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2011-12

Annual Report


Brightwater Care Group is a non profit organisation and one of the largest and best known providers of residential accommodation in Western Australia. Brightwater has an ethos built on a fundamental respect for people, expressed by our philosophy of Personhood. Our values of Care, Learning, Innovation and People, underpin the way we plan, carry out and reflect on everything we do.

Published by: Brightwater Care Group (Inc). ABN: 23 445 460 050 Design: Simon French Photographers: Frances Andrijich, Tobey Black and Samuel Goh For a copy of the Annual Report 2011-12 download from www.brightwatergroup.com or contact Brightwater Care Group on 08 9202 2800 or email welcome@brightwatergroup.com Front Cover: Beth resides at a Brightwater care facility and is actively involved in our Disability Access and Inclusion Group.

Printed using petroleum free inks on 100% recycled paper to international environmental management standard ISO 14001.

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


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Contents 2 Brightwater at a glance 3 Our Purpose, Philosophy and Values 4 2011-12 - Facts and Figures 6 Chairman and CEO Report 10 Care

- At Home support

- Investing in a bright future

- A new nurse practitioner model in practice

- Interprofessional Education

- The Brightwater Centre

- eLearning @ Brightwater

- The real value of Oats Street’s expansion

- Community Engagement: Holidays!

- Community Support

- Volunteers

- Culture, Communication and Work Relations

16 Learning

20 Innovation 24 People

32 Financial Results 2011-12 38 Brightwater Care Group Profile 40 Board Members 42 Governance 43 Leadership Team 44 Locations


Brightwater at a glance This Brightwater Care Group annual report for 2011-12 outlines our overall performance and some of the year’s highlights.

Our origins • A part of the WA community since 1901, Brightwater has developed an enviable reputation for service, flexibility and innovation. • Our care services comprise: Services for Older People and Services for Younger People. • Brightwater also has an extensive At Home Service that is available to people of all ages in need of support. • As a not for profit organisation, we return any surplus to the community we serve by: - updating and improving facilities; and - growing existing services and developing new ones.

A leading provider of care services • Brightwater Care Group is one of the largest providers of residential accommodation in Western Australia, with 23 facilities located from Joondalup to Mandurah. • 13 of the 23 facilities provide residential accommodation for older people. • Two houses are dedicated to people living with Huntington’s Disease. • Eight community houses provide a range of rehabilitation and residential accommodation for younger people with disabilities. • Brightwater At Home services provided assistance to 1,475 clients in their own homes last year, and continues to grow. • Brightwater also provides a specialist seating and equipment service called Seatec (seating and equipment clinic). This service operates on a consultation basis, addressing seating, postural, mobility, equipment, pressure management or splinting needs. A total of 177 referrals were received in 2011-12.

Commercial services • Brightwater boasts an award-winning over-55s community, Kingsway Court, specifically developed and designed to meet the needs of over 55s and retired Western Australians. • Brightwater has developed linen and catering businesses that provide quality services to its own facilities and similar organisations such as hotels, mine sites and hospitals in WA. Being not for profit means any income is directly returned to the organisation to improve facilities and services – something that Brightwater is very passionate about.

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


Our Purpose, Philosophy & Values All successful organisations are founded upon a clear purpose and philosophy, and a set of well understood and meaningful values.

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Our purpose, philosophy and values provide a framework for decision making throughout the organisation and assist in reinforcing our commitment to each other, our residents, clients, customers and stakeholders. Brightwater’s purpose, our statement of why we are here, is:

To Enable Wellbeing It is about providing people with the means, knowledge, opportunity and strength to achieve their desired level of contentment. Our values, which guide us in everything we do are:

Care:

We care about, and for, each other.

Learning: We continually learn, in order to respond to our own and other peoples changing needs.

Innovation: We harness our creative energy and transform it into activities and outcomes that make a difference.

People: We recognise and respect each and every person and value all the relationships which connect us.

Personhood Philosophy Personhood is defined as: “A standing or status that is bestowed upon one human being by others, in the context of relationship and social being. It implies recognition, respect and trust” (Tom Kitwood, 1997). Our sense of personhood is that feeling or sense of self which is derived from our place in a social group and from the roles we perform in that group. If our surrounding environment is positive and supportive our self-esteem is reaffirmed and strengthened. Brightwater approaches all aspects of service, in all areas, using a Person-Centered Approach and this is the fundamental philosophy that underpins everything we do.


2011-12 Facts and Figures Kingsway Court • The immaculate, award-winning gardens boast over 105 different species of plants and trees. • The residents of Kingsway Court provide a substantial and ongoing volunteer base for the adjoining Madeley Care Facility, as well as participating in and supporting their fundraising and social events.

Brightwater Catering

• Kingsway Court has a very active and enthusiastic social committee. In any one year, there are approximately 1,300 scheduled activities and over 260 special events to choose from.

• Meals provided to Brightwater residents per day – 1,200 • Fresh fruit and vegetables purchased per month – 8,300 kgs • Litres of soup produced each month – 3,000 litres

Growth of At Home Services 1600

1200

987

1163

1000

1476

800 600 400

Number of clients

1400

200 2009/2010

2010/2011

Brightwater Linen • Water (in litres) saved in 2011-12 – 9,000,000 Growth • Linen deliveries per week – 350 • Quantity of sheeting supplied in 2011-12 – 1,400,000

0 2011/2012

Awards for Brightwater in 2011-12:

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12

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• Brightwater received national recognition from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency, winning two Better Practice Awards for innovation. The Better Practice Awards went to Brightwater Madeley for “Building the workforce for aged care tomorrow – an innovative interprofessional approach” and to Brightwater Oxford Gardens in Joondalup for “Postural care equals good care – a care worker innovation.” • High Care Coordinator at Brightwater Marangaroo, Lyn Maitland, won a WA Nursing & Midwifery Excellence Awards for the category of Residential and Aged Care. Brightwater was extremely fortunate to have had two finalists in the Residential and Aged Care category Denise Hills and Lyn Maitland. • Brightwater had two finalists in the 2012 ACSWA Excellence in Care Awards: - Angela Lowe, Care Manager at Brightwater Joondalup and Edgewater was a finalist in the Employee Category - Olivia Cook, Enrolled Nurse Team Leader at Brightwater The Cove received a High Commendation in the Trainee Category.

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At Home Care 400

0

800

1600

1200

Act Co Act

2009-10

Client numbers

Community based services have seen sustained growth over the past 3 years with more care recipients within the Perth region (or WA) opting to remain in their homes for longer. Services provided range from high level clinical care to housework, meals, personal care and social support. 2010-11

2009-10

1476

1163

987

105%

2010-11

95%

85%

Brightwater continues to provide Residential, Rehabilitation, Transitional 1600 1200 800 400 an Acquired and Respite services to young people0 living with Disability or Huntington’s disease. 2009-10 In our Residential facilities we support all clients to maintain and enhance existing abilities, explore new opportunities & develop additional life skills.

Our commitment to meeting the needs of young adults impacted by a disability is shown in consistently 2010-11 exceeding our Disability Services Commission contracted hours.

2011-12

Actual Hours Provided Actual over DSC contracted hours

90%

2011-12

Services For Younger People

Contracted Hours

100%

80%

Actual over DSC contracted hours Contracted hours Actual hours provided 110%

300,000

105%

250,000

100%

200,000

95%

150,000

90%

100,000 50,000

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

228,689

215,119

200,999

245,228

230,006

206,389

85%

107%

107%

103%

80%

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

0

Services for Younger People

Client Numbers

2011-12

110%

2011-12


Lotterywest Executive Team L-R: Mr Alec James, Mrs Lorraine Driscoll, Mr Pascoe Rechichi, Mrs Jan Stewart, Mrs Jacquie Thomson, Mr Don Wharton and Ms Maree Brown. Photographed at Brightwater Oats Street – a unique rehabilitation service for people with acquired brain injury. The Oats Street programme helps people return to community living Photo credit: Frances Andrijich.

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


Chairman and CEO Report

It’s been another busy year, full of energy, challenges, achievements, and the combined efforts of all Brightwater’s people.

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Following sentinel reports from the Productivity Commission, governments have been on the reform path in the areas of both disability and aged care. But as we embark on this long journey ahead, we also look back at the past year and hope you will enjoy reading about the highlights in the pages that follow.

People and services Brightwater offers service, support and care to many hundreds of people, old and young, in their homes or ours, from Joondalup to Mandurah, and right across the Perth Metropolitan area.

Aged Care We are all witnessing the beginning of an extraordinary time in history – the ageing of our population is beginning in earnest. Government is facing the prospect of three or four decades of increasing demand and the rising cost of service provision. Service providers are anticipating great change and difficult times, and older people are becoming much more aware of what their future needs might be and wondering what the future will deliver. One thing is for certain, the system we have at present will not endure in its current form. Residential care is expensive to fund, operate and pay for. Care at home is much more available and accessible, but may not be adequate or appropriate for everyone. ‘Consumer directed care’ is a relatively new concept and needs more discussion and refinement before its attributes and applications are better understood. However, despite all the challenges that an ageing population may bring, the uncertain national and international financial environment, the political debates and the high expectations of the about-to-age Baby Boomers, this is an extraordinary and exciting time to grow old. Ageing is a triumph for the human race, and the possibilities and solutions are ours to create.

Younger people living with disability The recently announced National Disability Insurance Scheme promises long awaited funding arrangements to ensure all people with significant disability have access to the support they need, at their behest, so they can live their own lives their own way. This is a major reform with a large price tag for government, and it is anticipated that the introduction will be gradual in order to build on experience and learning along the way. Brightwater’s interest lies particularly in a smaller part of the overall scheme – the National Injury Insurance Scheme – as this relates specifically to people with traumatic brain injury and will ultimately ensure a quicker, more responsive system to assist many of our younger people.

Staff Over 2,000 wonderful people work throughout Brightwater. There is enormous diversity in this amazing group, in what they do, their various skills and contributions, where they work, their own personal cultural backgrounds and the richness they bring with them to their work. We have worked very hard to attract and keep the staff we need, despite all the challenges in the recruitment environment and pressures from Western Australia’s remarkable ‘dual economy’. Our strong drive to continually strengthen occupational safety and health processes has delivered very good outcomes. Not only is this vital for the personal wellbeing of each staff member, but for the collective effect on our whole workforce – boosting our competence and our confidence.


What binds us all together is the motivation of every single one of us.

We invest in encouraging and developing leadership capacity at Brightwater. Ours is a complex organisation operating in a complex environment, making leadership at all levels critical to our success. There is nothing more gratifying and exciting than unlocking leadership potential and watching a person grow in capability, skill and confidence, and seeing the difference in people management and service outcomes that follow.

Friends The Brightwater community is wider and broader than simply the people who give and receive services. There are many others who help and work alongside us, supporting the organisation’s internal systems and contributing indirectly to the end result. Suppliers, contractors, unions and many individuals in a number of government entities are all very important to us. We can’t do what we do without them and the positive outcomes benefit all parties. Hundreds of people volunteer their time and talent to make a difference for our residents and clients in so many ways. They are remarkable special friends of Brightwater. This year we’ve found more friends and been amazed by their generosity in terms of their time, enthusiasm and contribution. We acknowledge and thank all the people who have supported our fundraising efforts to expand Oats Street – our very special program helping people with serious brain injury to learn to live again. It has been such a pleasure to meet and work with all of them, and to share and celebrate the building journey with them.

Students and learning Everything Brightwater achieves is a result of people working together and is accomplished by combining our skills and knowledge. It has long been our dream to encourage this modus operandi for the health professionals of the future – to have students of all professional health disciplines learn together at Brightwater. Every year for the last decade, we have welcomed hundreds of undergraduate students to undertake their practical experience placements at Brightwater. But this last year, we’re realising our dream to introduce formal team learning. Working collaboratively with the University of Western Australia and Curtin University, we have established an Inter-Professional Education (IPE) program, affording nearly 300 students from several health disciplines the opportunity to tackle projects and learning experiences together, in our residential facilities and At Home services. It has been a remarkable program for all of us, not only the students. The outcomes have been more than we dared anticipate, and we will make sure IPE continues, regardless of funding vagaries. The IPE program has already attracted accolades, winning a Faculty of Health Sciences Teaching Excellence Award at Curtin University, runner-up in UWA’s Teaching and Learning Awards, and a national Better Practice Award from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency for “Building the workforce for aged care tomorrow, an innovative interprofessional approach.” But perhaps the most significant testament to IPE’s success to date is that several students from the program have come back after graduating to join our staff. It is our hope that other participants will carry their experience and appreciation of each other’s skills with them, whatever their chosen future field of practice.

Achievements in research The Brightwater Centre has evolved from modest beginnings to give staff the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of research, writing papers for journals and obtaining a speakers slot at scientific conferences. As the Centre grows, so does our confidence and success in the field of research. This year, Brightwater staff have successfully undertaken seven internal evaluation reports of a variety of initiatives and new service start-ups. They have presented several papers and

DR PENNY FLETT ChIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 8

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


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posters at national and international conferences in Australia and the UK. Our next goal is to increase journal publications. The Centre’s manager and research officer, Caroline and Karla, have personally tutored, encouraged and assisted every member of staff involved in these activities. Furthermore, their networks and contacts within WA’s universities have given us growing credibility. So, when we were invited to join a $25 million, five-year research partnership into ‘Cognitive Decline’ by the National Health and Medical Research Council just before Christmas 2011, we were confident and delighted to accept.

Growing and aiming for the best All our aged care residences have achieved full accreditation and have worked hard to continue to improve in many ways.

Better Practice Awards Two national Better Practice Awards were scooped this year by Brightwater Madeley for the IPE program, and Brightwater Joondalup for their postural care project involving care workers in an innovative staffing model. These are wonderful achievements and outstanding examples of our work towards preparing well for the future, both in clinical care innovation and investing in workforce capability.

Growing At Home This year has also seen At Home services grow apace. Services now cover all Perth metropolitan areas and our Regional Assessment Service (East Metropolitan) was launched in January 2011. There is no doubt that services to support people to stay at home for as long as possible will continue to grow and Brightwater intends to be closely involved. We believe the ability to offer care along a continuum of services is of fundamental importance to older people and their families.

Quality linen services Brightwater Linen has a well-earned reputation for high standards, reliable quality and responsive service. As a valuable component of Brightwater, the laundry serves all our own needs and works hard to deliver much-needed resources for our care services and new undertakings, while proudly upholding the Brightwater ethos of value and quality.

Celebrations at Brightwater Oats Street The rebuilding of Oats Street must surely be the most anticipated and worthy celebration this year. It has been an enormous challenge in many respects, but everyone’s hard work, patience, cooperation and dogged effort has enabled us to successfully reach the halfway mark – from the collective input into building planning and design, to the sheer tenacity of Oats Street staff and clients who have been squeezed into half their usual space. We’ve also been overwhelmed by the extraordinary response from friends and benefactors who have enthusiastically contributed to the fundraising effort. Furthermore, the continued positive support from Lotterywest and WA Health Department has given us great strength and confidence in managing the whole complicated process. Half the site is now happily occupied, and the remainder of the building is due for completion in the first few months of 2013. None of these achievements would happen without the willingness of Brightwater’s staff and community to dream boldly and work together to make the dream come true. It is the people who are to be celebrated, and we thank them all. We especially thank Board members, who take ultimate responsibility for Brightwater’s direction, stewardship of resources and accountability to the wider community of Western Australia.

Steven Cole Chairman

The rebuilding of Brightwater Oats Street must surely be the most anticipated and worthy celebration this year.


Care “I feel so blessed, it’s like I gained another daughter” Joy, 83, Brightwater At Home services client

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


Staying at home Brightwater At Home services have experienced another year of continued growth. This year we provided services to almost 1500 people.

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Brightwater At Home provide supports to people living at home to enable them to continue living in their home of choice for as long as possible. We aim to provide a seamless service to people as their needs change. Some people may only need a little bit of help, for example a visit once per fortnight to help with some household tasks, right through to people who need 3 or 4 visits per day to remain living at home. Through our transition care service approximately 100 people received a time limited restorative program following a hospital stay to help them get back on their feet. For 20011-12 the At Home team conducted more than 150,000 visits to clients in their own homes. These visits provided essential assessments, reviews, personal care, shopping, assistance with meal preparation, nursing care, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, dietetics, respite and domestic assistance. Of the 150,000-plus visits, 10,500 were for nursing care and 2,500 for allied health.

Highlights of the year included: • Opening of a new fit-for-purpose office in Rockingham for the South West staff. The facility includes a large training room, a clinical training room and an e-learning room, in addition to 16 workstations and a staffroom. The Strategic Learning and Growth team now deliver all training in the south from these rooms. • Expansion of our Eastern Suburbs services with the successful application of Extended Age Care at Home (EACH) packages. Our coordinator for this area is co-located with the Regional Assessment service in Dianella. • Successful application to expand our EACH and EACH Dementia program in the North Metropolitan area. • In December 2011 At Home services concluded the Inter-Professional Education (IPE) program. During the year we supported 35 students in their final-year placements. • A new Community Care Management software program was selected and the implementation project commenced. The team went live with this program on 20 August 2012. The year ahead is set to bring more changes, with a new office planned for the Northern Suburbs, implementation of consumer-directed care and the transition to working within the new paradigm of the Living Longer, Living Better aged care reforms.

At Home clients by age group (>30% are 85 years or older)

27.7%

250

26.5%

200

19.4%

150

10.6%

9.2%

100

3.6% 0.6% 2.1% 30 to 39

40 to 49

50 to 59

50

60 to 69

70 to 79

80 to 84

Age Group

0.2% 85 to 89

90 to 99

> 100

0

Male Female


Investing in a bright future Services For Older People We own and operate some of Australia’s most modern and progressive residential care facilities. In order to maintain and improve our residents’ quality of life, we continue to invest in our facilities to ensure they provide a welcoming and familiar environment with many home like features. Brightwater facilities are currently accredited with a full 3 year Commonwealth Accreditation in recognition of their very high standards. As at June 2012, we had 771 occupied beds in our residential facilities, a 98% occupancy rate.

Care

Brightwater Residential Aged Care Finishing Schedule It’s common for older people to have difficulties with colour discrimination, which impacts on their ability to live and function well within their environment. With this in mind, Brightwater undertook an audit of all 13 residential aged care facilities to determine how well the physical environment met the specific needs of our residents. The information was then applied to Quality Improvement plans, specifically focused on the refurbishment and structuring of the physical environment to ensure optimal resident function and wellbeing.

The process In collaboration with DeFiddes Design, Brightwater then embarked on a project to develop the Brightwater Residential Aged Care Finishing Schedule to ensure the interior design meets the specific needs of residents. This process involved assessing each house within our facilities to determine the orientation and natural lighting influences, and profile existing colours. From this information, design principles were reviewed to ensure appropriate colour, contrast and pattern selections were made to define the environment as clearly as possible. Particular attention was given to addressing the needs of people who have dementia, introducing good visual access, reducing unnecessary stimuli, maximising familiarity and highlighting helpful stimuli. Seven colour themes and fourteen sample boards were developed, featuring warm and cool tones. A vast array of finishes, wall and trim paints, wall carpet, flooring, hand rails, window treatments and upholstery fabrics were reviewed. Each house in each facility was then allocated a colour theme in either warm or cool tones and a bedroom finishing schedule has been completed for each colour theme. This will form the basis of all refurbishments and replacements going forward. The Care Managers were delighted to see a clear structure and visualise how the overall theme will look once the full transformation to the new theme is completed over the next few years. It’s an exciting time for Brightwater to have a vision realised, with the Residential Aged Care Finishing Schedule contributing to our efforts in creating an enabling, inviting and comfortable environment for our residents.

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


> 100

13

Awards for B

Awards for Brightwater in 2011-12

• Brightwater Standards a Awards for Brightwater tomorrow – Brightwater good care – • Brightwater Care Award - Angela Lo Edgewate - Olivia Coo Cove rece

Better Practice Awards

• Brightwater received national recognition from • High Care C the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation won a WA N Agency, winning two Better Practice Awards of Resident for innovation. The Better Practice Awards to have had went to Brightwater Madeley for “Building - Denise Hi the workforce for aged care tomorrow – an innovative interprofessional approach” and to Brightwater Oxford Gardens in Joondalup for “Postural care equals good care – a care worker innovation.”

Investment in maintaining our facilities 0

1000 1500

500

400

0

2000

2500 1200

800

3000

1600

WA Nursing and 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Midwifery Excellence Award

3500

Actual over DSC contracted hours

$2,262

2009-10

$3,295

110% 105%

$2,313

250 2010-11

2011-12

150

200,000

95%

150,000

$2,588

90%

100,000 ACSWA Excellence in Care Award

$2,242

85%

• Brightwater had two finalists in the 50,000 2012 ACSWA Excellence in Care Awards. 0 - Angela Lowe – Care Manager at Brightwater 2011-12 2010-11and Edgewater 2009-10 was a finalist in Joondalup the Employee Category - Olivia Cook – Enrolled Nurse Team Leader at Brightwater The Cove received a High Commendation in the Trainee Category.

80%

100

• High Care Coordinator at Brightwater Contracted hours Marangaroo, Lyn Maitland, won a WA Actual hours provided Nursing & Midwifery Excellence Awards for the category of Residential and Aged Care. 300,000 Brightwater was extremely fortunate to have had two finalists in the Residential and Aged 250,000 Care category - Denise Hills and Lyn Maitland.

100%

$2,605 200

3000

Male Improving Quality of Life Female Maintaining Quality of Life

Costs 50 Incurred in ($’000):

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

Improving Quality of Life

$2,242

$2,605

$3,295

Maintaining Quality of Life 0

$2,588

$2,313

$2,262


A new nurse practitioner model in practice Following our successful application for a Federal Government grant, Brightwater embarked on a major project to implement a new nurse practitioner model of practice in November 2011.

Care

The Department of Health and Ageing initiated funding of a series of trials (over three years from 2011 to 2014) in each state and territory, aiming to support the establishment of nurse practitioners in aged care settings. Brightwater is one of five organisations developing nurse practitioner models of practice in WA. Brightwater’s submission proposed a model of practice that involves nurse practitioners providing collaborative chronic disease management across several residential care facilities and for At Home services clients within the same geographical area. Nurse practitioners have an extended scope of nursing practice and are authorised by legislation to diagnose health problems and prescribe medications according to approved protocols. So their role is well suited to providing preventative and health maintenance care for people with chronic diseases such as chronic lung or heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, etc. Managed by the Health Care Delivery team, Phase 1 of the project launched in January 2012 with the appointment of the first of two nurse practitioners. Lorraine Martin is based at Joondalup, providing chronic disease management services for Edgewater, Joondalup, Oxford Gardens and Madeley residential facilities, as well as selected At Home service clients in the north region. Since January, Lorraine has logged over 200 direct client-nurse practitioner consultations and over 30 staff education sessions focusing on the correct administration of nebulised/inhaled medicines. She has also managed the communication and documentation requirements for the project.

Bringing some normality back to life with nurse practitioner care An example of a successful client care case is John, a 71 year-old man who lives in the community with his wife. John was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 20 years ago and has needed insulin to manage his blood sugar levels (BSLs) for the last three years. He was referred to the nurse practitioner for review of fluctuating BSLs and other health problems. Following comprehensive assessment, including blood tests, our nurse practitioner consulted with the client, his wife and the GP. His insulin regime required injections four times a day, but was not controlling his high BSLs, resulting in John often complaining of hunger, and also having increased urine output at night. His wife was experiencing significant carer stress with this intensive regime and she felt she was floundering. John’s wife was no longer able to transport him to the GP surgery or to hospital outpatient appointments. During a planned period of residential respite care, John’s BSLs were monitored intensively and analysed. He fluctuated between symptomatic hypoglycaemia (less than 5mmol/L) and asymptomatic hyperglycaemia (25 – 30mmol/L).The nurse practitioner prepared a new diabetes management plan and discussed it with a diabetes nurse specialist, John’s wife and his GP. The new plan replaced the intensive insulin regime with a twice-daily regime using Novomix 30/70. An oral anti-diabetic medication, prescribed by the nurse practitioner, was also re-introduced. The new plan was implemented with increased clinical input from At Home services nursing staff to support John’s wife, who was also given further education in

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


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contemporary diabetes management strategies. Over the next two weeks John’s insulin dose was adjusted by the nurse practitioner until a mostly stable and acceptable BSL range was achieved. The outcome of this plan was that John’s appetite and urinary output returned to a normal state and his overall wellbeing has improved. His wife has found the new regime much easier and is now managing it herself. The GP is also pleased with the result.

First steps make a positive impact Lorraine’s contribution to Brightwater residents and staff has already been significant, as reflected in the following comment from a Care Manager. “We think the nurse practitioner position is a really excellent step for Brightwater. It has made a really big difference in our residents’ wellbeing, and the timeliness of their care. Lorraine is so passionate about excellent nursing care for people with lung disease.” Phase 2 of the project commenced in June 2012, with the appointment of the second nurse practitioner, Leah Hansen, who brings extensive experience as a nurse practitioner in primary health care. Based at Rockingham, Leah is providing chronic disease management services for Huntingdale, South Lake, The Oaks and The Cove residential facilities, as well as selected At Home service clients in the south region, and has already completed almost 80 nurse practitioner consultations. The combination of planned and referred nurse practitioner services in this project has enabled more comprehensive, proactive and timely access to primary health care and chronic disease management services for Brightwater residents and clients. In turn, this has delivered improvements to treatment management regimes, resulting in greater health and wellbeing benefits and fewer distressing exacerbations and hospitalisations for residents and clients. Enhanced with Medicare and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme access, the nurse practitioners also support the GPs health care for residents, which is valued. One GP commented, “Thanks very much for the help, much appreciated and timely. Not used to this, but I love it! We will make our team at South Lake and Huntingdale the best.” Medicare provider numbers also allow the nurse practitioners to bulk-bill residents and clients using specifically allocated item numbers, which has resulted in a small income stream for Brightwater. Assessing the financial viability of the nurse practitioner position in aged care organisations is one of the objectives of the national nurse practitioners in aged care project.

Lorraine Martin and Leah Hansen


Learning 16

“Around 400 students are hosted every year across 23 facilities.�

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


Interprofessional Education Arthur’s vital signs, smile and rekindled enthusiasm for walking gave our student team the proof they were looking for after just three weeks – that regular exercise training improves quality of life, reduces breathing difficulties, increases exercise tolerance and builds muscle strength.

17

Building strength in numbers with Interprofessional Education (IPE) Arthur is 81 years of age with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, reduced mobility, arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive cardiac failure and diabetes. Unable to walk, Arthur was using a wheelchair to get around. And yet, under the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program, set up by university students on IPE placements at Brightwater, he’s beaten his own record of walking unaided with a zimmer frame. Arthur’s improved vital signs, his smile and rekindled enthusiasm for walking gave our student team the proof they were looking for after just three weeks – that regular exercise training improves quality of life, reduces breathing difficulties, increases exercise tolerance and builds muscle strength. For Brightwater, it’s also clear evidence that IPE is a highly effective alternative to standard student placements. Under the guidance and supervision of the IPE co-ordinator Karen Sharland, Brightwater’s first group of students developed the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program for Madeley residents in early March 2012. Made up of final-year physiotherapists, occupational therapists, dieticians, pharmacy students, medical students and nurses, the group collaborates and applies their discipline-specific skills to deliver daily resident activities and monitor progress. “The aim is to optimise physical, emotional and social wellbeing for residents by having the students work together as a team with the resident at its centre, supporting Brightwater’s philosophy of person-centred care to enable wellbeing.”

“The aim is to optimise physical, emotional and social wellbeing for residents by having the students work together as a team with the resident at its centre, supporting Brightwater’s philosophy of person-centred care to enable wellbeing,” says Karen. There are three components to the eight-month program, including exercise, education and motivational activities. A recent education session provided by a pharmacy student focused on how to use inhalers to maximise the medication being delivered. The occupational therapy students also provided support with relaxation sessions. “Not only are the residents empowered with knowledge on how to best manage their chronic disease, the students are learning from experienced staff about other disciplines and, in turn, the facility staff are learning about new developments in health from the students. It’s a winwin situation,” adds Karen. Student placements aren’t new to Brightwater. Around 400 university and TAFE students are hosted every year across 23 facilities and the At Home community program. But with the introduction of the IPE program comes improved communication between professionals, developing tomorrow’s professionals and fostering a collaborative approach in the delivery and management of care for complex conditions. Operating year-round, the IPE student placements vary from two weeks for nursing, pharmacy, dietetics and medical students to seven weeks for occupational therapy students. To ensure continuity, each IPE student group hands over to the next group on placement, providing an accurate record of the residents’ progress, enabling the new students to pick up where the former students left off. “We’ve also arranged for the first group of students, who set up the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program, to return,” says Karen. “So they’ll be able to evaluate wellbeing and quality of life for Arthur and the other residents in their care.” Participating universities have already expressed their praise for the IPE program, recently presenting Brightwater with the Curtin Teaching and Learning Award, and adding to the shortlist for the University of Western Australia’s Teaching and Learning Awards. In the students’ own words, “It has created a lot of different opportunities for us to learn about different disciplines, which you don’t get to learn from other placements,” says one participant. Some have also expressed an interest in specialising in aged care and are now considering a career in the area. Some have already taken up appointments in Brightwater. “Many residents and staff have commented on how much they enjoy having the students around. And when the students break for the Christmas holidays, they all miss having the students around!” says Karen.


The Brightwater Centre Meet the future of health research With Dr Caroline Bulsara In June 2011, Brightwater set about creating a research centre dedicated to identifying, researching and piloting projects that will contribute directly to improving the lives of people who are dependent on care. The foundations for this centre were not traditional materials, but shared ideas, expertise, passion and commitment to making a difference to Brightwater clients, their families and the community. The supporting structure will be formed of connections and collaborations with universities, service providers and other corporate organisations throughout the state, nationally and internationally. It’s a unique concept that immediately struck a chord with Brightwater Centre Manager Dr. Caroline Bulsara.

Q. What inspired you about The Brightwater Centre?

Learning

A. I’ve always sought out research projects that involve community input and have sound ethical implications, even while researching in a university setting. This ‘applied research’ has real meaning and relevance. I really do believe this is the way forward for health research. And now, with larger grant funding bodies starting to realise the importance of community research, even in lab-based work, organisations such as Brightwater will occupy a more central role in the research process as time goes by. What’s exciting about the Brightwater Centre is that it’s proactively driving that shift towards going out into the community and seeking the real-world views of community members. It’s not just about kudos and accolades, it really is about making a difference to people’s lives. Every step we take, however small, is an exciting move towards developing innovative care and support solutions as Western Australia’s population ages and chronic disease and acquired disability increases proportionally.

Q. What excites you about the challenges ahead? A. Since I joined Brightwater, I’ve been so impressed by the enthusiasm for research from staff at all levels. A lot of the research ideas that people come and talk to me about are so innovative and unique – all passionate people with the common goal of making a difference to the lives of clients, their families and staff. Their work is so grass-roots. So, what really motivates me as Centre Manager is having the opportunity to take those research ideas on board, evaluate them and take them a step further by developing, mentoring and nurturing research skills in others. There seems to be a common misconception that research is some kind of ivory tower concept. I just want to help staff understand that it is all achievable, even the most daunting aspects such as making conference presentations, preparing reports or writing a paper. By equipping them with the skills and belief in their abilities, I can help them take ownership of their ideas and build research capacity organisation-wide. That’s a pretty wonderful thing. We’re already working in partnership with the NHMRC who, together with the Commonwealth, have provided a sizable amount of funding to the Brightwater Centre for the next five years. As one of four organisations across Australia to engage with university-based researchers to study cognitive decline in the elderly, Brightwater is playing a central role in this project.

Q. How has the Centre taken shape over the past nine months? A. We’ve already set up a fledgling research group for services for younger people. Hosting our own workshops, we just recently completed a series of useful sessions on ‘How to create a scientific research poster’. We’ll also be inviting guest speakers from outside Brightwater to present their own research that’s relevant to services for younger people. Eventually, we hope to roll out this model across all Brightwater facilities and services, so anyone who is interested in research can join a group that’s focused on their area of work. I’m also working on the development of a web-based tool kit to share some of my research

18

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


19

“I really do believe this is the way forward for health research.” Dr Caroline Bulsara

knowledge and expertise, so staff across the organisation can easily access information about basic research methods that will help them take ownership of their work. It’s all still a ‘work in progress’ and, until now, I’ve been the Brightwater Centre! But with so many great opportunities to encourage research here at Brightwater, we’re currently in the process of appointing a research officer to help drive the next phase of development.

Q. What is the future of the Centre looking like today? A. There are lots of exciting plans already taking shape. We’re looking at offering a number of small bursaries to staff and maybe a university-based researcher to engage in small research projects. We’re looking at developing an intranet for a web-based research community within Brightwater, so people can engage with the program at a time and place that’s convenient for them. We’re looking at setting up a Brightwater Research Symposium, showcasing the research work undertaken at Brightwater and inviting researchers from other organisations to come and talk about their work to inspire more staff to undertake research work of their own. Taking it one step further, we’d also like to develop a retreat that will enable staff to take a day or two away from the day-to-day to focus on developing their research ideas. That said, it’s important to grow it very slowly, so we can make sure it develops in response to the research needs of Brightwater staff and the community. We need to take time to try things out, take everyone’s opinions on board and make sure we’re heading in the right direction. The Centre will evolve over the course of six to ten years, so it’s going to be one incredible journey, putting Brightwater at the very forefront of quality care provision and in touch with developments across the rest of the world. Dr. Caroline Bulsara brings over 15 years’ experience in health research to The Brightwater Centre. While undertaking her PhD part time, from 2002 to 2008, she was engaged in a number of patient/consumer focused research projects at the University of Western Australia, including working with carers in the community, researching the role of empowerment in the wellbeing of cancer patients. Dr. Bulsara currently holds adjunct academic positions at a number of WA universities.


Innovation 20

Breaking down the eLearning barriers As with many other aged care and disability organisations, we face many barriers to implementing eLearning, including user acceptance and computer literacy levels, IT infrastructure capabilities and availability of suitable learning sites. Over recent years, user acceptance and computer literacy levels have been partially addressed with the introduction of an electronic resident/client health records system, but will require ongoing education and effective change management strategies. To address other barriers, we have implemented a range of out-of-the-box solutions and some improvements to our IT infrastructure.

Considering our eLearning options eLearning may be solely used for the delivery of some training and assessments, but is often more effective if used as part of a complementary approach that includes more than one delivery method. For example, a blended learning strategy could include face-to-face learning and/or work-based delivery, combined with online learning and/or virtual classrooms. Brightwater will evaluate the most effective mode for learning when implementing eLearning.

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


eLearning @ Brightwater Innovation is not just about technology, it’s about improving the quality of life.

21

What is eLearning? eLearning is a term used to describe a range of electronically-delivered education and training featuring text and images, animation, audio, video, interactive media, virtual classrooms and games. Business-controlled social networking functions, such as forums and chat rooms, can also be used to facilitate informal learning and communities of practice. eLearning content can be bought off the shelf or customised for an organisation’s needs. The E-learning facts • 50% of Australian corporations use eLearning as part of structured or unstructured training. However, eLearning within the aged care and disability sectors is not yet widely established. • eLearning can be as effective as face-to-face learning if targeted, developed and delivered well.

Our eLearning story Over the last three years, Brightwater has been investigating and evaluating the value and feasibility of implementing quality eLearning for our employees and other stakeholders. To do so, we required a Learning Management System (LMS) with the capability to deliver and manage eLearning in conjunction with face-to-face learning, incorporating functionality to facilitate: • provision of information to individual employees, outlining their personal training plan and progress towards achieving their learning objectives; • a significant reduction in the time and effort required by managers to monitor staff training expectations and provide progress reports on training plans and budget; and • the delivering of learning to other stakeholders, such as volunteers, care recipients/ families/carers, students and external individuals/organisations. To date, the LMS software has been selected and completion of the implementation phase is planned for February 2013.

The benefits of implementing eLearning at Brightwater • Consistent, quality training is achieved by utilising the knowledge of the best subject matter experts. • Training is accessible from multiple locations. • Course material is available 24/7, making it accessible to shift workers and all staff can proceed at their own pace. • Consolidates ‘just in time’ training by reducing time between learning and application. • Communities of Practice can be formed to facilitate informal learning, collaboration and support. • Information can be delivered in an interactive format to engage learners. • Most assessment results are automatically calculated by the LMS, reducing demands on staff. • Progress can be regularly checked with staged assessments. • Immediate feedback of assessment results, keeping learners up to date with their progress. • Assessments can be conducted by staff, students, volunteers, care recipients/primary carers/families and external customers. • Time taken to complete the learning is reduced by 30% to 50%. • Reduces time spent away from the workplace which, in turn, reduces staff training costs. • Research indicates an average cost saving of 25% to 65%. Although the initial costs for the infrastructure and development of the eLearning program can be high, e-learning is an investment that increases its payback during its lifetime. Delivery and maintenance costs are relatively low, therefore, unlike instructor-led or paper-based communication, the peruser costs decrease each time the course is used.


The real value of Oats Street’s expansion The social cost-benefit of rehabilitation adds up

Innovation

Since 1991, Brightwater Oats Street has been setting the benchmark in Australia as a centre for specialist rehabilitation for people living with acquired brain injury (ABI). The Oats Street program is unique in a number of ways: • Offering residential rehabilitation that engages people with ABI in purposeful activities to relearn the skills lost due to their injuries and, • Integrating the activities of numerous specialists who form the rehabilitation team for each client. • Providing post discharge support for clients within the community • Giving specialist consultation , training and support in the area of ABI to health professionals across WA ABI Rehabilitation is an area where the boundaries of what can be achieved are moving rapidly. Whilst it is not always possible to return a person to the same level of functionality they enjoyed before their injury, it is possible to make substantial progress towards becoming an independent and valued member of the community. The process is highly efficient – not only benefiting the person with an ABI and their family, but also significantly reducing the cost of care long term. Brightwater is rebuilding and expanding the Oats Street program to cater for 43 residential clients, each of whom take roughly two years to journey through the rehabilitation process. This doubles the current program’s capacity and significantly improves its effectiveness by incorporating design features within the built environment that assist rehabilitation. The rebuild is costing $20 million and we were supported by generous contributions by Lotterywest, WA Health, philanthropic individuals, community supporters and Brightwater itself.

The process is highly efficient – not only benefiting the person with an ABI and their family, but also significantly reducing the cost of care long term. As part of the planning for the rebuilding, Brightwater commissioned ACIL Tasman to undertake a social cost benefit analysis of the Oats Street program. We already knew the huge positive impact the rehabilitation of people with ABI has on quality of life for them and their families but we were keen to understand the impact on the wider WA community. This was particularly important as we embarked on the rebuilding of the Oats Street site. ACIL Tasman assessed the benefits of the new Oats Street site against the cost of rehabilitation over two years, the cost of construction and the capital value of the land upon which it will sit. The analysis carefully considered a reduction in the costs of care for our clients flowing from: • Successful rehabilitation outcomes • Improvements in the quality of life • Improvements in employment opportunities The results of the report were compelling and the social cost-benefit report concludes Oats Street saves considerable money on the cost of on-going care.

22

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


23

The report concluded that the rebuilt Oats Street site will deliver $25.67 million in benefits over the lifetime of 20 rehabilitation clients against $6.2 million in treatment costs. This 4 fold return on investment in rehabilitation is due largely to reductions in the cost of care for each person following successful rehabilitation. The benefits that in turn flow to the wider community, are both through a reduction in the burden for families undertaking the care, and as a reduction in health system costs to pay for formal care. The Report concluded that the capital cost of the rebuilding will be more than covered by the benefits accruing to the new facility’s first 43 clients. Oats Street Rehabilitation Program is a very real way in which costs can be saved with the health system. More importantly the program gives enhanced independence and quality of life for those people who have suffered an ABI, and huge support for families. It is fair to say that Brightwater Oats Street is leading the way in cost-effective rehabilitation services, and is making a world of difference to those with ABI, their families, and the community at large.

Oats Street’s Growth

100 90 80 70

100

Transition Program Social Skills Program Rehab in the community Site based rehab

90 80

60

70

50

60

40 30

50

20

40

10

30

0 2012

20

2013

10 1991

2004

2011

0 2012

2013

Tran Soci Reha Site


People

Geraldton and Kalbarri “The most memorable moment was going fishing out of Kalbarri and getting on and off the fishing boat in a wheelchair - yes it is possible!” Michael Hanson (pictured), Brightwater Oats Street

Abbey Beach Resort Busselton “They do a bloody good breakfast! Also, I would like to say thanks to Richard for organising it and Max - he was a really good bloke, obliging, helpful and friendly. It was like going with a mate”. Mark Le Flohic, Brightwater Community client (Max Teong carer).

Day trips “We went on a Harley Davidson trike ride which made me feel free” Dean Davidson, Brightwater Warnbro. “It was wicked!! Can I go again next year?” Bill Jones, Brightwater Balcatta

24

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


Community Engagement: Holidays! We believe that everybody – no matter their circumstances - is entitled to enjoy a holiday.

25

Holiday Program for Brightwater residents With funding from the Gaming Community Trust Grants Program and tremendous support from staff, Brightwater has successfully launched the Brightwater Holiday Program. Aimed at enhancing the lives of young people (under the age of 65) living in Brightwater facilities, the program enables clients and residents to plan and enjoy a safe, memorable holiday with an accompanying staff member. Holidays have ranged from overnight stays for one person to a five-day bus trip for 14, at locations as close to home as Hillary’s Boat Harbour and as far afield as Melbourne. Geraldton, Busselton, Margaret River, Albany, the Swan Valley and Mandurah have all featured in the Holiday Program, to name a few. Brightwater residents and clients who are unable to participate in an overnight holiday haven’t been left out either. We arranged daytrips to Rottnest and the Swan Valley, day spa visits and outings to attend various concerts – each providing an individually tailored experience that would otherwise be unachievable. The feedback from clients, residents and support staff has been unanimously and overwhelmingly positive. The stories, adventures, smiles and photos shared by clients and residents make the Brightwater Holiday Program a truly worthwhile venture.

Holiday Program statistics 2011-2012 : 1. How many residents and clients enjoyed a holiday? • 43 residents and clients took a three-day or longer holiday • 31 residents and clients joined a daytrip

Total of 74 people enjoyed a holiday

3 days or longer

33

Day trip

27

3 days or longer

43

Day trip

31

2. How many staff have accompanied clients and residents on their holidays? • 33 staff supported clients and residents on a three-day or longer holiday • 27 staff supported clients and residents on a daytrip

T otal of 60 staff accompanied clients and residents on their holidays 3. How many destinations have been visited? • 10 destinations were visited for three-day short breaks, including the South West, Geraldton, Perth and interstate • 1 holiday through Activ recreation program • 6 destinations were visited on daytrips

Total of 17 destinations visited


Community Support CBA Long-Tail luncheon The inaugural Long Tail Luncheon in support of the Oats Street Redevelopment Project was held on 4 August 2011.

People

Energised by a delicious feast prepared by Chef Dale Sniffen, and inspired by presentations from Dr Penny Flett, Mr Steven Cole and Professor Lyn Beazley, Chief Scientist for WA, 100 guests learnt about the wonderful redevelopment plans for the Brightwater Oats Street facility that provides much needed post-acute rehabilitation for people who have experienced an acquired brain injury. This event was made possible through the generous financial support of the Commonwealth Bank Australia: Corporate Financial Services Division and the hospitality and ongoing support of the Victoria Park Council.

Trent Carter, Relationship Executive – Healthcare Banking WA Commonwealth Bank presenting a cheque from the staff of the Perth Corporate Services team to Dr Penny Flett, CEO Brightwater

Leaping Lizard Supporters Over 550 guests attended the launch of the community fundraising program ‘Leaping Lizard Supporters’ on 9 March 2012, which was held at the beautiful home of Mimi and Willy Packer. The support of a dedicated group of volunteers and many generous organisations allowed this function to be a ‘friend-raiser’ not only for Brightwater, but all Western Australians living with acquired brain injury, now and in the future. (L-R) Matt Hipsey, Paul van Vliet Abigail Watkins, Claire van Vliet, Gemma Day, Van Hipsey, Helen Plange, Tim Day

Jonesy’s Vision In June 2012, 120 of Perth Mining, Minerals and Construction industry luminaries, including representatives from Leighton Contractors, Downer EDI Mining and RIO Tinto, just to name a few attended the launch of, ‘Jonesy’s Vision’ in support of the Brightwater Oats Street Redevelopment Project. The function was dedicated to the leadership of the late John Johns, one of the seven directors of WA iron ore miner Sundance Resources who were tragically killed in a plane accident in The Republic of Congo two years ago. John Jones had a long involvement with Brightwater; his son Bill resides at a Brightwater community house for young people recovering from brain injuries. John was a great advocate and supporter of Bill and recognised the important role that the Brightwater Oats Street Rehabilitation Program had in the WA community.

26

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12

(L-R) Mark Boyne, Rachel Page, Oats Street Graduate Ben Carter, Lillian Ting and Joanna Yoon together with Western Force stars Nick Cummins and Patrick Dellit.


27

g pin Lea

Li z ar d

s

up po rte rs in

full swin g.

Thank You – Brightwater Supporters Throughout the past financial year Brightwater Care Group (Inc) has continued to benefit from the generous support of the Western Australian community.

Brightwater would like to acknowledge and extend sincere thanks to every supporter, donor and sponsor that has assisted us over the past year. This year we would like to particularly highlight supporters of the ‘Leaping Lizard’ Supporter Program. Thank you for joining Philippa Packer (Chair) and her dedicated committee of volunteers including Denise Cheir, Hugh Hagen, Ann Jones, Felicity Ruse, Iman Stubbs, Anne-Louise Willoughby and Sara Wordsworth, in raising funds for all the important things that make the new Brightwater Oats Street a welcoming and inviting community.


Volunteers Giving back the joy of companionship Every Sunday morning, Marcella and Scott deliver a small dose of the very best medicine available to Brightwater residents – laughter. They don’t have experience in health care or stand-up comedy for that matter. They simply want to give something back to the community of Perth.

“Perth has been good to Marcella and me. So, in a sense, we were looking for a way of saying thanks.”

People

“I’m originally from Denver, Colorado, and Perth has been good to Marcella and I. So, in a sense, we were looking for a way of saying thanks,” Scott recalls. Working full time for the resources industry and State Government, the couple spare an hour of their free time at weekends to visit a resident at Brightwater’s Onslow Gardens facility – an elderly gentleman named Frank who has no close family here in Perth. It’s a good arrangement for both Brightwater and Frank, as there are fewer staff at weekends, with most activities taking place during the week. For Scott and Marcella, they’ve also discovered there’s a little extra in it for them besides the warm and fuzzy feeling of bringing the joy of companionship and conversation to others. “Having both forged strong bonds with our grandparents growing up, Brightwater has given us the opportunity to relive some of those experiences,” says Scott. “We especially love making Frank laugh. Whenever he laughs, we know we’re doing a good thing.” Brightwater’s Co-ordinator of Volunteers, Sandy Beardwood, pays particular attention to matching backgrounds and interests to create a good resident-volunteer connection. Like Frank, Marcella’s father migrated from Ireland to Australia and Scott has worked in and travelled to many of the same places Frank did in his day. “Frank likes to hear about all our travelling adventures in WA, and he often remembers these places, sometimes sharing a quick story about something similar he did in the past,” Scott explains. “We also bring the weekend newspaper with us and read headlines and articles to Frank. Sometimes we laugh about them. Sometimes we just shake our heads.”

Marcella and Scott have become part of the Onslow Gardens extended family, as well as great companions for Frank. As regular visitors, Marcella and Scott have become part of the Onslow Gardens extended family, as well as great companions for Frank. “Everyone greets us with a smile and we are constantly amazed by the positivity and kindness staff and residents show us,” says Scott. “We find the experience very rewarding and we can tell the residents do too.” If you’re inspired by Marcella and Scott’s story and would like to find out more about volunteering with Brightwater, please contact our Coordinator of Volunteers Sandy Beardwood to arrange an orientation and information session at your nearest facility. Call Sandy on 9202 2800 or email volunteer@brightwatergroup.com.

28

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


Volunteers

488

2011-12

908.5 218new recruits

hours p/week on average

2011-12

23

%

77

%

29


Culture, Communication and Work Relationships Three to four years ago, at the height of the resources boom, labour shortages ravaged the aged care and disability sectors. As a result, organisations like Brightwater increasingly turned to a valuable source of workers from overseas, including recent migrants and refugees, to fill vacancies in our growing facilities and services.

People

There have always been challenges associated with a culturally diverse workforce, however, the influx of a new cohort of overseas workers raised new issues that organisations weren’t familiar with and weren’t necessarily equipped to deal with.

It was clear that a significant number of issues were emerging concerning communication, relationships and the literacy levels of workers. This resulted in misunderstandings, increased safety incidences, higher stress levels, and many staff from other cultures feeling that they were not adequately supported to do their job well. More crucially, these issues had the potential to risk the quality of care and the safety of our residents and clients. “Everything we do is all about people, the relationships and interactions between people, getting it right for each other,” said Dr Penny Flett. “To do that well, it is absolutely vital that we are able to understand each other, communicate effectively with our residents, clients and families, colleagues and managers, so together we can provide the right service in the right way. “Above all, this means that we must respect every person we work with and take all their traditions, preferences and expectations into account – their beliefs, roles, family relationships, past history and future goals. These are important things for all of us, whatever cultural background we come from.” Working in partnership with Uniting Church Homes (now known as Juniper), Brightwater was successful in obtaining a Social Innovation Grant through the Department of Communities to develop a Culture, Communications and Relationships at Work Resource Kit.

As part of the Resource Kit, we are developing: • a training program comprising 12 x 1.5 hour modules targeted at two levels, support workers and supervisors/managers; • references to existing training and support resources which we have identified through our research; and • recommended organisational practices to support a culturally diverse workforce.

The three key aims of the training program are to: • build cross-cultural communication skills across the board • develop relationship management skills between workers and managers/supervisors and workers, when cross-cultural issues arise • reduce impediments to communication posed by language and literacy deficiencies On completion of the project the Culture, Communications and Relationships at Work Resource Kit will be made available for all organisations in the aged, disability and community services sectors.

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


31

Long serving staff Thank you Lynette Tippett

40 years

Patricia Lobo Jean Witon Marjorie Wijeyesinghe

Malgorzata Sosin

Lynda Massey

Joan Prior

Mary Morris

35 years

Barbara Urbanek

Diane Oswald

Clotilda Colkers

34 years

Peter Holder

33 years

June Le Cerf Rosemary Emery Marlene Ginger

32 years

Bernadette Raye Raymond Francis

Anne Sandon

Jasvit Kaur

Lesle-Ann Harper

Norma Elkington

Roslyn Smith

Sara Hopkins

30 years

Maria Moczulska June Arland Jacqueline Gibb

29 years

Milagros Pablo Kerry Palmer

Jacqueline Miles

Ana Sevastos

Lorraine Jones

Sabrina Welti

Kevin Mccarthy

Janet Wagland

Penelope Flett

Tina Barker Chai Kow

Helen Skroza

Claire Quartermaine

Linda Maitland

Estelita Savic

Sarasvathy Nair

Gary Breeze

Roberta Hotham

Wendy Foote

Selva Retne

Kayleen Kiely

Felicity Fieldhouse

Andrea Bennington

24 years

21 years

Wayne Kyaw

Kerry Spence

Phillis Cameron

Joan Downey

Sarah Walsh

20 years

Faye Ducas

Length of service

(25 July 2012)

(25 July 2012)

200

182

150

53

72

100 50

<20yrs 20-24yrs 25-29yrs 30-34yrs 35-39yrs 40-44yrs 45-49yrs

50-54yrs

Age Group

55-59yrs

0 60-64yrs

65+yrs

500

Number of employees

250

173 166

600

300

262

238

595

350

306

277

165

Cynthia Bacaltos

25 years

Employee age profile

222

22 years

Judith Noack Rita Treasure

Kevin Deveney

Total active employee count 2,116

26 years

Marie Jorgensen

Lesley Flynn

Sylvia Nathan

Leslie Northcott Joy Williams

Mary Armit

31 years

Doris Samuels

23 years

Shirley Corrigan

27 years

Patricia Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;rozario

Susan Samuels

Audrey Colkers

Moreen Catto

Yvonne Eelsing

Margaretta Lewis Colleen Pastina

28 years

38 years 36 years

Rose Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;rozario Joan Henderson

Florence Hwang

405 331

400

327

300

178

201

200

79 <3mnths

3-12mnths

1-3yrs

3-5yrs

5-10yrs

Years

100 0

10-20yrs

20+yrs

Number of employees

Bridget Lewis


Financial Results 2011-12 Performance 2011-12 financial results at a glance Current Situation: Brightwater Care Group State Government Funding Commonwealth Funding Resident Fees Donations & Legacies Commercial Revenue Capital Grants Other Income

Actual Result (**) $31.9 $55.9 $16.8 $2.8 $14.5 $3.9 $4.1

Budget Target (**) $27.7 $56.8 $16.4 $1.2 $12.2 $5.0 $4.0

Variance (**)

Variance (**)

$4.2 -$0.9 $0.3 $1.6 $2.3 -$1.1 $0.1

15% -2% 2% 140% 19% -21% 3%

Total Income

$129.9

$123.2

$6.7

5%

Operational expenses Employee expenses Depreciation & Amortisation Financial expense

$25.4 $87.8 $5.9 $0.3

$25.3 $84.1 $7.1 $0.2

-$0.1 -$3.7 $1.2 -$0.0

0% -4% 17% -7%

Total Expenses

$119.3

$116.8

-$2.5

-2%

$10.5

$6.4

$4.2

65%

67.6% 67.6% 11.2%

68.6% 68.3% 9.9%

Net Surplus / (Deficit) Govt Funding as a % of Total Revenue Labour Cost as a % of Total Revenue Commercial Revenue as a % Total Revenue ** values in millions

Our income has continued to grow steadily exceeding our budget target by $6.7 million which includes capital grants of $3.92 million. However Commonwealth funding did not meet target due mainly to changes in our resident profile which produced lower levels of funding than anticipated. The Western Australian Government, through the Department of Health, has continued to partner with Brightwater to provide various care services. In 2011-12, funding increased by 15% driven mainly by the Sustainability Funding initiative. This initiative by the West Australian Government was aimed at ensuring care providers were able to meet increasing costs the future needs of West Australians. Through our Fundraising initiative, Brightwater has received a positive response from its strategic partners and the Australian public with Donations & Legacies exceeding targets by $2.3 million. Brightwater Commercial Services have continued to support and enhance our care operations and services by contributing an additional revenue stream.

Challenges: Providing quality care services requires Brightwater to continually invest in its people. However we continue to experience cost pressures within the WA labour market in acquiring and retaining high calibre staff. In 2011-12 employee expenses exceeded budget by 4%.

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Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


33

Income vs Expenditure We have achieved pleasing results over the past 3 years with a surplus of $10.5 million in 2011-12. Brightwater continues to hold reserves to protect the organisation during difficult financial times and ensure that we are building a sustainable organisation that is able to respond to the future care needs of the WA community. Brightwater is continually reviewing its business to ensure we increase our efficiencies 120 100 80 60 40 without 20 met 0 are in ways that ensure our long term goals and objectives adversely affecting the short term and medium term operating programs.

20

0

80

60

40

140

120

100

$100.4

2009-10

$96.7 140

$105.8

2010-11

Total Total

$102.8

2009-10 2011-12

2010-11

$129.9 $119.3

Total Revenue Total Expenses

$ in millions

Australian State and Federal Government Funds Other Income

2011-12

Government Funding vs Other Income

Brightwater is principally funded by both the Commonwealth and State Governments to provide its large array of care services. It does however recognise the importance of being able to diversify its sources of revenue with 32% of our Total Revenue now coming from other sources.

69%

2009-10

31%

73%

2010-11

80

60

40

20

0

27%

68%

2011-12

32%

Australian Stateand Federal Government Funds Australian State and Federal Government Other Income Australian State and FederalFunds Government Funds Other Income Other Income

State & Government Funding by Program

0 0

20

40

60

80

100

20

40

60

80

100

The Services for Older People Division continues to be the major recipient of both State and Commonwealth Government funding over 2009-10 the past 3 years. 2009-10

Due to the changing care needs and preferences of the WA community, At Home Services continues to be a significant growth area within Brightwater. 2010-11 2010-11 2011-12 (**)

2010-11 (**)

2009-10 (**)

Services For Younger People

$18.4

$15.5

$16.5

Services For Older People

$56.6 2011-12

$53.0

$46.8

At Home Services

$12.8

$8.6

$6.2

2011-12

** values in millions

2011-12

At Home Services

Services for Older People

Services for Younger People

2010-11

At Home Services

Services for Older People

Services for Younger People

2010-09

At Home Services

Services for Older People

Services for Younger People

100


Financial Results 2011-12 Financial Report Overview The Brightwater Care Group Inc. has recorded an overall surplus of $10.5 million for the financial year ended 30 June 2012. The majority of this surplus is however attributable to one of grants, donations and legacies totalling over $6.7 million which are largely committed to the redevelopment of the Brightwater Oats Street facility.

Income

INCOME BY SOURCE $’000

2012

2011

2010

• Our total income grew by $24 million to $129.8 million which State Government subsidies 31,871 27,070 25,292 was 5% higher than our $123.2 million budget target. Commonwealth Government subsidies 55,910 49,986 44,307 • State Government subsidies grew by $4.8 million (18%) to & supplements $31.9 million. This included an unexpected $2.3 million Resident fees 16,753 15,619 14,568 (15%) uplift in funding through the Disability Services Donations and legacies 2,808 440 497 Commission and the Health Department of Western Australian. These extra funds were provided as part of the Commercial revenue 14,503 8,500 12,244 Western Australian Government’s sustainability initiative. Grants 3,920 528 199 • Funding from the Commonwealth totalled $55.9 million this Other revenue 4,096 3,662 3,287 year which was an increase of $6 million on the previous year. Income 129,862 105,806 100,394 Commonwealth Aged Care funding is primarily based on our residents Aged Care Funding Instrument profile which State Government subsidies fluctuates with the changing needs and dependencies of our Commonwealth Government subsidies and residents. Our At Home services unit continues to grow with Resident fees State Government subsidies a 23% increase in our community based clientele. Donations and legacies State Government subsidies State Commonwealth Government Government subsidies subsidies and Commercial revenue • A very humbling aspect of the year was to see the level of Commonwealth Government Commonwealth subsidies fees and supplements Resident Government subsidies and Grants support provided by the community with $2.8 million being Resident fees Donationsfees and legacies Resident Other revenue Donations and legacies Commercialand revenue Donations legacies received in the form of donations and legacies. This result Commercial revenue Grants Commercial revenue was driven by the strategic fundraising efforts which was a Grants Other Grantsrevenue focus in the 2011-12 financial period. We would also like to Other revenue Other revenue acknowledge the very generous legacy provided through The Estate of the late Josephine McLarty. • Our Retirement Village, Catering and Linen operations continued to provide first class essential services for our many Brightwater sites and residents while using the excess capacity to provide essential services for other not for profit organisations and commercial clients. • Brightwater also recognises the significant financial support provided by the Western Australian State Government and Lotterywest for the redevelopment of the Brightwater Oats Street facility. The initial tranche of $3.9 million represents 64% of funds committed based on the redevelopment work completed as at 30 June 2012.

Expense • Compared to the previous year Brightwater expenditure has increased by $17 million (16%) to $119.3 million. While higher than budgeted it does reflect the expanded services provided by Brightwater and the overall increase in living costs within Western Australia. • Employee costs represent the single largest expenditure item in Brightwater. During the year these costs increased by 17% to $87.8 million. Recruiting sufficient numbers of suitably motivated and qualified staff in a tight labour market continues to present a challenge for Brightwater. NET SURPLUS $’000 Net Surplus

34

2012

2011

2010

10,522

2,958

3,726

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12

EXPENDITURE $’000

2012

2011

2010

Operational expenses

25,415

22,467

20,261

Employee expenses

87,792

74,915

67,420

5,883

5,357

5,089

250

109

272

Depreciation & Amortisation Financial expense Impairment Loss (Bed Licences) Expenditure

-

-

3,626

119,340

102,848

96,668

Operational expenses Employee expenses Depreciation and Amortisation Operational expenses Financial expense Employee expenses Impairment Loss (Bed Licences) Depreciation and Amortisation Financial expense Impairment Loss (Bed Licences)


35

INCOME & EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012

2012

2011

123,685

103,303

3,920

528

(119,090)

(102,739)

-

-

8,515

1,092

Financial income

2,257

1,975

Financial expense

(250)

(109)

2,007

1,866

10,523

2,958

-

-

(22)

(3)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD

(22)

(3)

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD

10,500

2,955

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012

2012

2011

Balance at July, 1

85,472

82,517

10,523

2,958

(22)

(3)

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD

10,500

2,955

Balance at June, 30

95,972

85,472

Revenue Other income Administration expenses Other expenses

TOTAL RESULTS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

NET FINANCING INCOME NET SURPLUS Other comprehensive income Net change in available-for-sale financial assets

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD Surplus for the period Net change in available-for-sale financial assets


Financial Results 2011-12 Balance Sheet FINANCIAL REPORT During the financial year ending 30 June 2012 net assets increased of $10.5 million (12%) to $95.9 million. Investments increased by $591,000 to $801,000 due to donations and legacies received during the financial year. Fees receivable increased by 10% to $5.7 million. During the year Brightwater invested significantly in its future and wellbeing of clients by spending $7.5 million on Stage 1 of the Brightwater Oats Street redevelopment and $2.2 million in improvements on its aged care facilities and other strategic initiatives.

What we Own ($'000)

2012

2011

2010

Cash Assets

33,371

33,688

25,511

Debtors etc.

5,165

5,516

4,395

801

210

232

Other Financial Assets Investment Property

78,895

77,960

79,930

Fees Receivable

5,664

5,160

8,263

Intangibles

1,246

931

1,211

Property, Plant & Equipment

100,077

91,266

87,795

Total Assets

225,219

214,731

207,337

Brightwater experienced a 13% reduction in aged care residents who paid accommodation bonds mainly due to the shift in new residents with higher care requirements who are not required to pay a bond under current legislation.

Cash Assets Debtors etc Other Financial Assets Cash Assets Investment Property Debtors etc Fees Receivable Other Financial Assets Intangibles Investment Property Property, Plant and Equipment Fees Receivable Intangibles Property, Plant and Equipment

Deferred income relates to capital grants received for the Oats Street redevelopment project, these funds represent the 36% portion of the remaining redevelopment works to be completed in 2013. The $3.7 million increase to provision relates mainly to employee entitlement provisions. These provisions have increased due to increased employee numbers, rate rises and an increase in general employee entitlements. Overall our balance sheet and financial position remain healthy and strong.

What we Owe ($'000) Trade Creditors & Accruals

2012

2011

2010

6,875

6,234

4,465

18,744

21,610

22,441

Interest Bearing Liabilities

3,281

3,585

3,889

Deferred Income

2,137

4,239

-

Lease for Life Contract Liabilities

83,995

83,060

85,030

Provisions

14,215

10,531

8,995

129,247

129,259

124,820

Accommodation Bonds

Total Liabilities

Trade Ceditors and Accruals Accommodation Bonds Interest Bearing Liabilities Trade Ceditors and Accruals Deferred Income Accommodation Bonds Lease for Life Contract Liabilities Interest Bearing Liabilities Provisions Deferred Income Lease for Life Contract Liabilities Provisions

Total Net Assets

36

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12

2012

2011

2010

95,972

85,472

82,517


37

BALANCE SHEET AS AT JUNE 30, 2012

2012

2011

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents

33,370

33,688

Trade and other receivables

3,601

4,275

Fees Receivable

495

425

Prepayments

996

981

Other assets

416

134

Inventories

152

128

39,030

39,629

5,169

4,735

801

210

78,895

77,960

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON CURRENT ASSETS Fees Receivable Investments Investment property Intangibles

1,246

931

100,077

91,266

186,189 225,219

175,102 214,731

Trade and other payables

6,875

6,234

Deferred income

2,137

4,239

102,739

104,670

3,281

3,585

10,617

8,043

125,649

126,771

3,108

2,081

490

407

3,598 129,247 95,972

2,488 129,259 85,472

95,987

85,466

(16)

6

95,972

85,472

Property, plant and equipment

TOTAL NON CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES

Other financial liabilities Interest-bearing loans and borrowings Employee benefits

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NON CURRENT L LIABILITIES Other financial liabilities Interest-bearing loans and borrowings Employee benefits Provisions

TOTAL NON CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS EQUITY Retained earnings Reserves

TOTAL EQUITY


BRIGHTWATER BOARD Governance & Performance Committee • Care Committee Audit & Risk Committee • Business Committee

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Dr Penny Flett

GENERAL MANAGER SERVICES FOR YOUNGER PEOPLE & MAJOR PROJECTS JENNIFER LAWRENCE Services for Younger People

Strategic Development

Residential Aged Care

Interprofessional Learning

At Home Services

OSH & Insurance

Clinical Governance

Quality

Service Development

Specialised Services

Transition Care Program

The Brightwater Centre

38

GENERAL MANAGER SERVICES FOR OLDER PEOPLE & SERVICE DEVELOPMENT TONIA ZEEMAN

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


39

Brightwater Care Group Profile

GENERAL MANAGER CORPORATE SERVICES RALPH GORE

GENERAL MANAGER PEOPLE SERVICES LAURIE BURNS

Finance

Employee Relations

Catering

Information Technology

Human Resources

Linen

Physical Resources

Payroll

Kingsway Court

Purchasing & Contracts

Recruitment

Corporate Support

Training & Development

Business Analysis

Workforce Planning

GENERAL MANAGER COMMERCIAL SERVICES TREVOR GREEN

Health Records Communications & Marketing Volunteers Project Governance

“Everything we do is all about people, the relationships and interactions between people, getting it right for each other” Dr Penny Flett


Steven Cole, LLB (Hons), FAICD Chairman Steven Cole has 35 years of professional, corporate and business experience gained as a senior legal consultant and executive manager, as well as in various non-executive appointments. His extensive boardroom and board sub-committee experience includes ASX listed, statutory, proprietary and NFP organisations covering the industrial, financial, educational, professional services, health and resources sectors. Since leaving leading national law firm Allens Arthur Robinson in 2007, Stevenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continuing appointments include: Chairman of ASX listed Emerson Stewart; Deputy Chair of Reed Resources, Chairman of the QE2 Medical Centre Trust; Chairman of two investment companies with around $20m under management; President of Australian Institute of Company Directors (WA Division) and National Board member; and Chairman of Brightwater Care Group. Steven was appointed to the Board of Brightwater in 2002..

Dr Ann Zubrick, F ACE, PhD, MA Psychology, MA Ageing and Pastoral Studies, MSc, BSc, LACST, Deputy Chair Professionally, Dr Ann Zubrick has had a long engagement with both the health and education sectors. Qualified as a speech pathologist and in lifespan developmental psychology, she has established educational and clinical services in Western Australia, as well as several settings in Asia, and runs a consulting business which includes educational and other work in ageing. Ann has served on several boards and committees including: the Western Australian Department of Housing and Works; Therapy Focus; a large Symphonic Choir (in which she also sings); and the Councils of three independent schools. Currently, she also serves on the Board of COTA (WA), the Board for the Centre of Excellence in Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research and Care, ASeTTS and The Friends School (Hobart). Ann was appointed to the Board of Brightwater in October 2008.

Martin Langridge, B A (Hons), CA (Scot), FCA, AIMM Honorary Treasurer After qualifying with the Scottish Institute of Chartered Accountants in Edinburgh, Martin migrated to Australia to take up a position in Perth in 1986. In 1996, he joined Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and was admitted as a partner in 1998. Martin is currently the partner in charge of the Forensic practice in Perth and Chief Operating Officer of the Australian Forensic practice. He has overall responsibility for all Deloitte Forensic services in WA, including dispute consulting, investigations, technology, data analytics and risk. Martin has extensive experience in providing accounting, taxation and management consulting services to the private and public sectors. He has been involved in the development of strategic and business plans and has a keen understanding of the corporate environment and critical success factors for business. Having served as the Honorary Treasurer of Cystic Fibrosis WA from 2004 to 2009, he is now involved in NFP groups promoting economic self-determination for Indigenous people. Martin was appointed to the Board of Brightwater in October 2010.

Robert de la Motte, B Com, FCA, FAICD Board Member Robert de la Motte is a chartered accountant with over 35 years of corporate experience. He commenced his career with a major international accounting firm, spending 15 years working across four continents, including six years as a partner. In Perth, Robert spent has spent six years with Challenge Bank (now part of Westpac) as Head of Treasury, assuming responsibility for overall bank funding and all aspects of balance sheet risk management. In 1996, he moved into investment banking and equity capital markets with Hartleys Limited, assuming the role of Director of Investment Banking to assist clients with ASX listings, capital raisings, mergers, acquisitions, divestments, succession strategies and private equity transactions. Robert joined Patersons Securities Limited as Director of Corporate Finance in 2002 and retired at the end of 2009. He was appointed to the Board of Brightwater in 2010.

40

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


Board Members

41

Narelle Finch, B Bus Board Member Narelle Finch is a passionate marketer and strategist with 20 years of experience in all aspects of commercial operations, including revenue generation, product development, strategic planning and brand management. She has a Bachelor of Business Degree in Marketing and Business Communications and is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors A Board member of the WA Cricket Association, President of WomenSport West and a Committee Member of Lordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taverners WA, Narelle was appointed to the Board of Brightwater in 2008.

Prudence Ford, B Sc (Hons), Dip Ed Board Member Prudence has 30 years of policy, program delivery and management experience in the public sector. She has worked for both the Australian and Western Australian governments in the health, community service and corporate management areas. Since leaving the public sector in 2006, Prudence has worked as a consultant for governments and the community-based NFPs. Previously a member of the National Health and Medical Council, the QE2 Medical Centre Trust, the Western Australian State Tenders Committee and the Human Research Ethics Committee for Edith Cowan University, she is currently a member of the Health Consumers Council of WA, the Medical Board of Australia (MBA) and the Western Australian Board of the MBA. Prudence joined the Brightwater Board in October 2010.

Paul Sadleir, B E, MBA, APPI, FAICD, FRICS Board Member Paul joined Cedar Woods in July 2000 and has focused on expanding the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s range of activities from residential land subdivision into medium density housing and urban infill projects. As Managing Director, his responsibilities cover strategic planning, human resources, portfolio management, equity and finance raising and investor relations. Prior to joining Cedar Woods, Paul was responsible for the establishment of the Bunnings Warehouse Property Trust, which successfully listed on the ASX in 1998. He has a Master of Business Administration degree and Bachelor of Engineering degree, both from the University of Western Australia, and is a fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors and an associate of the Australian Property Institute. Paul has served on various industry bodies, notably acting as Councillor for the Urban Development Institute of Australia and the Property Education Foundation. He was appointed to the Board of Brightwater in November 2010.

Dr Penny Flett, M BBS, DGM, FRACMA, AFCHSM, FAIM Brightwater Chief Executive Officer Ex Officio CEO of Brightwater Care Group, Dr Penny Flett began her career after graduating in medicine from the University of Adelaide. Penny has become a champion for people of all ages who need a high level of ongoing support and service and has a particular interest in services for younger adults with acquired brain injury and neurological disorders. She was named 1998 Telstra Australian Business Woman of the Year and, in 2009, was awarded WA Australian of the Year. Over the years, Penny has contributed to government and non-government Boards and associations in a number of roles, including: President of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry, WA; Chair of WA Aged Care Advisory Council; Pro Chancellor and UWA Senate Member; Director of National Seniors Association Ltd Board; and President of The Nursing Homes & Extended Care Association of Western Australia (Inc). Dr Flett was appointed an ex officio member of the Board in April 2004.


Governance Brightwater Care Group was established as the Home of Peace for the Dying and Incurable in 1898, following the initiative and leadership of Lady Madeleine Onslow and Dr Athelstan Saw. The original Committee of Management and General Committee included senior clergy of several denominations, as well as prominent politicians and citizens of the day. A grant of land in Subiaco from the Western Australian Government, together with funds raised to build the Home, achieved the first admission of a resident in 1903. In 1997, The Homes of Peace (Inc) changed its name to Brightwater Care Group (Inc). An incorporated body under The Associations Incorporations Act 1987 and a non profit organisation, Brightwater receives funding from, and is accountable to, three government entities: • The Department of Health and Ageing, under the Aged Care Act (1997); • The Department of Health, WA, under the Hospitals and Health Services Act (1927); and • The Western Australian Disability Services Commission, under the Disability Services Act (1993). Brightwater is also subject to a number of Commonwealth and State Acts and Regulations. The strong commitment to community service, which motivated the organisation’s founders, continues to underpin all activities. While Brightwater is non-denominational, the organisation maintains a strong values-based culture and promotes partnership and teamwork as fundamental working models. The organisation has a strategic plan which is reviewed and evolved annually. This is then translated into operations throughout the whole organisation by the annual business planning cycle. Board members are elected from subscribers, who are individual members of the association with constitutional objects, powers, rules and procedures. The Board is responsible for governance and major directional policies and employs a Chief Executive Officer to carry out its policies. The Board acts in a voluntary capacity. There are four committees in total, including Governance and Performance, Care, Audit and Risk Management and Business. The Chief Executive Officer is responsible to the Board and other businesses of the organisation for general management, risk management and the provision of financial administrative services. An annual report is published in October each year, with narrative and the audited financial report for the preceding financial year. This is presented to subscribers, general members and guests at the Annual General Meeting.

“The organisation has a strategic plan which is reviewed and evolved annually.” 42

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


43

Leadership Team Presented in order of appearance in the picture above (left to right)

Jennifer Lawrence - General Manager, Services for Younger People & Major Projects. BAppSc Jennifer held a number of executive roles within the private pathology industry, both locally and interstate, before moving to Brightwater Care Group in 2003. Currently, she oversees the business operations of 10 facilities for people with disabilities, is the sponsor of a $20m Oats Street facility rebuild project and has responsibility for occupational health and safety, workers compensation and insurance. She is responsible for establishing The Brightwater Centre which is Brightwater’s research arm. Jennifer is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and Australian College of Health Services Management. She published two journal articles in 2012 and presented at the World Brain Injury Congress in Edinburgh March 2012.

Ralph Gore – General Manager, Corporate Services. BBus MBA, FAICD Ralph has over 30 years’ experience in the finance and corporate sectors. During this time, he has held a number of senior executive positions, including Head of Human Resources Development & Training, Regional Manager and Chief Operating Officer. Since joining Brightwater in 2008, Ralph has operated in the role of General Manager for Corporate Services which oversees Brightwater’s finance, information technology, physical resources, health records, purchasing, project management, marketing and public relations functions. In recent times, he has also been actively engaged in the $20m Oats Street Rehabilitation Programme redevelopment. In his role, Ralph is an ex officio member of the Audit and Risk and Business Committees. Ralph is currently the Board Chairperson for the Independent Living Centre, a Director of the Innovative Chiropractic Learning Centre at Murdoch University, President of a local sporting group and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Dr Penny Flett – C hief Executive Officer. MBBS, DGM, FRACMA, AFCHSM, FAIM Penny joined Brightwater as the Director of Clinical Services in 1986, when the organisation was still known as The Homes of Peace, and became CEO in 1996. Penny has become a champion for people of all ages who need a high level of ongoing support and service. She has a particular interest in services for younger adults with acquired brain injury and neurological disorders. Penny is convinced that achieving successful ageing in our society in the next few decades must begin now, with strong and innovative leadership.

Tonia Zeeman – General Manager, Services for Older People. BAppSc (Nsg) Tonia Zeeman has held senior positions over 20 years in the public, private and non-profit health sector, gaining broad experience across aged care, community services, acute care and mental health. She is the General Manager of all Services for Older People and Service Development within Brightwater – this includes Residential Aged Care, At Home Services, Transition Care, Clinical and Business Systems support. Tonia is a Director on both the ACSWA and the Alzheimer’s Australia WA Boards. She chairs the Residential Care Sub-Committee of the ACSWA Board and is a member of the Health and Nursing Workforce Strategy Committee of CCI and the Australasian College of Health Services Management.

Laurie Burns – General Manager, People Services. BBus, MIR Laurie Burns has more than 30 years’ experience in employee relations and human resource management in Australia. He has worked for and consulted to a number of organisations, providing health, disability, community and aged care services in the government and private sectors. Following a career as an Industrial Officer and Industrial Advocate, Laurie has held human resource management positions for the past 23 years. He is currently the General Manager for People Services, which includes human resources and employee relations, strategic learning and growth, payroll and recruitment. Laurie is Deputy Chair of the Industrial Relations Policy Committee of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry and represents ACSWA on the national Workplace Relations Committee.


Services for Older People

Services for Younger People

At Home services

Commercial services

44

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12


45

Locations Birralee, Innaloo: 155 Odin Road, Innaloo, 6018 Phone: 08 9445 6600

Kingsley: 41 Renegade Way, Kingsley, 6026 Phone: 08 9309 0300

South Lake: 62 Bloodwood Circle, South Lake, 6164 Phone: 08 9417 6200

Edgewater: 19 Pioneer, Drive, Edgewater, 6027 Phone: 08 9306 5300

Madeley: 95 Imperial Circuit, Madeley, 6065 Phone: 08 9303 0300

The Cove, Mandurah: 35 Hudson Drive, Dudley Park, 6210 Phone: 08 9581 0100

Huntingdale: 31 Mildenhall Street, Huntingdale, 6110 Phone: 08 9490 0200

Onslow Gardens, Subiaco: 39 Hamersley Road, Subiaco, 6008 Phone: 08 9489 8600

The Oaks, East Vic Park: 2-10 Oakwood Crescent, Waikiki, 6169 Phone: 08 9593 9200

Joondalup: 6 Jolstra Crescent, Joondalup, 6027 Phone: 08 9404 9300

Oxford Gardens: 30 Regents Park Road, Joondalup, 6027 Phone: 08 9300 2701

The Village: 150 Dundas Road, Inglewood, 6052 Phone: 08 9370 0900

Redcliffe: 23 Johnson Road, Redcliffe, 6104 Phone: 08 9479 2300

Balcatta: 8-10 Milton Ave, Balcatta, 6021 Phone: 08 9344 8433

Ellison House, Carlisle: 240 Orrong Road, Carlisle, 6101 Phone: 08 9361 7474

Maylands: 5 Caledonian Avenue, Maylands, 6051 Phone: 08 9272 6427

Bentley: 44 Bedford Street, Bentley, 6102 Phone: 08 9258 5844

Kailis House, Belmont: 11 Stanley Street, Belmont, 6104 Phone: 08 9277 6120

Oats Street, Victoria Park: 170 Swansea Street East, East Vic Park, 6101 Phone: 08 9362 9200

Cannington: 66 Hamilton Street, Cannington, 6107 Phone: 08 9458 9782

Manning: 15 Cornish Street, Manning, 6152 Phone: 08 9313 2864

Warnbro: 2 Minilya Loop, Warnbro, 6169 Phone: 08 9593 0211

Marangaroo: 38 Brookland Crescent, Marangaroo, 6064 Phone: 08 9247 9102

AHS Joondalup: 30 Regents Park Road, Joondalup, 6027 Phone: 08 9400 8700

AHS Rockingham: Rockingham Shopping Centre 1, Council Ave Rockingham, 6168 Phone: 08 9553 1200

AHS Subiaco: 200 Townshend Road, Subiaco, 6008 Phone: 08 9489 5000

Brightwater Catering: 9 Meka Street, Malaga, 6090 Phone: 9248 0300 Brightwater Linen: 107 Beringarra Drive, Malaga, 6090 Phone: 08 9209 6800

Kingsway Court: 6 Countess Link, Madeley, 6065 Phone: 08 9302 3655

Brightwater House: 355 Scarborough Beach Road, Osborne Park, 6017 Phone: 08 9202 2800 www.brightwatergroup.com


Brightwater Care Group (Inc) PO Box 792 Osborne Park WA 6916 Telephone (08) 9202 2800 Facsimile (08) 9202 2801 Email welcome@brightewatergroup.com

www.brightwatergroup.com Brightwater Care Group (Inc) is a registered charity and all donations are tax deductible.


Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12  

Brightwater Annual Report 2011-12

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