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3. Lack of any kind of mandated framework for continuing professional development CPD is slowly becoming recognised in India as a key motivator for teachers to develop their skills and knowledge and achieve more satisfaction in their teaching, which, in turn, has an impact on the learners they work with. Much work is being done to increase awareness and understanding at policy level. Indian teachers are trained (if at all) largely in a theoretical way and, once qualified, the perception is that there is no need for any further learning to take place. This is especially true in a context in which a teacher is traditionally expected to ‘know everything’. However, for CPD to be truly effective teachers need to be committed and responsible for their own development, while at the same time the necessary enabling support must be in place on the ground. This is starting to happen in India and the British Council aims to support the agenda by identifying how a CPD framework can be integrated into local systems and processes to ensure that CPD is supported and sustainable. Over a 12-month period one of the authors of this chapter supported the British Council in developing an India-specific CPD framework. She worked closely with British Council staff working on projects across India and with some members of the CPD Policy Think tank, as well as visiting projects and holding teacher focus groups. The framework is based on the British Council global framework and extensive stakeholder consultation, best practice research, lessons learned from British Council projects and on the real needs of teachers in India. The development work to create this framework was extensive and sought to understand in detail the CPD context in the country, the potential barriers to CPD and how the framework might need to be adapted to fit this context. A number of steps were taken to develop the final framework, and work is continuing in India as the team continues to pilot and review the work completed. Below is a summary of the development work conducted. 1.

A typical profile of an Indian teacher was first mapped onto the global British Council framework. In India, many primary ELT teachers are either unqualified or have not received subject-specific English language teacher training. They teach all subjects and generally have very low levels of English themselves. Consequently, it is problematic to try and map language level to stage of career and a spiky profile of the typical English language primary school teacher in India emerged (see Table 2). We found that teachers in India tend to have a ‘spiky profile’ in the sense that they won’t necessarily have followed a traditional trajectory in terms of career path, i.e. study, teaching degree, teaching practice, followed by a full- or part-time post. Therefore, the spiky profile is used to show that teachers in India might be working as teachers with a mixed range of experience and qualifications ranging from possibly none at all to limited access to professional development opportunities and training. On the global CPD framework, the role of a Master Trainer, in terms of developing and training other teachers, might be mapped to level 5 or 6, whereas in India that profile is likely to be closer to levels 3 or 4.

Continuing professional development in action |

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Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...

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