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Regarding flexible use of the digital materials themselves, for the government’s new Diploma in Education initial teacher preparation programme (DPEd), the EIA classroom videos have now been incorporated into session materials within a ‘traditional’ face-to-face training room setting. Since the primary teacher training institutes (PTIs) are equipped with the basic technology to show the classroom videos, in this case they are presented in a version without the video guide. In the PTIs, the mediation and promotion of reflection come from experienced trainers who are able to exploit the content within the video using spontaneous and reflective interactions. Under the government’s new comprehensive Teacher Education Development plan (TED), which is currently being rolled out, new primary teachers will go through a supported in-school induction programme and, at a later stage in their career, take part in a refresher programme, ‘Subject-based training’, which, for the period 2014–15 alone, is set to cover 60,000 teachers. Ongoing discussions between the government and English in Action are likely to lead to EIA classroom video materials being incorporated here as well, with EIA intending to tailor new versions of the Teacher Facilitator training videos to suit the context of the large group of locally based teachers engaged on this programme. Although the relevant government bodies do not currently have capacity to develop their own video materials, this is another area on the agenda for further mutual co-operation; thus English in Action is currently looking for opportunities to assist with capacity building that would allow for sustainable ongoing development of video, or other digital materials, which could keep up with changes in the context. At the other end of the scale, the project team is currently working on adapting the digital materials to be used without any additional supporting materials. In the final phase of the project, when 64,000 additional teachers are to be reached, resources will understandably be limited and spread rather thinly. This means that the print materials which currently support the teachers’ digital resources on the mobile are to be reduced to a much slimmer booklet, even possibly eliminated altogether. In this case, the video guide’s role is likely to be enhanced to substitute for the text-based mediation contained in the printed guides. It will be crucial to hit the right balance between providing sufficient extra digital input to scaffold the videos as much as is needed without overloading the teachers with excessive amounts of unsupported conceptual material. Other government CPD provision in the country is also beginning to show signs of moving closer towards in-school approaches. Under the Teacher Education Development plan, for instance, there is likely to be provision for regular in-school professional development meetings with the aim of nurturing learning communities; the potential for low-cost, EIA-type materials to play a role here is also currently being explored. Assuming it does prove possible to make the successful transfer from print to additional digital narrator content, then the potential for wider dissemination and use in diverse contexts would be enormous. As the ubiquity and capacity of even the cheapest and most readily available mobiles is only likely to increase (or be replaced by an even simpler piece of technology), the scope for enhanced utilisation becomes very wide indeed.

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Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...