{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

1


facebook.com/o2academybristol twitter.com/o2academybris instagram.com/o2academybris facebook.com/o2academybristol youtube.com/o2academytv twitter.com/o2academybris instagram.com/o2academybris youtube.com/o2academytv

Thu 3rd Mar • £25 adv £45 VIP

Fowler In Bristol Sun 6th Mar • £18.50 adv

Stiff Little Fingers Tue 8th Mar • £19 adv

Sabaton & Alestorm + Blood Bound

Wed 9th Mar • SOLD OUT

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats Thu 10th Mar • £18.50 adv

Reef Thu 17th Mar • £20 adv

The Wonder Stuff 30th Anniversary Tour

Fri 18th Mar • £24 adv

HRH AOR On The Road Tour 2016 Sat 19th Mar • £24 adv

The Stranglers Sun 20th Mar • £17.50 adv

Simple Plan + Ghost Town

Wed 23rd Mar • £20 adv

Trivium Fri 25th Mar • £16 adv

Wilkinson + Delta Heavy

Sun 27th Mar • £13 adv

Asher Roth ft Nottz + Saga

Thu 7th Apr • SOLD OUT

Jack Garratt

Sat 9th Apr • £12 adv

Sunset Sons + Louis Berry

Sun 10th Apr • £20 adv

Brian Fallon & The Crowes

Thu 14th Apr • SOLD OUT

Thu 5th May • £18 adv

Rend Collective Fri 13th May • £26 adv

Gov’t Mule Wed 18th May • £15 adv

The Heavy

The Lumineers

Fri 20th May • £17 adv

Sat 16th Apr • From £9.44 adv 10pm-5am • over 18s only

Sun 29th May • £22.50 adv

Banjax: Toolroom Live Sun 17th Apr • £19.50 adv

The Dandy Warhols Magnum

Wolfmother

Fri 3rd Jun • RESCHEDULED DATE Original tickets still valid

Mon 18th Apr • £17.50 adv

Nelly

Hollywood Undead Thu 21st Apr • £25 adv

Wilko Johnson Fri 22nd Apr • RESCHEDULED DATE £23.50 adv £65 VIP

Ben Haenow

Sat 23rd Apr • From £5 adv 10pm-5am • over 18s only

Fri 10th Jun • £16.50 adv

Sham 69 + Angelic Upstarts

Tue 28th Jun • SOLD OUT

Grimes Fri 26th Aug • £5 adv

Beyond Recall

Garage Nation

Fri 2nd Sep • £11 adv

Wed 27th Apr • £12 adv

Guns 2 Roses

Raleigh Ritchie Thu 28th Apr • £25 adv

Billy Ocean “When The Going Gets Tough” 30th Anniversary Tour

Fri 29th Apr • £18 adv

Casts

Mon 2nd May • From £22 adv

Tarrus Riley & The Blak Soil Band + Assassin AKA Agent Sasco

Fri 7th Oct • £27 adv

The Mission Fri 21st Oct • £20 adv

The Undertones 40th Anniversary Tour

Sun 6th Nov • £16.50 adv

Y&T Tue 8th Nov • £15 adv

Sleaford Mods

O2 Academy Bristol Frogmore Street, Bristol BS1 5NA • Doors 7pm unless stated Venue box office opening hours: Mon - Sat 12pm - 4pm • No booking fee on cash transactions

ticketweb.co.uk • seetickets.com • gigantic.com • ticketmaster.co.uk

2 2

o2academybristol.co.uk

Mar • 2016


3


vvvvvvvvvvw

4


MAR ISSUE #50

RELEASES (P.26)

We did it! Welcome to our 50th issue. Can you believe it? I know I can’t. The shakey days of 2012 feel worlds away as I write this – and with good reason, too. Since then we’ve pulled events, releases, branching out to London and of course a new name under our belts and, I hope, grown a little as people each frantic month that goes by. This month we take a look at our favourite things from the last four-and-a-bit years in ‘50 Moments in Bristol Music’. With all the shows, releases, signings, openings and other crazy goings on it was damn hard to choose, but choose we did. On top of all that we talk to Joanna Gruesome and Why We Love, Rise share their picks for the month, plus of course all the usual release, live, and live listing madness. Take five, everyone.

08 11 12 19 21 26 30 31 43 45

Picks with: Rise Bristol Why We Love

‘50 Moments...’ Dear Dick Joanna Gruesome New Releases Live Reviews Live Listings Rehearsal Listings Thoughts

EDITOR / SALES: Loki Lillistone loki@bristollivemagazine.com DEPUTY EDITOR: Rhys Buchanan rhys@bristollivemagazine.com ONLINE EDITOR: Sammy Maine sammy@bristollivemagazine.com ALL PR / ENQUIRIES: info@bristollivemagazine.com Plus many more talented, wonderful contributors. ‘50 Moments’ illustrations by Mystie Chamberlin.

w w w. b r i s t o l l i v e m a g a z i n e . c o m 5


6


ROO PANES THE CAT EMPIRE

THE DUNWELLS

BRISTOL COLSTON HALL THE LANTERN

FRI 01 APRIL

+ JACK WATTS

WED 02 MARCH

FRI 01 APRIL

BATH PAVILION

BRISTOL LOUISIANA

NEWTON ZIBRA FAULKNER

MY BABY

SUNDAY 10 APRIL

THU 14 APRIL

CARDIFF UNIVERSITY MONDAY 11 APRIL

BRISTOL COLSTON HALL

TUE 12 APRIL

BRISTOL LOUISIANA

BRISTOL THE FLEECE

EXMAGICIAN THE HEAVY TELEVISION TUE 03 MAY

BRISTOL LOUISIANA

WED 18 MAY

BRISTOL O2 ACADEMY

MON 06 JUNE

BRISTOL ANSON ROOMS

TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM GIGSANDTOURS.COM & VENUE BOX OFFICES

7


GUEST PICKS

with:

BLOOD SPORT

Adrian Dutt @adriandutt

BLOOD SPORT AXE TO THE ROOT Anyone who has witnessed Blood Sport live will know how incredible they are. Self-proclaimed “aggro-beat” cum high-energy floorfillers, they tread the vortex-engulfing, noisy space between Fela Kuti and Factory Floor. Their new LP, released on Blast First Petite / Hybrid Vigour (their own DIY imprint), is four slabs of golden tropical-noise guitar-electronica making it this month’s essential purchase, and the live band to see right now.

8

LUBOMYR MELNYK THE LANTERN, 14TH Lubomyr Melnyk is my favourite Erased Tapes artist. His minimal piano compositions are layered, hypnotic, fractured and cyclical – but ultimately mind blowing. It is impossible not to be swept away in his lush immersive pieces, they are truly beautiful. If you’re looking to escape the real world for a few hours, I suggest you come and witness his magic. RINK RINK We might be slightly biased with this one, as one half of Rink is a member of Team Rise, but the solitary song they’ve unleashed into the world so far is a dreamy, fuzzy lullaby that woozes in and out of my head all day long. Reminiscent of Cocteau Twins, but with a seductive slacker backdrop.


Sebbo Newtan @risebristol

ED PENFOLD CAULKHEAD Part of the frustratingly talented Belvoir collective, Ed Penfold has started to grow bigger than Bristol, with 6music plays and a session both on the horizon. His hazy blend of psychedelia and folk tips its hat to the genius of Syd Barrett at times, but his unique sound is what brings the songs to life. Surreal lyricism that paints an addictive picture.

EAGULLS

PICK: The angular post-punk scuzzballs are back in the city! Fiddlers, 3rd. Colin Shelby

GOLDEN TEACHER LOVE If you aren’t familiar with Golden Teacher yet, we suggest you check them out now. The Glaswegian art school band are a multi-faceted monster who fuse dance music with funk and afrobeat rhythms. Whenever we play this song in the shop, we sell copies of the LP; and everyone starts to dance in their own little worlds. It’s a pleasure to witness.

GOLDEN TEACHER

STOKED ON... Let’s Kill Janice w/ The Jesuits @ PRSC, 5th.

We’ve been squirreled away for the better part of the past two years working on a record, so it’s great to finally be back. This show is going to be our unofficial homecoming, plus it’s always great getting to see Jesuits!

9


For all musicians

who write and compose

who record

who teach

theMU.org @WeAreTheMU

10


Why We

Love W. Loki Lillistone Little over a year ago, Why We Love shared Fake A Death with the world. The EP was a rare and inimitable lesson in candid, perfectlycrafted guitar-pop, complete with oohs and shimmering guitars. Sitting somewhere between the American and British definitions of indie, we could say between The Shins and Mystery Jets, you may be led on first listen to think that melody is king, but songwriter Joe Wellfair does more than chase hooks: “I have huge admiration for writers like Stuart Murdoch [Belle and Sebastian] or James Mercer [The Shins] who have this amazing ability to write tunes which are not only memorable and catchy, but also completely unique and unpredictable.” Unpredictable too, is the less produced, perhaps more flowing sound on new EP The Boy You Knew, certainly swimming in the opposite direction to most bands production-wise. “We really wanted to make this record sound natural and real,” explains Joe. “While that heavily produced sound worked for those songs [on ‘Fake A Death’], it can sometimes take away… Everything you hear on ‘The Boy You Knew’ is precisely as it was played or sung.” It’s easy to agree that the result is a more personal Why We Love, whose

songs speak for themselves irrespective of all else. If it’s not clear from the effortless harmonies (or kinda matching fiery locks) the band’s guy-girl vocals are powered by brother-sister telepathy. Bassist and second vocal Rachel Wellfair explains: “Joe and I have always sang and played music together… We are really in tune with each other creatively and the harmonies come together pretty naturally, like a sixth sense!” But they’re not unlike your average siblings. “Of course there’s a bit of sibling rivalry too, but Joe handles being the inferior one pretty well,” she laughs. Concerned we’ll have to wait another year for new music, I ask about their plans for 2016: “We always have new songs in the pipeline,” Rachel reassures. And I’m sure it’s true; great songs seem to just fall out of these guys. From their bittersweet stories to their coy melodies, listening to Why We Love feels like being let in on a little secret – but they won’t be a secret for long.

11


5 0 M O M E N T S I N

B R I S T O L

M U S I C

50 issues on, we take a look back at some of th e b es t th i n g s we’ve s een , h ea rd o r b een a part of since the depths of 2012.

2 0 1 2 23 03

The Gallimaufry opens it’s doors, forming an inimitable part of our vibrant scene. Within their first twelve months they’d go on to host some of the most memorable small shows of the year, including George Ezra before almost anyone else.

03 06

The first Love Saves The Day! It was shiny and new, and the weather was tip-top. This sellout set the tone for ensuing years, becoming a cornerstone of our now thick festival season.

27 08

The Deadpunk Bank Holiday Special has its inaugural show. This of course also marked the opening of the Exchange, with both now in their fifth year. Frankly, we can’t imagine life without either now.

12

22 09

Five years since Ashton Court Festival became defunkt, Brisfest brings us all back to the field many missed so sorely, considering that the original event had been going since the mid-70s. “It’s our spiritual home!” said organiser Poppy Stephenson – and she wasn’t wrong.

10 11

“When are you going to do another Fear Of Fiction Festival?” This is a question we hear on the regular. We got to book some of our fave acts that year, including reams of Bristol bands, and pack out weird and wonderful places like shortlived artspace, The Motorcycle Showrooms. We didn’t finish packing down until 4am… Ask us again next year.

17 11

Este from Haim proposes to Big Jeff on-stage, Exchange. “She got down on one knee and everything! Made me really blush!”


MØ, Swim Deep, Blue Hawaii, Dan Croll, Skaters, Wolf Alice and more in one day, it really personified the ‘find your new favourite band’ vibe that the fest does so well.

01 07

2 0 1 3 17 03

We celebrate our First Birthday with Casimir, Coasts and Parrington Jackson, Start The Bus. “We were blown away,” remembers Loki. “Everyone did awesome and it was one-in-one-out almost all night.”

13 05

The Croft send-off show! Turbowolf absolutely destroyed it as we all said a teary goodbye to a true pillar of our lives. “It’s like being told you can’t go in your lounge anymore,” said the band in our mini documentary with Rataplan Films, which was screened at the Exchange later that month.

16 05

Bristol invades Great Escape 2013 by way of Howling Owl, us and others. “We had Naturals, Spectres, Towns and Velcro Hooks on our official stage,” says Adrian from the label. “They saw the London show we did with this line up and wanted it for Great Escape. Idiots!” All culminated in burning a giant owl effigy on the beach at 2am.

16 05

It’s hard to pick a year from Dot to Dot, but 2013 really took it for us. With Deap Vally, London Grammar,

Roll For The Soul opens up! Things have never been the same for the DIY music / cycling contingencies of Bristol, or our burger-filled tums for that matter.

29 08

ArcTanGent launches. Having had three highly-subscribed years under its belt at this point, it’s hard to imagine what happened in Augusts prior, but if one thing’s for certain, Bristol can finally boast a bonafide get-in-the-damn-field festival longterm.

08 12

Factory Floor at Rise. Having given us so many memorable in-stores over the years, this bastion of independence and great records gave extra on this particular winter evening. Picture an entranced audience and, we’re sure, some fanboying members of staff.

12 12

The Cube finally reaches funding goal. Yep, they finally bought the building and ensured their future. “What has been done tonight can’t be underestimated,” said the team. “No matter what goes on around it, there will always be an arts centre on Dove Street South, Bristol.”

13


moving sound could be carried seamlessly over to the live setting.

2 0 1 4 10 01

George Ezra runner-up in BBC Sound of 2014. Big deal, no? One of many ways in which he did Bristol proud that year, it was great to see him garner recognition from one of the most coveted entities in new music.

23 01

John E Vistic and co. do Russian Winter. Their aim to bring “the romance and revolution of 1930s Russia” to Bristol was much more than a just gig, but also an album, film, audio-visual performance piece and an art-project.

23 01

Oliver Wilde’s Maida Vale Session with Huw Stephens. Opening with his then recent single, ‘Stomach Full of Cats’, Oliver proved to the whole country that his layered,

14

05 02

The power of the Internet helps return She Makes War’s stolen guitars. “My blog posts about it trended on Twitter, just below the London Transport strikes, and a few days later the police seized the instruments back off some bloke who tried to sell them in Bedminster.” As she puts it: “The universe is kind sometimes.”

03 04

Coasts sell out their Louisiana home-coming show. After at least three years of grafting as a small band, the guys finally got the industry traction they needed – and this was their triumphant return.

02 05

Temples Festival launches and smashes it. Things couldn’t have gone much better for organiser and savvy metal promoter Francis Mace, with Kerrang! even featuring the local fest alongside big-hitters like Download in their fest guide.

02 05

#Thekla30. What a huge weekend of gigs and parties this was. Acts as diverse as Gravenhurst, Seasfire and Idles all came out to give Thekla a 30th birthday to remember.

21 06

What was life even like before Chiverin’s first show? Their launch with Plastic Mermaids sold out and set a lot in motion for Bristol. A little-known Tamu Massif stepped


live show was one of the most memorable of the last few years. “A veritable masterclass in modern performance arts,” wrote Best Fit.

in as a last minute support, of course going on to release a great EP with Chiverin. “That was where it all started,” laughs label manager, Aled.

01 07

Spectres sign to Sonic Cathedral. A match made in heaven, SC helped to get the band’s unsettling sounds out to more people than ever before and teamed up with them on thought-provoking projects like ‘Record Store Day Is Dying’.

26 07

Howling Owl is Three. This was marked by a whole week of shows at Centrespace, with secret lineups ranging from the relatively unknown to then exploding Oliver Wilde.

21 08

Marble Factory opens. Another game-changer for Bristol, the team there went on to host some of the most diverse shows of the next twelve months, from Dry The River to, well, Lordi.

05 10

George Ezra scores a no.1 album. Yep, his debut Wanted on Voyage made just a bit of an impact, no? A great day for Bristol, BIMM and of course the baritone chap himself.

09 10

FKA Twigs at Trinity Centre. It’s no surprise, considering the perplexing yet beautiful nature of her on-track efforts, that her

25 11

Trust Fund sign to Turnstile. Not only did Ellis Jones et al reach a wider audience, but would go on to release two albums in the space of a year. Both don’t-call-it-lo-fi crackers, too.

02 12

Bristol reacts to Gravenhurst’s passing. It was our worst nightmare: current BLM coverstar, Nick Talbot, had suddenly passed away. The beautiful part, however, was the way Bristol poured its heart out. Nick, you touched many lives.

31 12

For Fans Of Bands NYE. The Exchange / Stag & Hounds hosted one of the most memorable rock ‘n’ roll new year’s eves for a long time, with Future Of The Left, St Pierre, Iran Iran and more.

15


18 04

Record Store Day 2015. Howling Owl and Sonic Cathedral turned the mounting ill-feeling into a positive with ‘Record Store Is Dying’, producing 365 copies of their de facto RSD release and releasing one a day for a year. Meanwhile, Rise kicked out a great live lineup as always and Jacknife invited people to vandalise their favourite record covers.

23 05

The Flux present their first fest stage. Bristol’s lovable and everdeveloping music blog The Flux turned a corner, hosting a small stage at Dot to Dot 2015 with some of their favourite new acts.

19 06

Tamu Massif EP Launch. Having shared an incredible debut EP and hit the cover of BLM, this launch show became the focal point for us all to celebrate together. Much time was spent translating his often patchwork sound to the stage – and it really showed. Magical.

2 0 1 5 21 01 30 01

01 02

07 02

04 04

16

Portishead’s Geoff Barrow scores Ex Machina soundtrack with Ben Salisbury. Apt, no? Independent Venue Week 2015 at The Louisiana. IVW isn’t just good fun – it’s damn important. This was the first year helmed by Chiverin, bringing The Bronze Medal, Rhain, Goan Dogs, Bad Sounds, Rebecca Clements, Fenne Lily and more into our ears and faces. What a night. Swiss-Bristolian photographer Laure Noverraz’s live music photography exhibition ‘Back Light’ starts at Start The Bus. It was a pleasure to hang out with shots from Bristol and beyond as you ate, drank or watched yet another band. Band-ception. Trust Fund sell out two nights in a row at RFTS, their debut album launch. Catching up with Rob Wall from the venue, he says: “They’re deservedly gaining a reputation... We’re very proud to have played some small part in that journey.” Goat: Sounds Of Surrender. Turning Portland Square into ‘Circomedia’, Red Bull called on Goat to bring something unique to their Music Academy UK tour, all clad in, esoteric ceremonial dress.

31 07

21 08

Farmfest’s 10th Birthday. Another local institution passes a massive milestone. Their 2015 lineup was a boutique triumph and we never appreciated them more. Maybe we’ll be ten one day, eh? Banksy’s Dismaland opens. Not just another great art project from arguably the city’s most famous export, but also a pop-up venue


for the likes of Sleaford Mods and Savages, who blew the doors off the following month.

07 10

Tamu Massif’s Malthouse Session. A gorgeous rendition of ‘Delphine’ from one of our favourite acts of the year, in one of our favourite studios.

24 10

Oliver Wilde at Simple Things 2015. As tricky as it is to pick one moment from such an increasingly influential festival, this is a sure favourite. “I melted…” said Thorny’s Joseph Waugh. “A near ten-piece band with strings and all. A wave of existential bliss.”

26 10

Spectres successfully troll us all about Sam Smith, posting hoax emails about a spat in which Sam Smith’s management sought legal action against their spoof Bond song. Reported by us, Fact, Noisey, Crack and later, er, The Sun.

28 10

The Sanctum’s 552-hour-long show. Theaster Gates’ most recent public art commission involved the building of a temporary, hobbit-like structure in the ruins of Temple Church and hosting a 24-hour calendar for 24 days straight.

13 11

The Naturals finally drop their debut album after ten years. A decade is a long time to wait for anything, especially a record. But wait we did – and great it was.

15 11

This Is The Kit with Rozi Plain and Rachael Dadd at The Canteen. “Everyone sat on the floor between tables, totally spellbound,” says John Blakely from the venue.

04 12

Thorny launch event at the Exchange. Since their soft launch earlier in the year, we were all eager for more from the arty, LGBT-friendly night — and Emily Breeze’s Candy Darling delivered in visceral, theatrical style.

13 12

Ho99o9 at The Louisiana. “From the moment the singer walked out in a wedding dress I thought, okay, this is going to be a bit different,” said BLM writer Adam Quarshie of the hip hop via hardcore duo. “The crowd erupted into a mosh pit after about three minutes.”

2 0 1 6 16 01

New Year / New Noise 3. There’s no question that interesting things happen at Bristol’s Arnolfini, and this instalment of NYNN with Rhain, Spectres, Repo Man and more was the topper on a trilogy of leftfield, outsider music.

12 02

Bristol hosts 6Music Festival. From the moment the city was chosen, to the last note played, the excitement was palpable. Not only did we have the likes of Yeasayer, Primal Scream, Savages and more, but the way our venues came together to offer a Fringe lineup that challenged the main one – unforgetable.

17


18


DEAR DICK E

ach month (or, you know, whenever) our own Dick Dixon will be answering your urgent questions with sincerity and fervor.

§I want to break into the world of bedroom production and was hoping to make it big. However, I have very little time on my hands. Can you give me any tips to speed up the process? Tom, Stokes Croft You’d assume just anybody could sit at home in their pants and knock out a banger, but there’s more to it than meets the eye. You’ll need a good Digital Audio Workstation, but you shouldn’t pay for it. Spread the cost by torrenting it for free! Yes, it’s unstable and loses your work, but it’s a reflection of you. Cnfs lstnrs by rmvng th vwls frm trck nms nd lbm ttls. Mysterious! Finally, saturate the market. I mean REALLY bump up the numbers. Your output should be the musical equivalent of a sopping wet jumper. Quantity is the new quality after all. D

§Congratulations on your 50th issue! I’m currently working on a new magazine promoting self-help, mindfulness and wholesome living for the people of Bristol: Bristol LIVE. Do you have any advice for those just starting out? Anon, St Werburghs I can’t tell if you’re in breach of copyright or common sense. Our sweat runs through the very streets of our fair city. Not literally of course, it’s a metaphor. Step off. “This town ain’t big enough for the both of us” Sparks. D Do you have a question? Email dick@bristollivemagazine.

19


20


J O A N N A

G R U E S O M E W. C h r i s t i a n N o r t h w o o d

A

s much as some people want you to believe that guitar music’s dead – it’s not. However, it can be very boring. You know, identi-kit acts being chucked together and writing pointless pop. Joanna Gruesome continue to prove that not only can you release two incredible albums, help to foster a DIY community and play in multiple bands, but you can do it all whilst writing catchy power-pop anthems. Formed in 2010, Joanna Gruesome released their fantastic second LP ‘Peanut Butter’ last year, an album that’s a punk riot, combining

P. C o u r t e s y o f J . G .

feedback, riffs, melodies, shouting and harmonies to create one of the best albums of 2015. Mid-way through the year, vocalist Alanna unfortunately left the group, with the remaining members bringing in Kate and Roxy to bolster the line-up. This doesn’t seem to have slowed them down, with guitarist and songwriter Owen Williams telling me the biggest change was “less space in the van, but they are legends obviously so [it] doesn’t matter.” While Joanna Gruesome may be the main focus for everyone in the band, it’s by no means the only one. All members have at least one other project, including Owen’s band, Caramel. He 21


The Joanna Gruesome extracurricular schedule – seances, trips to pagan sites, etc. – is exhausting. says that having both bands can be “overwhelming,” telling me that “writing a J. Gruesome album in itself is kind of like writing a power pop album and a hardcore punk album at the same time, so writing stuff for Caramel on top does involve a fair amount of concentration… Also the J.G. extracurricular schedule – seances, trips to pagan sites etc. – is exhausting. And then there’s working out what you’re going to wear!” Luckily though it’s not all stress and Owen thinks the fact that he, Roxy and Max play in other bands together helped them “gain that vital telepathic connection” leading to, among other things, no onstage outfit clashes. The other bands they’re in give them a sense of community and the support of like-minded musicians. At an Art is Hard event last year – a label they’ve released on before – I saw most of the band milling about during the day, playing or just hanging out. It gave the event a family feel, and Owen confirms this: “I think boring, apolitical bands tend not to have friendships with other bands or bother to position themselves

22

within those kinds of communities. So they tour with bands they’ve never met or listened to, play sponsored shows and probably take no interest in the operation of their band. I think the communities we’ve been involved with attempt to reject that model.” He says it’s “healthy” for bands to be fostering these communities, with proof of this being the sheer brilliance of all the acts involved. It helps nurture positivity and support, the kind exemplified by the community space that the band are currently trying to set up. They’ve got a location in sights and “fingers crossed” as Owen adds, they’ll be able to secure it. The aim is to create somewhere that counters the kinds of venues that Owen criticises are “a rented black box that would much rather be functioning as a bar and nothing else.” With truly independent and community-run venues hard to find in their main base of Cardiff, Owen tells me: “People obviously want politically and aesthetically exciting spaces, places where you are very unlikely to find bands of bearded men in plaid shirts playing on stages draped in Brewdog and Jack Daniels flags; i.e. places that won’t result in psychic death.” As you may have guessed, Joanna Gruesome don’t mince their words. It’s refreshing to chat to an outspoken band, helping to be the remedy to a lot of what they feel is wrong with music, or the world at large. Trying to remain “politically conscious about how the


band should operate in the real world and how our feminist /anti-homophobic principles and so on should inform our decisions and actions,” the band’s lyrics are often misinterpreted as being about these themes. Instead, Owen tells me that they’re “pretty much all standard espionage / revenge fantasy pop lyrics.” The explicitly political is instead the personal, not that these are necessarily mutually exclusive as Owen tells me: “I actually have been writing a bit about my own gender , processing my own feelings about it being non-binary, about being male assigned, performing femme, etc... And in a world that’s still super hostile towards these ideas, simply writing about one’s own gender in this way can obviously be a political, feminist or ‘queer’ act.” There are not many other acts, at least not many others that have won the Welsh Music Prize, that you can imagine tackling gender, politics and more in such a head-on way, but Joanna Gruesome are different – and they’re punk in the purest sense of the word.

March Dates: 18th // Exchange, Bristol 19th // DIY Space, London 20th // The Hope & Ruin, Brighton

23


BRISTOL GIG GUIDE FRIDAY 4TH MARCH

FRIDAY 18TH MARCH

THE LOUISIANA

START THE BUS

EMILIE & OGDEN

SUNDAY 20TH MARCH

THE LANTERN, COLSTON HALL

THE LOUISIANA

TUESDAY 8TH MARCH

GLASS / WASUREMONO / THE GREYHOUNDS START THE BUS

ROCKY VOTOLATO THE CROFTER’S RIGHTS

WAKEY WAKEY THE LOUISIANA

PIXEL FIX

THE PUPPINI SISTERS KOMEDIA, BATH

VUKOVI EXCHANGE

TUESDAY 22ND MARCH

MAN MADE

THE CROFTER’S RIGHTS

WEDNESDAY 9TH MARCH

WEDNESDAY 23RD MARCH

O2 ACADEMY

THE LOUISIANA

NATHANIEL RATELIFF & THE NIGHT SWEATS MATT CORBY

THE HUNNA

THURSDAY 24TH MARCH

ANSON ROOMS

FRANCIS LUNG

THE CROFTER’S RIGHTS

MONDAY 28TH MARCH

MODEL AEROPLANES / NATIVE PEOPLE / IDLSIDE PURSON / CROSA ROSA THE LOUISIANA

SUNDAY 13TH MARCH

FRANKIE & THE HEARTSTRINGS THE CROFTER’S RIGHTS

MONDAY 14TH MARCH

STEVEN JAMES ADAMS THE LOUISIANA

TUESDAY 15TH MARCH

HALF MOON RUN ANSON ROOMS

THE LOUISIANA

CAPE CUB

THE LOUISIANA TUESDAY 29TH MARCH

BILLY LOCKETT / ISSACO / EMI MCDADE THE LOUISIANA

MICHAEL KIWANUKA THE LANTERN, COLSTON HALL MONDAY 4TH APRIL

HIGH TYDE THE LOUISIANA

TUESDAY 5TH APRIL

THURSDAY 17TH MARCH

PATENT PENDING

THE LANTERN, COLSTON HALL

SOLOMON GREY

MARTIN HARLEY & DANIEL KIMBRO SKINNY LIVING

THE CROFTER’S RIGHTS 24

TRAAMS

MONDAY 7TH MARCH

THE DEAR HUNTER / GRUMBLE BEE

FL gigsbristol

THE MARBLE FACTORY THE LOUISIANA

Advance Tickets • alt-tickets.co.uk • gigantic.com • bristolticketshop.co.uk • + all other good outlets...


THEKLA

LIVE LISTINGS The Grove East Mud Dock Bristol BS1 4RB theklabristol.co.uk | thekla.club F L theklabristol | I X theklabris alt-tickets.co.uk • gigantic.com • bristolticketshop.co.uk

WEDNESDAY 9TH MARCH

RYAN HAMILTON

SATURDAY 16TH APRIL

THURSDAY 10TH MARCH

JOSEF SALVAT

FRIDAY 15TH APRIL

FUTURE OF THE LEFT

+ THE HALF EARTH

THE ALGORITHM + DRIP FED EMPIRE

FRIDAY 11TH MARCH

ADY SULEIMAN

TUESDAY 19TH APRIL

MIKE DIGNAM

SUNDAY 13TH MARCH

NATTY & THE REBELSHIP ST. PAT’S PAT’S

WEDNESDAY 20TH APRIL

MICAH P HINSON

THURSDAY 17TH MARCH

SHEELANAGIG

+ PETE ROE

FRIDAY 22ND APRIL

MOLOTOV JUKEBOX

FRIDAY 18TH MARCH

EMMY THE GREAT

MONDAY 25TH APRIL

NAO

SOLD OUT

SATURDAY 19TH MARCH

ROACHFORD

WEDNESDAY 27TH APRIL

THE SPITFIRES

TUESDAY 22ND MARCH

THE DUKE SPIRIT

SUNDAY 1ST MAY

AQUILO

WEDNESDAY 23RD MARCH

BANCO DE GAIA + SOPHIE BARKER (ZERO 7)

TUESDAY 10TH MAY

THE SUMMER SET WEDNESDAY 11TH MAY

THURSDAY 24TH MARCH

TRACER

+ FEDERAL CHARM + EVERYDAY CIRCUS SATURDAY 26TH MARCH

SHE MAKES WAR

+ JEMIMA SURRENDER + COUSIN KULA

MIKE PETERS

PRESENTS: THE ALARM - DECLARE YOUR STRENGTH TOUR SATURDAY 14TH MAY

ADAM GREEN FRIDAY 15TH - SUNDAY 17TH JULY

TUESDAY 5TH APRIL

ROOM 94

+ AUTUMN RUIN

MONDAY 11TH APRIL

LUCIUS

TUESDAY 12TH APRIL

THE DECOY WEDNESDAY 13TH APRIL

MEXRRISSEY

BRISTOL HARBOUR FESTIVAL FRIDAY 29TH JULY

FROST* WEDNESDAY 19TH OCTOBER

THE SUNSHINE UNDERGROUND 25


NEW RELEASES

EMMY THE GREAT

OUR RELEASE OF THE MONTH It’s taken three studio albums for Emmy The Great to finally find her sound. From dabbling in a Christmas album, to penning country love songs and an anti-folk approach – she’s eventually there.

Emmy The Great Second Love Bella Union | 11th Mar LIVE: Friday 8th March @ Thekla, Bristol, 7pm. Tickets £14 + booking fee from: bristolticketshop.co.uk 26

From the first track on Second Love, a pure, ethereal nature ripples through the evocative guitarwork and soothing, high-pitched vocals, echoing Agnes Obel. With a little help from Wild Beasts’ frontman Tom Fleming on astounding track ‘Swimming Pool’, Emma-Lee Moss is stripped bare for the whole world to see. The Hong Kong-born musician once sang of heartbreak and loss in albums past, but has settled for logic and philosophy this time round. It is, however, clear to see the older, stark and anxiety-ridden lyricist on ‘Social Halo’. Overall, what the album lacks in a final shuddering climax, it makes up for in quirky lyricism and a musical eccentricity that is irreplicable. Emmie Harrison


Telegram Operator Gramgram | Out Now Sounding like Toy with the reverb scraped off and the introversion banished, Londonbased Telegram’s debut explains why so many top bands have wanted to have them as touring buddies within the last year. Songs like ‘Aeons’ and opener ‘Rule Number One’ are equal parts punishing and mesmerising, drawing you in with their motorik rhythm section, before punching you in the face with heavy, squalling guitars. Produced by ex-Test Icicle Rory Atwell (which explains the unhinged guitars), it’s full of rabid solos and big choruses. There are some surprises, including ‘Telegramme’s menacingly slow build, but this is an album heavily cut from the 60s garage rock cloth. Christian Northwood

Poliça United Crushers Memphis Ind./PIAS | 4th Mar The synthpop Minnesotans made massive waves with Shulamith in 2013; now here we are, three years later, with an album perhaps less romanticised or adventurous, but certainly darker. We’re miles away from dancing reveries, faced now with wayward, atmospheric rock, where Channy Leaneagh’s voice dominates the arrangements. There remains, though, that marvellous mix of processed vocals and semielectronic instrumentation that gives Poliça their unique sound, as in ‘Lime Habits’, the album’s lead single. This is an album ‘correct’ for fans, but that will unlikely bring much to the table for new listeners in search of something truly special. Laure Noverraz

Why We Love The Boy You Knew Self-release | 25th Mar Opening with bare, acoustic tones and Joe Wellfair’s memorable voice, Why We Love are back and it feels good; even before initial gambit ‘Staying Awake’ erupts into the melodically dense guitar pop that has become their trademark. But there is variation. The instrumentation on ‘Surrender’ takes a rougher, more slackernodding tact that wouldn’t sound out of place coming from Courtney Barnett; this of course before the far-reaching chorus is fully let out of the box and woahs take us toward an almost shoegaze climax. I’ll admit it’s easy to miss some of the sparkle exhibited on their debut, but this is an EP that does no hiding, leaving nothing but their exemplary songwriting in sight. Loki Lillistone 27


Oh, The Guilt Self-titled EP Self-release | 19th Mar The sounds captured here are cold, atmospheric and, at times, satisfyingly abrasive. Bristol trio Oh, The Guilt merge brooding guitar lines with savage outbursts on a debut EP that loses none of the hypnotic power of their live performances. On ‘A Gesture Of Moral Support’ and ‘Watch Yrself’ guitarists Chris Nicholls and Ami Amp pull haunting metallic melodies from their instruments, which peak with waves of distorted noise. The real climax, however, is the violence of closer ‘White Car’, with its squalling guitars and drummer Hannah Layhe’s turbulent cymbal crashes. Visually Oh, The Guilt have a strong design aesthetic, but sound far from stylistic; this recording has genuine grit. Michael Liggins

Yuck Stranger Things Mamé Records | Out Now Conjuring memories of warmer days, sweat in your eyes and that feeling of melting into the pavement, Londonbased Yuck return with their third full-length – the second since the departure of lead songwriter Daniel Blumberg – championing their updated take on midtempo fuzz. In perhaps trying to achieve the punch they had on their self-titled debut, by way of tracks like ‘Cannonball’ and ‘Hold Me Closer’, Yuck drift through ‘Stranger Things’, occasionally allowing some vibrant guitar riffs to shimmer through on tracks like ‘Swirling’. Still, this record is a statement of identity, one that showcases their ability to suck listeners in with crunching, white noised dream-rock. Albert Testani 28

Nada Surf You Know Who You Are City Slang | 4th Mar

Venturing out from a four year hiatus, veteran indie rock underdogs Nada Surf have been hinting at this, their eighth LP release, for a little while now.

You Know Who You Are comes across as an album of well-crafted, yet insipidly rapturous pop rock that progresses like a wistful glance over the shoulder before stepping into the sunshine. Songs breeze along midtempo; ever hopeful and often bittersweet, as on numbers ‘Friend Hospital’ and the preachingly upbeat ‘Out Of The Dark’. Final track ‘Victory’s Yours’ closes with the line “I wish you peace now I’m gone.” Could this be Caws’ last respectful salute as Nada Surf retire into the nostalgic 90s ether? Ash Clarke


AURORA All My Demons Greeting Me As A Friend Decca/Petroleum/Glassnote 11th Mar Norwegian singer AURORA may only be nineteen, but don’t let her age fool you – she’s something of a prodigy, having started playing classical music at six years old, writing her own songs at ten and now continuing to take on the world with her distinctive sound. Still carrying her classical influence with her, Demons… is a hook-laden electro-pop delight, packed with atmospheric strings and haunting melodies, all strung together by her otherworldly vocals. A creative journey from beginning to end, albumopener ‘Runaway’ could be the dramatic soundtrack to a Hollywood blockbuster, while upbeat numbers like ‘Conquerer’ and ‘I Went Too Far’ may even make you want to dance. Angharad Bishop

White Denim Stiff Downtown/Sony | 25th Mar

Upon first listen, White Denim’s seventh album Stiff sounds as if it was compiled of rejects from the School of Rock soundtrack. As you delve deeper though, the perfect injection of psychedelic and proggy influences start to sound more Fool’s Gold than foolish. You can tell that this album left room for more experimentation, with plenty of plucky choruses that get heads bopping. The foursome mix together the kinds of riffs that will resonate nicely with fans of The Black Keys, or those who prefer the ‘Molly’s Chamber’ days of Kings of Leon. Topped with a good old Texan twang, the boys have created a stiff little number to play over and over again. Emmie Harrison

Liima ii 4AD | 18th Mar

Meaning ‘glue’ in Finnish, Liima is a collaboration between the three core members of Efterklang, and their live percussionist Tatu Rönkkö. Efterklang fans expecting epic, widescreen, orchestral tunes may be disappointed, but the band’s tunefulness is never far beneath the surface. Opener ‘Your Heart’, with its retrofuturistic keys, leads the way to percussive pop, hints of contemporary EDM, horn sections and even faint reggae beats heard later on the album. The record’s melodicism and the playful richness of its instrumentation make for a satisfying listen. Unusually for its improvised beginnings, the music of ii is easily accessible, while being interesting enough to justify repeat plays. Tim Ellis 29


LAST MONTH PHOTO: MUSTAFA MIRREH

NME AWARDS TOUR O2 ACADEMY The NME Awards Tour has been responsible for many memories here in Bristol, however this latest run of shows offers a slightly strange bill of acts. Ratboy gains a much bigger crowd than the first act Bugzy Malone, but the youngster performs like he’s just staggered out of a skate-park. It’s messy and slightly painful to watch as we’re patronised with feigned working class social realism. Drenge overshadow anything else on the bill as they tower with lurching and sinister numbers like ‘The Woods’; it’s a treat to hear a healthy amount from their second album Undertow. They make the subdued sounds of Bloc Party’s latest album appear stale as they attempt to follow up. Sadly, this was a weaker year in their history of delivering promising new music. Rhys Buchanan 30

Find full live reviews and more on bristollivemagazine.com LOYLE CARNER EXCHANGE There’s something about Loyle Carner. As soon as he introduced himself to the heaving Exchange audience, he had us in the palm of his hand. Carner interspersed his deeply intimate songs of love and loss with equally honest anecdotes. He spoke with an open ease, moving fluidly from rapping over a J. Dilla beat, to honouring his late father by donning his football shirt. His South London accent manages to marry perfectly with his 90s-leaning flow and boombap production in a way that truly sets him apart. This, in a nutshell, exemplifies Carner’s appeal; he doesn’t assume the traditional bravado that we relate with rap, instead he is resolutely himself. Juliette Motamed

PHOTO: RHYS BUCHANAN


LIVE LISTINGS Arnolfini 16 Narrow Quay, BS1 4QA The Bierkeller All Saints’ Street, BS1 2NA The Canteen 80 Stokes Croft, BS1 3QY Colston Hall & Lantern Colston Street, BS1 5AR The Crofters Rights 117-119 Stokes Croft, BS1 3PY Exchange 72-73 Old Market, BS2 OEJ

RHAIN, 6MUSIC FRINGE (LAURE NOVERRAZ)

Fiddlers Willway Street, BS3 4BG

Roll For The Soul 2 Quay Street, BS1 2JL

The Fleece 12 St. Thomas Sreet, BS1 6JJ

Snug Bar 30 Stokes Croft, BS1 3QD

The Gallimaufry 26-28 The Promenade, BS7 8AL

The Stag & Hounds 74 Old Market, BS2 0EJ

The Grain Barge Mardyke Warf, BS8 4RU

Start The Bus 7-9 Baldwin Street, BS1 1RU

Kingsdown Wine Vaults 31 Kingsdown Parade, BS6 5UE

The Surrey Vaults 8-9 Surrey Street, BS2 8PS

The Lanes 22 Nelson Street, BS1 2LE

Thekla The Grove, BS1 4RB

The Louisiana Wapping Road, BS1 6UA

The Thunderbolt 124 Bath Road, BS4 3ED

The Marble Factory / Motion 74-78 Avon Street, BS2 0PX

Tobacco Factory Raleigh Road, BS3 1TF

Mother’s Ruin 7-9 St. Nicholas Srreet, BS1 1UE

Trinity Centre Trinity Road, BS2 0NW

O2 Academy 1-2 Frogmore Street, BS1 5NA

The Tunnels Lower Station Aprch, BS1 6QS 31


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR 32

TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK 33


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR 34

TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK 35


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR 36

TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK 37


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR 38

TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK 39


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR 40

TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK


FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK

FOR TICKETS CALL 0117 929 9008 • ONLINE AT BRISTOLTICKETSHOP.CO.UK 41


42


REHEARSAL LISTINGS Dockside Studios Fully equipped in central Bristol. Free parking. No fixed booking times. Equipment hire and storage facilities also available. Open until 11pm every day except Sat (7pm). docksidestudios.co.uk • mail@docksidestudios.co.uk 0117 934 9994 • Albion Dockside Estate, BS1 6UT Factory Studios Where music is made! Eleven practice rooms, a recording studio and great discounts for student and regular bands. Book by phone or online. factorystudios.co.uk • info@factorystudios.co.uk 0117 952 5655 • Unit 23, Maze Street, BS5 9TQ Maverick Studios Rehearsal and recording (both audio & video). Large 30’ stage as well as dedicated sound-booth and control room available. All rooms with PA and drum kit. maverickstudios.co.uk • maverickstudiosbristol@gmail.com 07967 993 050 • Office Tower, Foundry Lane, BS5 7UZ RS Studios The largest independent rehearsal and recording Studio complex in the Southwest, consisting of 18 individual, custom designed & built sound-proof studios. rs-studios.co.uk • rsstudios@hotmail.com 0117 971 1495 • 47-57 Feeder Road, BS2 0SE Wilder Studios Acoustically treated rooms with complete backline, free wifi and off-road parking. On-site storage available and live recording studio with vocal booth. Daytime discounts. wilderstudios.co.uk • bookings@wilderstudios.co.uk 0752 252 2723 • 470 Bath Road, BS4 3HG Firebird Studios Run by musicians for musicians. Friendly, helpful staff, six affordable rooms, lots of onsite parking and food & drink available. Book by phone or online. firebirdstudios.co.uk • info@firebirdstudios.co.uk 0117 972 1830 • 21-23 Emery Rd, BS4 5PF 43


44


THOUGHTS

Comment and opinion from staff and guests.

Live Music Under Threat... by

Paul Gray, The Musicians’ Union

From street performers, to small indie gigs, to the very biggest festivals – there’s nothing quite like a living, breathing performance to captivate and draw you in. No amount of YouTube videos can replace the excitement and connection of actually experiencing a gig in person and, besides, pubs and clubs have traditionally been the place where musicians have honed their craft, built a following and often made a decent living. But over the last ten years around 40% of small venues have closed. Live music is under threat, and the MU is fighting back. The reasons are many and varied – with Fiddlers, for example, it’s as ridiculous as Bristol Council adopting a yellow line policy around the venue, making it impossible for punters and musicians alike to park – but a primary driver is the redevelopment of commercial buildings into new flats. They’re often adjacent to existings venues that had been operating without any problems for decades, yet this government has relaxed planning laws to the extent that all a developer now needs to do is apply for prior consent for a change of use. The result is that just one noise complaint from a new resident could shut the venue down. Well-established venues, such as Manchester’s Night and Day and Bristol’s own Fleece, have found themselves in this position, and the MU has been working closely with them in their fight. Together with the Music Venues Trust, we are actively lobbying for an ‘Agent of Change’ principle to be put into law. Put simply, if a music venue is in place before the residential building, the developer would be responsible for paying for soundproofing, instead of the current situation whereby the onus is put entirely onto the venue – something that they, or we as music-lovers, can ill afford. The MU have been at it since 1893; you can join at theMU.org

45


READ BACK ISSUES & MORE: BRISTOLLIVEMAGAZINE.COM

47


47


T H E

M J R

G R O U P

P R E S E N TS

UPCOMING EVENTS 02 MAR

02

WED 02 MAR 2016

CREEPER

APR

W/ GRADER & MONTROZE

SAT 02 APR 2016

NOVANA

THE FLEECE, BRISTOL

MOLES, BATH

02 MAR

03 MAR

11

WED 02 MAR 2016

PALEHOUND START THE BUS, BRISTOL

APR

15

THU 03 MAR 2016

EAGULLS

APR

W/ SPECTRES

FIDDLERS, BRISTOL

MON 11 APR 2016

GOLD CLASS START THE BUS, BRISTOL

FRI 15 APR 2016

TELEMAN W/ NZCA LINES

MARBLE FACTORY, BRISTOL

04 FIELD MUSIC

APR

25

22

FRI 22 APR 2016

24

SUN 24 APR 2016

27

WED 27 APR 2016

21

FRI 04 MAR 2016

MAR

MAR

EXETER PHOENIX, EXETER

FRI 25 MAR 2016

SUBMOTION ORCHESTRA

APR

THU 21 APR 2016

DIZRAELI

THE LOUISIANA, BRISTOL

DIZRAELI THE LOUISIANA, BRISTOL

MOTION, BRISTOL

26 MAR

SAT 26 MAR 2016

MUSHROOMHEAD & AMERICAN HEAD CHARGE

APR

MOULETTES THE EXCHANGE, BRISTOL

MARBLE FACTORY, BRISTOL

30 MAR

WED 30 MAR 2016

KNUCKLE PUCK

W/ SEAWAY & BOSTON MANOR

APR

LONELY THE BRAVE MOLES, BATH

THE FLEECE, BRISTOL

48

087 1 220 0260 (24HR HOTLINE)

S E E T I C K E T S . CO M

G I G A N T I C . CO M

T H E M J R G R O U P. CO M

Profile for Bristol Live Magazine

Bristol Live Magazine: March 2016  

Bristol's new music & listings magazine.

Bristol Live Magazine: March 2016  

Bristol's new music & listings magazine.

Advertisement