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1 Continuing professional development in action: an Indian experience Emma-Sue Prince and Alison Barrett Part 1: Defining CPD in India English partnerships between the British Council and state governments Everyone wants quality education for his or her children. The key to unlocking this quality depends primarily on teachers. Teachers need to be supported and motivated to enable children to achieve their potential. For this to happen, teachers need to have the opportunity to refresh and enhance their skills throughout their professional lives. A lifetime of teaching requires knowledge, skills and behaviours that continuously develop and evolve. This is encompassed in the concept of CPD – continuing professional development. With an estimated 3.2 million English language teachers working in government and private schools across India, the challenge of providing all of them with access to high quality and relevant professional development opportunities is immense. Teachers’ needs are often basic and fundamental; they work in low-resourced classrooms using linguistically challenging textbooks and often do not speak English themselves. Professional development offered by the central and state government tends to focus on mass training-based solutions, often through large-scale cascade models which provide limited scope for need-based and flexible inputs. The skills and experience of the teacher educators is variable and the lecture method tends to dominate, but, more critically, follow-up and schoolbased support is rare (NCTE, 2010). Since 2008 the British Council has been working in partnership with a number of state governments in India to design and implement in-service English language teacher education projects aimed at building teacher-educator and teacher capacity. They also aim to increase capability to improve language teaching and English language confidence, and to support ongoing professional development for teacher educators and teachers. Initially, the British Council was requested to provide short in-service trainer and teacher-training courses for existing government teacher educators, or master trainers, who then trained teachers. Although state government partners, educators and teachers were satisfied with the quality and impact of these courses, they recognised that one-off training programmes would not bring about sustainable classroom change in the medium

Continuing professional development in action |

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Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...