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The two years’ collaboration and sharing has led to the emergence of a community of CPD enthusiasts, starting with the members of the Think Tank but now steadily expanding with more teachers, teacher educators and researchers joining in. CPD activities have continued beyond the Think Tank too. Several members of the Think Tank, with new colleagues, have launched a collaborative and voluntary project of compiling a multilingual glossary of CPD for the Indian audience. Some members have organised seminars and conferences in their institutions with CPD as a major theme. Those associated with planning and delivering teacher training have started including separate sessions devoted to CPD in training programmes. In terms of conceptual, theory-related outcomes, the Think Tank managed to develop a working definition of CPD, after looking at definitions from other countries and other professions, and taking into account issues specific to India. It also succeeded in identifying, and to some extent describing, a number of key issues basic to CPD in India, such as: ■■

The significance of a shared understanding of CPD

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The importance of a broad and holistic CPD view

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The need for systemic support for CPD

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The role of teacher voluntarism in CPD

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The importance of personalisation of CPD by teachers

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The significance of institution-based CPD integrated with teachers’ regular work life.

The Think Tank work represented the first ever attempt at a deeper and better understanding and formulation of many of these issues in India.

Part 3: Contribution and significance of the Think Tank Learning from the Think Tank Teachers’ ongoing professional development is not a matter of concern for teachers alone. Various stakeholders – school heads, education authorities, state, society and parents – have interests in teachers’ CPD for their own reasons, depending on their place in the education system. Consequently, each of these stakeholders may have differing priorities for and expectations of CPD. Teachers may have their personal developmental priorities, usually determined by their needs, interests and aspirations. Institutions may have different expectations from teachers’ professional development, related to their concern with strengthening institutional performance, culture and image. Apart from these, the teaching profession also has interests in teachers’ professional development, which are reflected in education policies, politics and administration. Figure 1 represents stakeholder priorities in a general way.

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|  CPD policy ‘Think Tank’

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...