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NO.1 PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR WORKING PROFESSIONAL

SHARING IS GOOD FOR YOU

Use Flickr & Instagram to make ££

NEED A USP? YOUR KIT HOLDS THE KEY…

How your DSLR will help boost your business

ISSUE 94 £4.50 www.photopromagazine.com

PRO REVIEW

Hassle-free Hasselblad? Revolutionary H5D-50c gets studio-based grilling

AN HOUR WITH JERRY

GHIONIS

Top wedding pro shares unmissable marketing advice

Powerful

PORTRAITURE Light up your portfolio with our pearls of people wisdom

WEDDING NERVES? CURE THEM & SHOOT WITH CONFIDENCE!

THOMAS MOREL'S FAB FREEZE FRAMES CHOOSE THE RIGHT WIRELESS TRIGGER SHOWCASE YOUR IMAGES IN A VIDEO


A B S O L U T E

PHOTO I LOVE THE CONTENT OF THIS MAGAZINE! SNOWBASIC, 21 JAN - CANADA

It’s perfectly suited to the iPad with lots of interesting photography features and videos to explore KEVEALING, 10 JAN - UK

Amazing images and interactivity with great videos also. Great stuff! LEDLEY26, 19 DEC – UK

I love the multimedia format with print, video and sound ROSIEBARCELONA, 30 DEC - USA

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WELCOME This issue is sizzling with summer features, inspiring images and expert advice from some of photography’s top names

THOMAS MOREL

We’ve another great line-up of stories for you this issue, with top tips and inspiration from some of the world’s top trainers. If you want to keep your finger on the pulse of what’s happening in the world of professional photography this is the place to be! Jerry Ghionis is on his usual top form, talking about his natural instinct to market and the need to constantly reinvent yourself. Essential advice, so check out what he’s got to say. Meanwhile Brett Florens continues his series, this issue describing how to harness technology to develop a niche service, such as low-light photography, to set yourself apart from the crowd. Vital information again, plus you can download his useful training film. What’s left to say about Trevor and Faye Yerbury? The couple are at the top of their game, and their overview of the portrait market makes essential reading for any social photographer. Finally Andy Kruczek has been using the new Hasselblad CMOS camera and has some fascinating feedback to share. See what he has to say and whether this technology is for you. Fascinating stuff – I hope you enjoy the read!

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CONTENTS SAVE 45% ISSUE 94

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006 INBOX

064

The latest and greatest news, including details of a whopping 50-megapixel camera from Pentax, street art and the latest Bob Carlos Clarke exhibition.

016 PORTFOLIO: THOMAS MOREL

COVER Freeze frame! High-speed aficionado Thomas Morel explains how he produces his arresting images.

022 PROJECT: PERU

Fired by his passion for travel, commercial shooter Richard Watson packed his cameras, lenses and flash kit (but not his marmalade sandwiches) for a three-week trip to deepest, darkest Peru. 022

Pro Academy

030 POWER TO THE PORTRAIT COVER Perfecting people shots means mastering not only camera technique, but interpersonal skills too. Thankfully maestro Trevor Yerbury can talk you through the essentials.

040 WEDDING NERVES

COVER Whether you’re a seasoned pro or a complete newbie to wedding photography, read these six pages to banish any lingering cold feet and boost your confidence on the big day.

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Business Matters

049 BUSINESS MATTERS

Solve copyright conundrums, get SMART and build a virtual team – all with advice from our team of experts.

052 MASTER MARKETING

COVER Donal Doherty concludes his look at social marketing’s role in your business, with a run through of photo sharing sites and apps.

058 GET BUSINESS SAVVY

COVER Don’t just take a shot in the dark. Develop a USP with a niche idea from one of the best, Brett Florens.

064 GRANDMASTER GHIONIS COVER Star wedding shooter, Jerry Ghionis talks marketing and creativity.

071 HDSLR

COVER Top tips to make your move into moviemaking smooth and profitable.

Gear

076 HASSELBLAD H5D-50C

COVER Will this new CMOS-based 50-megapixel offering from behemoth Hasselblad cut the mustard with our medium-format-ophile Andy Kruczek?

087 PRO LOCATION TRIPODS

Taking a ’pod out on location is a different scenario to locking one down in the studio. We look at three-legged sidekicks to help you out in the field.

090 BUYERS’ GUIDE

COVER To misquote a royally famous song: off-camera flash, it’ll save every photo for us. But to do it well you’ll need one of these wireless kits.

106 NEXT ISSUE

Take it from those who’ve done it and got the T-shirt: words of wisdom from successful marketeers and celeb shooters.


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016 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 94


PORTFOLIO | THOMAS MOREL

THE SPEED OF Thomas Morel specialises in high-speed photography, freezing action and capturing scenes the eye doesn’t notice, and his unique vision is attracting a growing number of clients looking for something distinctly different WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES THOMAS MOREL

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Widely recognised as one of Northern Ireland’s leading commercial photographers, Richard Watson also harbours a deep love for travel, and he’s recently returned from a successful three-week trip to Peru WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES RICHARD WATSON


PROJEC CT

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PRO ACADEMY

ESSENTIAL PRO SECRETS REVEALED

Providing you with the essential skills, techniques and ideas you need to make it as a successful professional photographer

030 PORTRAIT MASTERCLASS Trevor Yerbury talks through the essentials of perfect portraits: camera technique and interpersonal skills.

040 WEDDING NERVES Read this to banish cold feet and boost your big day confidence.

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PRO ACADEMY

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PRO ACADEMY

THE POWER OF PORTRAIT MASTERCLASS

PORTRAITS

Weddings have become super competitive and clients can be fixated on price, but portraiture still gives you the chance to make a profit while giving your creativity an airing. Trevor Yerbury explains how it’s done WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES TREVOR & FAYE YERBURY

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

SECOND HAND WITH SAFETY Buying used photo kit can be risky, but Camera Jungle takes the worry out of the second-hand wilderness

NEW

photographer’s shopping list is never-ending – particularly if you’re thinking of stepping up from an entry-level APS-C DSLR to more mid or top range gear. Top-quality kit isn’t cheap, and your bank balance isn’t endless, but there’s a shortcut to getting all the kit you want – buy second-hand. Spending your budget on used gear means you can get a lot more kit for the same money. Instead of a brand-new camera body, you could get a used body along with lenses, a flash and accessories like a tripod and bag – an entire set-up without spending any extra. It could take months or even years to build up the same kit list with all new equipment. You might well be thinking that buying second-hand equipment is too risky. And if you’re thinking of online auctions or cashin-hand purchases, then you’d be right. How can you know without seeing an item what condition it’s really in? And what happens if you spend hundreds of pounds on something that breaks after a week and the seller’s vanished? Well, buying through online second-hand specialists Camera Jungle eliminates all the risk, leaving you with just

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= the savings and a bunch of kit you know you can rely on. Camera Jungle has a wide range of used cameras and lenses, ranging from beginner to professional level, all of which are fully functional. They include standard accessories such as battery, charger and leads, and have been professionally cleaned. You can even see for yourself online what condition the products are in – the pictures on the site show multiple views of the actual items for sale, and rolling your mouse over the images gives you a magnified, high-resolution view so you can see the entire exterior in detail. If you want an even closer look, you can even visit the Camera Jungle store in Chessington. Camera Jungle’s used range includes compact cameras, compact system cameras and DSLRs from the likes of Canon, Nikon, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus and Fujifilm, as well as lenses and accessories like flashguns and battery grips. If you’ve got some old equipment yourself, you can save even more by part-exchanging it for the kit you want to buy – this way, you get a Trade-in Bonus. Everything you see on the Camera Jungle site is in stock, and if you order by 2pm,

Instead of a brand-new camera body, you could get a used body along with lenses, a flash and accessories from Camera Jungle 048 048 PHOTO PHOTO PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL ISSUE ISSUE 9487

USED

it’ll arrive the next day. What’s more, if you decide for any reason you don’t want your used item, you have seven days to return it – no questions asked. And all used products are covered by a six-month guarantee. Selling your old kit is as easy as 1, 2, 3: they give you a price instantly online; they collect your kit; you choose between cash and part-exchange. With Camera Jungle, there are none of the risks you’d normally associate with secondhand equipment – you can just get all the kit you want within your budget, and with complete peace of mind. MORE INFORMATION www.camerajungle.co.uk


BUSINESS MATTERS 052 AN APP-TASTIC APPROACH

What photo sharing can offer you

SCOTT GAIR, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAWYER

How not to respond to a copyright claim f you ever find yourself embroiled in a copyright dispute after one of your images is stolen, be warned: there is a right way and a wrong way to handle things. Handle it the wrong way and you and your correspondence may end up being read by thousands around the globe as it’s splashed across social media. I read recently about a Sydney-based photographer called Rohan Anderson. Rohan discovered that an image he took of a band, Red Jumpsuit Apparatus (RJA), was posted on the band’s Facebook page without his permission. Quite rightly he took offence as his watermark had been cropped out, a filter added and the quality had been significantly reduced. Unfortunately the band responded in a wholly unprofessional manner despite very reasonable and civilised requests, and Rohan maintained a professional approach when many others would have lost their rag. After plenty of activity on RJA’s Facebook page and a running commentary on Rohan’s blog the dispute went viral, with people around the globe pitching in. Thankfully the matter now appears resolved and Rohan has been paid, but not before it all got rather messy and legal action threatened. I shall never cease to be amazed by the vast disparities of opinion you come across when a photograph has been stolen. Photographers generally have a basic level of understanding of copyright law, and appreciate that if someone steals their image without consent and payment, it becomes very difficult for any professional photographer to make a living. It follows that most photographers do something about it, if only by firing off a quick

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064 BE THE BEST YOU CAN BE

A star shooter’s unmissable advice

email to the infringer. However, when it comes to those who have stolen the image and the views of the general public, the opinions are incredibly diverse. Some people completely side with the photographers and understand copyright. They realise that if intellectual property rights are not protected, we would not have any creative industries because no one would be making a living from them. Think of the likes of Mario Testino, Rankin and David Bailey: if no one paid for their portraits they wouldn’t be where they are today, and they’d have to do something else to pay the bills. However, a large part of society seems to think that whilst stealing from a shop is wrong, stealing from a photographer is ok. Steal a chocolate bar from a shop, and the police get involved. Steal a photo, and it’s ok. They think if an image is available through Google it’s free and that photographers should be flattered. Because everything is digital they believe it doesn’t cost the photographer; how wrong could they be! If you are a professional photographer and someone steals one of your images (and let’s be honest, this happens to us all!), respond in a professional manner and always keep your cool. I was once told by one of the senior partners at work “before sending out any letter or email, just ask yourself one question: how would you feel if the content was read out in court?” You never know, the next time you hit send, your email may be read around the globe! QScott Gair is an intellectual property lawyer at Mayo Wynne Baxter and a professional photographer. Send your questions for this column to sgair@mayowynnebaxter.co.uk.

If intellectual property rights are not protected, we would not have any creative industries ”

051 A MARKETING TAIL 058 LOW LIGHT + DSLR = A USP OPPORTUNITY

KAREN MOULE, MARKETING SPECIALIST

Focus on your marketing hether your business is a oneman band or a larger concern, it pays dividends to take time to plan your marketing activity. Start by identifying exactly where you are now and where you want to be 12 months down the line. These goals need to be SMART – Specific, eg. increase income by 25 per cent; Measurable; Achievable; Realistic; and Timed, eg. within 12 months. Next, how are you ‘positioning’ yourself in the market? You aren’t the only photography business in town. Your customers have others to choose from, and this is where developing a niche can really help to position you as a specialist. For example, do you offer a particular type of wedding photography,

W

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BUSINESS MATTERS

START MASTER MARKETING

SHARING

Rounding off his look at the marketing opportunities offered by social networking, Donal Doherty examines the value of sites such as Instagram and Snapchat and explains how to make them work for you WORDS DONAL DOHERTY PICTURES DAVID BEAN & SCOTT RANKIN

n this marketing series I’ve been looking so far at how photographers can make the most prominent social networks, such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube, work for them and their businesses. While these are the tools most are using to reach their audience, a number of other social networks are at your disposal and deserve some consideration when planning your marketing mix. I’m going to round off my look at social media by focusing on these tools and I’m highlighting here how they can help you to drive traffic to your website, gain inspiration and provide a remarkable customer experience.

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Instagram When Facebook acquired the Instagram app for $1 billion in cash and stock in April 2012 it caused many to sit up and take notice. This social networking service enables users to take pictures and videos, edit them with filters and then share them across a variety of social media. Instagram’s feed is designed specifically for visual stimulation and to encourage interaction, and since its launch in October 2010 200 million users have signed up and have shared a total of 20 billion photos. The demographic of users is 68 per cent female,

It took 38 years before 50 million people gained access to radios. It took Instagram a year and a half 052 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 94

who prize imagery, so they are the ideal target client for photographers. Gary Vaynerchuk reflected on Instagram’s success in his book Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook. “It took 38 years before 50 million people gained access to radios,” he says. “It took television 13 years to earn an audience that size. It took Instagram a year and a half.” On Instagram your photos and videos are available to view forever and you can look at all the images posted by scrolling down through your feed. With no rules dictating which of your posts are presented, they all appear in the feeds of every single one of your followers. Drive traffic to your website by putting a link to your site in the bio (the only place you can put a hyperlink on Instagram) and by citing your website in the comments section of all your posts. Make sure to correctly use hashtags to increase the exposure of your posts to new users who will hopefully like, comment on and follow you.

PHOTOGRAPHERS AND BRANDS TO FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM • Zak Shelhamer www.instagram.com/zakshelhamer • Scott Rankin www.instagram.com/othellonine • Laura E Pritchett www.instagram.com/bythebrush • MTV UK www.instagram.com/mtvuk • Rebecca Minkoff www.instagram.com/rebeccaminkoff • Karmaloop www.instagram.com/karmaloop

Snapchat Snapchat has around 30 million active monthly users, with many being in the 18 to 24 age range. The ‘snap’ is the name Snapchat gives to its private message service, which is a derivative of SMS text message and instant messaging applications, and a unique feature is that photos will ‘self-destruct’ ten seconds after they have been viewed, after which they cannot be accessed again. Snapchat turned down a $3 billion buyout offer from Facebook last year, and Mark Zuckerberg and his team clearly recognise the potential for businesses to create a unique personal connection using the app, which is seen as the next step for many brands to get closer to the public. Taco Bell was one of the first major brands to embrace Snapchat, using it to inform fans of the return of the Beefy Crunch Burrito. They also used Twitter by tweeting to their followers that they would be making a secret announcement on Snapchat. This encouraged fans to add Taco Bell on Snapchat and made them feel like a VIP, since only they got the exclusive snap. A New York frozen yoghurt chain also used Snapchat to promote its ‘Snappy New Year’ coupon. They asked their Facebook fans to send out a Snapchat photo of their frozen yoghurt, and in return customers received a money-off voucher. Use Snapchat for your business in the following ways: • Announce competitions • Give a sneak peek of a new product • Send a voucher or discount code • Offer behind the scenes looks • Share a sneak peek of a wedding or portrait shoot • Unveil snippets of videos


DAVID BEAN

IMAGE A member since 2005, David Bean recognises the positives gained from sharing his images on Flickr, and linking to his own website to get his business seen.


ESSENTIAL PRO GEAR REVEALED All the essentials you need to take your videography to the next level

Rollei launches new action camcorder Rollei has launched its first Wi-Fi enabled action camcorder, and the new S-30 is designed to allow the highest quality videos to be captured by action adventurers and viewed by another person in real time. Like the rest of the Rollei range, the S-30 comes equipped with an extensive accessory package including underwater housing, protective casing with tripod mount and many further extras. With 1080p video resolution and a 120° wideangle lens, this action cam is waterproof up to ten metres, shockproof up to three metres, and has a Wi-Fi range of up to ten metres, with live video streaming via an app (for iOS and Android). It’s priced at £149.95 including VAT.

Stabilising support from gyro Shown at the NAB Show in Las Vegas in April, the new G-Rig gyro-stabilised camera system, known as VALOS, is claimed to have the potential to revolutionise the world of filming due to its simplicity and ease of operation. A motor-operated three-axis system that stabilises filming and substantially enhances handheld camera shots, the VALOS does a similar job to the well-

• www.rollei.com

established Steadicam. A highly sensitive sensor detects natural body movement, and this movement information is quickly processed by a microprocessor and passed on to the motors. These motors then move the camera, which is mounted on the system, equally into the opposite direction of the natural movement. This in turn creates a stable horizon, enabling smooth and steady motion pictures. Designed to accommodate cameras up to 6kg, one big advantage is unrestricted movement, allowing tracking shots from the floor to an overhead position to be performed. An app for iOS and Android devices is included and allows easy configuration of the system software. VALOS is priced at €8,900 (excluding VAT and shipping costs).

• www.g-rig.com

Updated Voigtländer 25mm An updated version of the Voigtländer Nokton 25mm Micro Four Thirds Lens, a 50mm equivalent that features an extraordinarily wide maximum aperture of f/0.95 – more than a full stop faster than a very fast f/1.4 – has been announced by distributor Robert White. This revised version features a new aperture control mechanism, which allows the user to choose between ‘clicked’ and stepless operation, a feature that makes it ideal for video/moviemakers, and which is already present on the 17.5mm and 42.5mm versions of this lens. Otherwise unchanged from the previous version, the new optic is a manual-focus lens with an optical formula of 11 elements in eight groups and a ten-bladed iris diaphragm. It’s available now from Robert White, priced at £660 including VAT.

• www.robertwhite.co.uk

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GEAR

All the vital gear you’ll need eed

ESSENTIAL PRO GEAR REVEALED

090 BUYERS’ GUIDE: WIRELESS TRIGGERS In today’s digital age connectivity is everything, and our round-up of flash triggers shows what’s available.

076 HASSELBLAD H5D-50C

Will this new CMOS-based 50-megapixel offering cut the mustard with our reviewer?

087 PROFESSIONAL LOCATION ’PODS We look at threelegged sidekicks to help you out in the field.

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The inclusion of a CMOS sensor is a radical departure from the CCD-based models of previous digital generations 076 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 94


ON TEST:

Hasselblad H5D-50c CMOS Following his recent first look at the new generation of CMOS medium-format cameras, Andy Kruczek has now taken Hasselblad’s H5D-50c for a serious spin. What’s the verdict on this potentially groundbreaking new model? WORDS & PICTURES ANDY KRUCZEK

H5D-50C CMOS SPECIFICATIONS CONTACT www.hasselblad.co.uk PRICE £18,500 plus VAT SENSOR 50-megapixel, 32.9x43.8mm FILE FORMAT Lossless compressed Hasselblad Raw 3FR SHUTTER SPEED RANGE 128secs to 1/800sec ISO SPEED RANGE 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 COLOUR DEFINITION 16 bit FOCUSING Autofocus metering with passive central cross-type sensor, ultra focus digital feedback, instant manual focus override EXPOSURE METERING Spot, centre weighted and centre spot STORAGE OPTIONS CF card type UDMA or tethered to Mac or PC CAPTURE RATE 1.1 seconds per capture HOST CONNECTION TYPE FireWire 800 (IEEE 1394b) VIEW CAMERA COMPATIBILITY Mechanical shutters controlled via flash sync. Electronic from Phocus DIMENSIONS (WXHXD) 153x131x205mm (with HC80mm lens) WEIGHT 2.29kg

t’s January 1981. Duran Duran’s ‘Planet Earth’ tops the charts, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is being aired for the very first time on BBC Two and I’ve just spent £450 on my first medium-format camera, a brand new Mamiya RB67 Pro-S. I really wanted a Hasselblad, but that was another two hundred quid and I was too young and impulsive to wait. If I’m honest, the RB and I never really got on. Thinking back, that reckless purchase probably triggered my long-lasting and often irrational affection for the Hasselblad brand. It was with some excitement therefore that I took up the offer from Mark Witney, Hasselblad’s UK marketing and communications supervisor, to test-drive the company’s new H5D-50c CMOS-based camera. Of course, in the intervening 30 odd years I’d used, and made a living with, a variety of Hasselblads, from

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the 500c to the H4D-40, but this model promised to be somewhat special. The inclusion of a CMOS sensor is a radical departure from the CCD-based models of previous digital generations, and offers the photographer a more ‘35mm-like’ experience, introducing to the medium-format user the advantages of higher ISO capabilities, longer exposures, an extended dynamic range and a host of other features such as live view, low noise and increased battery life. The camera, complete with a 35-90mm lens, duly arrived. In the box is the body, which is presented with the back and the HV90x-II viewfinder attached. Unlike some of Hasselblad’s other offerings, the camera isn’t currently supplied in kit form with a lens. Also in the box is the 7.2VDC 2900mAh lithium-ion battery that forms part of the handgrip, a universal battery charger supplied with a variety of international plugs, a strap, a FireWire 800 cable, numerous dust caps for the body and prism (plus a robust looking metal one to protect the sensor), an introductory brochure, a lens manual and a CD. The latter contains PC and Mac versions of Hasselblad’s capture software, Phocus, and a ‘light’ version of the same software, Phocus Quick, while a comprehensive set of PDF user manuals for the camera and software is also on the disc, although, after inspection, I found that the user manual for the camera appeared not to cover the new features of this latest model. Hopefully this is something that will be addressed in due course. Rounding off the CD contents are a tutorial video, a variety of sample images (shot with 31- and 39-megapixel CCD cameras!) and a plug-in that enables the camera to be used with Adobe Lightroom. Also included with new purchases (though not in my box for obvious reasons) is a fully licensed copy of Adobe Lightroom. Missing features The last thing I found in the box was a note welcoming the owner to their new H5D-50c camera, which listed a number of features not yet available, namely JPEG files, Live Video in Phocus and the ability to use the sensor unit in conjunction with a technical camera. I realise that this is a very early iteration of the camera and am assured by Hasselblad that the missing features will be added in due course, through firmware updates, but I couldn’t help feeling a little miffed. Had I just bought ISSUE 94 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 077


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GEAR

TRAVEL TRIPODS

LIGHTWEIGHT TRAVELLING TRIPODS

Even in this age of super-high ISOs, the tripod remains an essential pro accessory, and those on the move need a combination of light weight and stability. Here’s a selection of products that can do the job for you WORDS IAN FYFE

s a professional photographer your reputation depends on your ability to deliver quality results that are consistently better than those the hobbyist might supply. Part of your remit includes overall sharpness, even when files are blown up to huge sizes, and it’s not always possible to guarantee this side of things if you’re exclusively shooting handheld. Even the tiniest of wobbles will take the edge off your work, so whenever possible you should be working off a tripod, especially when the light levels dip or you’re working inside. Obviously there’s no such thing as one tripod that will do every job. The studio environment, for example, might call for a

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sturdy model that can accommodate the heaviest of cameras. If you’re on the road on a regular basis, you need something that’s more lightweight, that can be packed in your gadget bag and takes up minimal space. Even here there is a multitude of choices, and you can go with something that’s beautifully engineered and comes with a guarantee of a lifetime of service, or you could look for something more entry level to simply provide that extra touch of stability when used at low level, perhaps off the surface of a table. It’s a personal choice that revolves around your individual requirements. The key is to choose your tripod carefully. Carbon fibre is popular with professionals because it’s light and strong, but if you’re going

for a small size, aluminium might be light enough and will cost you much less. Match your tripod to your kit too – if you’re using a Nikon D800 or similar, you’ll need something very sturdy, but if you’re using a CSC, perhaps for reportage wedding coverage, there’s no need to go overboard with your support. The same applies to the head – ball heads are generally best because they’re more compact, but a very solid one can easily double the weight of the tripod, so avoid one that’s bigger than necessary. With all of that in mind, here’s a selection of some of the latest tripods for regular location work, from the smallest and lightest to the biggest you’d consider carrying with you.

3 LEGGED THING ERIC EVOLUTION 2

BENRO C1692TBO + B0 HEAD

STREET PRICE £299 legs only, £379 with Airhed 1

STREET PRICE £410 with B0 head

CONTACT www.3leggedthing.com KEY FEATURES Carbon fibre, four leg sections, reversible three-section centre column, zip-off leg muff, detachable monopod WHAT’S IN THE BOX Bag, carry strap, tools, spring ballast hook

CONTACT www.kenro.co.uk KEY FEATURES Carbon fibre, five leg sections, handgrip, one leg can be detached and combined with the centre column for a monopod, ballast hook

WEIGHT 1.36kg (legs)

WHAT’S IN THE BOX Bag with shoulder strap, tools, rubber/stainless steel spiked feet, wooden knob with built-in compass

LOAD CAPACITY 8kg

WEIGHT 1.49kg (legs)

FOLDED LENGTH 50cm

LOAD CAPACITY 8kg

MINIMUM HEIGHT 13cm

FOLDED LENGTH 40cm

MAXIMUM HEIGHT 210cm (centre column fully extended)

MINIMUM HEIGHT 40cm

This very versatile tripod is at the top end in terms of size for toting around town and, in this selection of pods, also in price. However, it is an excellent product made from 8 Core Stealth carbon fibre and looks great too. Stability is impressive even when fully extended so perfect for those challenging days when there’s a bit of a breeze. Handling is very good too. The twist grip legs are quick to use and lock securely with minimal effort. Speaking of legs, one of them detaches to give an instant monopod.

The Benro Travel Angel 2 Transformerr series is available in aluminium and carbon fibre. The C1692TB0 is made from eight layer, high density carbon fibre, hence its hefty price tag, with magnesium alloy fittings. The Angel 2 kits come with a matching Benro ball head and here you get the B0, a precision unit that accepts Arca Swiss plates. Legs are locked in place with rubberised twist grips and these are rust and water-resistant. Feet can be stainless steel or rubber and both are supplied as standard.

MAXIMUM HEIGHT 156cm

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Photo Professional Magazine - Issue 94