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We began by agreeing on the usefulness of these basic procedures and examined examples from other centres and published sources. Trainees were asked to identify what they liked about the examples to enable them to synthesise the results of their discussion into the design of their own procedures and documents, which they then implemented. The course also aimed to provide hands-on practice for short counselling sessions, through role play based on the participants’ own learning needs and wants, to enable them to conduct ‘pedagogic dialogues’ (MozzonMcPherson, n.d.). From our analysis, we agreed together that: a. Effective self-access systems require a time-efficient, cost-effective procedure for needs analysis for users at entry point. b. Learners benefit from a thorough induction process and learner training. c. Effective self-access systems require a process in which teacher co-ordinators reach agreement on what the learner can achieve through self-access within an agreed timeline, with agreed tasks and some type of feedback mechanism on how useful these tasks are. This process needs to be documented in a readily accessible way (sometimes referred to as a learner contract or SAC log). d. This agreement requires a counselling and discussion procedure for teacher co-ordinators and learners near the beginning and near the end of the timeline. This counselling needs to give the opportunity to the teacher co-ordinator and learner to discuss fully without putting too onerous a burden on the counsellor. e. Processes to collect and analyse learner feedback need to be in place. f. The regulatory aspect of the ‘House of Do’s and Don’ts’ is important to avoid the risk of misuse but equally important is helpful encouragement and advice for learners. g. Effective self-access systems require a process to identify overall SAC/LC use, including establishing level, frequency and nature of use. This process needs to be documented and, in summarised form, can be a useful leverage tool to obtain further funding. Principle 3: Resources in themselves are not enough: opportunities need to be provided for stakeholders to engage with resources The provision of resources is often one of the most top-down of all interventions related to self-access. All stakeholders, especially those nearest to the chalk face, benefit from familiarisation and engagement with those resources. A simple process was planned for CPD in which trainees were asked to list what resources they could recall and then make a physical comparison with what was actually available. Trainees were given the opportunity to experiment with resources they were least familiar with and report back in order to identify resources that could be used to meet specific needs. Throughout the training, teacher co-ordinators were encouraged to give their own opinions on what further resources could be purchased. In Ethiopia, in order to reach all stakeholders, awareness-raising on providing easy access to resources and the idea of choice was included in training for senior management and a simplified version of the course was delivered by one of the most able of the project teachers to military-appointed IT support in their first language (Amharic). Technical training was also provided by a skilled IT professional. Training

The house of ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts’ |

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Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...

Innovations in the CPD of English language teachers  

The publication, edited by David Hayes offers global perspectives on the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of English language teach...