conditions, to complete the final artwork. Preparatory studies include idea development, analysis of the work of other artists who may be related to your theme or direction, observational drawings of key subjects, thumbnail designs, refinements, planning, discussions of possible problems and how those problems can be addressed. You will create your final artwork under exam conditions, over a ten hour period. Of course, in the early stages of the course, the teacher will prepare you for these tasks and a mock exam will be given prior to the final. You will be expected to take ownership of your own work; homework can be intensive and usually on-going throughout the coursework units. Your progress will be monitored closely and a formal assessment will take place at the end of every coursework unit.

Assessment Throughout each piece of coursework, you will be assessed within the assessment objectives set by the examination board EDEXCEL. These are: AO1 record observations, experiences and ideas which are appropriate to Intentions AO2 analyse and evaluate images, objects and artefacts, making informed connections with the work of others AO3 develop and explore ideas, using a variety of media and processes that are appropriate to intentions AO4 review and refine ideas, modifying work as it progresses, before presenting a coherent personal response.

Where next? IGCSE Art prepares you for further study at the IB level and possibly a future career in the visual arts. Here are some possible career pathways: Fine Artist, Architect, Art Director, Film Director, Technicians, Craft Maker, Jewellery Maker, Floral Designer, Fashion Designer, Graphic Designer, Interior Designer, Product Designer, Animator, Museum Director, Illustrator, Photographer, Set Exhibit Designer, Game Designer, Visual Merchandiser, and many more. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 39


Careers Work-related learning is an essential part of secondary education. It is about preparing our students for adult life and the ‘world of work’. Work-related learning is defined as “planned activity that uses the context of work to develop knowledge, skills and understanding useful in work, including learning through the experience of work, learning about work and working practices, and learning the skills for work.” Qualifications and Curriculum Authority Students will learn and develop new skills that will help them to become successful learners, responsible citizens of the future and effective contributors to the workplace and society.

An important aspect of work-related learning is our careers education programme for Year 10 and Year 11 students. Our bespoke careers education programme is designed to ensure we meet the needs of our international students. As part of the programme, students have dedicated ‘careers’ lessons throughout the academic year. They also attend presentations/workshops delivered by visitors from a number of different fields such as universities, working professionals and career organisations.

Aims of the course To enable students to: • • • • • 40

Gain a greater understanding of the ‘world of work’ Make informed decisions in the future about subject/course choices Explore their career options Help connect learning in school to the workplace Develop employability skills and enhance life skills SECONDARY CURRICULUM


Year 10 pupils work experience An integral part of our careers education is the work experience programme. Pupils in Year 10 are given the opportunity to attend a work experience placement for one week during the summer term. They can sample working life, learn more about a chosen career and develop important key skills. For many university courses, work experience is essential in order for a student to be accepted onto the course.

SECONDARY CURRICULUM 41


SPORTS LEADERSHIP The Level 1 Award in Sports Leadership is a nationally recognised qualification in the UK that enables successful candidates to lead small groups in simple sport and recreational activities whilst under the direct supervision of their Tutor. The qualification teaches generic leadership skills such as organisation, planning, communication and teamwork through the medium of sport. It is a fun and practical qualification with no entrance requirements or final examinations to sit. The qualification will take approximately 30 Guided Learning Hours. The students will follow seven units of study in the course. Unit 7 requires candidates to complete a minimum of one hour of leadership. This hour is not included in the 30 Guided Learning Hours. Each unit is broken down into learning outcomes. These learning outcomes indicate what the candidate is expected to know, understand, or be able to do in order to pass each unit. It is possible to take each of the learning outcomes and break them down further into assessment criteria. The assessment criteria are what the candidate will be expected to achieve, in order to demonstrate that the learning outcome has been met. The Sports Leaders Level 1 course is based on the following seven units of study. The students must demonstrate the competence expected in each unit to be able to pass the course.

Unit 1 – Planning, preparing and assisting a simple sporting activity The learning outcomes are to plan and prepare a simple sporting or recreational activity; deliver a simple sporting or recreational activity whilst under supervision; evaluate each session and plan future sessions.

Unit 2 – Basic communication skills for leading a sporting activity The learning outcomes are knowledge and basic proficiency in the chosen activities in order to demonstrate verbal communication, non-verbal communication and use of a whistle and communicating with groups and individuals involved in sporting and recreational activity.

Unit 3 – Principles and practice in delivering a basic health and fitness session The learning outcomes are to understand the factors which prevent individuals taking part in healthrelated exercise; the effects of diet, smoking, alcohol and age on the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle; the development of a directory of local contacts offering health-related exercise and leading a simple exercise session for a group whilst under supervision.

Unit 4 – Understanding fair play in sport The learning outcome is that throughout the course you have actively demonstrated and encouraged the concept of good sporting behaviour and fair play in sporting and recreational activities.

Unit 5 – Understanding the role of the sports official The learning outcomes are the role of the official in sporting activities; rules and regulations of a number of sports and activities; evaluation of performance of officials and acting as an official for a number of sports and activities.

Unit 6 – Understanding the scope of local sport and recreational activities The learning outcomes are demonstrate knowledge of the range of local agencies and facilities that offer sporting and recreational activities to the community and how awareness of the sports-related courses of study that are available through schools, sports development teams, national governing bodies and other associated agencies. 42

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Unit 7 – Demonstration of leadership skills in sport The learning outcome is to organise a number of sports sessions, ideally in two different sporting or recreational activities for your peer group or lower-age group children.

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REWARDS At BISS Puxi Secondary School, Rewards are seen as a way of reinforcing healthy behaviour choices and encouraging positivity in how students approach all aspects of school life. Our teachers recognise that praise is the most effective form of reward and, as part of their daily classroom practice, our teachers praise their students. Additionally, in Key Stages 3 and 4, a House Merit System operates. Pupils are rewarded for academic achievement and improvement, contribution to extra-curricular activities and sports teams, positive behaviour and good citizenship and uniform. House Merits are recorded in students’ Planners and teachers award a House Merit Certificate when students have received five House Merits in each subject area. House Merit Certificates are presented in regular Achievement Assemblies where all students are encouraged to celebrate the success of their peers. Form Teachers monitor the total number of merits awarded to each child in their Form Group and students are also awarded for having achieved a total number of merits. At IB level, our students are naturally more intrinsically motivated, but here too we recognise and reward good work and positive contributions to school life. The Prefect Programme provides an opportunity for students to take on a much valued and respected leadership role within the student body. A further tier to our rewards practice is the ‘Principal’s Commendations’. These are awarded at the discretion of Mr Foyle for outstanding performance or sustained improvement in any of the following areas: citizenship; behaviour and social graces; contribution to arts and music, sports or ECAs; academic effort or excellence. Our teachers and managers are reward-orientated in their educational philosophy. They seek imaginative ways to highlight achievement and help our students to feel positively about the learning process and their daily experiences at BISS Puxi.

SECONDARY CURRICULUM 45


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THE INTERNATIONAL AWARD The International Award is an exciting self-development programme available to all 14 to 25 year olds. Launched in the UK in 1956 as The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, the Programme has now spread to 126 countries. Over 6 million young people worldwide have taken up the Award challenge. The Award is tough but it is about individual challenge, not about reaching specific standards set by someone else. Young people design their own Award Programme, set their own goals, and record their own progress. The only person they compete against is themselves, by challenging their own beliefs about what they can achieve. The Programme is based around three levels, each successive one requiring a greater degree of commitment. Bronze is for those over 14. The minimum period of participation to gain this Award is 6 months. Silver is for those over 15. The minimum period of participation to gain this Award is 12 months. Gold is for those over 16. The minimum period of participation to gain this Award is 18 months. To gain an Award, participants must complete activities in four Sections for a specified minimum period of time. There is an additional requirement of a Residential Project at Gold Level.

Service Participants engage with their community and discover the impact they can have through: • • • •

Community service projects Conservation work Voluntary service in hospitals or community homes More specialised training such as lifesaving, first aid or rescue services. SECONDARY CURRICULUM 47


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Adventurous Journey The Adventurous Journey is about adventure and discovery. Participants develop an understanding of the environment and the importance of working together in a team with a common purpose. It can be on foot, by bicycle, boat or on horseback. Training, preparation, self-sufficiency and self-reliance are the key elements.

Skills The Skills Section is about developing personal interests and learning practical skills. There are almost limitless possibilities to choose from. There is no set standard that participants must reach: they set their own goals and measure their progress against them.

Physical Recreation By undertaking some form of organised and regular physical activity, participants show perseverance and improve their fitness. Their goal is to record their individual progress. Most team and individual sports are included, such as football, athletics, and archery.

Residential Project This is only a requirement at Gold Level. It aims to broaden experience through living and working with others (who are not everyday companions). The project takes place over a period of five consecutive days. It requires resilience, adaptability and consideration for others.

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EXAMINATION BOARDS Our programme for students in Years 10 & 11 is based on the University of Cambridge

Local Exams Syndicate (UCLES) and by the Edexcel Examination Board, both of which have offered IGCSE subjects as an integral part of their international provision for many years.

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CURRICULUM

S E C O N D A RY H A N D B O O K

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There are very few aspects of a parent’s responsibility that are more important to the growth and development of their children than the school that they choose. The British International School Shanghai, Puxi Minhang Campus offers a superb, forward-looking education featuring the very best of the British educational system. The school offers a stimulating and supportive setting, defined by its sound balance of academic excellence and opportunities for personal development. This is achieved through our highly

proficient delivery of the English National Curriculum and the IB Diploma Programme. Visit www.bisspuxi.com, phone 021 5226 3211 ext. 110, fax 021 5226 3212, or email admissions@ bisspuxi.com for further information.

Floreat Nostra Schola W W W. B I S S H A N G H A I . C O M


KS4_Curriculum_Handbook