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$10.00 July 2005

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Brilliant Results

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RELATIONSHIPS

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RESOURCES

RESULTS

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July 2005 Vo l . 2 , N o . 7 College & University Marketing

    


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Now Available for Corporate Sales For more information contact your promotional products distributor or Idea Workshop at 888-831-0401 e-mail: natnast@ideaworkshop.com

www.ideaworkshop.com


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Contents

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Vol. 2, No. 7 20

8

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COVER STORY 8 COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY MARKETING ~ THE E-COMMERCE EFFECT

An exclusive interview with Joseph Tantillo, the Owner of Express Design Group Inc., a man who took the chance reading of a doctor’s waiting room business magazine and turned it into a million-dollar business with a focus on online retail at www.greekgear.com

features

departments

MASCOTS: GOOD LUCK ~ GOOD MARKETING 20

columns

PUBLISHER’S LETTER 6

Mascots are not just for sports or the military anymore. Today mascots are becoming more about good marketing then good luck. A mascot could just be one of the best investments your organization makes.

HOT PRODUCTS… THINGS WE LOVE 56

BRILLIANT IDEAS FROM THE SOURCE 54

Brilliant Results previews a treasure trove of exciting products.

ADVERTISING INDEX 74 Get FREE information from this month’s advertisers

WHAT WORKS: 64 Successful Case Studies for your next powerful promotion.

FRATERNITY/SORORITY TIES THAT CAN LAST A LIFETIME 24

Whether it is securing a Greek endorsement or marketing directly, this is a segment with far-reaching profit potential because it’s a lifetime membership. Remember “Once a Greek – Always a Greek.” COLLEGE BY THE NUMBERS 30 A few facts and figures that just may convince you to get into college marketing. HOW THE INDUSTRY WORKS 32 Some information and news about the workings of the $17+ billion promotional products industry. BRAND LOYALTY THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PREFERENCE 34

What drives brand loyalty? The psychology behind human behavior as it pertains to brand selection can be both rudimentary and complicated at the same time. By Bill Nissim

CALENDAR 76 THE LAST WORD 78 Brilliant Results spends a few minutes with Stan Frank, Director, Marketing Administration for Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc. to learn how American’s largest bookseller has entered the college marketplace by operating 500 campus bookstores & counting. OFF THE CUFF 82 Just a bit of college trivia with a dash of mascot matching

ALUMNI – A VALUABLE INVESTMENT 42 Usually associated with colleges and universities, numerous organizations now pursue their alumni. PROPOSAL WRITING MYTHS AND REALITY & TEN WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR PROPOSAL WIN-RATE 46

Often only a point or two separates a winning proposal from the second place finisher – forget the Myths & Follow these Tips to Win. By Randall P. Whatley

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They’ll look like Tiger. Even if they putt like Larry from HR.

Chances are, nobody you buy for can golf quite like this guy. But how they dream. So let them dream bigger. Order Nike Golf apparel and equipment. From balls to jackets, bags to umbrellas, the full line is waiting to tee up your logo. Why Nike Golf? On championship courses everywhere, we’ve fast become the brand of choice for many of the world’s top pros. Which means, everyone who plays golf will appreciate the chance to wear and use our gear. From the CEO with a 2 handicap, to the guy who spends more time in the rough than on the fairway. Visit our new corporate sales site to find Nike Golf apparel, equipment and accessories. It’s all here.

nikecorporatesales.com

Broder Brothers

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NES

Ball Pro

Gold Bond

Golf Plus

Par-One

Pro Golf Premiums

Samco

Tee-Off

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RELATIONSHIPS | RESOURCES | RESULTS

Publisher’s Letter I STARTED TO WRITE THIS LETTER with the sentence ‘College was a fun time for me’ and for the student, I am sure that is often the case. However, from a marketing perspective, college and college students are serious business. With numbers in the millions and disposable income in the billions, both of which are increasing, capturing the interest and pocketbooks of college students can be exceptionally good for almost any business organization. That said; Brilliant Results decided to explore that bazaar of the 18 – 25 demographic and find out how successful businesses are reaching them and at the same time provide some suggestions that those of you not ‘in school’ yet might want to consider. We spoke with or more correctly emailed with – a method fast becoming the preferred communication vehicle by our demographic – Joseph Tantillo, an entrepreneur who took the idea of an online store from a business magazine article and turned it into a million dollar business when he launched www.greekgear.com. Joe gave us some insights into capturing the interest of the college marketplace by finding the right niche – merchandise for fraternity/sorority members – and then continuing to develop additional specialized online retail sites to expand your market penetration. We also spoke with Stan Frank, Director of Marketing Administration, at Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc. Stan provided a glimpse inside the campus bookstore and the ways in which Barnes & Noble, America’s largest bookseller, is making its presence a part of college life on over 500 campuses nationwide. Those bookstores are not just sticks and bricks; they each have an online presence and Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc. has an affiliated online marketing network. Successful marketers in this segment realize that you cannot overlook the fact that this is the generation of the wired – we may soon have to change that catch phrase to the WiFi generation. Articles about the growth of mascots, alumni and fraternity/sorority marketing potential, brand psychology and successful proposal writing round out the issue and should provide all of you readers with something to think about. Although, right now I’m just going to think about how much fun college was! Have A Brilliant Day,

Maureen maureen@brilliantpublishing.com 717-608-5869

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Brilliant Publishing LLC 9034 Joyce Lane Hummelstown, PA 17036 Ph: 717.608.5869 Fax: 717.566.5431

PUBLISHER / ADVERTISING Maureen Williams..... maureen@brilliantpublishing.com 717-608-5869

EDITORIAL Editor in Chief MaryAnne Morrill Senior Editors Michelle Donofry, Pierce Roberts Style Editor Charity Plata Asst. Editor Mildred Landis

Contributing Writers... Naomi Abrahams, Sharon Biernat, Robbie Burkett, Kevin Bush, Christine Dumas McAtee, Bill Nissim, Gary Rugoff, Randall P. Whatley, Wompro Pty Ltd.

PRODUCTION / DESIGN Art Director Percy Zamora Photo Credits: Olympus Flag and Banner for the Mascot photos and to Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc. for the bookstore photos. BRILLIANT RESULTS is published monthly by Brilliant Publishing LLC, 9034 Joyce Lane Hummelstown PA 17036 (717) 6085869; Fax# (717) 566-5431. Postage paid at Mechanicsburg PA and additional offices. POSTMASTER please send address changes to Brilliant Results, 9034 Joyce Lane, Hummelstown PA 17036. Volume 2. Number 7. Brilliant Results subscription rates: one-year $120; Canadian $160 USD; one-year foreign $225 USD. All subscriptions are non-refundable. Copyright © 2005 Brilliant Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any advertising or editorial material. Advertisers, and/or their agents, assume the responsibility for any claims against the publisher based on the advertisement. Editorial contributors assume responsibility for their published works and assume responsibility for any claims against the publisher based on published work. No part of this publication can be reproduced in any form or by electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without written permission from the publisher. All items submitted to Brilliant Results become the sole property of Brilliant Publishing LLC. Editorial content does not reflect the views of the publisher. The imprints, logos, trademarks or trade names (Collectively the “Marks”) displayed on the products featured in Brilliant Results are for illustrative purposes only and are not available for sale. The marks do not represent the implied or actual endorsement by the owners of the Marks of the product on which they appear. All of the Marks are the property of the respective owners and is not the property of either the advertisers using the Marks or Brilliant Results.

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Joseph Tantillo, Owner of Express Design Group Inc.

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&

COLLEGE UNIVERSITY

MARKETING

~ THE E-COMMERCE EFFECT THE MAJORITY OF today’s college and university students cannot remember a time without computers and to most; the Internet is an indispensable part of daily life. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 99 percent of schools had Internet access in 2002 and 58% of Americans over the age of 18 accessed the Internet that year. Statistics from 2003 estimated that those Internet users spent $156 billion in online retail venues, some 50 million purchased books and about 41 million bought music through the Internet. So when Brilliant Results decided to focus on college and university marketing, the impact of e-commerce could not be ignored. More often then not today’s students are connected – connected to their friends and to e-commerce sites. To get a feel for how these sites function, Brilliant Results e-mailed Joseph Tantillo, the founder and sole owner of Express Design Group, Inc., a man who took the chance reading of a doctor’s waiting room business magazine and turned it into a million-dollar business. Express Design Group, Inc. is a privately-owned Illinois corporation founded in 1999 and the parent company of five online stores, including www.greekgear.com, www.coedgear.com, www.guidogear.com, www.mychristiangear.com and www.bidmaniac.com. Together, these online retail sites have attracted more than 3 million customers a year and last year, those visitors ordered 70,000 items.

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www.pei-corporateapparel.com

Family Owned and Operated Since 1983 Family Owned and Operated Since 1983


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Family Owned & Operated Since 1971

to place orders contact the appropriate distributor below: Broder – 800.521.0850 Sanmar – 800.426.6399 S & S – 800.523.2155 Sanmar Canada – 604.273.9088 Heritage – 800.537.2222 TSF – 800.331.1067


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“Reading a business magazine in the doctor’s office inspired me to try my hand at online retailing.”

chandise. With a mission to provide the easiest way for Christians to buy merchandise on the Web and millions of visitors, MyChristiangear.com is fast becoming the largest online source for Christian & Religious merchandise. Since this issue is all about higher education marketing, we decided to focus on the first of these online stores – Greekgear.com. Items available on this site include everything from custom-printed shirts, shorts, hats and other apparel, to afghans, pillows, license plate frames, flip- flops, jewelry, and party favors, among others.

The guidogear.com Web site specializes in Italian gift items, such as logoed sweatshirts and other apparel, party favors, mugs and signs. It grew out of a family reunion where Joe realized how much he missed his Italian heritage since moving from North Jersey to the Midwest. According to Joe,”Guidogear.com is more a labor of love than anything else.” Likewise, mychristiangear.com features religious and Christian wearables, stickers and other mer-

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Tell our readers how Greekgear.com came about? “Reading a business magazine in the doctor’s office inspired me to try my hand at online retailing. At the time, my wife and myself were expecting our first child and wanted to work from home. An article about starting an online store jumped out at me. From being in a fraternity in college, I knew what kinds of Greek items they bought. I’d always had a list of things I wanted to do. One of the ideas was to sell Greek merchandise myself, so when I got home from the doctor’s office, I started working on designing the greekgear.com Web site.” Founded in 1999 as a result of that inspiring magazine article, Greekgear.com has become the largest source on the Internet for Greek logo merchandise including fraternity and sorority items. After setting up shop for just $79.95—the cost of a merchant account with Yahoo! — Joe began his exhaustive research to determine what products his former fraternity brothers might like. His persistence helped him become the preferred vendor for a few national Greek organizations and secure partnerships that allowed him to advertise on other websites in exchange for a sales commission to the organizations for every clickthrough purchase. He then located suppliers who would work with him on a drop-ship basis and began selling. He opened his online doors in May of 1999 and had his first three sales by June. His first order, for a Phi Gamma Delta hat, still sits on his desk. www.brilliantpublishing.com


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Can you tell us a little bit about the business? “Our business model is a simple one. To create customized products, with low or no minimums that target niche groups. People are passionate about the organizations they belong to, their religions, schools or their heritage, by creating custom products that these consumers cannot get elsewhere, we fill the need in that marketplace.” Express Design Group, humble in its origins, remains loyal to its home base of Freeburg, IL. A brand new, state-of-the-art facility was recently completed in Freeburg to allow Tantillo and his staff to continue to grow and produce their own screen printing, embroidery, sign making, pad and glassware printing, sublimation and engraving. The new, larger facility allows Tantillo to provide faster, higher quality service to his growing number of nationwide customers. With the recent partnership with long time Standard Rule employee, Tracy McCullom to acquire two long time local advertising specialty companies (Standard Rule Promotions - started in 1949 and Ideas Unlimited - started in 1978), the Express Design Group has made the successful crossover to B2B sales to compliment their online retail business. This new business model will be able to now create entire promotion campaigns from product development to setting up e-commerce websites which can help customers sell their merchandise online. We ship tens of thousands of orders each year for companies we are already handling production and fulfillment for and we expect combined sales to reach $3.5 million in 2005.” Who are the principal clients of Greekgear.com? “Fraternity & sorority members both undergrad and alumni.” When it comes to understanding your target audience what processes do you use? “Magazines – visiting the mall to watch for fashion trends.”

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How do your marketing tactics for Greekgear.com differ from standard retail marketing procedures? “Our demographic is 18 – 22 and being in my mid 30’s I try very hard to keep up with the latest trends and fashions. Our customers want unique merchandise – not your typical mug or mouse pad – I especially like producing merchandise we can produce in house – like our new slide sandals – we print them in house with a low, low minimum www.greekgear.com/ customsandals.html” Do you work with any corporate sponsors and how does that synergy function? If so, what is your approach to forming corporate relationships? “We are the official Greek provider for many of the large college related websites – we are working on a deal right now to get our Greek merchandise in over 500 online college bookstores.” Do you sponsor any events or charities associated with the Greek community of fraternities and sororities? “We donate a lot of merchandise and gift cards to many events.” How do you source your merchandise and determine what’s “in”? “Trade shows, our suppliers, the mall – the competition – we can produce just about anything in house – so I love creating our own products – we could not find a supplier for pink and light blue sweatshirt blankets – so we bought bolts of material and we make our own blankets in house. http://www.greekgear.com/ grswbl.html” What is the most popular merchandise on your site? Why do you think that is? “Clothing is by far the best and most profitable – we can create one of a kind items that our customers just love – The sororities love the gift items – much more then the fraternities.” What has been the most successful promotional campaign you have used to raise awareness of Greekgear.com with your target audience? “Time – We are still growing at an incredible pace – going on our 6th year – sales are up over 50% over last year at this time. Patience is key with online – “ Do you use any direct marketing strategies to reach your audience? “We mainly advertise just online – we found that offline advertising just does not benefit us like online does. We do a monthly newsletter with special offers and promotions for our existing customers and database.”

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Have you used a particular type of promotional merchandise to increase ‘e-tail’ interest? “We send out lots of promo items from pens to gift cards, wipe erase boards for the college dorm fridge, t-shirts, etc.”

“Stay passionate and find a niche – it is much easier marketing tshirts to a particular niche”

Do you use promotional merchandise to reward employees or thank clients? “We sure do – We are always printing and producing clothing – varsity school jackets, hats, etc. for our staff and our clients.” Do you have any ‘e-tail’ strategy suggestions for our readers? “Stay passionate and find a niche – it is much easier marketing t-shirts to a particular niche – like our Guidogear.com website – We market that to Italians – MyChristianGear.com we market to Christians – MySpiritGear.com – we market to school children and their families and of course Greekgear.com where we market to Fraternities & Sororities – Type in t-shirts in Google and thousands of websites come up – type Italian tshirts in and we are on top – and we are an “expert” because that is all that website sells – instant trust!” Finally, what do you see as the future of ‘e-tail’ marketing? “In the 6 years we have been doing this – sales and customers have increased tremendously – as more and more people jump on board it will get harder and harder – but to keep a positive attitude and provide outstanding customer service which helps bring a face to our websites – that will help us stay on top.” When asked the key to his success, Joe said, “The ability to identify niche markets, with a goal of opening a new online store each year. I want to stay focused and stick with our plan. It’s limitless at this point.” However, Joe was quick to point out that his success wasn’t merely a stroke of good luck and credited his prior experience in sales promotion, communications and marketing. As a matter of fact his first business endeavor out of college was his partnership in a sales promotion company. A couple of years later he sold his interest to his partner when he relocated. Five years later after some more sales experience, the online commerce bug bit and as they say the rest is history. • Joe still resides in Freeburg, a small farming community just 25 miles from St. Louis with a population of approximately 3000. He is married and now has 3 children. His success story has been featured in Entrepreneur Magazine and in the St. Louis Business Journal.

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LACoste

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Now Available for Corporate Sales For more information contact your promotional products distributor or Idea Workshop at 888-831-0401 e-mail: lacoste@ideaworkshop.com

www.ideaworkshop.com


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MASCOTS GOOD LUCK ~ GOOD MARKETING A FRENCH COMIC OPERETTA written in 1880 by Edmond Audran called “La Mascotte”, from the French slang “masco” meaning witch, was so popular that it was translated into English as “The Mascot”, which created the English word for an animal, person, or thing that brings good luck – mascot.

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Thus a mascot has come to mean something, typically an animal or human character, used to represent a group with a common identity. In ancient times some of the first mascots were those animals brought along on board ships whether for companionship (good luck mascot) or emergency food (mascot bad luck ). Modern Coast Guard crews still follow this ancient custom, many times actually enlisting the animals into the service, complete with service and medical records, uniforms and their own bunks. While these mascots may be promoted or punished, they no longer serve as emergency food and many actually see combat against the enemy, some are wounded, some die, and many are decorated. Schools and professional sports teams were among the first to employ mascot characters for

the purpose of promoting team spirit and the good luck that is often a part of winning. Whether it is Yale’s bulldog “Handsome Dan” or Georgetown’s English bulldog “Jack” or the University of Georgia bulldog “Uga”, or something as unusual as the Stanford band’s tree, mascots have become the primary identifiers of their schools as well as almost sacred symbols. Sports team merchandise often bears the team logo as well as mascot. From a purely financial standpoint, mascots have generated untold dollars from their appearance on promotional merchandise ranging from keychains to sweatshirts. In 1968, the first Olympic mascot made an appearance at the Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France. However, it wasn’t until the appearance of Misha at the1980 Summer


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Olympics in Moscow that an Olympic mascot began to reach its full marketing and advertising potential. Misha was used extensively during the opening and closing ceremonies, had a TV animated cartoon and appeared on several merchandise products. These are now common practices not only at the Olympics, but also at other competitions such as the FIFA World Cup. Today most of the merchandise targeted to younger consumers focuses on these mascots rather than flags and organization logos. Mascots are not just for sports or the military, countries have mascots, such as the eagle, symbol of Imperial Rome and the United States, or the bulldog of Great Britian, even a continent can have a mascot, such as the condor symbolizing South America. Today mascots are becoming more about good marketing then good luck. A mascot "What are the toughest challenging situations could just be one of the best investments you have to deal with as a mascot?" your organization makes. Think Ronald McDonald®, a mascot that has enhanced the Kids trying to pick a fight with mascot (25) McDonald’s corporate image through his Mascot doesn't get the credit it deserves (21) charitable association with Ronald McDonald® homes for the families of sick Costume is very hard to wear and perform in (18) children and continues to build brand loyalty and recognition with both children and Areas of performance (at games) are too restrictive (17) adults. His image has appeared on a wide variety of merchandise and as a children’s Rules of conduct are too restrictive (16) doll, making Ronald McDonald®, who Mascot is the last person to get updates on events and games (16) according to Fast Food Nation (2001) is recognized by 96% of schoolchildren in the US Spotters aren't doing their job (15) (Only Santa Claus was more commonly recognized) one of the best known mascots in Cheerleaders don't care about mascot (13) the world. Advisor has different view of how mascot should act (11) When thinking mascots, one must let the creative juices flow because almost anyRival mascots are uncooperative (10) thing can have a mascot. Mascots aren’t limited to continents, countries, armies, Adult fans criticize what mascot does (9) schools, sports or corporations, even products as mundane as fabric softener and Other city mascots are uncooperative (9) refrigerator dough can have beloved masOutside events aren't organized for me (8) cots. Think the Snuggle™ Bear; the cuddly and completely adorable teddy bear that Top brass doesn't like mascot (7) always has a cute little giggle when squeezed to show how soft and comfortable Source: Mascot.net Snuggle fabric softener makes everything it touches. Think Poppin’ Fresh®, the Pillsbury Doughboy, mascot of The Pillsbury

IT’S NOT EASY BEING A MASCOT When MascotNet asked 195 mascots:

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Company, a small anthropomorphic character apparently made out of dough that when poked in the stomach, a sign of affection and thanks for his excellent products, lets out a soft, warm chuckle. Both of these mascots are highly recognizable and a part of many of their respective company’s commercial advertising campaigns. It only stands to reason that competitors would find it hard to defend themselves from the emotional appeal of these two lovable characters. And therein lies a part of the secret of a good mascot – mascots are huggable, companies and their products are not. Since a good mascot has “legs”, Poppin’ Fresh® and Ronald McDonald® have been around for 40 years or more, it is important to create

strong ties between your mascot, your brand identity and your marketing message. A well thought out mascot like Ronald McDonald®, is loved by kids and adults alike and is a good source of human interest stories that capture media attention…all of which can lead to increased sales and profits. These are just the potential profits generated by exposure and loyalty, there is also the additional profit potential that promotional merchandise based on your mascot can generate. What’s your mascot? Savy corporate marketing departments should not overlook the mascot profit potential. For creative merchandise ideas to expand your mascot’s reach, contact a promotional products professional. • Mascot artwork provided by Olympus Flag & Banner for more information visit www.olympus-flag.com.


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Fraternity/Sorority ~ Ties That Can Last A Lifetime Fraternity: A Greek organization of men committed to similar ideals that develop the human spirit: leadership, scholarship, service, athletics and brotherhood. Sorority: A Greek organization of women that emphasizes leadership and personal development, banded together for education, philanthropic, civic and social purposes. THE IDEA OF SECRET FRATERNAL SOCIETIES began 7,000 years ago with the ancient Egyptian mystery cults, which worshiped the moon and performed fertility rites. Later, in Greek and Roman times, the Eleusinian mysteries attracted such celebrities as Homer, Socrates, and Plato. The craft guilds of the Middle Ages led to the semisecret friendly societies of eighteenth-century England, which, among other social ventures such as partying, invented the concept of group health insurance. By 1776 several chapters of the Social and Benevolent Order of Freemasonry (Masons), an outgrowth of the friendly societies, had been formed on American shores. While the terms fraternity and sorority may be used to describe any number of social and charitable organizations, they are most commonly known as higher education student social organizations in the United States and Canada. Fraternities are all male or mixed-gender, except for the sororities, which were founded before the word “sorority” was coined. Gamma Phi Beta coined the work “sorority” in 1874. Fraternities and sororities are also referred to as student corporations or academic corporations or simply corporations.

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With few exceptions, the names of fraternities and sororities are comprised of two or (usually) three Greek letters. For this reason, fraternities and sororities are known collectively as the Greek System, and its members are known as Greeks. The first secret college society was The Flat Hat Club formed in 1750, which named Thomas Jefferson among its members. The reason for its secretive nature and that of later fraternities was the fact that a school’s faculty often felt threatened by these groups and would enforce retribution on members, including expulsion. The Flat Hat Club was very similar to literary societies of the day except that it incorporated social activities as a part of its intended purpose. Since 1772, there has been no record of the Flat Hat Club being in existence. The P.D.A. Society formed in 1751 was the first society to use the letters of its motto as its name. Members had little regard for scholarship; they preferred the social aspects of college fraternities. They also refused to admit anyone who considered himself a “Greek” scholar. One theory holds that an offended “Hellenist” then organized his own secret society, and thus started the trend for Greek-lettered organizations. That first Greek-lettered society was Phi Beta Kappa founded in 1776 with many connections to Masonry including; documented membership of Phi

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Beta Kappas in lodge, and practice of chartering new chapters in other locations which many believe was taken directly from Masonry. What made Phi Beta Kappa different from other literary societies of its day and what places it at the foundation of Greek history, was a decision made three years after it was founded to establish branch chapters - to expand “to the wise and virtuous...of whatever country” - a decision possibly arising from a desire to help unite the thirteen American States, then at war with England. It was this that allowed Phi Beta Kappa to survive the war, and to spread Greekdom throughout the country, which continues to this day. In 1831 when the Harvard chapter released its ritual in fear of the antisecret society movement, the societies orientation changed. This organization is now a prestigious honor society. All three of these organizations were originally founded at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia by undergraduates without any assistance from adults. At this time, college was almost exclusively for white Anglo-Saxon Protestant upper-class males studying for the ministry, medicine, and the legal profession. Most early fraternities were founded as a protest against faculty domination of student activities. As one group formed, others sprang up to compete.

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make a date with success! ASI l 95280 W l www.warwickpublishing.com Contact your local Promotional Products Distributor


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Groups developed largely because students wanted some control over their lives and wanted to create an organization that would complement and enhance what they learned in the classroom, often allowing free discussion of “controversial material”. Because higher education was something nice girls shouldn’t be partaking of, the first sorority was not formed until 75 years after Phi Beta Kappa. This first sorority was the Adelphian, founded by nineteen women in 1851. The second was its rival, the Philamathean, founded by three women in 1852. Both were primarily literary societies. Like men’s fraternities, the two sisterhoods each had rituals and mottoes, etc.,

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but unlike men’s fraternities, they had no desire to form sister chapters at other colleges. (When each finally did decide to “go national” 50 years later in the early 1900s, they changed their names to Alpha Delta Pi and Phi Mu, respectively.) The first women’s fraternity with a Greek-letter name was Kappa Alpha Theta founded in 1870 by a woman who was first offered token membership in Fiji, which her brother belonged to on campus. She demanded full membership, but instead got a silver cake basket as a compromise. Her father, a Beta, then suggested she start her own group. So she did - the Thetas. The Fijis and the Thetas are now considered brother and sister societies on a national basis. However, being Greek means more than just wearing Greek letters, attending meetings, and going to parties. It is in this fraternity/sorority environment that friendships lasting far beyond the college years are formed and personal development is enhanced by committing to ideals of scholarship, leadership and service. While Greek individuals comprise only 2% of the population of the United States, they are often some of the society’s most powerful members. Many Presidents of the United States have been members of fraternities, including the current President. Most fraternities maintain a ritual system that is highly symbolic in nature and kept a closely guarded secret. Some signs point to common ancestry in both sorority and fraternity ritual, but most are likely derived from Masonic order ritual. Other “fraternity secrets” may include passwords, songs, handshakes, journals and initiation rites. The notable exception is Delta Upsilon originally founded as anti-secret in1834.

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Members of fraternities and sororities generally live on campus in a Chapter (The campus group affiliated with a National Fraternity/Sorority, or a local group that has established it’s own Greek letter organization.) house. Because of this communal lifestyle close “family” bonds are formed between members and a keen sense of pride in the fraternity/sorority is encouraged. During a period known as “Rush” or “Rush Week”, fraternities and sororities invite fellow students to attend events at the house (or on-campus) and meet the current members of the organization. At the end of this period, the house invites the visitors of their choice to “pledge” the fraternity. If the invitation, or “bid”, is accepted, the student will enter a period of pledgeship. Upon completion of the pledgeship and all its requirements, the active members will invite the pledges to be initiated and become active members. The pledgeship serves as a probationary period in the fraternity membership process where both the fraternity and the pledge make sure that they have made the right choice. Almost always, after a pledge has been initiated they have a membership in the organization for life. Wherever pride of belonging is encouraged, there will also exist a strong desire to let outsiders know you are a member. Hence, a wide variety of promotional

merchandise is available to the members of Greek Row. Acquiring the appropriate licensing to include a fraternity or sorority logo can lead to substantial profits. The opportunities to market insignia wear to this market are obvious; however, marketing executives should consider reaching out to the Greek fraternity/sorority in other ways. The proof of the value of this market is best illustrated by the growth of Internet ‘etail’ sites devoted exclusively this target audience. Based on the nature of the Greek experience and the desire of members to belong, an item endorsed by a fraternity or sorority could become a ‘must have’ for the majority of the members. Whether it is securing a Greek endorsement of your product or marketing directly to these entities’ National Corporate Organizations, this is a segment with far-reaching profit potential because of its lifetime membership nature. Remember “once a Greek – always a Greek.” • A GreekZone.com article by Heath Golub served as a source for some information contained in the above article. Wikipedia at answers.com also provided information for this article. Consult these sites for additional historical and/or factual information about fraternities and sororities.


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College By The Numbers If you think the college marketing isn’t for your organization, consider this…

16.7 million The projected number of students enrolled in the nation’s colleges and universities this fall. This is up from 12.1 million a quarter-century ago.

with an advanced degree. This compares with $51,206 a year for those with bachelor’s degrees, $27,915 for those with a high school diploma only and $18,734 for those without a high school diploma.

64%

And, there are more potential college students on the horizon ~

Percentage of the 2003 high school graduating class that went directly to college.

329,000

37% Percentage of all college students age 25 and over. With almost $200 billion in spending power per year, the college market commands attention…and offers a unique opportunity for smart college marketers: longterm ROI. Why? Because college is the first place where hundreds make their first independent buying decisions…decisions that will influence their preferences and purchasing habits for years to come. And, because they stayed in school they will have more disposable income to support those purchasing habits – $74,602: Average annual earnings of workers age 18 and over

The increase in the nation’s high school-age population between 2003 and 2004. More than two-thirds of the states experienced an increase in this group over that period, led by California (78,000), Florida (33,000) and New York (24,000).

54.6 million The projected number of students to be enrolled in the nation’s elementary and high schools (grades K-12) this fall. That number exceeds the 1970 total of 51.3 million, when virtually all of these students were “baby boomers,” which swelled school enrollments. Statistics Source: U.S. Census Bureau CB05-FF.1, June 16, 2005

Almost 25% of independent college students have a $50,000+ income now: Percentage distribution of independent undergraduates at specified student income levels 2003-2004

Independent student income

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Institution and student characteristics

Less than $10,000

$10,000 19,999

$20,000– 29,999

$30,000– 49,999

$50,000 or more

U.S. Total (excluding Puerto Rico)

22.3

18.2

15.8

19.0

24.8

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How The Industry Works IT IS OFTEN EASIER TO ACHIEVE the best end result if you understand some of the ins and outs of how the industry you are dealing with works. In an effort to provide some guidance in this area, Brilliant Results will from time to time endeavor to bring you some information and news about the workings of the $17+ billion promotional products industry. According to the Promotional Products Association International (PPAI), promotional products include useful or decorative articles of merchandise that are used in marketing and communication programs. The items are usually imprinted with a company’s name, logo or message. Promotional products that are distributed free are called advertising specialties; imprinted items given as an incentive for a specific action are known as premiums. In addition, business gifts, awards and commemoratives are also considered promotional products. PPAI is the non-profit association that represents the industry. Every January, they hold the PPAI Expo, which Tradeshow Week Top 200 has ranked as number 48 in its just-released annual list of the country’s top 200 trade shows. In 2003 it encompassed 350,500 sf of tradeshow space and included 3,505 booths. The annual PPAI Expo provides an excellent opportunity for the industry’s suppliers to demonstrate their wares to a large portion of the industry’s approximately 20,000 distributors. From time to time groups of suppliers and distributors have formed alliances to create a mutually beneficial synergy and better serve end users. One of those alliances is the Premier Group, whose mission is to create an alliance of independent distributors and suppliers who are committed to the success of each other’s businesses as well as their own. The Premier Group was started in 1997 and has grown to become the largest cooperative group in the Promotional Products Industry with representation in 46 top U.S. markets. This alliance recently held its 6th Annual Meeting themed “Mission Possible” at the Estancia

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La Jolla Resort and Spa La Jolla, California. Chairman Dan Weisberg, President of Branded Solutions, a distributor company in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was pleased to announce, “We have nearly doubled sales within the group over a two-year period. And, the enthusiasm of the members is fantastic.” Jonathan Isaacson, President and Owner of Gemline, provided the keynote speech, “Beyond the Numbers: Perspectives on the Promotional Products Market.” In his comments, Isaacson said that the Premier Group partnership offers a unique and powerful differentiation to its members. “It allows for idea sharing and personal growth within the model of individually owned companies.” He added, “Each member gets the benefit of all of the years of experience and wisdom of everybody else in the group. It’s an incredibly powerful and effective tool.” • Brilliant Results thanks Paul Smith, President, Calconix/TimeZone® for providing the information about the Premier Group Annual Meeting contained in this article. Premier Group Contact: Tammi Santucci Executive Director, 412-323-0564 x313 tammis@premiermember.com www.brilliantpublishing.com


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Bill Nissim, June 2005 ©

“Marketing battles take place in the mind of a consumer or prospect. That’s where you win. That’s where you lose.” Jack Trout: Big Brands, Big Trouble

develop, and drive a deeply rooted brand preference. Let’s begin by understanding how we interact with our surroundings.

Communications Model: WHAT DRIVES BRAND LOYALTY? The psychology behind human behavior as it pertains to brand selection can be both rudimentary and complicated at the same time. We will explore this conundrum by investigating noted authors’ insights into the realm of brand preference. By unveiling current research and opinions of experts, a convergence of ideologies will advocate techniques in order to deepen current and potential relationships. Methods will be introduced which evoke the use of our five senses to evaluate, www.brilliantpublishing.com

To better understand the process of preference, let’s first look at a basic communications model (www.ibranz.com/com.html). The five components of this model are sender, medium, filter, receiver, and feedback. On a daily basis, we are exposed to messages (sender/medium) via our radio, television, billboards, Internet, mail, and word-of-mouth. Although these messages are pervasive, we continually screen out (perceptual screen) or ignore content that has little or no relevance to us. All messages are coded patterns Brilliant Results | July

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Brand Loyalty Defined: ”You learn that creating customer loyalty is neither strategic nor tactic; rather, it is the ultimate objective and meaning of brand equity. Brand loyalty is Brand Equity” Daryl Travis, Emotional Branding So, what constitutes brand loyalty? According to Bloemer and Kasper, brand loyalty implies that consumers bind themselves to products or services as a result of a deep-seated commitment. To exemplify this point, they rendered a distinction between repeat purchases and actual brand loyalty. In their published research, they assert that a repeat purchase behavior “is the actual re-buying of a brand” whereas loyalty includes “antecedents” or a reason/fact occurring before the behavior. Bloemer and Kasper further delineate brand loyalty into “spurious” and “true” loyalty. • Spurious Loyalty exhibits the following attributes: • Biased • Behavioral response • Expressed over time • By some decision-making unit, with respect to one or more alternate brands • A function of inertia. True brand loyalty includes the above, but replaces inertia with a psychological process resulting in brand commitment (Ref: Journal of Economic Psychology, Volume 16, Issue 2, July 1995.) Next, let’s turn to how this psychology plays out in the branding process.

Brand Positioning:

and sensations – colors, sounds, odors, shapes, etc. Those messages deemed recognizable, or a basis for a relationship, are decoded and stored in our memory (filter/screen). A successful convergence between sender and receiver will result in some type of response to a brand’s compelling message (feedback). Stored experiences in our long-term memory are connected through a series of nodes and networks. An example could be all the associations you might have with the word Starbucks TM – including coffee, rich aroma, relaxing, sofa, earth tones, etc. As presented by Shultz and Barnes, “this node and connection process, called spreading activation, makes every person different (Strategic Brand Communications Campaigns, 1999).” Since we all have different experiences, connections, and relationships, this supports a theory that the CONSUMER, not the organization, owns the brand.

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“A strong brand position means the brand has a unique, credible, sustainable, and valued place in the customer’s mind. It revolves around a benefit that helps your product or service stand apart from the competition” Scott Davis, Brand Asset Management Organizations seek to develop and project brand perceptions based on internally driven needs and goals. In Jack Trout’s book “Differentiate or Die,” he presents evidence that supports his theories on consumer behavior and interpretation. Although these concepts seem self-evident on the surface, organizations tend to ignore these immutable laws in their daily branding activities. Minds Can’t Cope Due to the shear volume of messages we encounter on a daily basis, the human mind can’t begin to cope with interpreting them all. Trout notes some statistics: • Humans tolerate constant daily electronic bombardment www.brilliantpublishing.com


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• Printed knowledge DOUBLES every 4 – 5 years • 4,000 books published around world every day • WWW grows by 1,000,000 pages each day! • You’ve watched 140,000 TV commercial by the age 18 Minds are Limited • Perceptions are selective • Memory is highly selective • Physiological limitation to process stimuli • Dramatic difference needed in crowded category • How much of your message gets through the clutter Minds are Insecure • Mind’s are both emotional and rational • Purchasing decisions are really not known • Recall – mind’s remember things that no longer exist What conclusions can we draw from these theories? During a recent speaking engagement, I asked the audience if they knew the current tag line for United Airlines. They resoundingly responded with “Fly the Friendly Skies!” When I pointed out that United changed its tag in 1997 to “Rising” and again in 2004 to “Its Time to Fly,” they were astonished. Despite the millions of dollars United spent on this ad campaign (Minds can’t cope & limited), the audience only recalled something that didn’t exist (minds are insecure). When drafting your brand positioning strategy, you may want to consider your previous message layering activities and determine if your new value proposition enhances or conflicts in the minds of your intended audience. Now let’s turn to a technique to analyze brand perceptions.

negative, in its current state. By virtue of this analysis, you can achieve greater clarity and insight into your positioning or re-branding process. The McDonaldsTM brand molecule, as portrayed in this pictorial, illuminates the basic constructs of this process. Key elements of this model include: linking all brand associations (emanating from the center), the importance of each (size), and how they relate to each other. Once accomplished, you can begin the process of removing those associations that no longer “fit” and adding new identifiers in their place. This process provides the manager an opportunity to view the entire brand and affect change in a strategic manner. A real-world example of this process was the recent transformation of Cadillac. In the late 80’s and early 90’s, sales for this brand were declining due to European and Japanese penetration into the luxury car market. To reverse this erosion, the Cadillac group invested in the brand molecule analysis to reinvent both the design and market preference. This brand was meticulously assessed, disassembled, reassembled, and re-positioned in the late 1990’s from something grandpa drove into a fast, sexy, and desirable product. Today, you know when a Caddy commercial is playing when you hear Led Zeppelin’s “been a long time” blaring through the speakers.

Brand Molecule: “The functional, emotional, and social dimensions of the jobs that customers need to get done constitute the circumstances in which they buy.” Dr. Clayton Christensen, The Innovator’s Solution A brand molecule, according to Hill and Lederer, is the process of identifying all associations connected to your brand. In addition to understanding the type of connections, you need to evaluate the importance of each association and how much weight it carries independently. By unfolding a brand molecule, the organization is able to view all possible connections, either positive or

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Gabriel's Ad

4/28/05

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When analyzing your brand, how strong are the links between each of your sensory touch points? How interdependent are they?

touch points. This is comprised of examining a brand’s stimuli, enhancement, and bonding capabilities. Lindstrom’s point is simply the more sensory components, the stronger the foundation of your brand. Another area discussed is the synergy across sensory touch points. Lindstrom suggests we use many senses when evaluating our surroundings, including brands. Returning to the Starbucks example, one could view an encounter with this retailer in this manner Visual

Sensory Approach:

Visual/Auditory

“The role our five senses play in creating the ultimate bond between the customer and the brand” Martin Lindstrom, Brand Sense

Visual/Auditory/Touch Smell/Taste

The most innovative brand research I’ve encountered recently was derived from Martin Lindstrom and his “Brand Sense” concept. A precursor to his theory lies in three components, and when combined, builds both loyalty and what he terms “smash ability”. The constructs of his theory reside in the following: • Sensory branding stimulates your relationship with the brand • Allows emotional response to dominate our rationale thinking • Different dimensions of a single brand • Ultimate goal: Strong, positive, loyal bond between brand and consumer so the consumer will turn to brand repeatedly • Goal: Emotional engagement, match between perception/reality The essence of his work lies in what Lindstrom terms the “Six Sensory Steps.” These include (1) Sensory audit, (2) Brand Staging, (3) Brand Drama, (4) Brand Signature, (5) Implementation, and (6) Evaluation. Through this discovery method, an organization can unveil aspects of their current offering or new avenues to exploit. This process, according to the author, will enhance brand loyalty and deepen existing relationships. Since this article can’t possibly delve into all six steps, a cursory view of a few elements of this process is provided next. Lindstrom’s approach to brand loyalty stems from the use of our five senses. In order to understand any brand, a sensory audit must be conducted to assess the brand’s leveraging of sensory

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Unique logo on building, cups, and bags Uniform and customer approach Interior aesthetics (sofa, colors, wall paper, music) Distinct aroma released of freshly ground coffee

When analyzing your brand, how strong are the links between each of your sensory touch points? How interdependent are they? In the beginning of this article we mentioned Lindstrom’s term “smash ability.” This simply means how independent each sensory aspect is and its ability to stand on its own? If you removed the Starbucks logo from the building, would you still know the brand?

Conclusion: In order to understand the psychology of brand preference, we undertook this journey by examining a basic communications model and the process of receiving/filtering messages. Next we reviewed research that suggested a distinction between spurious and true brand loyalty. Several truisms concerning how a brand is positioned in the marketplace revealed the challenges with marketing to the human mind. Finally, we surveyed research that submits the essence of brands is connected through our five senses. The culmination of this information may help any organization facing brand loyalty issues with their constituents and provide resources to uncover core issues. • Bill Nissim consults with nonprofit organizations on brand management issues. His website www.ibranz.com contains reference materials, links, and helpful articles on the many facets of branding.

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ALUMNI ~

A VALUABLE ASSET TYPE IN THE SEARCH WORD “alumni” and the Google search engine will deliver some 34,500,000 hits. This fact alone makes it obvious that there is a lot of effort being put into reaching alumni and generally where there is great effort there is usually financial motivation. In the case of alumni, the majority of the financial receipts from reaching out and touching them are put to good and/or charitable use. We usually associate alumni with colleges and universities; however, numerous organizations now pursue their alumni. For more than 20

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years the NFL Alumni Program has been a charitable organization whose former pro football members are guided in their volunteer efforts by the motto “Caring for Kids”, with a secondary objective of offering support to former pros who have financial or medical hardships. A non-profit organization, the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association (MLBPAA) was formed in 1982 to promote the game of baseball, raise money for charity, inspire and educate youth through positive sport images and protect the dignity of the game through former players.

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Today, there is even a website for corporate alumni to reconnect with former business colleagues and make valuable new contacts. While this may sound like just another social get together opportunity, it is possible that it may be a sign of things to come. With the current professional job turnover trends and the number of former “employees” who are joining the entrepreneurial ranks of the self-employed, the opportunity to network with former corporate contacts could become another valuable “alumni” asset. In fact progressive business organizations might even consider forming alumni groups of retired employees to mentor the ‘new kids’ and reap experience value. However, the true pros at reaping alumni value are still principally focused in the college and university sector. Harvard University’s endowment fund, which grew to $22.6 billion during the 2004 fiscal year, resulting in a 21.1 percent return according to The Chronicle of Higher Education, is one of the more outstanding examples of alumni value. The most intriguing aspect of the Harvard endowment is that the majority of growth has taken place over the past 20 years when cuts in government research grants forced American universities to find a way to replace those funds. At many colleges and universities the alumni sector became the focus of efforts to replace those lost funds and replenish the institution’s coffers. Harvard does this through the concept of a ‘community’ of its alumni: Year group coordinators communicate with other members of their class on a semi-annual basis; class reunions occur every five years and are centered around a program of activities and meetings designed to build closer ties between the alumni and the university. Considering the intrinsic value that the community of alumni of any organization, not just those of an educational institution, can have when creative out-of-the-box thinking is employed, the following suggestions for mining that gold are presented. Because direct marketing is the principal initial tool used to

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reach any group of alumni (business organizations could also insert the words ‘group of former customers’), there is a real need for that outreach program to jolt your alumni into action. Creating that sense of community and encouraging a continuing relationship with your organization needs to employ elements of: • Design – to brand and define your identity and position in the marketplace; • Content Management – to insure that your communications with your prospects are ‘on message’ and increasing their interest through targeted communication; • Event Management – to create ‘event’ opportunities to interface with your alumni whether through special event or trade show experiences; • E-Mail Marketing – to reach the alumni with value centric newsletters, white papers, specials, etc.; • Data Management – to insure that your communications are relevant to your target ‘alumni’ and that you have the current information that you need to stay ‘on message’;

• Community Interaction – to allow your alumni to communicate in a controlled environment with their peers. Community-facilitated communication among your constituents can help to reinforce their affinity with your organization. Each step of this process can be facilitated by the judicious use of promotional merchandise. While the initial contact pieces included with your direct mail pieces may be free to the alumni, as you build a sense of community and the prestige of association with your organization, your promotional merchandise can develop into a revenue stream. Most importantly, the alumni that you recruit into your community will be a source of potential and continuing value to your organization. Your alumni campaign may start with a keychain, a seed packet, a t-shirt, a mug or a pen; but properly worked, the members of your alumni community may just use that free pen to sign a big check made payable to your organization. •


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Proposal Writing Myths and Realities &Ten Ways to Improve Your Proposal Win-Rate By Randall P. Whatley, President, Cypress Media Group

MANY BUSINESS PEOPLE AVOID new business development that requires written proposals. They believe common myths about the subject that are, in fact, false. The following five myths about proposal writing refute and demystify the process.

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Myth 1: “If my proposal has all the right ‘buzz words’ in it, I will win the contract.” Reality: Good proposal writing is very important! However, it is only one of four strategies to employ to win new business. Proposal writing is part of the presentation strategy. The other three, of equal importance, are the technical strategy, pricing strategy, and competitive strategy.

Proposal preparation is too difficult and too expensive to frivolously bid and lose. Only pursue business that you have a realistic chance of winning.

Myth 2: “If we bid on this job and lose, we will at least get our name out.” Reality: A losing bid rarely makes a good impression. Clients usually receive many proposals for each request for proposals that they issue. Their elimination process is swift and harsh. Unless you are one of top three finalists, your company name probably won’t even be recognized a week after your proposal is reviewed. Proposal preparation is too difficult and too expensive to frivolously bid and lose. Only pursue business that you have a realistic chance of winning. Myth 3: “Our Company will stand out because we’re different. We have great customer service, computers, good reports, etc.” Reality: All your competitors think the same thing. Your company will actually stand out if you have a winning combination of the following six factors: 1) Price 2) Technical proposal 3) Experience 4) Personnel qualifications 5) Location/facilities 6) Special considerations Myth 4: “Our written proposal isn’t important. It’s our price/insider contacts/oral presentation, etc. that will really matter.” Reality: Your pricing, contacts, oral presentation, and numerous other factors are important. However, you should never take the impact of your written proposal for granted. What you put in writing is a definitive statement about your company. It can be re-visited by reviewers. It can even be held against you legally. Most importantly, your words can make your company look unprofessional, even unqualified.

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Myth 5: “Jobs that require complicated written proposals are impossible to get. It’s not worth the trouble to go after that kind of business.� Reality: 1. It is not any more difficult, time consuming, or costly to respond to RFPs than it is to pursue other marketing options. All marketing vehicles require effort and/or expense. 2. Because so many of your competitors believe this same myth and are not pursing business that requires written proposals, there are often fewer competitors for these projects. 3. From a new business development perspective, it is probably unwise to overlook any marketing options. What if you are wrong in your judgment? If you lose out on an opportunity, it may be several years before you have a chance to compete for the contract again. Now that these common proposal-writing myths have been debunked, consider pursuing new business development that requires written proposals. This marketing tactic could become a successful and lucrative one for your company, especially since often only a point or two separates a winning proposal from the second place finisher. Following is a list of ten commonly overlooked things that you can do to improve your proposal win-rate.

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TEN PROPOSAL WIN-RATE SUGGESTIONS 1. Research the project before the bid is released. Establish contact with the client in advance, if possible. Use the Freedom of Information Act and Open Records laws with government agencies to learn as much as possible about the project and the precise needs and expectations of the client. Create a dialogue with the buyer, if possible. 2. Provide a clear solution to the client’s problem. Clients want to feel that you understand the problem that they are trying to solve and that you actually have a solution. On the other hand, they are suspicious of bidders who just tell them what they already know and provide only vague answers to their questions. 3. Make sound bid/no-bid decisions. Your proposal win-rate will dramatically increase once you make rational, logical bid/nobid decisions. You must make a thorough analysis of each bid to scrutinize your organization’s fit with the project, your competition on the bid, and the client 4. Create the impression that your firm is superior to your competitors. The truth is that in most situations, several bidders are equally capable of meeting the client’s needs. Your challenge is to create an impression with your proposal that your firm’s approach is unique. 5. Know your competitors. It is important that you know the advantages and shortcomings of your competitors. It is also important to know their bidding tendencies. By doing so, you can subtly address their shortcoming in your proposal and know how to position yourself against their tendencies. 6. Highlight the major points of your proposal. Use everything from graphic design to repetition to make sure your major proposal points are understood and remembered. All major points should stress the specific direct benefits to the client.

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7. Organize your proposal writing effort. Proposal writing is a time consuming task. Don’t waste time and labor with a poorly organized writing plan. Allow enough time to review and edit it before you submit your proposal. 8. Update your business information regularly to prepare for the next proposal. This will allow you to edit your material with an open mind and fresh pair of eyes and make important improvements on future bids. 9. Perform the “little things” correctly. Don’t let small mistakes kill you. Omitting requested information, exceeding page limits, or word counts, ignoring proposal guidelines, placing information in the incorrect place, or failing to repeat or reiterate information in different sections are the small things that will cause you to lose points with an evaluation team. 10. Make a strong, positive last impression. Whether it’s in final negotiations or on a site visit, give the client a new reason to accept your proposal. Sometimes this means making a price concession or adding more value to your offer. Sometimes it simply means presenting the client with yet more research on their project to show that you’re still thinking about it and working on it, even after the bid deadline. • Randall P. Whatley is a 26-year media veteran with diverse business experience. Whatley is president of Cypress Media Group, Inc., www.cypressmedia.net, an Atlanta-based advertising, public relations, and training firm. He has extensive experience advising government officials, political candidates, public officials, and corporate executives on media relations and presentation skills. He has written two syndicated newspaper columns and numerous magazine articles. Whatley has hosted his own television and radio program and appeared often as a TV and radio program guest. He has produced hundreds of TV and radio ads and taught a myriad of seminars ranging from Public Relations Writing to Media Relations. He can be reached by e-mail at randy@cypressmedia.net.

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brilliant ideas | From the Source

A Supplier's Marketing Tips & Ideas for Brilliant Results PORTRAIT FOLDERS ~ • Use to showcase home for sale • Introduce a new employee • Send a seasonal greeting with picture • Announce a company picnic • Promote a fundraiser • Use as a restaurant menu PREMIUM & STANDARD FRAMES • Car or boat dealerships • Trade shows • Amusement parks • Company events & programs • Golf outings • Grand openings • Congratulations • Church Events • Pet Shops • Cruise Ships • Lodges & Resorts FUN FRAMES TO COLOR • Day Care Centers • Doctors & Dentists • Company Picnics • Promote a Fundraiser • Restaurants • Banks • Schools

EASY STICK CALENDARS • Business to Home: Advertise your product or service and have your customer keep your name and number handy! They’ll be placed in key locations where household buying decisions are made. Use each month of the calendar pad as a coupon for customers to redeem and ensure regular business! It can also say thanks to your customers for their regular patronage! • Business to Business: Send a thank you to your business associates for a continuing relationship, or to alert them to a new product or service. • Business to Community: Make a public announcement to be distributed widely or to your key circulation. These items can be as targeted as you need!

This month's suggestions courtesy of:

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Things We Love 1 Put a Fresh Spin on the School Insignia… …and have fun at the same time with these top quality logoed yoyos complete with instructions to visit the company’s website for tips & tricks. Yomega

2 Show Your School Spirit… …whether driving in your car or on your dorm room wall these handsome metal ‘license’ plates will let everyone know you support the team. Dixiline

3 Give Them The World… … with this Stylish, Magnetized Stainless Steel Globe. Designed in 72 stainless steel puzzle pieces and it sits on a customized base. The magnetized puzzle pieces are released by a special Lift Magnet on the bottom of the base. This excellent desk accessory or award is available with custom designs and laser engraving. Smarte Goods LLC

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Things We Love

4 Wear A Badge That Gets Attention… …this message badge can store up to 6 messages at 256 characters apiece. Plus, it’s easy to program with the buttons on the back; no PC required. The user can control not only the message, but also the speed of the scroll and brightness of the LEDs. JMTek

5 This Clock Doesn’t Just Tell Time… …it sends a message. This 11” wall clock is the perfect place to make sure your message gets a lot of looks. Time Products International

6 They’ll FLIP over this gift… … yet oddly enough, they won’t know why! This is no ordinary calculator and pen set. The patented case opens like a regular case, yet has no hinges. The unique design flips around and the panels change place – the pen and calculator will even switch sides. Imprinted logos appear, disappear, and reappear! Prime Resources

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Things We Love

7 Want A Conversation Piece… …then make sure that this unusual tissue box is in the dorm rooms of your favorite students. A logo on this box is sure to get ‘nose’ticed! Retro 51

8 When you want them to know… …who is the best, these fun, colorful foam products are sure to get the message out and raise team spirit. Century Foam

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Things We Love

9 Don’t Forget Another Appointment… …this desktop note pad fits perfectly on any computer desk and lets you plan your days where you are sure to see what you planned. No more reasons for missed appointments. KR Line

10 No more Scratches or Dings… …when loading or unloading cargo. The GATOR GUARD is the ultimate rear bumper solution that protects your clothes, your cargo and your car. Gator Guard

11 No Game Today… …no problem, you can play Football Corn Toss anytime. Put a little fun back in rainy days. Each set includes 2-2x4 foot boards and 8-1 lb. Bags, so invite a friend. JEBCO

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Things We Love

12 No More Cold Toes… …this space age, compact designed Sports Cushion, instantly converts into a Body Warmer. Enjoy any outdoor event in comfort. The Sports Cushion has become so popular they now have the licenses for many of the major colleges and universities. Custom Cushion Company

13 This is One Key That Won’t Get Lost… …this flashing LCD Key Tag is bound to attract attention with key ring advertising that won't stop! LCD technology delivers a clear and bright logo. Solar powered battery means unlimited product life. Pro Innovative

14

A Fun Take Anywhere Chair… …complete with double drink holders so you can double your fun. The handy shoulder strap carrying bag makes this the perfect traveling chair no matter what your game is. It’s All Greek To Me

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Things We Love Don’t Let Germs Ruin Your Vacation… …these handy pocket hand sanitizers will help keep your hands germ free, even out in the wild where soap and water are in short supply. HBC Corporation

15

Not Just Your Ordinary Hat… …this unusual net cap will go to all the games because it’s ‘cool’ and sometimes students just want to have fun. CorpLogoWear

16

17 Just Another Day At The Beach… …but think of the fun they will have with these custom logoed sand pails. A variety of sizes, a variety of colors and a variety of ways to have fun whether building castles or collecting shells. The Humphrey Line

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Sales Incentive Program – Waste Management, Inc.

Challenge:

The Company wanted to build sales and achieve a minimum of 110 percent over the nationwide goal.

Solution:

An eight-month campaign was announced with pre-recorded voicemail and e-mail messages that directed the recipients to a special Web site for details. The campaign was entitled “Power of Performance” as a nod to the grand prize a powerful Ford Mustang GT Convertible. To keep the contest fresh promotional mailers were sent out during the year. Flags and banners were given to offices for merchandising. The campaign was further supported by a clever selection of promotional merchandise: a custom mailer box with a transparent side that revealed a “Power Bar” inside, a stainless steel “Power Mug”, a logoed light-up key tag and a money pad and shredded money pen (referencing a $25,000 cash prize that was also a part of the program). Mid-contest goals were set along the way, earning sales representatives and managers Cross® chrome pen and pencil sets and TAG Heuer men’s and ladies’ watches.

Result:

More than 47 percent of the sales force achieved and maintained at least 110 percent of their goal during the contest period; and more than 17 percent of the sales representatives achieved 150 percent or more of their goal. Strong positive feedback means that this popular contest will be repeated next year. Case study provided by: Sharon Biernat, President & CEO, Promotional Strategy Partners, Inc. – www.promosp.com. This program was a Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) Pyramid Award winner.

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Non-Profit Program – Rotary International

Challenge:

Rotary International wanted to raise funds and increase the exposure of Rotary International’s polio eradication program.

Solution:

The Rotary International polio eradication program is called “Sow the Seeds of Love.” To raise money for the program, the organization adopted a literal translation of the theme and sold Nigella seeds – an easy to grow and colorful plant whose colors actually duplicate the colors of the Rotary Wheel. However, one of the very creative aspects of the campaign was the seeds’ packaging. The seeds come in fold-over matchbook style packages. Inside each package are 10 tear-out, biodegradable sticks, and on each stick are five to eight seeds. The instructions are easy – tear out stick, plant in soil and water. Each package can grow approximately 50 plants. This environmentally friendly item was a huge success generating enthusiastic response. It proved to be a fun and inexpensive product that could be enjoyed by old and young alike; and, Rotary International reaped approximately a 110 percent profit on each seed package sold.

Result:

Initially launched in Australia, USA and Canada, the promotion was expanded to the UK, Europe and Asia due to the overwhelmingly positive feedback. One Rotarian reported selling more than 2,500 packets in two days at a craft fair! Case study provided by: Wompro Pty Ltd – www.wompro.com. This program was a Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) Pyramid Award winner.

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Retail Delivery – Abita Springs Water, Inc.

Challenge:

The Abita Springs Water Company was looking for a promotional campaign that would result in the addition of 500 new customers to their home delivery program.

Solution:

Abita Springs Water developed a sparkling fresh program designed to motivate existing customers to generate qualified referrals and sent it to 5,000targeted households in a four-state region. Delivery personnel distributed full-color brochures to customer households explaining the specifics of the promotion and featuring a selection of five gifts should one of their referrals sign up for delivery. The appealing gift assortment consisted of a Patio Refreshment Set (four double-wall tumblers and acrylic pitcher), Playground Pal (portable folding chair with cooler compartment and insulated sports bottle), Easy Picnic Pak (insulated soft cooler with food compartment and a squeeze sports bottle) and Commuter Survival Kit (no-spill acrylic travel mug, two coffee mugs and a squeeze bottle). These are relatively low cost items compared to the benefits of signing a new delivery account. Selected incentives were personally delivered to participants on their next water delivery day.

Result:

The promotion was a crystal clear success and the 500 new customer goal was exceeded by 52 – the program gave 110% results! Case study provided by: Christine Dumas McAtee, President, Adventures in Advertising – Insignia Marketing, www.insignia24hr.com in cooperation with Troy Cox, Marketing – Promotion Administrator, Abita Springs Water Co., Inc., www.abitasprings.com. This program was a Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) Pyramid Award winner.

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Travel – Interstate Hotels & Resorts

Challenge:

Interstate Hotels & Resorts wanted to attract hard-to-reach convention attendees to a company event that they were staging during the convention.

Solution:

Competing to draw attendees to a Saturday night event during a convention is not for the timid. This is traditionally the hottest night of the convention week for industry parties and events. Interstate Hotels & Resorts wanted to fill their dance card early, so four weeks before an upcoming convention, they sent 400 custom, screen-printed surfboards to targeted attendees all over the U.S. The “Ride the Wave” themed surfboards, suggesting a fun, adventurous vacation, arrived in custom-printed FedEx boxes. Interstate Hotels knew they’d scored big even before the convention when they began receiving calls and e-mails praising the surfboard invitations.

Result:

Interstate Hotels & Resorts was the big winner at the convention, recording an incredible 90 percent positive RSVP rate.

Case study provided by: Gary Rugoff, President & CEO, Gary Rugoff Sales – www.promotionalmerchandise.com. This program was a Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) Pyramid Award winner.

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Technology Sales – Insight, Inc.

Challenge:

Insight, Inc. wanted to introduce a new IBM product to their sales staff and create excitement for the product.

Solution:

New product introductions are a regular event at Insight, so the strategy team for the new IBM x440 knew they had to do something special to make the product stand out. A well-crafted, four-day promotion built excitement and interest. On Day One, a lunchtime rock-climbing activity was held in the parking lot, complete with rock-climbing wall and rock candy. Salespeople were invited to “Scale To New Heights With The IBM x440.” Day Two enticed salespeople to “Find Your Fortune With The IBM x440” and sweetened the deal with a sack of gold chocolate coins left on the desk of each targeted salesperson. Days Three and Four continued the promotion with customized fortune cookies and imprinted lava lamps placed around the office. Different posters promoting the product were hung throughout the week to keep the intrigue and interest alive. This was a solid and highly effective promotion that made excellent use of a modest budget and generated impressive results.

Result:

The first four months following the promotion showed amazing sales increases over the month just prior to the campaign, measuring 615-percent, 324-percent, 1,069-percent and 486-percent growth. Case study provided by: Naomi Abrahams, Sales Representative, Go Promotions – www.gopromotions.com. This program was a Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) Pyramid Award winner.

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Non-Profit – SIDS And Kids

Challenge:

The SIDS and Kids charity was seeking a promotional campaign that would generate exposure and awareness of their national fundraising day.

Solution:

SIDS and Kids is Australia’s biggest not-for-profit organization, raising money and awareness for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The national fundraising day, Red Nose Day, needs all the publicity and support it can get to help battle SIDS. Prior to 2003’s Red Nose Day, 430 colorful coffee mugs, featuring the new mascot, “Sid the Bear,” were sent to publicity departments of all key television stations, newspapers, magazines, PR companies, publicists and ad agencies. Rather than a single “Sid” mug, the organization created two designs and shipped them in custom cardboard gift boxes. The beauty of choosing the bright, whimsical mugs is that they are desirable, even collectable items but are not perceived as expensive which would have detracted from the charity, fund-conscious nature of SIDS and Kids.

Result:

Exposure of Red Nose Day 2003 was at an all-time high, and the organization recorded their most successful fundraising day in the event’s 20-year history. Additional funds were raised through retail sales of the popular mugs. Case study provided by: Wompro Pty Ltd – www.wompro.com. This program was a Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) Pyramid Award winner.

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Electronic Gaming Industry -- Majesco Entertainment

Challenge:

Working with a small budget, create an item to give away at E3 (the Electronic Entertainment Expo), which attracts crowds and sells a new title, JAWS Unleashed.

Solution:

Hit the attendees of this huge event right in the stomach with just a plastic cup and about 1,000 lbs. of candy. The cup was designed as a Cup O' Chum, and was handed out filled with candy worms to attendees only at specified Feeding Times, announced on placards around our client's booth. What better way to promote a game about an always-hungry shark? The promotion ensured curious and sugar-loving lines of people throughout each day of the event, and helped our client announce the upcoming release simply and effectively. It also encouraged repeat business at Majesco's booth from people who wanted a Chum-Refill.

Result:

An effective teaser for this new title that didn’t sink the budget, and a giveaway item with a message those recipients could literally sink their teeth into! Case study provided by: Kevin Bush, Senior Account Manager, Post No Bills – kevin@postnobills.com

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Case Studies in Success

Industry:

Entertainment – Universal Studios Home Entertainment

Challenge:

Create a unique 3-part mailer for the release of the 10th Anniversary edition DVD of “Casino” for Universal Studios Home Entertainment. The mailer would go out to select press throughout the US. The mailers should be inexpensive to produce & ship as well as being relevant to the film.

Solution:

Post No Bills, Inc. created a set of evidence bags containing items allegedly seized by the FBI during their investigation of the Casino. Each mailer featured an item from one of the three main characters. For example: one held a bloody pen that Joe Pesci’s character “Nicky Santoro” stabbed someone with at a Las Vegas bar. Each bag also contained an evidence sheet, which described the items and why they were seized. The series was mailed out over a period of six weeks leading up to the June 14, 2005 DVD release.

Result:

By incorporating economical yet clever content and packaging, this project was transformed from a generic 3-part mailer into a fully creative mini-campaign. Universal was so pleased with the concept that they doubled their usual order. Case study provided by: Robbie Burkett, Account Executive, Post No Bills – robbie@postnobills.com

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GET YOUR OWN SUBSCRIPTION TODAY You want to build your company brand recognition and out sell your competition. A subscription to Brilliant Results gives you the competitive edge. In every issue you’ll find real world ideas and better ways to increase your brand building ROI, motivate your staff and build your customer base. Filled with outcome driven editorial and the resources to build long-term relationships for BRILLIANT RESULTS.

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RELATIONSHIPS | RESOURCES | RESULTS

Free Product Information. July 2005 Issue.

For free product information from these suppliers, complete and mail this page to: Brilliant Results Magazine 9034 Joyce Lane Hummelstown, PA 17036.Or fax to (717) 566-5431. Supplier

Page No.

3M ®

3

Ashworth ® Corporate

13

BAS

15

Ball Pro

71

Blake & Hollister

37

Bravo Awards

41

Brilliant Results Magazine ™

73

Bullet Line ®

Back Cover

Calconix / Time Zone ®

45, 75

Gabriel Metal Casting GROLINE ®

39

Jelly Belly ® / PLEG

Inside Back Cover

Key-Bak ®

43

Lacoste ® / Idea Workshop

19

Liz Claiborne ® / Hartwell Industries

7

51,53,55,59 Nat Nast ® / Idea Workshop

Inside Front Cover

Neet Feet ®

33

Nike ®

5

Pepco Poms

21

Perry Ellis International

10-11

Sierra Pacific Apparel

63

Skagen ®

17

Tele-Comp Solutions™

31

Timenet USA

23

Vonco

29

Warwick Publishing

27

Name

THINGS WE LOVE Section Supplier

Page No.

Product No.

Yomega

56

1

Dixiline

56

2

Smarte Goods LLC

56

3

JMTek

57

4

Time Products International

57

5

Prime Resources

57

6

Retro 51

58

7

Century Foam

58

8

KR Line

60

9

Gator Guard

60

10

JEBCO

60

11

Custom Cushion Company

61

12

Pro Innovative

61

13

It's All Greek To Me

61

14

HBC Corporation

62

15

CorpLogoWare

62

16

The Humphrey Line

62

17

Title

Company

Industry

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2005 August

Calendar

August 01

STI Knowledge Center Symposium Bellagio Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, NV Information at: www.STIKnowledge.com/Symposium or Call 770-290-3474.

August 01 – 04

SpeechTEK 2005 Exposition & Education Conference New York Marriott Marquis, New York, NY Information at: www.speechtek.com or Call: 877.993.9767

August 08 – 11

Search Engine Strategies Conference & Expo – San Jose San Jose McEnry Convention Center, San Jose, CA Information at: www.jupiterevents.com/sew/summer05 or Call 203. 662.2976

August 11 – 13

Imprinted Sportswear Show Indianapolis Indiana Convention Center & RCA Dome, Indianapolis, IN Information at: www.issshows.com or Call 800.933.8735

August 14 – 18

ASD/AMD Trade Show – Las Vegas - Summer Las Vegas Convention Center, Las Vegas, NV Information at: www.merchandisegroup.com/merchandise/index.jsp or Call 800.421.4511

August 14 – 19

TDWI World Conference – Summer 2005 Manchester Grand Hyatt - San Diego, San Diego, CA Information at: www.tdwi.org or Call 800.280.6218

August 15 – 19

HP World 2005 Conference & Expo Moscone Center, San Francisco, CA Information at: www.hpworld.com/conference/hpworld2005/index.jsp or Call 800.468.3739

August 25 – 27

The Awards & Custom Gift Show - Charlotte Charlotte Convention Center, Charlotte, NC Information at: www.nbmshows.com or Call 800.560.9941

August 27 – 30

ASD/AMD’s Variety Merchandise Show – Fall Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York, NY Information at: www.merchandisegroup.com/merchandise/index.jsp or Call 800.421.4511

August 28 – 31

Apparel Sourcing Assoc. Pavilion – ASAP Global Sourcing Show Sands Expo & Convention Center, Las Vegas, NV Information at: www.asapshow.com or Call 626.636.2530

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September

RELATIONSHIPS | RESOURCES | RESULTS

September 08 – 15

PRINT 05 McCormick Place Complex, Chicago, IL Information at: www.PRINT05.com or Call 703.264.7200

September 09 – 11

ASR Trade Expo – San Diego September San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA Information at: www.asrbiz.com or Call 949.376.8144

September 15 – 17

Imprinted Sportswear Show Atlanta Cobb Galleria Centre, Atlanta, GA Information at: www.issshows.com/iss/1235/index.jsp or Call 770.955.8000

September 18 – 22

COMMON Conference & Expo Fall 2005 Orlando World Center Marriott, Orlando, FL Information at: www.common.org/conferences/2005/fall/ or Call 800.777.6734

September 19 – 24

5th Annual itSMF USA Conference & Expo 2005 McCormick Place Complex, Chicago, IL Information at: www.jupiterevents.com/itsmf/fall05/index.html or Call 203.662.2857

September 25 – 27

ASD/AMD Houston Variety Merchandise Show George R. Brown Convention Center, Houston, TX Information at: www.merchandisegroup.com or Call 800.421.4511

September 27 – 29

The Motivation Show McCormick Place South, Chicago, IL Information at: www.motivationshow.com or Call 800.752.6312

September 29 – 30

AMA’s Corporate Branding 2005 Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, NV Information at: www.amanet.org/events/cb2005/index.htm Call 800.262.9699

* To have your show listed in our Calendar please send your information to Brilliant Results magazine. *

www.brilliantpublishing.com

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The Last Word

BARNES & NOBLE, INC., THE WORLD’S LARGEST BOOKSELLER, has become a growing presence on the nation’s college and university campuses through Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc. Building on a name already known for quality, Barnes and Noble College Booksellers, Inc. has renovated, redesigned, revamped and revitalized over 500 campus bookstores. Barnes & Noble College Booksellers give the brands in their stores the opportunity to reach college students where they live, learn, and shop. Their TurnKey tools permit brands to benefit from effective marketing programs aimed specifically at college students, such as: Sampling: efficient, targeted sampling of product and collateral In-Store Promotion: from live demonstrations to strategic placement of “Point-of-Sale” Around Campus Promotion: gets the message out of the store and into public places Advertising: via proprietary and traditional vehicles, mass-marketed or targeted Student Network: utilizing “brand ambassadors” on campus

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Online: linking with each university’s bookstore website and the SparkNotes website Through their Barnes & Noble College Marketing Network division, they have leveraged the power of their bookstores to reach over 4.3 million college students in-store, on campus and online with their welltargeted marketing programs. With a history spanning over 35 years on campus, the Barnes & Noble College Marketing Network utilizes Barnes & Noble College Booksellers’ unique status as: an official textbook headquarters; a host of special events; a general store and a gathering place to continually expand their reach and penetration into the college community. Recently, Brilliant Results had the opportunity to speak with Stan Frank, Director, Marketing Administration for Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc.

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Since 1968 when we signed our first contract to operate a campus bookstore, Barnes & Noble has developed a reputation for operating the finest service-oriented campus bookstores in the nation. BR: How did you become involved with Barnes & Noble College Bookstores, Inc.? SF: I joined Barnes & Noble College Booksellers in 1987 as Marketing Manager with responsibility for overseeing the development of proposals for colleges and universities that were interested in privatizing their campus bookstore operations. In the last 15 years, we have contracted with 10 to 15 new schools each year to manage their campus bookstores. Currently, we manage more than 500 campus stores throughout the country. BR: In your opinion what is the most important service/contribution that Barnes & Noble College Bookstores, Inc. offers to its college/university bookstore partners? SF: Since 1968 when we signed our first contract to operate a campus bookstore, Barnes & Noble has developed a reputation for operating the finest service-oriented campus bookstores in the nation. Our client list includes Harvard University, Yale University, Columbia University, Texas A&M University, Northwestern University, Georgia Tech, DePaul University, Cal State University at Los Angeles, University of Pennsylvania, Louisiana State University, College of William & Mary, University of Mississippi, and University of Nevada at Las Vegas, among others. All campus stores are customized to meet the specific needs of their campus community and feature a highly professional management staff, top quality merchandise, computerized book ordering and innovative store design.

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The Last Word continued

BR: How have you integrated the Barnes & Noble College Marketing Network into your bookstore operations? SF: There are three separate Barnes & Noble entities in the B&N “family”. My company is Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc. (www.bkstore.com). The second company is Barnes & Noble, Inc. (www.barnesandnoble.com), which operates over 600 large “superstores” throughout the country. The third company is B&N.com (www.bn.com), our Internet Company. Each of these three companies is a separate entity with its own management staff. Each serves a different audience. Barnes & Noble College Booksellers often works closely with management from the other two companies. In some cases, we use the same suppliers and in-store design people used in the other companies. BR: How did Barnes & Noble develop a connection with over 500 colleges & universities? SF: Our reputation essentially grew by word of mouth. In the college industry, if you run a good retail operation, the word spreads very quickly. Although it is a very large industry, college administrators know each other, and they often move up to other institutions, and they bring with them stories of our success at their former schools. Very often, they seek to duplicate their successes at the new schools with which they are associated. BR: How do you use promotional products and/or direct marketing strategies to increase interest in Barnes & Noble College Bookstores, Inc.? SF: We have a large merchandising department of 12 to 15 people who work with our approved suppliers to determine which products will be sold in our stores; they also work closely with suppliers to develop special promotions that are introduced at major selling periods throughout the year. We are especially active during “Rush” periods at the beginning of each semester, graduation time, holiday season, Halloween, Valentine’s Day, etc. Promotional products are promoted through a variety of media including school papers, in-store signage, on-campus posters, campus radio, community newspapers, etc. We emphasize the value and savings we offer students.

www.brilliantpublishing.com

BR: Do you source the bookstore’s promotional merchandise? If so, do you have a regular supplier/distributor/agency that you work with and why? SF: All our suppliers and vendors must be approved by our merchandising department before they can sell our stores. We have a defined procedure to ensure that a supplier’s products are up to our quality standards and taste level, and that the supplier can produce, price, store and ship merchandise according to our needs. All suppliers must also conform to our Business Code of Conduct policy. Inquiries can be made through our web site. BR: What is your personal favorite promotional merchandise item and why? SF: My personal favorite promotional item is always changing with changes in student preferences. One year, it might be a new sweatshirt in a new fashion color; another time, it may be a backpack or an inflatable chair for a dorm room. My preferences are really shaped by what students want at any particular time. Additional information about Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Inc. is available on their website bkstore.com.

Brilliant Results | July

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Off The Cuff

College Trivia Which of the following is not an Ivy League School? a. University of Pennsylvania b. Brown University c. Cornell University d. Stanford University

On which college’s campus did the Revolutionaries win their only battle in the New York campaign? a. New York University b. Barnard College c. Ithaca College d. Niagara University At which college does ‘Good Will Hunting’ take place? a. Harvard University b. Princeton University c. Massachusetts Institute of Technology d. Amherst College Which college is not all girls? a. Vassar b. Smith c. Mt. Holyoke d. Bryn Mawr

Match That Mascot:

Quote

~

Education is when you read the fine print Experience is what happens if you don’t. ~ Pete Seeger The world does not pay for what a person knows But it pays for what a person does with what he knows. ~ Laurence Lee

82 Brilliant Results

| July 2005

1. Miami Hurricanes

a. Gorilla

2. 7-Up

b. Misha

3. Chicago Bulls

c. Bear

4. AFLAC

d. Benny

5. Alabama Crimson Tide

e. Sir Purr

6. GEICO

f. Fido Dido

7. Miami Dolphins

g. Duck

8. Phoenix Suns

h. T D

9. Snuggle

i. Gecko

10. 1980 Summer Olympics

j. Neve & Gliz

11. 2006 Winter Olympics

k. Ibis

12. Carolina Panthers

l. Big Al

Answers: College Trivia – 1:d, 2:b (Battle of Harlem Heights), 3:c, 4:a Mascots – 1:k, 2:f, 3:d, 4:g, 5:l, 6:i, 7:h, 8:a, 9:c, 10:b, 11:j, 12:e

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