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EDITO R ’ S LETTER

WELCOME

BELOW: Seeing how

both came back confirming they were free and how delighted they would be to get involved. There was a booking form attached too, along with details of costings and payment schedule; polite, professional and just right. Ultimately, we left the final choice to the bride and groom, but when the day came, their choice was the perfect gentleman. He engaged with the guests, took on people’s ideas and had people talking about him (in a good way) long after he’d left. It was a masterclass on how to handle a wedding from start to finish and it left me thinking that gaining this valuable insight, whether as a client or an assistant is something every professional should do. Often. Enjoy the issue.

Editorial director Roger Payne

R O G E R P AY N E @ B R I G H T- P U B L I S H I N G . C O M @ R O G P AY N E © BRETT FLORENS

other pros work can only help you improve the way you do, especially when it comes to a wedding

Last week, our son got married. It was a beautiful day in a stunning location and, I’m pleased to say, it all went without a hitch. The bride turned up and everything. When our son and my now daughter-in-law announced their engagement, my wife and I offered to organise and pay for the photographer; there was no way that I was going to experience the day through a viewfinder, so had quickly admonished myself of any chance of being the official snapper. But what it did mean was that I was able to experience the other side of the coin when it comes to choosing a wedding photographer; the process clients go through. It was fascinating. Almost immediately, we set ourselves a budget and then asked friends and colleagues if they recommended anyone. With suggestions bagged, we hit the various photographers’ websites and looked at their style of work, knowing that the bride and groom wanted to go for a more contemporary, unposed approach. Then, with a shortlist of two, contacted them both to check availability for the big day. First contact is always crucial and the two photographers certainly knew the importance of this initial approach. Within hours of sending the email, they

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© BRETT FLORENS

C O NT E NTS

EDITORIAL Editorial director Roger Payne 01223 492244 rogerpayne@bright-publishing.com Deputy editor Lisa Clatworthy Contributing editor Terry Hope Features writer Jemma Dodd Sub editors Catherine Brodie & Siobhan Godwood Contributors Adam Duckworth, Will Cheung, Richard Gunn

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ADVERTISING Sales director Matt Snow 01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Mike Elliott 01223 499458 mikeelliott@bright-publishing.com Advertising manager Krishan Parmar 01223 499462 krishanparmar@bright-publishing.com

DESIGN Design director Andy Jennings Senior designer Mark George Designer Emily Stowe Ad production Lucy Woolcomb

WEB Digital development manager Ashley Norton Interactive designer Will Woodgate

PUBLISHING Managing directors Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck Head of circulation Chris Haslum

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Professional Photo is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Professional Photo is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Professional Photo that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. While Bright Publishing makes every effort to ensure accuracy, it can’t be guaranteed. Street pricing at the time of writing is quoted for products.

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C O NTENTS

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UPF RONT

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RI CHARD SEYMOU R

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COVER WORRY-F REE W EDDI NG S

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PROJECT

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A majestic collection of awardwinning, grant-winning and ear-splitting images Inside the creative mind of this superb commercial photographer We explain hassle-free ways to edit your wedding shoot from thousands to hundreds of shots How Jack Terry’s personal project has turned into an excellent marketing tool Top tips to get more eyes looking at your photography website As the 2016 shortlist is announced, we speak to those who are (and aren’t) on it

COVER PHOTOKINA 2016 Show-stealing Fujifilm GFX previewed, plus all the important pro-related launches

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L I GHT I NG SECRETS

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COVER CANON EOS 5 D M K I V

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BUYERS’ GUIDE; PRESENTATION

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T HE STORY BEHI ND

How one man balances a busy life with a growing wedding business The secrets of shooting shiny objects revealed! Canon EOS 5D MkIII owner Richard Gunn decides whether he should upgrade A test of add-ons designed to make your life easier Need prints to hang on a wall? These companies can help… Jayne Mansfield! In the bath!

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OP ENI NG SH OT

DRUM ROLL PLEASE It can be tough getting a clear shot of a drummer when they’re at the back of the stage. Photographer Deirdre O’Callaghan’s latest project puts them front and centre DEIRDRE O’CALL AGHAN

JEMMA DODD

Deirdre O’Callaghan has built a career uniting her passions for music and photography and her new book, The Drum Thing, combines the two perfectly. “As a photographer, I love watching a drummer perform – the sheer physicality of playing this kind of instrument. To me drumming is almost like a dance, and the idea of capturing this energy and rhythm really appealed to me,” Deidre begins. “I am always working on different personal projects and really felt that this project encompassed a lot of different things that I’m passionate about. “I chose to include Julie Edwards of Deap Vally as I like her originality as a player. For such a mild-mannered person she is a very energetic and dynamic drummer. We had a chat before the shoot to work out a few ideas regarding the location as her studio is in a different area to her house. It was very important to me that every shot in the book was taken in the most personal space to each drummer,” Deidre tell us. “It was a very relaxed and fun shoot with Julie, this shot was taken where her kit was set up. I shot with a Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III with a 50mm f/1.4 lens and for lighting used two Profoto battery packs and three heads.”

PRESTEL.COM DEIRDREOC ALL AGHAN.CO.UK The Drum Thing is priced at £35. There will be a free to attend book launch at The Photographer’s Gallery Bookshop, in London, 20 October, 6-8pm where Deidre will be signing copies of the book.

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PROFOLIO RICHARD SEYMOUR

RICHARD SEYMOUR TERRY HOPE

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Richard Seymour has always had photography in his blood and is continually looking out for the next challenge, exploring not just conventional imagery but also cutting-edge technology like CGI and VR

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PROFOLIO RICHARD SEYMOUR

@PHOTOPROUK

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T EC HNIQUE

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Wedding something

T EC HNIQUE

THE FINAL COUNTDOWN Wedding photographer Brett Florens takes you through his post-production workflow – from around 1500 shots to a completed album BRETT FLORENS

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n my opinion, post-production doesn’t start when one gets back to the studio – it is part of the process from your first press of the shutter. I shoot with intent. I paid my dues shooting film where every image counted and overshooting ate into my profit. I still believe that shooting too much is detrimental, not only to your profit margin, but to your final product. Carefully constructing images and shooting with the album in mind has enabled me to work a system that is reliable and efficient. As I am shooting I have a clear idea of how the final album is going to look and where certain images are intended to feature. This does come with practice and the best way to train yourself to think this way is to ask yourself: how will this image fit into the story; what is going on the other side of the page; or diagonally opposite the image? Once you’ve shot four portraits of the scene, you will now need a landscape for a double-page spread – and so on. This kind of thinking will get you to a point where choosing the images at the post-production stage is about selecting the best shot. Once I have downloaded the images onto my backup drive, I rename them. I then back up the renamed Raw images to another hard drive. Now it’s time to choose. I understand the temptation to let clients choose their images, but I shot with a very clear vision of what the album will look like. This is a method that I have clearly communicated to my client. I choose the images – it’s as simple as that.

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Before you begin to compile the album, focus on social media. The first images I choose are for social media. If the wedding was on a Saturday, I blog around 15 images on the Monday morning. These images are picked carefully to fulfil certain people’s emotional expectations. These would be parents, grandparents, friends and obviously the bride and groom. I outsource my post-production and pre-book Monday morning to process the 15 images. I upload those to Dropbox and get going on the copy for the blog. Best of the best Now because I have shot the wedding with a preconceived idea of what the final product will look like, I really only need to choose the best image of each segment. I also need to choose images specifically for other vendors that were a part of the wedding. Marketing my brand to the trade is a fundamental part of my business and shooting images for other vendors to use in their marketing is also part of my thought process when shooting the wedding. The client may not ever see these images as they are not shot for the album. There are a few programmes that you could use to catalogue or label images, such as Photo Mechanic, Adobe Bridge or Adobe Lightroom. I use Adobe Bridge because my choosing system isn’t very complicated. I use the coloured labelling system to label the chosen images. My code is Red for images that are going to be processed as colour images. Yellow-labelled images are to be used in composite images, and I also assign a single star to the main image to be used in the composite. Green-labelled images

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PRO J E C T

AN INSIDE JOB JACK TERRY

LIS A CL AT WORTHY

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What began as a personal project has turned out to be a whole lot more than that… ABSOLUTEPHOTO.COM


T HE I ND U STRY

THIS PAGE (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEF T): Sarah

Williams, art buyer/M&C Saatchi. Dave Bounaguidi, chief creative officer/CP&B London. Farid Haddad, model agent/BMA Models. Tanja Adams, producer and art buyer/Another Production. Lisa Pritchard, photographers agent/LPA. Stu Minshaw, art director & Rob Syme, copy writer/ Integer

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© KOVI KONOWIECKI

INSPIRED

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THE HOLY GRAIL

TAYLOR WESSING PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT PRIZE VA R I O U S

L I S A C L AT W O R T H Y

For many photographers it’s the competition to enter. We talk to this year’s lucky shortlisted photographers, and the not so lucky here’s always a frisson of excitement surrounding the Photographic Portrait Prize. I only became aware of it when I started working on photography magazines a decade or so ago, back when it was still the Schweppes prize. I knew it was a big deal by the frenzied discussion that greeted the press release announcing the winners shortlist. From that day, I’ve been swept up in the hubbub and try to go to the exhibition each year. And this year is no different; the opening date is already in my diary (17 November). I also know that my enthusiasm for this particular competition is shared by photographers around the globe. Many of them enter every year, but few are selected. This year, for example, the odds of being chosen for the exhibition was 1 in 74. And from the 58 images included in the exhibition, just four are on the winning shortlist: two shots of a group of Israeli Orthodox Jews, a print of a Johannesburg schoolboy and a tintype of a Californian surfer and his girlfriend. So who took them and why did they enter them?

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@PHOTOPROUK

Shimi, and Tilly and Itty Kovi Konowiecki is the photographer behind the shots of Shimi (opposite) and Tilly and Itty (overleaf). The two images are taken from a large project photographing the same extended family of Israeli Orthodox Jews around the world and choosing which to submit was no easy decision, says the American photographer from his Californian home. “I feel a strong connection to quite a few of them, visually and to the stories behind them,” Kovi says of the images in his series. “Given that I wanted to choose the ones that related to people in the most universal way and also the ones that I felt told the strongest story – the story that I was trying to tell with the series – it was a very difficult process. At the end of the day, the story kinda made my decision.” Having selected his images, it still wasn’t an easy process. “I don’t know if complicated is the right word, but Taylor Wessing is one of the few competitions where the print you’re submitting is the work that’s being evaluated, so I wanted to make sure it was exactly how I wanted it.”

Currently working on the final project for his Master of Arts degree from the University of Arts in London, Kovi works between documentary and fine art. This was his first submission to the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, after being encouraged by his university tutors to ‘get his work out there’. He’d visited last year’s exhibition and remembers “walking through and telling myself, wow, this is a huge goal to be part of this exhibition. That was always in the back of my mind throughout my masters,” he says. “I knew I wanted to submit something and I didn’t know what. And then obviously after the project, shooting these Orthodox Jews for a large part of the year, it just felt right, that I was ready.” And he obviously was as he’s been shortlisted. Exhilarated to find himself one of the final three, Kovi plans to be back in the UK in November to see the exhibition, as well as hand in his final project. It’s not his first competition success. One of his portraits was selected in the Portrait of Britain too. He’s pragmatic about entering competitions: “I think the most

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30/09/2016 16:33


K I T NEWS

PHOTOK I NA SP EC I A L

THE GRE ATE S T SHOW ON EARTH Masses of new exciting products to touch and try over multiple halls of stunning stands? Will Cheung is our kid in a candy shop at the biennial Photokina

WILL CHEUNG For gear nuts like me, Photokina is heaven. The show, which takes place in Cologne every second September, is an event that photographic manufacturers earmark as one to launch new gear and, as such, has borne witness to some seminal product announcements over the years.

@PHOTOPROUK

With today’s rumour-laden Internet, it’s hard to keep new products entirely under wraps prior to the show. Some manufacturers, Canon included, made their key announcements in the weeks running up to the event, but there were others that kept their powder dry and used the show as a launch platform. What follows here are selected highlights of the announcements that

were made either prior to the event or at the show itself. With 983 exhibitors and 191,000 visitors this year, it was impossible to get round everything in the couple of days I had there, but one thing is for certain - there are some very exciting new products arriving in the coming months, with professional users particularly well catered for.

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K I T NEWS

FUJIFILM GFX 50S Few could deny that Fujifilm stole the show this year with the announcement of the medium-format GFX system. The first camera in the range - the GFX 50S - isn’t going to be available until early 2017, with March being the best guess right now, but it will be joined initially by three lenses. Customer demand, and the recognition that APS-C and 35mm formats have their limitations, are the motivations behind the new system. The GFX is based around a 43.8x32.9mm sensor and the GFX 50S will feature a low-pass filter free 51.4-megapixel sensor. The sensor does not use the X-Trans technology found in most X-series models - Fujifilm claims

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this isn’t required when you’re dealing with a chip of these dimensions - but it will offer additional ratios over and above the default 4:3. These include 1:1, 4:5, 6:7 and even 6:17. Processing is handled by the X-Processor Pro engine already seen in the X-Pro2 and X-T2. The body design , with the top-plate’s lockable shutter and ISO speed dials, has a familiar look to the company’s X-series. The rear LCD is adjustable, with functionality similar to the X-T2’s, including the ability to swing out for comfortable low-level or upright shooting. An optional Vertical Battery Grip will also be available, plus the GFX 50S will support tethered shooting. To keep size and weight down an EVF that sits in the hotshoe is removable

so you can use the monitor on its own, plug in an external monitor or buy the optional tilt monitor that can be set for waist-level or low viewpoint shooting. The body is weather and dust resistant, and the shutter is designed to be quiet with minimal ‘shutter shock’ vibration.

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PHOTOK I NA SP EC I A L

IMAGES: Show-

stealer, the Fujifilm GFX 50S mediumformat camera

A lens road map was also announced, the plan being to have six lenses available by the end of 2017. Three lenses will be launched with the camera, the GF63mm f/2.8 R WR, the GF120mm f/4 Macro R LM OIS WR and the GF3264mm f/4 R LM WR offering 50mm, 95mm and 25-51mm equivalents in 35mm terms. A GF110mm f/2 R LM WR (87mm equivalent), GF23mm f/4 R LM WR (18mm) and GF45mm f/2.8 R LM WR (35mm) are expected to follow during 2017. As these lenses use the same naming conventions as XF lenses, we can see that all will feature aperture rings (denoted by R) and weatherresistance (WR). Linear motors (LM) for fast and quiet autofocusing feature in all but the 63mm, plus the macro lens will benefit from stabilisation (OIS). At this stage, more detailed spec for the GFX 50S was not available but the headline features are impressive. The price could be too – it is going to be ‘well under US$10,000’ for the body and 63mm lens. How that translates to the UK come launch time we will have to wait and see, but for quality conscious professionals, the GFX system is likely to be a compelling option.

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HANDS ON WITH THE FUJIFILM GF X 50S Pre-production samples were available at the launch to handle but not to shoot with. The GFX 50S body feels solid and while the contoured handgrip is large, it allows a secure and comfortable hold. The buttons and controls had a robustness which inspired confidence, too. The removable EVF concept works well and the optional tilt monitor is a very neat piece of design that will appeal to many photographers. The body with the standard zoom didn’t feel much heavier than a full-frame DSLR with an f/2.8 standard zoom, and I think I could carry and use the combination for extended periods with no problem. Of course, image quality is key, and untested, but if it matches the handling, and the GFX 50S’s price is competitive, then medium-format photography the Fujifilm way is a very real possibility.

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Set for arrival in the first half of 2017, the Panasonic Lumix GH5 1 is the first compact system camera to offer 4K video recording at 60p and 4:2:2 10-bit 4K video. It will also be the first Panasonic model to have 6K Photo; an 18-megapixel still image lifted from video footage. Hasselblad continued its 75th anniversary celebrations with the launch of the X1D 2 ‘4116 edition’ and V1D 4116 concept 3 . The special X1D is all-black and comes with an extended warranty, leather hand strap and XCD 45mm lens in a unique box, while the V1D is a modular concept designed to explore future camera design. Nikon added to its KeyMission range of action cams with the KeyMission 80 4 and the KeyMission 170 5 . The shock- and waterproof KeyMission 170 has a 170° wide view and it can record 4K UHD video. The KeyMission 80 is an ultra-slim, wearable camera. It features a main 4.5mm VR wide-angle lens on the front and a second 1.8mm lens on the rear for 4.9-megapixel selfies (the main lens delivers 12-megapixel stills and Full HD video). GoPro meanwhile added the HERO5 Black and HERO5 Session models 6 . Both models offer 4K, voice control and image stabilisation, but the Black has faster frame rates, a higher quality stills camera and a touch display.

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R I S ING S TA R

RISING STAR NICK CHURCH

JEMMA DODD

Passion, determination, organisation and an eye for capturing stunning natural moments has given Nick Church not just the creative outlet he needed but a booming business

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Nick Church

@PHOTOPROUK

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GEAR

ANYONE FAMILIAR WITH THE CANON DSLR MENU WON’T FIND ANYTHING TO CHALLENGE THEM but with much clearer 1620k dots resolution instead of 1040k – is now a touchscreen one, ideal for the iPad generation. Something Canon seems especially proud of is its Dual Pixel Raw, which, with the bundled Digital Photo Professional Software, can be used for minute fine-tuning (see panel). I could go on, but you get the general idea; it is a pretty impressive, wellspecced and obviously considered piece of kit and arguably a much greater jump forward than the 5D MkIII was over the MkII, thanks to the ever-increasing pace of technology. But do the enhancements justify the £3629 that Canon is asking (although demand for this camera will no doubt mean plenty of deals around that undercut this price)? Especially when you can still pick up a new MkIII for over a grand less, while the pixel-busting 5DS and 5DS R variations can be found for well over £500 less? And then there are the rivals from Nikon and relatively new kid on the block Sony to consider. Before plunging in, I should declare a Canon interest. I’ve owned the company’s cameras since I first got seriously into photography many moons ago using a Canon AE-1 Program. Although I have cameras from other brands, it’s Canons that I regard as my ‘business’ tools – the ones I turn to when I’m looking for high-end, professional results. I went

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through several EOS film cameras before going digital with an entry-level 1000D and then progressing through the 600D and 60D to the 5D MkIII. I bought mine shortly after it was unveiled. While I’d be the first to admit this makes me a Canon enthusiast, it also makes me very conscious, and critical, of those areas in which I feel there can be improvements. And my in-depth knowledge of the MkIII means I can appreciate – or otherwise – how successfully Canon has upped its game. In the hand The EOS 5D sits second in line in Canon’s DSLR range, beneath the flagship £5199 1D X MkII, the capabilities of which it is close to rivalling. It’s getting quite crowded at the top end of the Canon tree now, with the 6D and 5DS and 5DS R also appealing to either professionals or amateurs who want superior results. Out of the box, the 5D MkIII is simple enough to set up, with only one menu to go through – setting the time, date and approximate location etc – before you can simply jump in and start shooting with effective enough results. Anybody familiar with Canon’s DSLR menu system won’t find anything to challenge them with the way the MkIV operates, other than the sheer number of options there are – 25 screens in total, each with multiple selections themselves. Even if you’re not that familiar with the way Canons behave, navigating through the menus is pretty instinctive, even if what some choices actually represent might require further explanation from the manual (which is an online PDF). At first glance, there seems little

SPEC I FICAT I ONS PRICE £3629 body only EFFECTIVE PIXELS 30.4 megapixels TOTAL PIXELS 31.7 megapixels SENSOR SIZE/TYPE 36x24mm/CMOS PROCESSOR DIGIC 6+ IMAGE SIZE 6720x4880 pixels ISO RANGE 100-32,000 (expandable down to 50 and up to 102,400) AUTOFOCUS MODES One Shot, AI Focus, AI Servo AF AUTOFOCUS POINTS 61 EXPOSURE COMPENSATION +/-5EV in 0.3 or 0.5EV stops, AEB +/-3EV in 0.3 or 0.5EV stops SHUTTER SPEEDS 30secs-1/8,000sec, plus B METERING 150,000-pixel RGB+IR sensor, 252 zones. Evaluative, partial (approx 6.1%), spot (approx 1.3%), centre-weighted EXPOSURE MODES Scene Intelligent Auto, program AE, shutter-priority AE, aperture-priority AE, manual, custom x3 MAX FRAME RATE 7fps for up to unlimited JPEGs or 21 Raw files LCD Fixed 3.2in touchscreen, 1620k dot resolution VIDEO FUNCTIONALITY 4K (4096x2160 pixels) at 30p/25p/24p, Full HD at 60p/30p/25p/24p, HD at 120p/60p OTHER Built-in GPS, Wi-Fi and NFC INTERFACE USB 3.0, HDMI mini out, microphone socket, headphone socket STORAGE Dual card slots: 1xCF (UDMA 7 compatible) and 1xSD (UHS-I compatible) DIMENSIONS (WXHXD) 150.7x116.4x75.9mm WEIGHT (BODY ONLY) 890g

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

CANO N EO S 5 D MK I V

difference between the bodies of the MkIII and the MkIV – a gentle evolution rather than a big revolution. All the rear buttons remain in approximately the same place, although there’s an additional customisable thumb control (which serves as the AF area selection by default). The front handgrip and rear thumbrest are a bit thicker and contoured and the multi-controller now has a textured surface rather than the slippery smooth one of the MkIII. It’s comfortable in the hand. Elsewhere, the mode control dial now has its markings slightly recessed – perhaps a retrograde step, as after only a little bit of use, natural dirt from hands along with dust is dulling the lettering already. The pentaprism, a little larger than before thanks to the GPS and Wi-Fi gubbins, also has a rough outer surface which seems more prone to attracting dust and marks. These are niggles though, because when it comes to controls, the rear LCD now being a touchscreen is a big boon. If you’re shooting using live view on the rear screen rather than through the viewfinder, or you have the camera mounted on a tripod, it’s much easier to manipulate the rear screen. You simply push one icon to unlock it, then use it much as you would any tablet or smartphone, instead of using a combination of the physical controls. It’s extremely simple and effective – especially the live view ‘touch shutter’ option, which allows you to focus in a particular spot and then shoot immediately. Just remember to lock the screen again before you bring the camera up to your face, otherwise you’ll find yourself altering all sorts of settings using your nose. One thought that

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form factor ensures existing MkIII users will feel immediately at home with the IV.

@PHOTOPROUK

ABOVE: The ISO performance from the Mark IV offers a small, but notable improvement over the Mark III. Digital noise only really becomes an issue once you get to the heady realms of ISO 25,600. Highly impressive.

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Professional Photo 125 sampler  

Stress-free weddings, award-winning portraits & show-stealing kit: everything you want to know

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