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NO.1 PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR WORKING PROFESSIONAL

THIS TIME, IT'S PERSONAL

Why you should shoot projects

STUDIO PORTRAIT LIGHTING MASTERCLASS

Editorial photographer reveals shadowy secrets

ISSUE 93 £4.50 www.photopromagazine.com

PRO REVIEW

Nikon D4S Faster, sharper, more sensitive. Better?

MAKE MONEY WHILE YOU'RE ON HOLIDAY GENERATE INCOME THROUGH FINE ART MUST-HAVE MEDIA TO MAKE YOUR SHOTS MARVELLOUS

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H tturning How i to t video id could help you make some serious money

Essential tips to

GET MORE WORK How to build your brand and stay ahead of competitors

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CONTENTS SAVE 45% ISSUE 93

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006 INBOX

016

From the hottest launches to the top competition winners, we’ve got every bit of news you need to read.

016 PORTFOLIO: HEATHER BUCKLEY

Photographer and digital marketing guru, Heather Buckley walks the streets and talks the digital talk.

024 PROJECT: D-DAY

70 years after the Allied Forces landed on the beaches of France, a book and exhibition commemorate their bravery and document their stories. 024

Pro Academy

032 LIGHTING MASTERCLASS

COVER It’s a real balancing act, getting light and shade, shadows and highlights right in studio portraiture – an act that Mark Harrison has clearly mastered.

040 ON THE ROAD AGAIN

COVER Pack up your camera in your old kitbag and market, market, market to profit from travel shots, says Steve Davey.

047 IT’S PERSONAL

COVER Boost your creativity (and profitability) with inventive, personal projects, just like Gary Lashmar does.

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Business Matters

053 BUSINESS MATTERS

From a to z, we’ve got every aspect of running a profitable business covered.

056 MASTER MARKETING

COVER Follow Donal Doherty’s advice and become a YouTube sensation – you and your business will be a sure-fire hit.

060 A QUESTION OF STYLE

COVER Are you a follower of fashion? Don’t be. Buck the trend and ignore the fads to shoot enduring wedding photos.

066 STARTING OUT

COVER There’s no better way to begin in business than with helpful hints from a success story, so read Brett Florens’s new series and get business savvy.

072 FINE ART SALES

COVER Present your personal vision perfectly for a profitable production.

Gear

080 NIKON D4S

COVER Its ISO range runs into six figures, but is the Nikon D4S worth its four-figure price tag, ponders Adam Duckworth.

088 INTERFIT PRO-FLASH

If you’re in the market for an off-camera flash kit, the Pro-Flash One Eighty might just fit the bill.

090 CANON PIXMA IP8750

For quick, quiet efficiency from an A3+ printer, try the inconspicuous iP8750.

092 BUYERS’ GUIDE

COVER Our pick of the latest papers and inks for the discerning photographer.

114 NEXT ISSUE

Take the plunge! With high-speed action, marketing tips and wedding workshops, plus the Hasselblad CMOS kit in use.

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PORTFOLIO | HEATHER BUCKLEY

to the Heather Buckley takes inspiration from everything around her, but although it’s her street photography that got her noticed, she’s equally at home focusing on digital marketing methods for photographers WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES HEATHER BUCKLEY

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PORTFOLIO | HEATHER BUCKLEY

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

Age is taking its toll, and each year the number of veterans returning to France for D-Day commemorations is falling. As the 70th anniversary approaches Robin Savage was determined to mark this special occasion WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES ROBIN SAVAGE

William Bray at Drop Zone N, Ranville. This shot was taken on 6 June 2013, exactly 69 years after William jumped into this field on D-Day.

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A B S O L U T E

PHOTO I LOVE THE CONTENT OF THIS MAGAZINE! SNOWBASIC, 21 JAN - CANADA

It’s perfectly suited to the iPad with lots of interesting photography features and videos to explore KEVEALING, 10 JAN - UK

Amazing images and interactivity with great videos also. Great stuff! LEDLEY26, 19 DEC – UK

I love the multimedia format with print, video and sound ROSIEBARCELONA, 30 DEC - USA

Find out why people are talking about Absolute Photo magazine.

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PRO ACADEMY

ESSENTIAL PRO SECRETS REVEALED

Providing you with the essential skills, techniques and ideas you need to make it as a successful professional photographer

032 LIGHTING MASTERCLASS It’s a balancing act, getting light and shade, shadows and highlights right in studio portraits – Mark Harrison has mastered it.

040 ON THE ROAD Marketing is key to profiting from travel shots.

047 THIS TIME IT’S PERSONAL Boost your creativity with inventive shoots. ISSUE 93 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 031

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PRO ACADEMY

THE BALANCE LIGHTING MASTERCLASS

OF POWER Successful studio portrait lighting is all about achieving a careful balance between light and shade, shadow and highlight, and Mark Harrison is a master of his trade and expert at creating the look he wants in-camera WORDS CHRISTIAN HOUGH

ike so many other successful photographers, Mark Harrison’s interest in the craft started young, his inspiration coming from his father’s fascination with the darkroom as he grew up in suburban Surrey. After a period where he produced prints of local actors for their Spotlight promo book, Mark had the opportunity to help out in the studio of a top fashion photographer, and it was this experience that motivated him to consider a career in photography. While studying for a degree in art and design at West Surrey College of Art and Design in Farnham (now UCA) he built up a portfolio of portraits of famous authors, and following his graduation commissions started to arrive from the likes of BLITZ magazine and The Independent magazine, and he also started to work regularly for the Sunday Telegraph’s 7 Days TV supplement. Some 25 years on, he’s

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PICTURES MARK HARRISON

still shooting editorial, with a bit of advertising, corporate and film and TV work, and his work is held in such regard that last year the National Portrait Gallery acquired several of his images for its permanent collection.

There are some great shots here

CH Mark. Tell me more about them.

MH They were taken on three different commissions, two of them from The Times Magazine, and the other, of Professor Brian Cox, for the Radio Times. I’m one of their regular photographers and often shoot covers for them. What planning went into the Brian

CH Cox shoot?

MH The idea was to try and capture the personality of Professor Cox whilst telling a story with the picture. It would have been very easy to sit him down and shoot a static portrait, but the image of many of these

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PRO ACADEMY

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BUSINESS MATTERS 060 STAND THE TEST OF TIME

056 BE A YOUTUBE SENSATION

How movies will boost your profile Follow fashion or keep your own?

SCOTT GAIR, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAWYER

Limiting your liability with commercial property uying or leasing a commercial property can be an extremely expensive exercise, and it’s important not to get caught out by common traps. There are so many ways to limit your liability when acquiring a commercial property that I cannot list them all here, but here are some relatively easy steps you can take which could save you thousands of pounds. Tax advice: If you’re buying or leasing a property, get advice from an accountant before doing so. Buying a property in your own name is not necessarily tax-efficient, and a decent accountant will give you advice to mitigate potential tax liabilities, be it VAT, stamp duty or capital gains to name but a few. The tax savings you could make with your accountant could more than cover their fee! Repairing liabilities: If you’re leasing a property, tenants are usually required by the terms of the lease to fully maintain and repair it. This means that irrespective of the state of repair of the premises when you move in, you will be obliged to put and keep the premises in good repair and condition. If the property is in a poor state at the outset it could cost you a small fortune to put it in to full repair. One way to reduce your repairing liabilities would be to limit your repairing obligations by reference to a schedule of condition. A schedule of condition is a series of photographs that will be annexed to the back of the lease, detailing the state of repair of the premises at the commencement of the lease period. The lease terms would need to be

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amended to make it clear that your obligation to repair only obliges you to keep the property in no worse a state of repair than it was in at the start of the term. If it is in poor repair, you will not need to put it in to full repair. Personal liability: If you are going to lease a property, the landlord will want to know in whose name the lease will be under. Inexperienced tenants may offer to take the lease in their own personal name, but if you do this then you will have assumed personal liability for all sums due to the landlord. If you are struggling to pay the rent and fall into arrears, the landlord can sue you personally, issue bankruptcy proceedings, ask the court for a charge over your own home or, worst case scenario, ask the court for an order for your property to be sold if you do not pay up. One way to avoid this is to take the lease in the name of a limited company. It is very easy to set up an ‘off the shelf’ company. The advantage of this is that the company will assume responsibility, and you will not be personally responsible for the debts of the company (save in very limited circumstances). The landlord may want added security in the form of a rent deposit, but in my view that is often much more preferable than putting your own house at risk. Make sure you take independent professional advice before walking in to the minefield that is commercial property. Failure to take professional advice at the outset could leave you in the hurt locker, so don’t let that be you. QScott Gair is an intellectual property lawyer at Mayo Wynne Baxter and a professional photographer. Send your questions for this column to sgair@mayowynnebaxter.co.uk.

One way to reduce your repairing liabilities would be to limit your repairing obligations ”

066 START A SUCCESSFUL PHOTOGRAPHY BUSINESS 072 SELLING FINE ART

ZACH PREZ, INTERNET MARKETING GURU AND CREATOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY SPARK

How to create great email newsletters s Facebook business pages approach zero reach, the need for email marketing has never been higher for photography studios. An email newsletter offers the perfect way to continuously brand your business and trigger quick sales when you need them. What’s inside an email drives whether or not people open and engage, or simply ignore it. Your challenge will be to interest the reader while driving sales. Achieve this by including the following five elements in every email. • Examples of your work: Emails should showcase your best work, not simply your most recent work, in a wide variety of themes. • Personality: Use your unique personality to attract the customers you want. Be personal, be conversational, and use your headshot. • Expertise: Talk about your knowledge of photography. It showcases your expertise. • Educational information: An email about photo tips, ideas for posing, or what to wear is much more relevant to a reader than ‘Zach and Amber’s wedding photos’ that you posted last week. It makes them want to open your next email for more advice.

A

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BUSINESS MATTERS

STYLE OR BUCK THE TREND

SUBSTANCE? As a wedding photographer, your images are documenting an important family event and, as Mark Archibald suggests, they need to have the staying power to still be doing their job years down the line WORDS & PICTURES MARK ARCHIBALD

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GEAR

ESSENTIAL PRO GEAR REVEALED

All the vital gear you’ll need eed to be a successful professional photographer

092 BUYERS’ GUIDE: FINE ART INKJET PAPERS & INKS Our pick of the latest media for the discerning photographer.

080 NIKON D4S

Its ISO range runs into six figures, but is the Nikon D4S worth its four-figure price tag?

090 CANON PIXMA IP8750

For quick, quiet efficiency from an A3+ printer, try the inconspicuous PIXMA iP8750.

088 INTERFIT PRO-FLASH

If you’re in the market for an offcamera flash kit, the One Eighty might just fit the bill. ISSUE 93 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 079

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ON TEST:

Nikon D4S

Nikon has taken its flagship professional DSLR and added some scintillating new features, including a mind-blowing top ISO speed of over 400,000, but is the new D4S really worth breaking the bank for? WORDS & PICTURES ADAM DUCKWORTH

NIKON D4S SPECIFICATIONS CONTACT www.nikon.co.uk PRICE £5199 RESOLUTION 16.2 megapixels SENSOR Full-frame CMOS with EXPEED 4 processor LENS MOUNT Nikon F EXPOSURE MODES Program, shutter-priority, aperture-priority, manual FRAMES PER SECOND Up to 11

f you want a camera that’s the ultimate in creating low-light images with minimum noise, then there’s a new king of darkness. It’s the mammoth-sized Nikon D4S that comes with a ridiculously high ISO of 409,600. Yes, you read that right. That’s a full 12 stops more sensitive than the camera offers at its base ISO of 100. To put that in some sort of context, if your exposure is half a second at f/16 at ISO 100, then to get the same exposure at maximum ISO you’d need to be cranking in 1/8000sec – the camera’s maximum shutter speed. Of course, huge ISO numbers are largely academic, as the vast majority of pro work is done between ISO 100 and 6400. But with a camera as sensitive as the D4S, it means those lower settings give cleaner files than on just about any other camera. Compared to the previous low-light king and the camera it replaces, the two-year-old Nikon D4, then the

I

D4S is a step ahead. Up to ISO 400 it’s incredibly hard to tell any difference. But as the ISO creeps up to 800, 1600 and 3200, then the D4S gives cleaner images with less noise in the shadow areas. Nikon boldly claims the camera could be up to a stop better or even more, but our test proves this might be a bit optimistic. A third of a stop better at ISO 800 and up to two thirds of a stop better at ISO 6400 and beyond is a more reasonable advantage. Either way, if you want detail in low-light pictures, such as night-time sports photographers wanting to keep a fast shutter speed, wedding workers balancing with low ambient light or photojournalists, then the D4S is the new king of darkness. One unusual characteristic was that at the matching ISO, the D4S was up to a third of a stop more sensitive than a D4. In other words, ISO 500 on the D4 was about the same as ISO 400 on the new D4S. So if you are working with a pair of cameras – a D4 and a D4S like we used – then the exposure may not be the same on both of them. A tweaked metering system on the D4S b

ISO RANGE 100-25,600 (expandable 50-409,600) LCD SCREEN 3.2in with 921,000 dots SHUTTER SPEED RANGE 30secs – 1/8000sec STORAGE MEDIA Dual slots, XQD and CF DIMENSIONS (WXHXD) 160x157x91mm WEIGHT 1350g (including battery)

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ON TEST:

Interfit Pro-Flash One Eighty The ability to work with off-camera flash is a must for professional photographers these days and units like the new Interfit Pro-Flash One Eighty offer power, userfriendly features and the benefit of a supporting system WORDS WILL CHEUNG

SPECIFICATIONS PRICE Pro-Flash One Eighty kit £350, head only £285; optional Pro-Flash power pack with battery £125, USB Radio Trigger set £40, beauty dish with honeycomb grid £50 WHAT’S IN THE BOX Head, flash tube, standard reflector, power pack, charger, soft bag, pack to flash lead

ff-camera flash photography used to be comparatively rare, but that has changed completely with the immediacy of digital capture. Also, as the creative world seeks p more and more imaginative ways to use flash, so the makers have strived for new and innovative methods to deliver light. The Interfit Pro-Flash is a battery-operated unit fitted with a hotshoe and it is manual control only. With the hotshoe fitting it is possible to fit it on the camera

O

GUIDE NUMBER 60 (ISO 100/metres) MAXIMUM POWER 180 watt/seconds COVERAGE REFLECTOR To suit a 28mm lens with the standard POWER SUPPLY Pro-Flash battery pack RECYCLING TIME 0.05sec-2.6secs FLASH DURATION 1/800-1/10,000sec OUTPUT CONTROL Full power to 1/128th power in 1/3EV steps FEATURES Focus assist beam

ABOVE The optional Trigger set costs £40, but doesn’t work with high-speed sync mode.

although given its bulk it better suits mounting on a lighting stand. The gun is powered by a separate lithium battery pack which gives an enormous capacity, with up to 900 p flash flashes in full power and obviously a great many more at output settings. With fractional outputs down the lower l to 1/ 1/128th, this could mean you shooting thousands of shots before you need to recharge. Usefully, optional shot leads allow Canon or Nikon speedlights to be powered by lead this battery pack. Out O of the box, the first thing you have to do is insert tube/protective glass cover assembly into the the flash f head. Now you have a bare bulb flash which you can head modify. The supplied reflector locks into position. mod T basic reflector has a shiny dimpled finish for The maximum light efficiency – for example, when you’re max usin using the flash bounced into a brolly or off the ceiling. However, you may prefer to diffuse output and you can How do th this with the supplied translucent piece of plastic. The T One Eighty system offers other modifiers inclu including a 45cm octa/softbox that is quick to set up and comes with an optional cloth honeycomb grid. Ther There’s also a 30cm beauty dish, with its own cloth honeycomb grid too. hone T Triggering the Pro-Flash can be done via its hotshoe, with a sync cable, with a suitable trigger/receiver or using the optional o Pro-Flash Trigger set which costs £40. The trigger set has a receiver that plugs into the flashgun’s trigg USB socket and then the transmitter is used to fire the flash and to wirelessly adjust power output. One O feature lacking in the Pro Trigger set is the ability use the One Eighty in its high-speed sync mode. Use to us Pock PocketWizards, however, and that feature is available.

FLASH MODES Manual, two slave modes, high-speed sync triggering, stroboscopic flash OUTPUT COLOUR TEMPERATURE 5600K ±200K over entire power range, overheat protection function, audible recharge beep WEIGHT 2.04kg (complete kit)

ABOVE The supplied basic reflector has a shiny dimpled finish, but other optional modifiers come with honeycomb grids.

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With fractional outputs down to 1/128th, this could mean you shooting thousands of shots before you need to recharge

In terms of output, I used a Gossen DigiSky to measure output from a One Eighty with its basic reflector without a diffuser. At two metres, full power gave f/16 at ISO 100. Adding the softbox, the same setting and distance produced f/8; easily enough for portrait shoots.

Verdict

ABOVE The One Eighty offers plenty of power, which is controllable from full power down to 1/128th in 1/3EV steps.

There’s much to like about the Interfit Pro-Flash One Eighty. It puts plenty of power at your disposal, offers fast recycling even when used at full power and the lithium battery provides tremendous capacity. It also has a handy system of modifiers and, with the appropriate trigger, there’s even the option of high-speed flash sync. The complete kit costs £350 and for that you get the flash, battery and the basic reflector. While that amount of cash can buy you a decent speedlight with plenty of automation and dedication, the One Eighty lets you take full control and that is very much a good thing, so this unit is highly recommended. MORE INFORMATION

www.interfitphotographic.com

With the reflector, at two metres, full power gave f/16 at ISO 100.

RATING FEATURES ....................................................................8/10 PERFORMANCE ....................................................9/10 HANDLING...................................................................8/10 VALUE FOR MONEY ..................................8.5/10

Overall Rating

8.5

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