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THE UK’S ONLY MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR WORKING & ASPIRING PROS

SING FOR YOUR SUPPER

Why personal work can reap rewards

SONY’S

A7R III

PHOTOGRAPHYNEWS.CO.UK

ISSUE 145 £4.75

Does it mark the coming of age for Sony mirrorless?

LIGHTING THE WAY

Westcott Solix & Interfit Honey Badger on test

YOU’RE NOT ALONE Why you should be team building NEW SERIES

So you want to be a

CANDID CAMERA

How to earn more at balls and weddings

PRINTS MAKE PROFITS

Three events printers to boost your bottom line

WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER VOW TO BE THE BEST WITH OUR TOP BUSINESS ADVICE

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WE LCOM E /CONT E NTS

©Brett Harkness

Issue #145

Welcome IT’S TRADITIONAL IN MAGAZINE PUBLISHING THAT, WHEN A different name appears on the bottom of the Welcome column, a sort of formal introduction and showing of credentials is required. So here goes. I’m the new editor in chief of this very magazine, and have spent many years involved with photography as well as magazine editing and publishing. I started with a Canon A1 loaded with Tri-X back in 1987, and so I’ve seen massive changes in the industry. Digital cameras, mirrorless and video are obvious tech milestones. But in photography businesses, changes have been more profound. Staff photographers with jobs for life, stock photographers making a fortune from a single image, magazine editorial departments having budgets to fund proper shoots, and social and wedding shooters owning their own highstreet studios are all things we’ll probably never see again. Times have changed and therefore what we offer as professional image makers must do, too. My own career has been what can be loosely called a ‘portfolio’ approach. That means multiple income streams, from things as varied as commercial, editorial, social and wedding photography and filmmaking, speaking at photo shows, running workshops and training courses plus writing books and articles. It’s a new world out there for image makers, but it can still be profitable and rewarding. I hope Professional Photo will continue to inform, inspire and encourage you to seek out new opportunities in the business. Enjoy the issue.

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UPFRONT

10

INTERVIEW: SAM GIBSON

16

PROJECT: THE JAZZ SINGERS

23

TEAM BUILDING

26

LIGHTING SECRETS

35

EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY

Setting the scene and the agenda, plus a crash guide to producing your first video

NEW SERIES

Why a background in film makes Sam a great documentary wedding photographer

Tom Oldham shares the wisdom behind his latest award-winning personal work

Working with talented specialists you too can create a crew to tackle any commission

Brett Harkness talks us through three of his most captivating wedding set-ups

Top tips to ensure you don’t ‘leave any money in the room’ at black-tie functions

38

HOW TO BE…

44

SONY’S COMING OF AGE

50

LIGHTING TESTS

54

GROUP TEST: EVENT PRINTERS

The best wedding photographer you can be. Advice to make your business blossom

Do the new Mark III models mark a milestone in the mirrorless market?

Westcott Solix and Interfit Honey Badger rated

Which will you take to the ball?

58

MINI TESTS

61

ROAR INTO BUSINESS

We test the peripherals so you know where to splash the cash

Make a noise with your marketing by following these four simple steps

64 ASK THE EXPERTS

You asked about insurance and data law; our experts provide the answers

66 THE SELECTOR

When wedding photographer Lyndsey Goddard says “I do”

ADAM DUCKWORTH ABIPP | EDITOR IN CHIEF adamduckworth@bright-publishing.com @HashTagFlash

Subscribe to PROFESSIONAL PHOTO by Direct Debit and pay just £13 every six months See page 22 for more info on our special offer

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U PF RON T_ I N THE DI RE CTOR’S C HAI R

DIRECTING YOUR FIRST VIDEO: THE BASICS

Take our crash course in filmmaking with your DSLR or mirrorless camera to ensure your first video’s a hit WORDS ADAM DUCKWORTH

JUST BECAUSE YOU KNOW THE technicalities of shooting stills doesn’t mean you understand video. Chances are your camera may offer filmmaking in at least HD quality, but making a successful short film is about far more than understanding what settings to change your camera to. It’s about being your own director or director of photography. Here are our top tips.

1

YOU’RE TELLING A STORY

You’re not just taking random bits of footage. Think about the story then work out which shots tell that story. If it’s a wedding day, the story is pretty obvious – starting with the couple preparing then the ceremony, reception, speeches and dancing. If it’s a story about a scriptwriter who does little more than sitting in front of a laptop, it’ll need more thought.

2

GET YOUR ESTABLISHING SHOT

This is typically a wide shot that establishes the location and what the scene is about, even the time of day. And you might need one for every major change of scenery.

3

THINK ABOUT COMPOSITION

Many of the rules of stills composition apply to video: the rule of thirds, having straight horizons and including foreground interest in wide scenes.

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SHOOT A LOT OF FOOTAGE

Once you’ve shot what you think are the main scenes, shoot more from creative angles, using different focal length lenses, perspectives and anything else you can think of. This is often called B-roll, and it makes your film more interesting. Try not to make any shot longer than ten seconds. Often, three seconds is enough – depending on how long each shot will hold a viewer’s attention.

5

MOVE THE CAMERA

Panning and tilting shots are best done with a tripod and fluid video head. Nothing looks worse than wobbly footage, and a standard photo tripod is not up to the task. An easy way to make your viewers feel queasy is to constantly move your camera around, so be careful.

6

CHOOSE THE RIGHT SETTINGS

A 24fps frame rate is said to give the most cinematic look, 25fps is what most TV is shot in and 50fps is good for slowing down to half-speed slow motion. In general, 25/50fps is typically for PAL areas like the UK while 30/60fps is for American-standard NTSC. 4K gives the ultimate quality but often there aren’t many frame rates and it eats up memory space. Full 1080 HD is not as high quality but offers more frame rates, ideal for slow motion.

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MASTER THE SOUND

Bad audio will ruin your films, and most built-in microphones are terrible. Every time you touch the camera, that noise will be recorded. A proper external mic, as close to the subject as possible, is ideal. Perhaps with an external recorder.

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SET THE RIGHT SHUTTER SPEED

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NAIL YOUR WHITE-BALANCE

There’s an old rule that says shutter speed should be double the frame rate to avoid a staccato look to footage. So if your frame rate is 25fps, your shutter speed should be 1/50sec. Alter your exposure using your ISO, aperture or an ND filter. That’s a big difference to stills.

If you’re used to shooting stills in Raw and fixing your white-balance in post, stop: you need to be more careful in video. Set white-balance manually. The files don’t have the same leeway in post.

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LEARN TO EDIT – THE BASICS

Learning to edit your footage helps your shooting as you know what shots you need. Start by putting all the essential bits of footage on the timeline to tell the story for a very rough cut. Then finetune by adding B-roll, tweaking the edit and adding transitions and titles.

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INTERVIEW_SAM GIBSON

IN TERVIEW

In love

wi th stil l s WORDS TERRY HOPE IMAGES SAM GIBSON

While so many photographers are moving into motion Sam Gibson made the journey the other way

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photographynews.co.uk

13/04/2018 12:11


INTERVIEW_SAM GIBSON

W

hatever career you might have, if you intend to enjoy it to the full, the golden rule is to be true to yourself and to realise what your true passions are. So it was that Bristol-based Sam Gibson, having worked his way to the top of a greasy pole to become a self-shooting director for the BBC, made the life-changing decision seven years ago to follow his true love, to be a stills photographer, with weddings as his principal focus. “In many ways what I had was a dream job,” he reflects. “The travel was exciting and the work was creative and challenging. I had started at the BBC as a runner when I was 21, making tea and doing all sorts of different jobs on various programmes as my career progressed. My

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speciality was observational documentaries, so films about people, basically. I would go and live with them for weeks or months on end to film often very complex and sensitive situations. But I always loved stills and would often wish I was in those places to take pictures rather than make films. “Eventually I reached the point where I thought it was now or never, so I handed in my notice. The BBC was a little surprised and, looking back on it, I think I was pretty unprepared in many ways. I only had six weddings booked by the time I actually became self-employed, so I jumped in at the deep end really. It was definitely time for a change though and I knew deep down that it was the right thing to do.” Self-taught both as a film cameraman and as a photographer, Sam found the

process of moving into stills easier because of his visual background. He learned his skills through trial and error and by working alongside other talented creatives, but for the wedding market he also drew on his experience of being able to empathise with those who might start out as complete strangers on a day that can be full of stress and emotion. In fact, it’s the emotion that drew him into weddings in the first place. “It’s what I was always interested in as a filmmaker and the same applies as a photographer,” he says. “I am an avid people watcher and love capturing an honest, truthful picture of someone in a still image. Weddings are a microcosm of our lives and to have all these different things going on in front of your lens is a total treat.”

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P ROJ E CT _YAC H TING L IF E

A COMPETITIVE STREAK Ask Tom Oldham why photographers should enter competitions, and he’s instantly into his stride, summing it up simply:

“Because, of course, you don’t bloody well know what will happen”

P ROJ ECT

Th e Jazz Sin ge r s WORDS LISA CLATWORTHY IMAGES TOM OLDHAM

Tom Oldham explains how being friendly with the pub landlords landed him a Sony World Photography Award

I

’ve won the portrait category,” exclaims Tom Oldham excitedly when we start talking about this latest personal work. “It’s weird to have such a personal project acknowledged in that way, but maybe that’s what they saw in it: that I love it.” They are the Sony World Photography Awards, and the project is The Last of the Crooners, which netted Tom the Professional Portrait Series award. As well as being genuinely chuffed with the win, Tom is amused that a project shot in a pub just 500 yards from his house is a winner, which you can understand when you appreciate that as a portrait

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photographer, he travels all over the world shooting editorial and commercial work, as well as projects for charities. Describing the inception of the project, Tom says, “I’m relatively new in town; I’ve only been going in the pub for about 17 years, so I’m still trying to make my mark. I really like the people and I get on with them, and I politely asked them if they thought now was the time to document the pub.” For the last 40 years, The Palm Tree in Bow has put on jazz music every Friday, Saturday and Sunday night. “I really love this pub and its atmosphere,” says Tom. “They’ve kept it unique and consistent for those 40 years.

He confessed to us that he entered the Sony World Photography Awards at the eleventh hour. It’s not the first competition he’s entered or even won, but “for all my experience, I didn’t foresee for one second that there might be the possibility for this getting noticed. And it’s won,” he says. “The chances of that are slim. The really healthy, gloriously wonderful thing about the Sony World Photography Awards is how broad it is and anybody generating really nice work has a chance of getting in. It isn’t exclusive to well-known names, industry big guns, by any means at all. For any reader who’s like ‘oh I don’t think so this year’, I say, give it a go, aim for that standard and try.”

IMAGES: “The pub was really, really obliging in organising everyone,” says Tom Oldham, “but still at 3pm, we didn’t have any pianists, by 7 o’clock we had three. In East London, jazz pianists are like buses!” Top: The Palm Tree Trio Above: Stephen Pierre Right: Helen Keating

photographynews.co.uk

13/04/2018 12:13


PROJECT_ THE L AST OF THE CROONE RS

“I don’t want to be famous, I just want to be treated seriously”

“They’re proper singers coming in with a proper band and they treat it very seriously. I just thought there was something fascinating in this. It is a dying scene – live jazz in pubs – which is a shame. The singers are getting older and older, they’re not dying but they’re fading away and I just thought, we’ve got to document this.” Throughout this project Tom has felt the weight of responsibility to portray the pub in the right way. “There are a lot of stakeholders in a project like this, from the owners to the artists to the performers, the regulars, the hipsters… I wanted to work really hard to get the feel right, to make sure that feel was honoured. You have to honour it. Anybody seeing this project would say, that looks like The Palm Tree. Which is absolutely key to the success of it for me, the integrity of the project lies in that feel. You’ve got to do it proud. You have to be careful and respectful with how you approach it. There are lots of different aspects to how we’re delivering on this and they’ve all got to be bang on. It’s a big deal for me.” The different aspects even include producing an LP. Realising that no one had ever recorded the jazz musicians who frequent the pub, Tom set that in motion. It’s an unusual thing to do, but “not ludicrously expensive; it’s the perfect showcase for the photography. We’ve done a gatefold album and a beautiful sleeve. It’s got a little insert, a mini portfolio within the album with lots of pictures and a few words. There’s no point me doing all the corporate stuff that I do if I don’t spend it on things like this, that I love.” The LPs were on sale at the launch night in the pub, which was on 21 April to coincide with Record Store Day. If you’re quick you can still see Tom’s images adorning the walls of the pub and buy a record. Given that Tom’s dedicated two shoots to this project, produced 500 LPs, numerous beer mats and printed and mounted dozens of photos, this was no cheap undertaking. “I don’t think I will break even,” he admits. “It’s all promo budget; it’s a great vehicle to shout about Tom Oldham Photography in PR terms.

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L I G H TI N G_S EC R ETS

Li ght ing sec rets revea led WORDS KINGSLEY SINGLETON IMAGES BRETT HARKNESS

M

y approach to lighting at weddings has changed a great deal over the years,” says Brett Harkness, a veteran of ‘big day’ shoots since 2001. “Starting out in Miami working on cruise ships we would shoot weddings every day, and every shot was with fill from on-camera flash, just trying to lift the shadows in the harsh light. Returning to the UK, my first wedding was very different, all natural light, and I don’t think I even owned a flashgun.” That all changed a few years later when he bought his first real lighting kit, Elinchrom Quadra 400 and Ranger RX Speed AS packs. “After that, I became known for ‘big’ lighting at weddings; powerfully lit images with lots of wow factor. And though in recent years my documentary skills have come more to the forefront of my wedding work and I use a lot of available light, I still use flash, just more carefully and gently.” Would he say there are many constraints to using flash at weddings? And what pressures do they bring? “It’s a lack of time really. At a lot of our weddings we have very little time, so we have to work fast and think on our feet,” and those time pressures he says mean

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only a few fully lit shots can be grabbed in between documentary images. “I’d say 90% of my images are natural light, but some jobs in central London in the winter can be 100% flash due to timings and the lack of available light. And I always prefer to use flash off camera, so someone has to hold it. My assistant stays by my side throughout. This way of working isn’t for everyone but I find it suits me well. We will also set up separate lights if need be, in the church or at the venue for family shots. I use speedlights in the winter months as well as the new ELB 400 and 1200s, my main modifier being the Elinchrom Portalite Softbox and occasionally a 70cm box.” These tend to be held on a Lastolite extending handle. “Sometimes though, we get a client who gives us more time; say 30 minutes for a cool couple session. This is amazing and means I can go the extra mile and play a little more with location and lighting,” he enthuses. Now shooting on average 2025 weddings a year all over the UK and abroad, Brett also offers training packages for wedding photographers wanting to improve their skills and create images like those you’ll see here.

FEELING THE FIREWORKS There’s so much energy in this shot. I think it comes from the clever lighting, which gives a real physicality to the guests and the couple, and of course the expressions are spot on. How did it come about? Was there much planning involved? Or did you need to think on your feet? It’s definitely one of my favourites from recent years. It was a New Year’s Eve wedding, and it was dark and raining as we came out of the church. I’d heard the crowd outside lighting the sparklers as we were preparing to leave. I was prepared for it being quite dark outside, I had my settings

photographynews.co.uk

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L IGHTING _S E C RE TS

dialled in expecting sparklers which weren’t as powerful as those used, so the brightness was quite unexpected! I turned to face the couple, and seeing everything was brighter than I’d thought, I had to act fast. I left all the settings as they were – flash power, shutter and aperture – and just dropped the ISO to compensate. So you’re shooting manual here, rather than TTL? Yes, those who’ve been on my wedding training courses know that I don’t shoot TTL. I never find it trustworthy enough. With manual I always say if it looks bad I can fix it. If it looks bad in TTL then what do you do? It’s all about flash-to-subject distance with manual flash, keeping this a

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constant and learning how to control the ambience is what makes the shots work. Was most of the light coming from the sparklers, with a little fill flash? Yes, my assistant was carrying the flash, and walking outside the line of the crowd, about 4ft to my left. Most importantly they were keeping the flash at a constant distance to the subjects. With the couple moving quickly and me back-pedalling, I took what I could and knowing that I’d nailed this moment, I was super happy. What sort of light was used, and where was it placed and modified? We used an Elinchrom ELB 400 with a

70cm softbox, and with a honeycomb grid on the softbox to stop the light spilling. That part’s really important because you don’t want to spill the light too much onto the people holding the sparklers – too much flash and too much spread would have killed the moment. Did you get multiple versions of the image? If so, why did you select this particular one? I shot the whole journey from the church door to the venue (everyone walked as it was only five minutes away). All the shots were equally well exposed but this shot was it for me. The groom high-fiving his best man, the couple’s expressions, the movement – a moment captured forever.

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Sponsored by

G E A R_S O N Y A 7R III

Sony

comes of age WORDS AND IMAGES ADAM DUCKWORTH

The third-generation of Sony’s full-frame A7R series finally meets the needs of the working pro WHILE IT SEEMS LIKE THE WORLD OF photography has gone mad for compact mirrorless cameras, professional photography is still dominated by DSLRs from the major brands. They are robust, fast, well proven and offer ergonomics fine-tuned by years of evolution. And the majority now shoot HD or even 4K video, if that’s important to you. Plus there’s the backup of professional service centres and rental houses where you can always get hold of the kit you need. The mirrorless brands are only just now catching up in a serious way. So while cameras like the Sony A7 series may have won over a significant number of users thanks to their fullframe sensor, small size, great low-light

performance and stunning video footage, in other areas they haven’t been up to scratch. Single card slots, poor battery life, no dedicated AF-ON button, slow frame rates, tricky tethering and slow AF mean they haven’t been for everyone. The second-generation Mark II versions of the A7 series went further towards what a pro needs, but they still had quirks. The new Mark III versions, spearheaded by the 42-megapixel A7R III, go a long way to not only solving those handling and usability quirks, but can actually offer a lot of features that DSLRs don’t or can’t. We check out Sony’s newest flagship A7-series camera, the A7R III, to see if it really is now an option for pro work.

NEW PRO CONTROLS

Many professionals use backbutton focus using the AF-ON button. This is the first Sony A7 camera to offer it. There’s also a much more obvious Rec button to trigger video recording, instead of the tiny button on the old camera. And finally a thumb-operated AF Multiselector toggle allows you to quickly move the AF point. Like all pro cameras should.

TOUCHSCREEN

The screen still tilts, and is now a touchscreen. This is ideal for doing focus pulls during video, or just touch-to-focus in stills mode.

THE SYSTEM INCREASES Lack of lens choice was always an issue with earlier A7 series cameras, as all Sony had at launch was a trio of f/4 zooms and a few small primes. Now the G-Master series of top-end pro lenses has a full complement of f/2.8 zooms, some incredible fast primes, a macro lens, and a 100-400mm sports lens. A fast 400mm f/2.8 prime lens is on the way soon, too. But there’s still no sign of tilt- shift lenses or an exotic fisheye yet. That said, the E-mount means other lenses can be fitted using adapters. And Sony is investing in its Pro Support network, too.

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photographynews.co.uk

13/04/2018 13:02


castlecameras.co.uk Call: 01202 526606 Twitter: @Castlecameras Facebook: facebook.com/castlecameras/ Blog: https://blog2.castlecameras.co.uk/

GEAR_ S ONY A7 R I I I

WHY THE A7R III IS NOW READY FOR PRO USE

£3199 Sony.com

A BATTERY THAT LASTS You’d need a least a couple of batteries to see the old A7 series through a day’s shooting. The new lithium battery is more than twice as big and lasts for allday shooting, thanks to the camera’s more efficient use of power.

SIDE OF CAMERA PC SYNC SOCKET For the first time in the Sony A7 series, the A7R III comes with a PC connector so you can plug in a studio flash unit.

DUAL USB CONNECTIONS The Sony has two USB connections, one standard USB-2 but the other is the fast USB-C. This makes it ideal for tethering via USB-C, or even for downloading cards or charging up the camera from a laptop. And while tethered, you can use a remote release in the other USB-2 slot.

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PIXEL SHIFT AND FRAME RATES The sensor may be the same 42-megapixel unit of the old A7R II, but it’s now capable of much more thanks to improvements in in-camera processing. The frame rate is upped from 5fps to 10fps, and can record up to 76 compressed Raw files in a continuous burst. At the other end of the scale, pixelshift multi-shooting combines four shots from a tripod-mounted camera to give the equivalent of a 169.6-megapixel sensor.

DUAL CARD SLOTS A single card slot was a deal-breaker for many. The A7R III has two slots, although only one is for the faster UHS-II cards. If you write to two cards at once, the maximum transfer speed is governed by the speed of the slower card.

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13/04/2018 13:04


G E A R_MINI TESTS

Sekon ic L -308X £215 sekonic.com

WORDS ADAM DUCKWORTH

THE INSTANT FEEDBACK OF DIGITAL cameras coupled with the exposure flexibility of shooting in Raw means many pro photographers don’t own a light meter. But with so many stills photographers also shooting video, there is now more of a reason to use one – and that’s where Sekonic’s new pocket-sized L-308X comes in. It’s the first meter designed for the new breed of professionals equally at home using their camera to shoot either moving images or stills, with both natural light and flash. While shooting Raw stills does give the opportunity to tweak the exposure in post-processing, there’s nothing like getting it right in camera for the best quality results. If you are shooting video, then exposure is far more critical. No DSLR or mirrorless camera, and very few high-end professional cine cameras, can shoot Raw video. You’re always recording a compressed file more akin to a JPEG, so it’s much more important to get exposure right in camera. While many cinema cameras offer professional-grade monitoring tools such as waveforms, vectorscopes and adjustable zebra pattering, most mirrorless or DSLR cameras don’t. Sekonic’s new L-308X is based on the popular L-308S photo meter with many functions of the video-focused L-308DC added in. There’s also a new

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backlit screen which automatically comes on when light levels fall. You can also dial in calibration compensation from -1 to +1 stops in 0.1-step increments to match other meters or your camera. The meter has three modes: Photo; HD-Cine, ideal for DSLRs or mirrorless; and Cine which is aimed at full-size video cameras. Changing modes involves holding down the Mode button while turning on the meter, then selecting the mode you want. Then turning it off and on again to use it. It’s not very obvious. The meter has a sliding lumisphere, which covers the metering cell for incident metering, and which can be slid out of the way for reflected measurements. In photo mode, the L-308X handles ambient light, flash via a PC cord and wireless flash. You set the ISO, then choose either the shutter speed or f/stop you want depending on the mode, and hit the measuring button. The settings for your camera are displayed, or the EV value, and you can specify whether you want measurements in full stops, half stops or third stops. The results are shown in tenths of a stop for total accuracy. It’s precise, easy and aids fast set-ups, especially when used in a studio to measure relative brightness of light sources. It won’t actually trigger wireless studio flash systems, though.

IMAGE: The Sekonic L-308X is compact and reasonably priced, but is it ready for those who shoot both still and moving images?

For that, you need to upgrade to a more advanced model. In HD Cine mode, you set your ISO, frame rate and shutter speed, and take a reading which can display the required aperture or the illuminance in lux or footcandles. Cine mode is largely the same, except you can set shutter angle instead of speed. Then you just dial in the f/stop for consistent exposures every time. VERDICT Although the meter is aimed at the new breed of image makers, it hasn’t caught up with camera technology. The ISO only goes to 8000. And in photo mode, the maximum shutter speed is only 1/8000sec and in flash mode it tops out at 1/500sec. In both cine modes, the frame rate goes up to 128fps but many cameras go faster than this. But for most users who juggle stills and video, it’s a great tool that helps to get exposure right. It’s small, accurate, useful for stills and video and not too expensive.

photographynews.co.uk

13/04/2018 16:25


GEAR_ M I NI T E STS

Ph i l ips 328P6AU BR EB £396

philips.co.uk WORDS ROGER PAYNE

SIR IAN BOTHAM, ANDREW FLINTOFF and Kapil Dev all have something in common. They are widely regarded as three of the best all-rounders the cricketing world has ever clapped eyes on. Fitting the concept of an all-rounder perfectly, they were decent with both bat and ball as well as being far from shabby when it came to fielding. You find allrounders in other walks of life, of course. And when it comes to monitors, Philips believes that the 328P6AUBREB is its very own Beefy Botham. There’s much about the snappilytitled monitor to back this claim up. For starters, it’s a healthy 32in screen (the actual viewable area is 31.5 inches) and, being part of the company’s Brilliance

IMAGES: A bit of an all-rounder, perfect for image editing, not ball tampering

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range, it boasts High Dynamic Range (HDR) for a greater tonal output. With a 10-bit display and 12-bit internal processing, you’re certainly not short of colours with 1.074 billion on offer for smoother gradations and no colour banding. The physical size of the monitor is manageable even on a smaller desk (I know, I have one), plus it tips the scales at just under 10kg with supplied stand in place, so it’s hardly a heavyweight. Resolution is Quad HD which shouldn’t be confused with 4K. Whereas 4K is four times Full HD, Quad HD is four times standard HD, which means that the 328P6AUBREB has 2560x1440 pixels. In reality, the monitor represented a notable step up from my, admittedly prehistoric, Full HD monitor and confirmed that I really do need to get an upgrade. Soon. Assembly proved very simple, although there is some screwdriver work to be done to attach the stand as opposed to it all just clipping together. Once on the stand, there’s plenty of movement on offer, with 340° of rotation, 25° of tilt (20° back, 5° forward) and 180mm of vertical shift available. The whole screen can also be turned through 90° if you’d prefer to use it in a portrait orientation. And then there are the connectivity options, which cover all bases including a new, one-stop USB-C dock which will both display and charge a laptop through the one port. Additionally, there are two fast-charging USB ports

for those times when you want to quickly add some extra juice to your smartphone, along with a number of options and their associated cables. In fact, the only thing I didn’t really like was the touch-sensitive controls on the front right of the screen. Philips will point out that this isn’t a true photo editing monitor, a fact that should be evident by the tempting price tag, but I didn’t consider it to be poor in this regard. Sure, there are better monitors out there for super-precise editing of both stills and video, but this monitor is no slouch and, staying true to its all-round roots, it’s also lovely to use for day-to-day admin tasks and general surfing. One reason for this could well be the LowBlue mode, which makes for less eye strain and the fact that there are two built-in speakers offering stereo sound. VERDICT I’m not a big cricket fan, but I do like an allrounder and the 328P6AUBREB certainly ticks all the right boxes in this regard. Each monitor comes with a data sheet displaying colour uniformity at shipment and I have no reason to think that this had degraded before it ended up on my desk. Luminance uniformity was also impressive. Some will rue the lack of 4K, but you won’t find this combination of features and 4K at this price point so if this is the budget you have to spend, you could do a lot worse than plump for this Flintoff-esque screen.

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13/04/2018 09:54


BU SINESS_ MARK E T I NG

ROAR! WORDS RICHARD BRADBURY

Research, Organise, Action, Response: the secret of strategic marketing in four easy stages

ROAR stands for Research, Organise, Action, Response. It is a process-based system that will unveil the mysteries of strategic marketing success. I describe it as a marketing method that works every time, based on the principles of analytics, psychology and anthropology. Without having a clear understanding of who your clients are, what drives them and why they should pay for your services, you will

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never be able to control your workflow. You will pick up random work and the reasons why your clients come to you will always be, at best, an educated guess. That is why ROAR is so important. I believe it is the most effective longterm marketing plan that any business can undertake, and it can be applied to any type of photographic business in any specialist field. You simply need to learn the principles and follow the process.

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Professional Photo 145 sampler  

Vow to be the best – from weddings to events, this issue is guaranteed to produce success

Professional Photo 145 sampler  

Vow to be the best – from weddings to events, this issue is guaranteed to produce success