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attractive components in an interface (Kang et al., 2008). Feedback from teachers strongly affirms their sense of the narrator, Shanta, as being ‘known’ by them. The video guide is the expert voice, speaking a script written by OU academics to ‘sandwich’ the classroom film. She asks teachers to think carefully about what they are about to view and sets some focused questions for them to think about while they are watching the video. After seeing the classroom footage, the video guide asks the teachers to reflect upon what they have seen, and think about how they could apply similar techniques to classes they are currently teaching. By using the video guide ‘expert voice’ we were able to move away from the default ‘cascade’ model where information is passed down from the original author, through a range of master trainers, eventually reaching the teacher in a much diluted form. Instead, each teacher receives training, in its original concentrated form, directly from the expert through the video guide. With the mobile phone, the training is then literally ‘held’ by the teachers and is very much in their own hands, thus allowing the teachers to build their own understanding of the concepts in a bottom-up manner, through guided reflection, both individually and with support from peers. Figure 1 provides an example of how the guide works in practice. Figure 1: Extract from the video guide script: English in Action video Secondary Module 6: Listening in action Part 1: English in the classroom Hello and welcome to Module 6, which is about listening in action. We begin with Part 1 (SM6-V1) – English in the classroom. You will start this module by watching two video clips, which show two different teachers teaching the same lesson – Class 7, Unit 3, Lesson 14. As you watch the clips, try to answer this question: In which clip do students listen to more English? ***************************************video clip 1 ***************************************video clip 2 So – in which clip did the students listen to more English? [PAUSE] The students listened to much more English in the first video clip. They played a short game – guessing the name of the country – and they listened to the teacher asking questions about the country; for example: Is it very big? The teacher also gave instructions in English; for example, saying things like: Read the letter for two minutes to find the answers. In the second video clip, the teacher uses English to give instructions only. The lesson featured in these two video clips is a reading lesson, but you can see how it is possible to get students listening to English here – and speaking it too – by asking questions in English, and by giving instructions in English. It is true that the activity is quicker in the second clip – but the students in this classroom don’t get to hear as much English, don’t get to speak it, and may have more problems understanding the text that they are about to read, because they are less prepared, and are not so actively involved. Now what about you? Is your classroom more like the one in the first clip? Or the second? [PAUSE] How can you increase the amount of English you use in your classroom? [PAUSE] Go to Module 6 ‘Try in the Classroom 1’ in the Teacher Guide, and learn about how you can use more English in your classroom.

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|  English in Action in Bangladesh

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...