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in CPD and some experience of having worked on formal or informal initiatives in CPD. The presence of the UK consultant and some non-Indian British Council representatives added a valuable ‘outsider’ perspective to the work and facilitated the identification of commonalities and generalisations. In the course of the work the diversity of members proved to be a significant asset for the Think Tank, not only because it brought in so many different perspectives and perceptions, but also because it helped everyone involved to better understand the complexity of the field and to make the work as relevant as possible to different contexts within India. Objectives, agenda and brief overview of activities At the very outset a concept note about the Think Tank, prepared by the British Council, was sent to the members. The concept note listed the following broad objectives of the Think Tank: ■■

Stimulating further debate and discussion around the recommendations arising from the Third Policy Dialogue and English Next India (Graddol, 2010) and other key documentation and case studies

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Facilitating the production of a set of action plans, which could be reviewed and implemented by major stakeholders

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Facilitating knowledge sharing between policy makers and practitioners of best practice

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Supporting the initiation of ongoing networking and collaboration among policy makers and practitioners. (British Council, 2010: 1)



These objectives were identified on the basis of the following specific recommendations made by the speakers and delegates at the Third Policy Dialogue in 2009: ■■

There should be a policy or accreditation framework for continuing professional development (CPD) of teachers and teacher educators. This will facilitate a shared understanding of CPD.

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CPD initiatives need to be given more institutional support, funding and recognition.

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There is a need to improve the interaction among representatives of teacher associations, NGOs and corporate organisations so as to make CPD initiatives relevant to underlying needs.

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It might be useful to build CPD awareness into pre-service teacher education as well as in-service teacher education programmes.

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CPD is still reduced to in-service teacher training and education. It needs to be recognised and understood in its own right.

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It is necessary to evolve a commonly agreed operational definition and action framework for CPD, which will facilitate national policy-making, planning, implementation, accreditation and monitoring.

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No policy document, including NCFTE (National Curricular Framework for Teacher Education), is clear about CPD. What one usually finds is that the terms ‘CPD’ and ‘in-service teacher education/ training’ are used as if synonymous.



(British Council, 2010: 2)

CPD policy ‘Think Tank’ |

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Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  
Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...