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Issue 42 13 Mar – 12 April

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Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


News Tests Clubs

Exhibitions

Techniques

Interviews

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Reviews

Photography Produced by

Issue 42 13 Mar – 12 April

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The Photography Show 4-page pull out

Your FREE newspaper packed with the latest news, views and stories from the world of photography

Shoot at home… … and win £200 to spend on exhibitionquality prints, page 7

Complete TPS floor plan and exhibitor guide, page 49

Canon EOS M5 Top-of-therange mirrorless tried and tested, page 62

Three winners from Canon

Canon celebrates 30 years of the EOS family with two new enthusiast DSLRs and one mid-range mirrorless camera

Joining the EOS family in its anniversary year are the EOS 77D and the EOS 800D, both APS-C format DSLRs featuring the latest imaging technology including a 24.2-megapixel sensor and the DIGIC 7 processor. The EOS 77D is aimed at those users keen to take the next step in their photography and expand their imaging

horizons and this camera offers the perfect upgrade. Priced at £829 body only, the EOS 77D will be available from this April, body only as well as in kit configurations. For people just starting out on their DSLR journey, the EOS 800D is certain to appeal. With an optical viewfinder, touchscreen vari-angle monitor and an advanced 45-

point autofocusing system, the EOS 800D is easy to use and highly capable, too. This is due in the shops in April too, at a price of £779 body only or £869 with an EF-S 1855mm f/4-5.6 IS STM. The third new camera is the EOS M6 with a new 24.2megapixel sensor. The EOS M6 is a monitoronly camera but if you want

an electronic viewfinder, you can add the EVF-DC2 for £219. This retro-looking accessory slips into the camera’s hotshoe and gives a 100% view. The EOS M6 is set to sell for £729 body only or £839 with the EF-M 15-45mm f/3.56.3 IS STM standard lens. canon.co.uk

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Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Three winners from Canon Canon’s trio of new cameras includes two DSLRs and one mirrorless model. While some brands are forecasting that mirrorless cameras will overtake DSLRs within a matter of years that is clearly not a belief shared by Canon, which is hardly surprisingly given its existing product line-up and heritage. However, it has obviously decided that mirrorless is not a market to be ignored – which it did for a few years – and Canon is now putting some effort behind its EOS M range with the introduction of the EOS M5 last year and now the EOS M6. The EOS M6 is a mid-range model, with the EOS M5 at the top end and the EOS M10 at entry level. At the M6’s core is an APS-C format 24.2-megapixel CMOS sensor working with a DIGIC 7 processor and a Dual Pixel CMOS AF system. The sensor is new so not the same one featured in the EOS M5, and Canon is keeping the actual differences close to its chest right now. With the fast processor and advanced AF system you can get seven frames-per-second with focusing out of the M6 and this increases to 9fps with fixed AF. Assisting with sharp shooting is a body-integral five-axis image stabilisation system. The EOS M6 is a monitor-only camera and the screen has touch functionality. An optional EVF, the EVF-DC2, will be available that will slot into the hotshoe and this retro-looking gadget with a 120fps refresh rate gives a high-quality viewing image. It is compact too so you can have it in the camera bag

ready for occasions when viewfinder operation is preferred. The downside is that it costs £219. The EOS M6 is available in black or silver. The body-only price is £729, with the 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens it’s £839,and £1079 with the 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM. Stock will be in the shops from April. Thirty years since the first EOS burst onto the scene, Canon has added two enthusiast-oriented models to its DSLR collection. The EOS 800D is targeted at first-time DSLR users while the EOS 77D aims to attract photographers keen to progress to the next step. Both are capable of first-class picture quality. The CMOS sensor is an APS-C format with 24.2 megapixels on hand – both cameras use the same sensor – and that works in partnership with the DIGIC 7 processor. It’s the same imaging technology as used in the popular Canon EOS 80D so not only do you get the same high level of image quality but you get also very fast live view autofocus and the ability to capture at 6fps for fast-moving subjects. Both cameras feature a 45-point AF system and all those sensors are cross-type for extra accuracy and speed.

Although both cameras have plenty of features to explore and essentially give the same high level of performance, the handling and the controls are different with the EOS 77D suitable for more experienced camera users. See the interview below with Canon’s David Parry where he explains Canon’s product naming structure. The EOS 800D costs £779 body only while the EOS 77D is slightly more expensive, priced at £829 for the body only. Canon introduced a new kit lens option, the EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM, alongside the two new cameras. This is the most compact non-retractable kit lens of this focal length range in the market. Bought on its own this lens costs £219 while partnered with the EOS 800D the price is £869 and with the EOS 77D £919.Availability for these products is April. The same availability applies to the Remote Controller BR-E1 and this accessory is priced at £39.99. This bluetooth gadget allows remote shooting from up to five metres and also features focus and zoom controls. canon.co.uk

David Parry, Canon product intelligence Of the three cameras launched by Canon what is the one that gives you the most excitement? I’m a classic photographer-type person so for me it is the EOS 77D. What I like about it is that it is a photographer’s camera. It has the right sort of button layout so you can get used to it very quickly and it is so small and lightweight which is really, really nice. The EOS 77D leads on from the EOS 760D which continues in our line-up. That is still a three-digit camera, but the EOS 77D is a twodigit camera which should explain what sort of camera it is. You know your product range so you know the differences between the two- and threedigit Canon DSLRs, but can you explain the differences to those of us less familiar with your product line-up please? Our range starts off with the EOS 1300D and that is a four-digit camera, that tells you it is a super simple camera. It is a true DSLR but it is simple to use and ideal for people just dipping their toe into photography. They still might be sure that photography is for them but they want to try it with a true DSLR. It is a great place to start. If you want a more advanced camera, say with a faster shooting rate or more control, then look at a three-digit camera like the EOS 700D and 750D. There are our mainstay cameras where many people come in at and offer more control. People love these cameras and stay with them for quite a while because they are simply designed,

have plenty of control and allow you to grow in your photography. When you get to a point that you want to work faster and want more buttons, that is when you step into the two-digit DSLRs. And then when you want to step up again you go for a single-digit camera like an EOS 5, 6 or 7. By now you will have decided what type of photography you want to do, whether that is landscape, fashion or sports and you can pick the camera to suit. The new EOS 800 DSLR is a three-digit camera but it seems very close to the EOS 77D, a twodigit model. Is that right? Internally and as far as image quality is concerned, yes, but the way you get to the final image, no. The EOS 800’s layout and control design still makes it a three-digit DSLR. It is when you add more buttons or have the screen that flips upwards that you get a two-digit model. The handling, the extra features and the way you arrive at the image are what make the two ranges different. Moving to mirrorless, the new EOS M6 is an interesting innovation and compared with the current EOS M5, it does not have a built-in viewfinder and an EVF is offered as an optical accessory. What is the thinking here? Well, the EOS M6 sits where the M3 is sitting at the moment. That camera is going out of the range because of the new arrival so the range goes M10, M6, M5. The EOS M6 is aimed at the

mid-range photographer, perhaps they have a DSLR at the moment, like the controls of a DSLR and doesn’t want an in-built viewfinder. The EOS M6 is designed to be smaller and lighter than the M5 but have lots of control. So you get a control wheel front and back and the option of adding an EVF. The EOS M5 is designed to work as a DSLR but it is a CSC, so if you want a DSLR experience from a mirrorless camera you’d look at the M5. The EOS M6 has a completely new sensor so it is not one used in the EOS M5. The new sensor with the DIGIC 7 processor gives faster autofocus and gets information off the sensor really quickly so you can shoot at 7fps with AF or 9fps with fixed focus. There is also a 1EV improvement in ISO so the top speed is 25,600. The EOS M6 also has a screen that folds up to face forward so if you do a lot of vlogging, it would suit you more. What is the stand out feature of the EOS M6 in your view? I’d say autofocus. It will be incredible because of the new sensor and DIGIC 7 processor. Who are you finding is buying Canon M cameras? Is it just existing EOS system users with a bagful of EF lenses? The M5 and M3 are being bought by Canon users who want a smaller and lighter mirrorless camera and the same experience as using a Canon DSLR with a control layout and menu structure they are used to. Interestingly a lot of M10s are being

bought by vloggers, people who want a small, lightweight camera with great image quality but with a high-quality video function to film themselves. The M10 is super simple, it works like a compact but has an APS-C sized sensor for true DSLR image quality, with built in mic and huge lens capability. canon.co.uk


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Fujifilm for filmmakers

Sigma sets world first

Sigma has recently launched the 14mm f/1.8 DG HSM Art lens, the world’s first and only f/1.8 ultra-wide-angle lens, which will be available in Sigma, Nikon and Canon mounts. Also new for Sigma’s Art line-up is the 2470mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM and 135mm f/1.8 DG HSM telephoto lens for full-frame cameras, which offers fast autofocusing

Fujifilm has unveiled its MK series of cinema lenses. The first lens to be released in the new the line is the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9. This will be followed by the Fujinon MK50135mm T2.9, which will be launched in summer. Fujifilm is also planning to develop a telephoto prime lens and ultra-wide angle lens zoom adding to its XF medium-format lens range.

speed and has a dust and splashproof construction. In addition, the Contemporary range sees the introduction of the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM lightweight, ultra-telephoto zoom. All prices and availability are yet to be announced.

fujifilm.co.uk

sigma-imaging-uk.com

Elinchrom introduces the ELB 1200 Adding to its wide range of lighting equipment Elinchrom has launched the ELB 1200. Weighing just 4.3kg the unit features a redesigned flash head, which has a dimmable LED modelling lamp and silent mode, making it ideal for video recording as well as stills. The unit features a large OLED control display making it easy to adjust settings and offers strobo, sequence and delayed flash modes. The ELB 1200 will be available in four kit options from mid 2017; the ELB 1200 Pro To Go, which features an ELB 1200 Pro Head and 16cm/90° reflector, the ELB 1200 Hi-Sync To Go, which also comes with a 16cm/90° reflector, but an ELB 1200 Hi-Sync Head instead, the ELB 1200 Pro To Roll, which comes with a shallow umbrella and an 18cm/70° grid reflector with 30° Grid, plus the ELB 1200 Pro Head and finally the ELB 1200 Hi-Sync To Roll, which comes with the same umbrella and grid, but an ELB 1200 Hi-Sync Head. Pricing and availability is yet to be confirmed. elinchrom.com

Photography News at The Photography Show It’s March, which means it’s time for the Photography Show! This year the Photography News team will be back, and you’ll be able to pick up your free physical copy of the issue at the show. Pop along to our stand in the food gallery to say hello. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, @PhotonewsPN and Facebook, facebook.com/photonewsPN to keep up to date with us. There’s so much to look forward to this year from masterclasses and workshops to Super Stage speakers, as well as the chance to see a wide range of manufacturers. Visit the Canon stand on D141/E131 where you’ll have the chance to get handson with kit including the EOS 650, EOS-1 series and EOS 5D Mark IV. Nikon will be over on stand C11 showcasing its range of DX and FX-DSLR models, as well as the KeyMission range, COOLPIX and Nikkor lenses. There will also be a

special Nikon School stand, which will hold host to a range of speakers including Nikon ambassadors and photographers such as Bob Martin and Joe McNally. Olympus will have free sensor cleaning with its Check and Clean service for Olympus users, as well hosting a range of ‘audience with’ talks with some of its ambassadors. Visit the stand on D91 where you’ll also be able to pick up a free copy of the 50th issue of Olympus Magazine, find out more on page 34. On stand D61 the Fujifilm team will be on hand with its range of X-series products, plus you can see the medium-format, mirrorless GFX 50S in the flesh. Among the many speakers taking to the many stages at the show, The Photography Show is pleased to bring award-winning documentary photographer Sebastião Salgado to the Super Stage on Tuesday 21

Fujifilm Professional Service Scheme Fujifilm has enhanced its service to professional photographers by launching its Professional Service Scheme, which now incorporates the GFX and X cameras and lenses. Available now in the UK and Germany the service will be gradually expanded across all major markets in Europe across 2017. The service will cost £260 per year, but will be offered free for the first two years to working photographers and owners of a GFX, or those with two professional camera bodies and three XF lenses. Fujifilm has also introduced Fujifilm X Acquire, which is compatible with the Fujifilm GFX 50S and free to download from the Fujifilm website. The tethering software allows you to connect the GFX to a Mac or PC to enable direct transferring of images. The software is also compatible with the Fujifilm X-T1 and X-T2. fujifilm.co.uk

March at 11am. Tickets cost £20, but you will also need to have entry to The Photography Show. On the same day Sebastião Salgado will also be on Canon’s Live Stage at 2pm taking part in a Q&A session with Clive Booth.

Download the free The Photography Show 2017 app to access exhibitor details, seminar programmes, show news and much more while on the go. photographyshow.com


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Samyang goes wide

Two teles from Sony Sony has announced the FE 100mm f/2.8 STF GM OSS and the FE 85mm f/1.8 to its line of interchangeable lens cameras. Shipping for both lenses will begin in March. The 100mm will be priced at £1600 and the 85mm at £600. Also new is the HVLF45RM compact radiocontrolled flash, designed for use with the E-mount cameras and full-frame models and is priced at £400. In addition adding to its line of memory cards Sony has launched the world’s fastest SD card offering read speeds of 300MB/s and write speeds of 299MB/s. The SG-G SD series will be available this month in 32GB, 64GB or 128GB capacities.

Samyang has launched a new video-cine lens. The XEEN 20mm T1.9 is the latest addition to the XEEN range of cinema lenses, which includes a 14mm, 16mm, 24mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm and 135mm. This ultra wide-angle aspherical lens offers optimal image quality and also has a circular aperture with 11 blades for stunning bokeh. In addition to these features it also has a smooth focus ring, high durability, FFG and declicked aperture making it a premium option for professional moviemakers. Launching this month the lens has a recommended retail price of £1799.99. samyanglensglobal.com xeenglobal.com

sony.co.uk

Sevenoak video supports

Hasselblad XCD lens line-up

Kenro has announced three camera supports. First is the Sevenoak Motorised Follow Focus Rig with Memory (SKMHF04), which allows filmmakers to steady their camera while on the move with its shouldermounted design. It features two operating systems with hand grips to allow easy control of both focusing and zooming and has an adjustable base plate to allow you to use attach different cameras, the focus rig is priced at £419.99. Also announced is the Sevenoak Electronic Motorised Pan Head (SKECH03), priced at £314.99, which comes with a variable speed joystick controller to offer smooth and continuous 360° pan and tilt movements. The head can support both DSLRs and camcorders and can hold a maximum weight of 5kg. It is designed to be used with tripod, sliders or jib arms. Finally, is the Sevenoak Carbon Fibre Jib Arm (SKJA20), a tripodmounted camera crane designed to offer smooth up and down movements in a 360° arc, which is priced at £309.99.

Hasselblad has introduced four XCD lenses to its X1D system. The first to be launched is the XCD 120mm f/3.5 macro lens, which will be available at the end of June. The other three lenses in the range are the XCD 35-75mm, XCD 65mm, XCD 22mm, which we can expect to see before the start of 2018. hasselblad.com

News in brief

kenro.co.uk

Win prints worth £200 © Will Cheung

Photography News has teamed up with expert photo printers LumeJet to bring you the chance of seeing your favourite photographs in glorious print. Win this free to enter contest and you have £200 to spend on the LumeJet website. LumeJet is passionate about printing great photographs and uses its developed S200 printer for highend photographic and commercial print use. This high resolution printer features the LumeJet RGB Digital Print Head and Fujifilm professional-grade Crystal Archive materials to achieve a unique, ultrahigh quality with extraordinary colour fidelity, superb tonality and great light-fast qualities. To be in with the chance of winning £200 worth of LumeJet prints all you have to do is take a picture at home. Yes, it is that simple but we are looking for you to stretch

your creative skills so perhaps your entry could be an awesome food still life, an elegant window-lit portrait or a beautiful floral close-up. Upload images to flickr.com/ groups/3277339@N20/. There is no fee to enter but you will have to join flickr.com, which is free. Only one photograph per person can submitted and the entrant must be UK-based. Images should be 1500 pixels across and we will contact you if we need higher resolution files to judge or publish. The editor’s decision in this contest is final and for full terms and conditions please see absolutephoto.com. The closing date for entries is 6 April 2017 and the winner announced in PN issue 43 out from 18 April 2017. The winner of last month’s Winter contest is Jack Paton so congratulations and well done!

Ultrawide Irix Irix's latest launch is a 11mm f/4 ultrawide lens for full-frame format DSLRs. Key features include a lens lock mechanism, infinity click-stop, depth-offield scale and a rear gelatin filter slot. You get weather resistant build and neutrino coatings to miniimize ghosting and flare. Optical construction comprises 16 elements in 10 groups. It includes nine special elements including two extra low dispersion and three aspherical. en.irixlens.com New addition to Fotospeed Fine Art Gloss papers

Fotospeed has introduced the Platinum Gloss Art Fibre 300 to its Fine Art Gloss range of inkjet papers. The new paper is water resistant and compatible with both dye and pigment inks. fotospeed.com


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PermaJet release new Baryta paper PermaJet is pleased to announce the launch of a new fibre-based Baryta paper, specially formulated for monochrome images. The FB Mono Gloss Baryta 320 has a glazed gloss surface and an alpha cellulose, acid-free base, which has been buffered to enhance the paper’s fade resistance. It’s also water resistant. The paper has a weight of 320gsm and a thickness of 0.35mm. While

Kenro Gimbal head

aimed at monochrome images, it is also capable of amazing colour pictures too. The FB Mono Gloss Baryta 320 will be available in A4, A3, A3+, A2 sizes and also in 17in, 24in and 44in rolls. Prices will be similar to existing PermaJet FB papers and it’ll be on show at The Photography Show.

Kenro has announced a new Gimbal head. The KENGHC1 Gimbal Tripod Head is made from carbon fibre and aluminium and features an elevated tilt mechanism and a height-adjustable platform, which allows you to align the tilt axis of the head with your camera or lens’s centre of gravity. Priced at £269.94 the Gimbal offers 360° smooth panning and can hold up to 15kg. Both the panning base and swing arm have separate locks to allow to adjust your position with ease. kenro.co.uk

permajet.com

B&W cases now in the UK The B&W outdoor case range consists of 11 different sized cases, including two specifically designed for holding drones. Made of polypropylene, certified with the STANAG 4280, DEF STAN 81-41 and ATA 300 standards, all of the cases in B&W’s range feature an automatic air pressure compensation valve. With a 30-year warranty the cases boast rugged credentials which

include being 100% waterproof, able to withstand temperatures from -30°C to 80°C, and drops of up to three metres, they’re also dustproof. In addition, there are also a range of accessories available to customise the cases, including foam inserts and shoulder straps. Available now, prices start at £32.99. intro2020.co.uk

Manfrotto launches Xume adapter The Manfrotto Xume adapter allows you to quickly and easily change filters, thanks to its magnetic design. Using the Xume filter holder you can attach your filter and the holder will magnetically attach to the Xume lens adapter. Available in sizes 49mm, 52mm, 58mm, 62mm, 67mm, 72mm, 77mm and 82mm prices start from £9.95 for the filter holders and £24.95 for the lens adapter. Read our review of the Manfrotto Xume over in First Tests. manfrotto.co.uk

Manfrotto and National Geographic collaborate Joining forces Manfrotto and National Geographic have launched a new range of bags. The National Geographic Australia Collection consists of five durable bags, made from high-quality materials and premium leather. The range includes the NG Australia camera and laptop backpack for DSLR/ compact system, the NG Australia 3way camera backpack for DSLRs, the NG Australia camera messengers for Compact System Cameras (available in small and medium), and finally the NG Australia Camera Holster for CSCs. Prices start from £59.90 exclusively at Manfrotto’s website. manfrotto.co.uk

News in brief Airselfie Taking selfies to the air, the AirSelfie is smaller than a smartphone and can fly up to 20m high. It features a fivemegapixel camera and can wirelessly connect to selected smartphones to take aerial selfies of you and your friends. Available to pre-order at €259 (£223.31). airselfiecamera.com Lexar 256GB microSD Lexar has announced a 256GB Professional 1000x microSD UHS-II (U3) card. It offers write speeds up to 90MB/s and read transfer speeds up to 150MB/s. The 256GB microSD has an guide price of £357.99. Other capacities are available: 32GB, 64GB and 128GB. Lexar has also added a CFast 2.0 512GB card to its range with a write speed of 525MB/s. This has a guide price of £1732.99. lexar.com X-Rite bundle offer Until 31 March 2017 all purchases of the X-Rite ColorMunki Photo calibrator will receive a Color Confidence GrafiLite Desktop Daylight Viewer free, making a saving of over £61. xritephoto.com SIRUI R-3213X tripod The SIRUI R-3213X will be on show for the first time at this year’s Photography Show on stand C21. The ten-layer carbon-fibre tripod features leg angle locking mechanism, foam rubber leg wraps and three solid ratchet steps for flexible use. sirui.eu/en


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Money-saving offers for PN readers These are third-party offers. For full terms & conditions, see the respective websites.

Save 20% off SRB ND1000 Rugged Filters The SRB ND1000 Rugged Filter is a 10EV extreme long exposure filter that features a rugged and tough mount for easier use when you’re out shooting creative shots of fastmoving clouds or flowing water. The ND1000 Rugged Filter features an easygrip system, which allows you to place your fingertips around the filter to easily and quickly remove it from the camera thread; an ideal feature when shooting in tricky conditions. Sizes range from 46mm to 82mm with prices from £29.95 to £44.95. From 17 March through to 28 April, there is a 20% discount off normal prices. When ordering off the SRB website use the coupon code SRBNEWS. srb-photographic.co.uk

Fotospeed offers one of the most comprehensive ranges of inkjet papers on the market. If you are unsure as to which paper best suits your needs, Fotospeed has a range of cost-effective test packs to suit your every requirement. There’s a Fotospeed Photo test pack with two sheets of nine different papers; a Fotospeed Fine Art Matt test pack with three sheets of eight different papers; plus Matt and Glossy test packs that include some of Fotospeed’s award-winning Signature papers. All papers have identification on the reverse, so you will always know which paper you are printing on. The packs are already discounted down to £10 or £11.99, but the great news for The Photography Show visitors is that you can buy three test packs for £25, which means you could save up to another 30%. fotospeed.com

Get into print and save 25% ProAm Imaging is renowned for its awardwinning quality and service – it has won Best Professional Lab for four years running in the SWPP Awards. And you get all this with amazing prices. For example, an A3 print costs £1.15 and an A4 print is just 60p. You can put ProAm to the test and get five free 8x6in prints. Simply register on the website and upload your files. All correctly prepared orders received by 1pm are printed and dispatched the same day either by first class post or by FedEx courier for delivery next day. From 17 to 31 March, you can save 25% off your ProAm Imaging order. To claim your discount, before placing your order please ring 01274 723622 or email sales@proamimaging. com quoting the code PNEXTRA. proamimaging.com

Free postage with On-line paper The On-line Paper Company, the original pioneering e-commerce paper company, was the first to sell Hahnemühle digital inkjet papers in a web shop in 1999. Its online catalogue can save you up to 60% off retail price, and now covers arguably the largest range of digital inkjet paper in one place, including the complete Hahnemühle paper range, the TIPA awardwinning Canson Photo Lustre and Baryta, plus the top sellers from PermaJet, Ilford, Fujifilm and Fotospeed. They also sell the more specialist papers like Somerset Enhanced and the legendary 300gsm 100% cotton Museo Silver Rag, which emulates the traditional darkroom look and feel. Order from the website before 15 April and quote checkout code PN42 to receive free UK postage and packing. on-linepaper.co.uk

Save 30% off Fotospeed

Save 10% off full body software

Before

After

Before

After

The creators of retouching software Portrait Pro now have PortraitPro Body available – it’s the first dedicated full-body retouching software. Powerful and fast to use, this software uses cutting-edge technology to give fully adjustable, realistic results. Two versions of PortraitPro Body are available, Standard and Studio, selling at £29.95 and £49.95 respectively. You can start with the Standard and upgrade to the Studio edition at any time. The more powerful Studio edition can handle Raw and DNG formats, has colour space support and works as a plug-in in Lightroom, Photoshop and Elements. Photography News readers can get an extra 10% off these prices by using the code, PN42a at the checkout. portraitprobody.com

Discover Canson bargains Canson launched Infinity Baryta Prestige 340gsm last year and it proved a great success. It is a baryta paper aimed at the Fine Art printing market with a cotton white base and the look and feel of a traditional darkroom paper. Its wide colour gamut gives exceptional results and has excellent D-Max for deep blacks and rich shadow details. It is available in a wide range of sheet and roll sizes. Canson will have plenty of show offers at The Photography Show including Discovery Starter packs at £7 each (a saving of £12) or two Discovery Starter packs with a ten-sheet pack of any other paper for just £20. Discovery packs feature between 10 and 14 sheets of A4 paper focusing on either the Fine Art range or the photo-based media. There will be offers across the range at The Photography Show with savings up to 35%. cansoninfinity.com


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Photo 24, version 2017 Fancy indulging your photography for 24 hours in one of the world’s most fantastic locations? Of course you do, so come and join us for the Photography News Photo 24 in London. It’s a great, fun experience for photographers of all levels London is one of the world’s most vibrant cities that also happens to be one of the most photogenic with something for every camera user; stunning modern and classic architecture, bustling streets and markets and awesome open spaces. Our incredible capital city is just so full of opportunities for the camera that you need several lifetimes to capture it. Or as someone sitting in the Photography News office once said ‘when a photographer is tired of London, they might as well take up collecting beer mats.’ The Photography News Photo 24 is now in its fifth year. To recap, it is a free event for 250 photographers on or around the longest day of the year. As weekends are best for most people, the actual day of the event shifts around a little and this year the appointed day is 23 June 2017 with a noon start and a noon finish 24 hours later. It is a great chance to

spend the day with a bunch of enthusiastic and like-minded fellow photographers. You can share experiences, learn from and inspire each other and simply have some fun with your camera. Photographers of all levels are welcome. Support will be available for newcomers to this sort of event, as well as advice on shooting in urban situations and help for those who don’t know London very well. A printed guide will also be provided in advance of the event and, of course, we will be covering Photo 24 in detail over the coming months in the pages of Photography News with technique advice and inspiration. If you’re concerned that you can’t keep going for 24 hours or are only interested in shooting at particular times, then don’t worry. You can come along for a few hours and go home, or shoot until dinner before retiring for

the night to a hotel and then coming back the following morning. It is entirely up to you how you use the 24 hours. There is no requirement to justify what you aim to do in the 24 hours. On past Photo 24s we have seen people when they registered and didn’t see them again until the close, but we knew from social media that they were shooting all the time and racking up many, many steps. Photo 24 is free. Obviously you have to pay for your own food, travel and accommodation if you book any, but it is free to take part in Photo 24 and all you have to do is register, of which more in a while. However, in the past we’ve organised optional events that are paid for simply because they cost money and costs have to be covered. These optional events will be revealed in due course. Previously, we’ve enjoyed sunset on the London Eye and at the top of the Shard, spent the night aboard classic

London buses and had an early morning boat trip down the Thames. As an added incentive, should you need any, we’ll have photo contests and challenges running to encourage you to push your creativity even further. Details of this year's contests will be revealed in due course. It all sounds fab. don't you agree? So join us for Photo 24 – a free photographic experience like no other. Now, here’s the thing. We have capacity for 250 photographers and the event is so popular now that we need hold a ballot to give everyone an equal chance of gaining a spot. The ballot will have set opening and closing dates. When you register has no impact on your chances and there will be only one entry per person. We’ll have provision to be fair to groups and clubs too. So, watch this space.

© Will Cheung

© Will Cheung

© Will Cheung

© Will Cheung © Will Cheung

© Will Cheung

Stay up to date with Photo 24 news Registration and the ballot are not open yet. We’ll be releasing details in the next issue of Photography News, out 17 April. If the supply of our printed PN is irregular, you can read PN for free online by registering on absolutephoto.com. We’ll also put information on Twitter, @PhotonewsPN and Facebook, facebook. com/photonewsPN.


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Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

News News in brief

Access All Areas © Paul Harries

© Paul Harries

Roger Mayne at The Photographers’ Gallery Taking place 30 March – 11 June the Photographers’ Gallery will be showcasing the first major exhibition in London of Roger Mayne’s work since 1999. Tickets cost £4 or £2.50 for concessions. The print sales gallery features a rarely seen selection of Martin Parr's early monochrome work including images from BawWeather. This is on until 23 April. thephotographersgallery. org.uk

Kerrang! magazine photographer Paul Harries will be exhibiting a collection of his live music and portrait images at Proud Camden in London, until 23 April 2017. Showcasing images of iconic rock legends such as Nirvana, Slash, Metallica and more, Access All Areas by Paul Harries will allow music and photography fans to dive into images Paul has taken over the last two years, as well as have the chance to see some previously unseen works. The exhibition is free to attend and is open 11am-5pm Monday to Friday and 11am-4pm Saturday to Sunday. Access All Areas: Photographs by Paul Harries will be displayed at Proud Camden from 9 March to 23 April 2017. Proud.co.uk

© Ignacio Álvarez Neches © Ashley Franklin

© Magda Zelewska

Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography More than 200 images by more than 150 artists will be on show as part of a major exhibition of pinhole photography at the National Media Museum. Taking place 17 March- 25 June 2017, the exhibition is free to attend. nationalmediamuseum.org.uk

historicengland.org.uk

© Giordano Cipriani

Photobook releases Octopus Books has announced two new releases Complete Photography; Understand cameras to take, edit and share better photos by Chris Gatcum priced at £16.99 and In Camera; How to get perfect pictures straight out of the camera, by Gordon Laing priced at £19.99. Both books are available to buy from Ilex now. octopusbooks.co.uk ilex.press

Your chance to win £2000

England’s Maritime Heritage from the Air by Peter Waller features over 150 never-before-seen photographs of England’s most iconic ports, docks, ships and more from the English Heritage’s Aerofilms archive. The images include The Cutty Sark, HMS Worcester and more. Published by Historic England (previously English Heritage) the book will be available from 28 April priced at £45.

© Luigi Repetto

William Henry Fox Talbot work available on the web The complete works of British photographic pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot are now available to the public through the Bodleian Libraries. Comprising of collections from around the world you can search through over 1000 annotated digital images and by 2018 there will be 25,000 images available. See the collection at foxtalbot.bodleian.ox.ac.uk

Historic England

© David Kilpatrick

Travel Photographer of the year winners Over 7000 images were entered in the 2016 Wanderlust Travel Photographer Of The Year competition. The four amateur winners were announced as Vittorio Ricci, Christopher Roche, Sanghamitra Sarkar and Julia Wainwright, who have all won a photo commission to Thailand. Portfolio winner Trevor Cole received a cash prize of £3000. See the winning images at travelphotooftheyear.co.uk

© Paolo Ronc

© Alice Kohler

Survival International Open for entries now, the Survival International photo competition aims to raise awareness of tribal peoples and their ways of life, as well as the threat to their existence. The competition invites photographers from around the world to submit their photos that show tribal people

in their natural environment. Joining this year’s panel of judges, which includes Survival’s Director Stephen Corry, Survival Italy Coordinator Francesca Casella, Max Houghton (Senior Lecturer in Photography at the London College of Communication), and award

winning photographer Edmund Clark is the Little Black Gallery’s Co-Founder Ghislain Pascal. The closing date for entries to the competition is 30 April.

Two new photography professionals have been added to the judging panel of the ArtGeminiPrize; Professor Brian Griffin D.Univ. (BCU) Hon. FRPS. and publisher and editor David Kilpatrick. Open for entries now, the competition gives photographers the chance to win £2000, photographic prizes and two curated exhibitions. The categories to enter are Architecture, Nature, Wildlife, People, Sport, Portrait, Travel, Street & Staged, Documentary & Photojournalism, B & W, Monochrome and Colour. Entries close on 30 April. photox.co.uk

survivalinternational.org / photography


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

17

Tell us your club’s latest news, email: clubnews@photography-news.co.uk

Camera club news If your club has any news that you want to share with the rest of the world, this is the page for it. Your story might be about your club’s success in a contest, or a member’s personal achievements; it could be about a group outing you had recently or when the annual exhibition is on show. Any news is eligible for inclusion, so club publicity officers please take note of the submission guidelines and get your stories in

History is made at Durham PS Durham Photographic Society held their Annual Dinner and Awards Ceremony recently and the 2016 awards winners were presented with their trophies. No fewer than fifteen members shared the eighteen awards with this year setting a record by showing the highest number of female members winning awards since the club started some 125 years ago.

Durham PS is the largest club in the North East and Cumbria with an action-packed programme. It meets on a Thursday night for 50 weeks of the year, as well as organising assignment days out for the members once a month and other photography-based activities. durhamps.co.uk

Clubs

How to submit

Deadline for the next issue: 3 April 2017

We need words and pictures by 3 April 2017 for the next issue of Photography News, which will be available from 17 April 2017. Write your story in a Word document (400 words max). Please include contact details of the club, exhibition or event: website, meeting times, opening times, whatever is relevant. Images should be JPEGs, 2000 pixels on the longest dimension, any colour space, and image credits should be included. If the story is an exhibition or event, please send a picture from the exhibition (not the publicity poster) or one from the event. If it includes people, please identify them. Attach the Word document and JPEGs to an email and send to clubnews@photography-news.co.uk

Talk at Warrington Photographer Neil Hulme will be giving a presentation entitled Moments in Mono at Warrington and District Camera Club on 27 March 2017 at 7:30pm. The presentation will focus on Neil’s long-exposure black & white photography and will include Neil’s photographs from around the North West of England, including images from The Wirral, Peak District, Lake District, North Wales, Yorkshire Dales and the Fylde Coastline. The venue for the presentation is at Grappenhall Community Centre, Bellhouse Lane, Grappenhall, Warrington WA4 2SG. thewdcc.org.uk/index.php/ about-us/contact-us neilhulme.smugmug.com/

dandtcameraclub.co.uk

© Peter Elgar

epscameraclub.co.uk

Dawlish and Teignmouth Club has been thriving for 36 years and has a history of community involvement. An exhibition to celebrate members’ work was held in January, at a community arts centre in Teignmouth. The week-long event, which included prints and a slideshow, attracted nearly 600 visitors and over 300 of them voted for their favourite image. Club Chairman Alison Crowter said, “This was a really successful exhibition and a chance for the club to share its work with the wider community.” There were two joint winners for the most popular image, both confirming the public’s love of man’s best friend.

© Joanne Philipson

Eastbourne Photographic Society, established in 1893, will be holding their Annual Exhibition at The Da Vinci Art Hotel, 10 Howard Square, Eastbourne BN21 4BQ from 29 April to 29 May, open daily from 10am to 4pm. Work from all members will be represented.

© Debbie Christie

Eastbourne flying high

Dogs reign supreme at Dawlish and Teignmouth CC

© Peter Elgar

Above right After the Storm by Debbie Christie Right Consolidated PBY-5 Catalina by Joanne Philipson

Exhibition at Sheffield PS Sheffield Photographic Society will be holding their annual print exhibition between 21 and 27 April, from 12pm to 4pm each day. The exhibition will show the winning images from society members plus other selected images. Images have been judged by John Chamberlin FRPS APAGB MFIAP, and the venue is Sheffield Cathedral, Church Street, Sheffield, S1 1HA. Entry is free and all visitors are welcome.

New skills for Brentwood PC Brentwood & District Photographic Club member Bob Wright shared his knowledge of table-top photography at a members’ evening. Bob had two set-ups, one with multiple flash using slave units and one with daylight quality LED strip lights. He had two Canon DSLR cameras for members to view through. Subjects were his award-winning model aircraft for the flash set and his figurines for the LED set. The club meets every Friday from 7.45 to 10pm in Friends’ Meeting House, Shenfield with free parking and visitors can have three free trial attendances.

sheffield-photographer.org.uk bdpc.co.uk


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

18

Profile Before the judge

Jenny Hibbert

Join us for our monthly chat with a photographic judge. Jenny Hibbert became a judge so that she could pass the things she’d learned and help photographers improve their images

How many years in photography? Since I was 11 years old but seriously over the past 12 years. Home club Bridgend in Wales. I am external competition secretary. What is your favourite camera? Canon EOS-1D Mark 1V. What is your favourite lens? Canon 300mm f/2.8. What is your favourite photo accessory? My tripod with a gimbal head. Who is your favourite photographer? Danny Green. What is your own favourite photographic subject or technique? Wildlife, especially dippers. What awards/distinctions/ medals have you won? I have my EFIAP, MPAGB, AWPF. I have been lucky enough to win three gold medals numerous silver and bronze medals as well as ribbons. I won a ribbon in a Royal Photographic Society Exhibition. Also a FIAP Blue pin in the Arctic Exhibition.

© Jenny Hibbert

Biography

I became a photographic judge around eight years ago now. My motivation for taking up judging was because I wanted to help others to improve their images. After all, we all started as novices and had to learn to get better. I had to go to a seminar where I was checked to see if I was good enough to become a judge and then I started judging for local clubs here in Wales. I have progressed so I am now a PAGB judge, judged a lot of international salons and have assessed applicant panels for the Associateship of the Welsh Photographic Federation (AWPF) distinction. So I do a variety of judging and I don’t have a favourite subject or event, they are all special. I do find that it can be very rewarding but it is also occasionally frustrating too. Most notably, I get frustrated when judging with fellow photographers, especially when they give a cracking image a low mark. On the other hand, one time when judging the AWPF panels, there was one entry that has remained in my memory, it was simply breath taking in every way and inspirational too. The overall standard of photography in our clubs here in Wales is very high. In fact I’d say that the standard in amateur photography in the UK is high. Of course you have the beginners who are just dipping their toes in the water but as I said earlier everyone has to start somewhere and newcomers need all the encouragement you can give them. When judging, sometimes I try to suggest how a picture could be improved but at times it’s very hard. You might have what is essentially a snapshot in front of you and it is not very challenging or even interesting in the context of a photo contest but you have to give encouragement and suggest how they can improve their work so they have greater success

© Jenny Hibbert

next time round. My advice might be to suggest using the rule of thirds, even if I don’t always agree with it and many images work perfectly well without it. But to a relatively inexperienced photographer it could prove very useful. In club competitions, a lot of pictures don’t make the mark for the same collection of reasons. A lot of people are over zealous with the unsharp mask in Photoshop and you see a nasty halo effect and enhanced noise. Cropping is another big one. Just taking off parts of the image can have such a huge benefit and give a much stronger picture where my eye would go straight to the focal point. Some photographers would do better with more control when they are editing their pictures. So, for example, better control of highlights and shadows would improve many pictures instantly. Not only that but such major improvements can be made with very little effort. It is just a matter of using the tools provided as standard in editing software and there is plenty of advice and technique tutorials available for free on the web. Then, of course I see a lot of similar images too and that is a challenge. For instance, in natural history I see a great many puffins and some judges think, ‘oh no, not another puffin shot’. But we as judges have to assess the pictures as individual images in their own right and not as just another puffin shot.

A while ago, bright, contrasty colourful HDR images were all the rage and such images did well which encouraged more but that seems to be wearing off now. Judges do get a raw deal at times. Do I think it is justified? Yes, sometimes. It might be that a judge has only just started out and while they try hard they don’t have much of a clue. If you are on the receiving end of being judged by one, it can be very disappointing and frustrating. As a judge I do understand but judging is not an easy job. One piece of advice is to carefully and critically check your images that you are going to enter into a contest and make sure there are no obvious failings. Be very honest with yourself too and if you spot something the odds are that the judge will do so too, so do something about it at this point. Or better still ask a photographer friend to look the pictures over and give you some honest feedback. The point of this is to see if there is anything that jumps out at them and how the image can be improved. You might find, for instance, that there is a strong highlight and because our eye always goes to the lightest part of the image the picture could be improved by darkening or even removing the offending area. Of course, if you do such remedial work it needs to be done competently because a badly done correction can exacerbate the problem and draw attention to it.

One piece of advice I would give: less is more and a strong image is as much about what you leave out as what you include. I mentioned cropping before but it is worth repeating because it is such a simple way of improving a picture. Good cropping will take the viewer’s eye to the subject and hold attention while poor cropping means the eye wandering around the frame before disappearing into space. Uncluttered backgrounds work best, so try different viewpoints. In wildlife a low one usually works best and that helps blur the background too. It’s the same with action. Last thing is: get to know your camera inside out, practise in the dark changing your settings, because you can guarantee the moment you look down to change a setting is the time something special happens and you end up missing it. jennyhibbertphotography.co.uk

What do you think? Have you seen a photographic judge at work who you’d like to see profiled in Photography News? If so please drop us a line to opinion@photography-news. co.uk with the judge’s name and, if possible, their contact details.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Interview Profile

Duncan Midwood CEWE is one of the biggest names in European photo printing. We catch up with the UK managing director on the state of the printing business

Biography Years in the photo industry? About seven years Current location? Warwick Last picture taken? On a family walk with the kids. Taking the camera out nowadays is an event and I use the camera phone a lot When you were younger, what did you want to be when you grew up? A vet when I was really young and then from a teenager I wanted to run my own business Dogs or cats? Definitely a dog man Toast or cereal? Cereal, or if I have the time, both Email or phone call? Phone call for the personal touch

50% of our production now is on premium matte photo books and we print for the whole of CEWE Europe

Can you introduce us to CEWE please? How long has the business been around? CEWE is 55 years old and the company invested heavily in digital from early on and expanded across Europe, buying a company here called Standard Photographic in 2005. I joined the company in 2010 and the evolution has continued. We had to put in all the digital equipment and, therefore, started to attract people who wanted digital and photo books is probably the most important. So in the UK we always had a digital focus and photo books is our biggest category. How many people do you have working at your Warwick facility? We have about 70 working here in Warwick, going up to 100 around Christmas with temporary staff. How does it work with you in the UK and Germany? The company is a traditional north German company with a family ownership. In the UK we are a very different culture within that. We are more entrepreneurial and because we are a small business we try to respond quickly and be very agile. For me we are acting like a small company operating with a big company in the background. Germany is pretty hands-off. On the commercial side, we are given a lot of autonomy; as long as I deliver the growth they are happy. Are you a web-based business, or can customers get your products on the high street? Our approach is to work through retailers to develop the brand. The only way you might spend £40 on a CEWE Photobook instead of £20 on another brand’s photo book is to appreciate the quality and you only do that by touching and feeling. The problem with websites is that everyone will say their books are great quality because no one will say they are selling poor-quality product. So the words are all the same and the only way to tell is to see the product. When we go to shows, we watch people come round and touch and feel the product and that is what we want. We do The Photography Show and increasingly we are focusing on the travel sector and we exhibit at most major travel shows. We’re pushing on travel shows because of all the categories of events that people use our products for, travel is the biggest. About 60% of our photo books we make are related to travel and the next most popular is weddings and babies and then special birthdays. Travel is dominant.

So people are already telling us that our products are perfect to remember premium travel so working backwards we want to be where there is a premium travel experience. If you are paying £25K on a holiday you are not really looking for the cheapest photo book, you want the one you know will represent your pictures. I gather that CEWE UK developed the premium matte photo book. How did that come about? Yes, that is an interesting story. We’d launched a personalised online card service called here Cardtown which was a bit like Moonpig. We have some non-industry standard print machines here that we were using to produce these cards. I asked the machine makers to come in to show us how we could get more premium from the cards we were making. One thing they showed us was to produce a matte finish so I asked if we could do photo books with that finish and they said, sure, you can do that. We did some trials, showed them to one of our customers and they absolutely loved them so they started selling them. We eventually presented them to Germany and everyone in the whole group loved them so we launched them. They have transformed our business and 50% of our production now is on premium matte photo books and we print for the whole of CEWE Europe. It is a real success story because we did what no other CEWE lab had done before and supplied CEWE Germany. A German lab does now print premium matte books but we do about two thirds of them. How do you come up with your innovations? We listen to the market. Sometimes our customers give us ideas, we research the market, not just in photography but in gifting, we look at what our competitors are doing because they occasionally come up with something that we don’t have and then we have an internal process within the group. In the UK we collate all our ideas and vote on them to decide the most important ones and then move those forward to a group process. Once a year hundreds of products are displayed at an internal fair, where everyone votes on products. We literally get to the point where everyone has 50 stickers to put on products they like. We did this with the premium matte book and it was covered in stickers so it was obviously very popular. Photo books are very popular and the service is widely

offered, so how is CEWE doing in the photo print business? Photo books are growing strongly and so too are calendars and wall art. The market is also changing in that some products are commoditized – prints are really commoditized and it is all about price; canvas prints have gone that way as well. Photo books are more difficult to commoditize because part of the photo book is not just product but how the product is created and it is more differentiable. A photo book is very different depending on how you experience it whereas a print is a print is a print. That is why we concentrate on photo books because we think we can differentiate our offering against anyone else’s with our software, the inspiration and the support and the product itself. You mentioned your software, I have tried it and found it is easy to use while being very versatile too. I liked being able to work offline too. How important has the app been in your success? Our app is key to our business and the are several reasons why ours is a good solution. With bigger and bigger files even with the fastest broadband it is still quite a challenge so doing it offline is preferable. We know a lot of people want to go online and create quick and easy photo books but we purposefully don’t position the CEWE Photobook brand to compete with that. We can do those and our entry level price is £5.99 generally and that competes with any of them but we tend to focus on people who spend time creating their books and really value the beauty of it. Our belief is if you spend a couple of hours on a photo book and you get an A6 booklet you will be pleased but not bowled over by it. If you invest the same amount of time and get a 12-inch square book with lay-flat photographic paper you will be wowed by it with the same investment of time. Has there been growth in the bigger photo book sizes? Absolutely, generally what we find is that people are starting to trade up more and more. The A4 landscape book is where most people start and we help customers trade up, not just in size but also in paper type, finish and number of pages. Part of the reason for doing this is that we bring people into our heartland where we provide the best products out of the price competition area. Every site says their books are wonderful and well made but when you get two books side by side you see the difference. When a year later the binding is starting to come apart

you really see the difference. But of course people don't buy two books and generally don't test over a year so we have to get people to trust us that we give the best quality. This is where Trustpilot and the like are so important, where there are real reviews from real people. Everyone tells me that we don't print enough compared with when we shot film, is this true? It is a funny one and a question I get asked a lot. Now people share pictures by passing their mobile phone around or by social media. The reality is that people are taking more pictures than ever before and I saw a statistic the other day that says in the next two years we will make more prints than in the history of photography to date. As a percentage fewer people are printing photographs and that’s true, but the number of photos we are printing off is more than ever before – it is just a smaller proportion of the pictures that get taken. People are printing off in different ways. So take an average photo book which might have 100 pictures, that is a higher added value to the customer and to us as the producer than 100 prints which is what we used to do. So the number of photos we are printing off is going up all the time, and the format of those prints is very different. What we are trying to say is take time to look at the pictures you treasure and share them, and we help to make things as easy as possible. It seems wherever you go people are taking photographs with their smartphones. Is this reflected in CEWE’s turnover? While we don’t really aim at people using their smartphones it is now the most popular capture device for images in our photo books. The iPhone is the number one capturing device in our photo books, overtaking Canon DSLRs. What is next for CEWE UK? Our focus in the UK is to get the CEWE brand and in particular the CEWE Photobook brand, firstly well known and then widely recognised as the best, so our aim right now is to get the CEWE brand out there. What makes you proud working for CEWE? I do feel proud every day of the products we make. It is a cliché but it is true. You go round the lab and you see prints coming off and these are not just pieces of paper with prints on, they are real peoples’ lives and these are really important to people. cewe-photoworld.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


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Photography News Issue 42 absolutephoto.com

Awards Gear of the year

Photography News Awards 2016 WINNERS The

Over the past few months we have been asking you to vote for what you consider to be the best imaging kit on the shelves. You voted in your thousands, so thank you very much for your support. We’ve had the abacus out and done some counting… and here are the results. Well done to all the winners!

Photography needs equipment, whether that is a biscuit tin with a pinhole, a bag to carry your kit around in or the latest camera complete with bells and whistles. The great thing nowadays is that the huge breadth of kit available to help us produce pictures means we don’t want for choice. In fact, if anything, there is too much choice.

Our annual Awards, voted for by Photography News readers, aims to recognise truly outstanding kit and as you go through the roll call of winners we think you’ll agree that this year’s winning crop is quite exceptional. Sadly, not everything can win, so our heartfelt commiserations to the nominees for getting there but not quite, as well as massive

congratulations to the winners and thanks to our readers for your support. The Photography News team will be giving the winners their trophies at The Photography Show at the Birmingham NEC, 18-21 March. If you’re going to the show, please drop by the Photography News stand (in the food gallery area) and say hello.


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Photography News Issue 42 absolutephoto.com

Awards CONSUMER DSLR WINNER: Sony A77 II Nominations: • Canon EOS 80D • Canon EOS 1300D • Nikon D3400 • Nikon D7200 • Pentax K-3 II

ADVANCED DSLR Winner: Nikon D500
 Nominations: • Canon EOS 7D Mark ll • Nikon Df • Nikon D810 • Pentax K-1 PROFESSIONAL DSLR Winner: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Nominations: • Canon EOS 5DS/5DS R • Canon EOS-1D X Mark II • Nikon D5 • Sony A99 II CONSUMER CSC Winner: Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II Nominations: • Fujifilm X-E2S • Fujifilm X-T10 • Olympus PEN E-PL8 • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX80 • Sigma sd Quattro

ADVANCED CSC Winner: Fujifilm X-T2 Nominations: • Canon EOS M5 • Leica T • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II • Olympus PEN-F • Sony A6300 PROFESSIONAL CSC Winner: Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II Nominations: • Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Leica SL • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4 • Sony A7R II • Sony A6500 COMPACT Winner: Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II Nominations: • Fujifilm X70 • Leica Q • Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX15 • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 Mark V • Sony Cyber-shot RX1R Mark II MEDIUM-FORMAT Winner: Hasselblad X1D Nominations:

• • • •

Hasselblad H6D-100c Leica S Pentax 645Z
 Phase One XF 100MP

WIDE-ANGLE ZOOM Winner: Sigma 12-24mm f/4 DG HSM Art Nominations: • Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM • Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM
 • Pentax-D HD FA 15-30mm f/2.8 ED SDM WR • Sigma 24-35mm f/2 DG HSM Art
 • Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD STANDARD ZOOM Winner: Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Nominations: • Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM • Fujifilm XF16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR 
 • Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR • Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art • Tamron SP 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD

MACRO Winner: Tamron SP 90mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Macro Nominations: • Fujifilm XF60mm f/2.4 R Macro
 • Leica APO-Macro-Elmarit-TL 60mm f/2.8 ASPH • Olympus M.Zuiko ED 30mm f/3.5 Macro • Samyang 100mm f/2.8 ED UMC Macro 
 • Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM VIDEO LENS Winner: Samyang 50mm T1.3 ED AS UMC CS Nominations: • Samyang 21mm T1.5 ED AS UMC CS • XEEN 50mm T1.5 • XEEN 85mm T1.5 • Zeiss Loxia 50mm f/2

ON-CAMERA FLASH Winner: Pixapro Li-ION580 ETTL Nominations: • Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT • Kenro Speedflash KFL101 • Metz 64 AF-1 Digital
 
 • Phottix Mitros+ • Sigma EF-630

TELEPHOTO ZOOM Winner: Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5.6-6.3 Di VC USD G2 Nominations: • Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM • Fujifilm XF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR • Nikon AF-S 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR • Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sport • Sigma 50-100mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art SUPERZOOM Winner: Nikon AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nominations: • Fujifilm XF18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR
 • Olympus M.Zuiko ED 14-150mm f/4-5.6 II • Olympus M.Zuiko ED 12-100mm f/4 IS Pro • Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Macro • Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di VC PZD

TRIPOD: CARBON-FIBRE Winner: Kenro Karoo Ultimate Travel Tripod 401C Nominations: • Benro Mach3 TMA28C
 • Gitzo Systematic 3
 • Manfrotto 055 3-section • Nest Systematic NT-5303CK • Novo Explora T10

TRIPOD: TRAVEL Winner: Benro FTA18CC Travel Angel Nominations: • Vanguard VEO 265AB • Gitzo GT1555T • Kenro Karoo Standard Travel Tripod 104C • Manfrotto BeFree Carbon • Nest Traveller NT-6264CK

PORTABLE FLASH Winner: Elinchrom ELB 400 with Quadra HS head Nominations: • Bowens XMT500 • Broncolor Siros 400 L • Phottix Indra360 TTL • Pixapro CITI 600 TTL • Profoto B2 MONOBLOC FLASH Winner: Profoto D2 Nominations: • Bowens XMS500
 • Broncolor Siros 400 L • Elinchrom ELC Pro HD • Lencarta SuperFast 600 • Westcott Strobelite Plus

PRIME: WIDE-ANGLE Winner: Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art
 Nominations: • Laowa 12mm f/2.8 Zero-D • Nikon AF-S 24mm f/1.8G ED
 • Samyang 20mm f/1.8 ED AS UMC CS • Voigtländer 10.5mm f/0.95 Nokton • Zeiss 12mm f/2.8 E Touit PRIME: STANDARD Winner: Fujifilm XF35mm f/2 R WR Nominations: • Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM • Olympus M.Zuiko ED 25mm f/1.2 Pro • Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art
 • Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD
 • Voigtländer 25mm f/0.95 Nokton II PRIME: TELEPHOTO Winner: Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 Nominations: • Fujifilm XF90mm f/2 R LM WR • Laowa 105mm f/2 STF • Nikon 105mm f/1.4E ED • Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art • Tamron SP 85mm f/1.8 Di VC USD

MAINS FLASH: POWER PACK Winner: Profoto Pro-10 Nominations: • Broncolor Scoro S 1600 RFS • Elinchrom Digital 1200 RX TRIPOD: ALUMINIUM Winner: Manfrotto 290 Dual Aluminium 3-section Nominations: • Benro COM37AL • Nest NT-6294AK • Slik Pro 700 DX • Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT • Velbon SUB-65

CONTINUOUS LIGHT Winner: Westcott Flex Bi-Color mat Nominations: • Bowens Mosaic2 Bi-Colour LED panel • F&V Z400S Soft Bi-color • Ice Light 2 • Kenro NanGuang CN-900CSA
 • Litepanels Astra 1x1 Soft Bi-color



25

Photography News Issue 42 absolutephoto.com

Awards COLOUR MANAGEMENT DEVICE Winner: X-Rite ColorMunki Display
 Nominations: • Color Confidence GrafiLite • DataColor Spyder5PRO • DataColor Spyder5CAPTURE PRO • X-Rite ColorMunki Smile • X-Rite i1Display Pro

STUDIO/LIGHTING ACCESSORY Winner: Rogue FlashBender 2 XL Pro Nominations: • CamRanger • Elinchrom EL-Skyport Plus HS • Lastolite Urban backgrounds • Manfrotto Digital Director • Phottix Odin II

PHOTO BACKPACK Winner: Lowepro Pro Runner BP 350 AW II 
 Nominations: • Lowepro ProTactic 350 AW • Manfrotto Pro Advanced Rear Access • Nest Diverse 20 Modular backpack • Paxis Mt Pickett 20 • Tamrac Anvil Slim 15


MONITOR Winner: BenQ PV270 Pro 27in IPS Nominations: • Eizo ColorEdge CG277 27in
 • NEC Multisync PA322UHD 32in • Samsung 32in UD970 UHD • ViewSonic VP2468

FILTER Winner: Lee Filters Big Stopper
 Nominations • Cokin Nuances


 • Hoya Fusion Antistatic filters • Hoya ProND family • Lee Filters Landscape Polariser • Marumi DHG Super Circular Polariser

MEMORY CARD Winner: PNY Elite Performance SDXC UHS-I/U3 Nominations: • Delkin Devices Cinema SDXC UHS-II V90
 • Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC/SDXC UHS-II • PNY Elite Performance SDXC UHS-I/U3 • Samsung SDXC Pro Plus UHS-I
 • SanDisk Extreme PRO SDHC/SDXC UHS-II • Toshiba Exceria Pro UHS-II EXTERNAL STORAGE DEVICE Winner: Samsung Portable SSD T3 Nominations: • Drobo 5C • G-Technology G-Drive with Thunderbolt • LaCie Porsche Design Desktop Drive • Seagate Innov8 • Western Digital My Book

SHOULDER/SLING BAG Winner: Nest Hiker 30 Nominations: • Crumpler Proper Roady Photo 7500 • Lowepro Slingshot Edge 250 AW • Vanguard VEO 37 • Tamrac Corona 14 • Tenba Cooper 15

MOVIE ACCESSORY OF THE YEAR Winner: G-Technology G Drive ev RaW Nominations: • Atomos Ninja Flame • Micromuff family • Saramonic SR-AX107 Audio Adapter
 • Shape Monitor Cages • Syrp Slingshot

ROLLER/HARD CASE Winner: Manfrotto Professional Roller Bag 50 Nominations: • Lowepro PhotoStream RL 150 • Nest Odyssey 10
 
 • Panzer Conqueror 31 • Peli iM2450 Storm Case • Tenba Roadie II Hybrid

360° CAMERA OF THE YEAR Winner: Kodak Pixpro SP360 4K Nominations: • 360fly 4K • Nikon KeyMission 360 • Ricoh Theta S • Samsung Gear 360

INNOVATION Winner: Fujifilm GFX mirrorless medium-format camera system Nominations: • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Dual Pixel Raw • Hasselblad X1D mirrorless medium-format system • Nikon D5 – ISO up to 3,280,000 • Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II superfast continuous shooting • Profoto D2 and Pro-10 super-short flash duration

INKJET PRINTER Winner: Epson SureColor SC-P600 Nominations: • Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 • Canon PIXMA PRO-100S • Canon PIXMA TS9050 • Epson SureColor SC-P400 • Epson SureColor SC-P800

BEST RETAILER Winner: Jessops BEST HIRE CENTRE Winner: Calumet Rental

BEST INSURANCE PROVIDER Winner: Aaduki Multimedia Insurance

INKJET MEDIA: PHOTOGRAPHIC FINISH Winner: PermaJet FB Gold Silk 315gsm Nominations: • DaVinci Fibre Gloss Silk 310gsm
 • Fotospeed Photo Smooth Pearl 290 • Hahnemühle Photo Silk Baryta 310 • Ilford Galerie Prestige Gold Fibre Silk 310 • Innova Exhibition Cotton Gloss 335gsm

LAUNCH Winner: Fujifilm X-Pro2
 Nominations: • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

 • Canon EOS-1D X Mark II • Fujifilm X-T2 • Hasselblad X1D • Nikon D5

INKJET MEDIA: FINE ART FINISH Winner: Hahnemühle William Turner 310gsm Nominations: • Canson Infinity Rag Photographique 310gsm • Epson Hot Press Bright 330gsm
 • Fotospeed Smooth Cotton 300 Signature • Innova Fabriano Artistico Watercolour Rag 310gsm • PermaJet Museum Heritage 310

MOVIE CAMERA OF THE YEAR Winner: Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Nominations: • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV • Canon XC15 • Fujifilm X-T2
 • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II • Sony A7S II

BEST PROCESSING LAB Winner: Loxley Colour BEST BOOK SERVICE Winner: CEWE PHOTOBOOKS PHOTO WEBSITE PROVIDER Winner: Zenfolio TRAINING PROVIDER Winner: Jessops Academy


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

26 In association with

IMAT LT

E

© Kingsley Singleton

Wide awake

U

Technique

Get up to speed with this month’s Ultimate Guide to Lenses. Looking to buy, improve your technique, or embrace some exciting projects then you’ve come to the right place... Words Kingsley Singleton Pictures by Will Cheung and Kingsley Singleton

© Kingsley Singleton

PART 1

© Will Cheung

Getting to grips with lenses can make all the difference to your photography; each distinct type that you fit to your DSLR or CSC can change the way you see the world in a profound way, and that’s why photographers are so keen to pick the right models and use them in the correct way. Last issue, we looked at telephotos; this time it’s the opposite end of the scale – wide-angles. Wide-angle lenses are considered those with focal lengths shorter than about 40mm in the 35mm format, and anything below about 20mm is extreme wide-angle. In APS-C format a wide-angle is anything shorter than 30mm. The shorter the focal length, the wider the field-of-view will be, and things get even broader when you encounter fish-eye optics; while regular wide-angles fight distortion to keep the view as natural as possible, fisheyes embrace it showing severe bowing in straight lines like the horizon. A wide field of view also affects how objects appear based on their distance. It exaggerates the sense of depth in the opposite way to how a telephoto compresses it. To see this in action, find a scene with two distinct objects in it, near and far. At wide-angle, compose with the closer of them at the bottom of the frame and the more distant object will look tiny. Switch to a standard or telephoto focal length and they’ll be more similar in size. Many think wide-angles are only for landscapes. A broad field of view will certainly let you shoot expansive scenes. But wide lenses can also focus more closely than standard and telephoto options, so you can fill the frame with details. So, it’s not just about scenic shots; their properties make them perfect for architecture, interiors, abstracts and stylistic portraits.

Pick the right lens

Everything you need to know about choosing a wide-angle lens Picking a wide-angle means making a decision based on lots of factors. Not least, there’s price, and you won’t see much change out of £300 for a basic wide-angle. Of course, at the top end, you can spend thousands on a fast aperture ultrawide.

© Kingsley Singleton

© Kingsley Singleton

Above Wide-angle lenses change the way you see the world. Taken in the same location but at different camera to subject distances, the shot on the left uses a wide-angle 24mm focal length, while the one on the right is closer to 80mm. The difference is clear. The wide-angle view makes close objects much larger in comparison to the background, while the longer focal length keeps the subjects at a more similar size.

What focal length do you need? Depending on your camera, the first place to look is for focal lengths of 40mm and below. But why ‘depending on your camera’? Well although the cropping effect of smaller sensors (like APS-C and Micro Four Thirds) can be a benefit to telephoto lenses (you get more reach), it means you often can’t shoot as wide as you’d like at the other end. For instance, a 24mm lens on a full-frame camera would give a much broader view than on an APS-C camera where, due to the crop factor, it’d be around 36mm or 38mm; still wide-angle, but less so. If you’re a full-frame user, it’s also important to realise that lenses designed for smaller sensors won’t necessarily work on your camera, or may require in-camera cropping. Specialist lenses designed to give

very wide views on APS-C cameras project a smaller image circle than a full-frame lens. So, if you use one on a full-frame camera you’ll see lots of vignetting. Lens names help identify this; on Nikon it’s DX, on Canon EF-S, and on Sigma, it’s DC. The temptation is to go for extreme wide-angle lenses, those starting around 10mm or 12mm, but remember these can be trickier to use; you’ll get a massive fieldof-view, but you need to be careful when composing, to avoid empty foreground and tiny distant subjects. Prime or zoom? Fast or slow? Zoom lenses allow a range of focal lengths, and primes just one, so which type of lens you need depends on how flexibly you need to frame. Zooms are more adaptable, so you can reframe without moving your feet. On the other hand, primes can make you work harder at your compositions. Prime lenses will also often offer faster maximum apertures and improved image quality thanks to their simplified design (though of course this isn’t always the case!).


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

27

Technique

In association with

How to decode a wide-angle lens

3 5

8

© Nathan Hale

6

9

2 4

10

1 7 1

Front element

On a wide-angle lens, the front element will often be large and bulbous; and as these lenses focus close to the subject, you should take care not to knock it. Many lenses also have water and oil-repellent coatings, which can make cleaning easier.

2

Lens hood

A lens hood helps cut out light sources like the sun, which can cause lens flare. They’re particularly useful at wide-angle where the increased fieldof-view makes it more likely. Lens hood also protect the front element from knocks, and some wide-angles have one built in.

3

Filter thread

Filter thread size varies from model to model, and you’ll need to know this to fit screw-on filters or a filter holders. Some wide-angles, like the Sigma 12-24mm Art pictured above don’t have a filter thread, so a specialist holder must be used.

4

Focus ring

The focus ring is used to manually focus the lens, and also, in the certain AF modes, to make minor corrections to autofocus.

5

Maximum aperture

6

Focus distance window

This states how wide the aperture will open; on wide-angle zooms, the aperture may be variable, closing as you extend the focal length. Wide apertures are useful when exposing and focusing in low-light.

Here you’ll be able to read the focus distance in metres, and feet, between infinity and the lens’s closest focusing distance. On some wideangles you’ll also get a depth-of-field scale, helping you judge what’s in focus and what isn’t.

© Kingsley Singleton © Will Cheung

On some zooms you can use the same maximum aperture at all focal lengths. If the maximum aperture is f/2.8 or wider, these are called ‘fast zooms’. On other zooms the maximum aperture is variable – for example, f/2.8-4 – and you won’t be able to shoot with the same setting at the long end as you can at the short. Variable maximum aperture lenses are often less expensive than constant aperture zooms. Whether you need a fast zoom depends on what kind of light you’ll be working in. A wider maximum aperture lets in more light, allowing you to use faster shutter speeds. Fast wide-angles are important for shooting night landscapes with starry skies or aurora; these fast zooms will be bigger and weightier than those with variable apertures. Using filters on wide lenses One of the prime uses of wide-angle lenses is landscaping, so it’s well worth checking what size filters you’ll need when buying – or if you’ll need an adapter to fit them. Wide lenses will often need filters as a wider field-of-view usually means more sky and that equates to greater dynamic range. Though many wide-angles have accessory threads allowing you to mount filters and filter holders, some extreme wide-angle lenses have very bulbous front elements and

7

Controls

Switches here will include features like switching from auto (AF) to manual focus (MF), and activating the image stabilisation mode if the lens has it. Sigma has OS (Optical Stabilisation) technology in its armoury – although it 8 is not featured on this lens.

Focal length On wide-angle zoom lenses, there will be two focal lengths written here, denoting the widest and longest settings. If it’s a prime, the lens is restricted to a single focal length and you’ll need to move your feet to reframe.

built in lens hoods that don’t allow conventional filters to fit. You’ll need a special adapter for these models, like Lee Filters’ SW150 system. On very wide lenses, you may find that your regular filter holder becomes visible as vignetting, too. Polarising filters won’t work in the same way as on longer focal lengths, either. To get the maximum effect of a polariser you need to shoot at 90º to the sun, but your wide view may stretch to well over 100º; with so much of the scene covered, the effect will be patchy. Focusing and image stabilisation Arguably, because of their principal uses, wide-angles don’t need to focus all that quickly, or feature image stabilisation. That said, it depends on how you’re intending to use the lens. For instance, if you’re planning to use a 17-40mm, or 1635mm handheld as a lens for travel or general photography you might be glad of image stabilisation to sharpen your exposures; camera shake is less noticeable at wideangle, but it’s better to have stabilisation than not. The extra speed afforded by a focusing motor in the lens, like Sigma’s Hyper Sonic Motor, will help you lock on to fleeting subjects, too. Wide-angles naturally feature closer focusing distances than lenses with longer focal lengths,

9

Zoom ring

On wide-angle zoom lenses, the zoom ring is used to set the focal length from the from the widest to the longest settings the lens allows. Prime lenses won’t have one of these, of course.

10

Lens mount

The mounting point between lens and camera. A metal lens mount will offer greater strength and durability, and many lenses have weather sealing here, too, to protect the camera and the lens contacts which transfer exposure and focusing information.

and closer focusing means enlarged detail, but make sure to compare minimum focusing distances to see how close you can go. Distortions and build Some level of barrel distortion (outward bowing lines) used to be part and parcel of wide lenses, but many now claim to feature ‘zero distortion’. The less the lens distorts, the less editing you’ll need to do on the computer, although some softwares do this automatically. Some cameras offer integral correction too. A level of weather sealing is a good thing. Although you should always try to protect the lens in dusty, humid or rainy conditions, weather sealing means you don’t need to worry as much and can continue shooting when other lenses would lose functionality. Top left Sensors smaller than full frame (24x36mm) will crop the view from a lens, so the field of view won’t be as wide as you’d think. Here, the main image was shot at 28mm, while the cropped view gives an effective focal length of 42mm. Bottom left Very wide and fisheye lenses can give a highly distorted view. Pictures from them can look amazing when they’re used creatively though.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

29 In association with

PART 2

Technique

Get more from your wide-angle lens Improve your wide-angle technique with these four easy-to-follow tips © Kingsley Singleton

Increased field-of-view means dynamic range is likely to be higher across the frame. Compare this with the cropped view of a telephoto lens, and you’ll generally find less contrast variation. High dynamic range in a scene means the camera can’t record all of if correctly in a single exposure, so some parts end up being too bright or too dark; it’ll look fine to the naked eye, but typically, in landscapes, the sky will be too bright or the land too dark. The traditional way to control this is to use graduated ND filters, which have clear and darkened sections and come in various strengths. Place one of these over the lens, so the dark part sits over the brightest areas and you’ll equalise the light. The modern route is to shoot in Raw mode and process the image in software. During processing you can use digital grads, or brushes to darken the parts you want. Alternatively, you can use your camera’s bracketing mode. This will shoot several exposures, typically three, five or seven shots, altering the lightness each time. You can then either pick the best, or blend two or more in Photoshop to achieve the results you want.

© Kingsley Singleton

1 Deal with dynamic range

2 Fill the frame The short focal lengths of wide-angle lenses provide a very wide field-of-view, and this in turn exaggerates depth. Close-up objects seem very large, while distant ones get smaller. This causes a problem in many wide-angle shots, which have lots of foreground, but very little for the eye to settle on in the distance. The wider you go, the more exaggerated depth becomes, and with many photographers drawn to those extreme wide angles, it can lead to poor composition, with too much space around the subject. To fix this, you can do two things. If you have a wide-angle zoom, try pushing in a little and using one of the longer focal lengths. Going from 12mm to 24mm, should see the foreground and background equalise a little, though you’ll almost certainly need to recompose and move back a little if you want to include the same foreground element. The second method, is simply to move your feet. If possible, get closer to the subject and, if required, find new foreground interest nearer to it. This way you’ll be able to fill the frame more easily and avoid large, blank areas that can spoil a shot.

✘ © Kingsley Singleton

✔ © Kingsley Singleton

© Kingsley Singleton

© Nathan Hale

© Nathan Hale

© Kingsley Singleton

3 Combat converging verticals and distortions

Because of their broad field-of-view and construction, wide-angle lenses are more likely to show certain distortions and problems than longer lenses. These problems include converging verticals, where buildings will seem to topple over backwards, barrel distortion which causes a bowing of straight lines, and also lens flare, where the light source reduces contrast and causes ghosting. Converging verticals occur in any lens, they’re just more obvious in wide-angle shots. Your pics don’t need to be totally free from them, but too much distortion will look unnatural. The only way to remove converging verticals is keep your shooting position level; any tilt up or down will send the vertical lines off balance. This is difficult if you’re close to the subject, and it’s tall, so try moving away from the subject. You can also use lens correction

software features to straighten things up after the event, but you will loose some of the picture to cropping this way. Allowing for more room around the subject when taking the shots will help. Many modern wide-angles show very little distortion and some, like Sigma’s 12-24mm Art lens, claim none at all. There’s nothing in shooting you can do to help, aside from switching on lens corrections in the camera (these can also be applied in your editing software). When it comes to lens flare, there are several things you can do. The most obvious is to make sure you’re using the lens’s supplied hood, which should cut out the light source causing the problem. If it’s outside of your composition, and still causing problems shield the lens front from the light source with your hand or a card.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

30

Technique PART 3

In association with

Get creative with your wide lenses Four simple projects to shoot with your wide-angle lens.

We just told you how to get rid of converging vertical lines if you want to. Well now how about using them to your advantage? With the right subject shot in the right way you can use those converging lines to lead the eye into the pic, accentuating height or depth. The trick here is to find a location or subject where there are enough lines to balance each side of the frame, or where there’s enough detail to balance the composition. Otherwise the effect will seem lopsided. In the latter case, it comes back to filling the frame as much as possible, because those converging lines will draw the eye to something so strongly, there’d better be something for it to rest on. In the example images, simply shooting wide and angling up at the tree in a horizontal framing doesn’t do it justice; it looks unbalanced and unsteady. But getting in closer I was able to fill the lower right of the frame with the trunk, forming an anchor, so that the eye follows the branches up and through to the bright leaves.

© Nathan Hale

1 Shoot vertical for impact

© Kingsley Singleton

© Kingsley Singleton

2 Exaggerate the foreground The majority of landscape pictures rely on strong foreground to anchor the composition, and draw the eye into the frame – and wide-angle lenses really help with this. Because of the way they enlarge close subjects via a wide field-of-view and can focus closer than other lenses, you can get big, detailed foregrounds with ease. To really enlarge the foreground, especially when it’s small or you want to make the most of fine details, you’ll need to focus as closely as possible, so first check your wide-angle lens’s minimum focusing distance. For example, the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 Art lens used here has a minimum of just under 28cm. Next set your camera on a tripod and compose so that the foreground is very close to the minimum distance, but not inside it, or it won’t be fully sharp. Now use the AF, or manually focus on the foreground. Finally, before shooting, switch to aperture-priority mode (A or Av) and set a high f/number like f/14 or f/16 to hold as much of the scene in focus as possible. You may find that focusing so close affects sharpness in the distance. So after the first shot, take pictures focused on the middle ground, then background. If required, you can then merge the separate exposure in Photoshop to ensure sharpness throughout the scene.

© Kingsley Singleton

© Kingsley Singleton

© Nathan Hale


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

33

Technique

In association with

4 Capture a wide-angle portrait © Kingsley Singleton

Typically, wide-angle lenses are avoided by portrait photographers because they naturally distort the subject, which is usually seen as unflattering. And this isn’t just about the barrel distortion that affects many wide-angle optics; the way that a large field-of-view accentuates closer objects also means that any facial features close to the camera will look more bulbous and pronounced. However, if you really embrace this effect and use it on the right kind of subjects it can be a winner, giving a characterful, comical or even gruesome look to your portraits. Attach a wide-angle lens, or even a fisheye optic if you have one, then frame up on your subject. You’ll need

to get a lot closer than normal, and for the maximum distortion try composing as close to the lens’s minimum focusing distance as possible, which could be just a few centimetres. You’ll also need to turn off any in camera distortion correction if you want the most exaggerated effect. Shooting in aperture-priority mode (A or Av), decide on the amount of picture you want to be in focus and set the aperture accordingly. When shooting with wide-angles, you can get a decent level of front-to-back sharpness even with middling f/numbers like f/5.6 or f/8, but if you want some separation between subject and background, set a low f/number like f/2.8.

© Kingsley Singleton

✘ © Kingsley Singleton

✘ © Kingsley Singleton

✔ © Kingsley Singleton

© Kingsley Singleton

© Nathan Hale

A broad field-of-view can cause problems when it comes to dynamic range; with very dark and very light areas in a composition, you many find the camera struggles to correctly expose the whole scene. But you can also embrace this. The sun – or any light source – will be brighter than the rest of the scene, so normally, you’d try to compose without it. But with the right camera settings it’ll form a pleasing starburst. This can happen on almost any lens, but wide-angles make it easier, because the large field-of-view keeps the light source small. Although we’re often told not to look at the sun through a lens, with wide-angles it’s safer but using live view avoids any risk. To get a sunburst you’ll need to set a small aperture, so in aperture-priority mode (A or Av), dial in a high f/number like f/16 or f/22. Also, try not to focus too close, or the ’burst will lose sharpness in the distance. As exposing in this way can be tricky, try shooting in Raw, or bracketing, so you can tweak exposure in software. The starburst effect will be exaggerated if the sun is partially obscured by another object in the landscape or poking through the branches of trees, and you should make sure your lens and any filters are free from dust or water droplets – if not these show up and look messy (see top).

© Nathan Hale

3 Add starbursts to your landscapes

Next month Next time in Photography News’s Ultimate Guide to Lenses, discover a whole new world with standard lenses. You probably own one already, but we show you why it might be worth upgrading your existing one or considering the prime option.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

34

Advertisement feature

Olympus at The Photography Show Get up close and personal with the OM-D E-M1 Mark II and the rest of the Olympus range at stand D91, where the Olympus team of experts will be on hand to show you the system’s full potential

At this year’s Photography Show you’ll be able to get your hands on Olympus’ flagship OM-D E-M1 Mark II. Announced in September last year, the OM-D E-M1 Mark II reached new limits with its blazingly fast 60 framesper-second shooting speed. In continuous autofocus the camera can shoot at 18fps, but switch to the OM-D E-M1 Mark II’s Pro Capture mode and you’ll be able to capture shots at 60fps in single autofocus. To help you freeze instant moments the camera will buffer shots at 14fps while the shutter is half pressed, and then record at 60fps as you fully push down the shutter. What’s more, with on-chip phase detection and a 121-point hybrid autofocus system the E-M1 Mark II can focus quickly and precisely making it perfect for wildlife and sports photographers.

Improving on the sensor of its predecessor the OM-D E-M1 Mark II features a 22-megapixel sensor and also features a high-res shot mode which merges shots to create a 50-megapixel file. As the first Olympus camera to feature 4K video, videographers can capture pro-quality footage and with the in-camera image stabilisation you’ll get steady footage even when handheld. Couple the camera with the M.ZUIKO 12-100mm f/4 PRO lens which features its own image stabilisation and you’ll be amazed at the results. Another first for Olympus is the inclusion of dual memory slots. The camera’s tilting touchscreen allows you to compose images with ease and you can also tap the screen to focus and shoot. All of these features are packed

Visit the Olympus stand at The Photography Show, at the Birmingham NEC, 18-21 March, stand D91. olympus.co.uk

The OM-D E-M1 Mark II reached new limits with its blazing fast 60 frames-per-second shooting speed into a weather-resistant body that incredibly weighs just 574g. Find out more by visiting the Olympus stand at D91. If you already have an OM-D E-M1 Mark II visit olympus-imagespace. co.uk to see a range of exclusive events for OM-D E-M1 Mark II owners, plus more Olympus events.

Above With a rugged design the OM-D E-M1 can withstand freezing temperatures, dirt and moisture for all-weather shooting.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

35

Advertisement feature Free sensor cleaning

The Olympus PRO Service

Olympus users can take advantage of a free sensor clean with the Olympus ‘Check and Clean’ service. Bring your camera along to the show and visit the Check and Clean counter on the Olympus stand (D91) to book your camera in for cleaning. Make sure to visit early so you don’t miss out!

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II owners can take advantage of the Olympus PRO Service for a range of benefits. With three different packages available you can choose the service that suits you best; the free Standard Plus package, which covers one body and one lens, the Advanced package which covers one body and three lenses and costs £119 per annum, or the Elite package, priced at £199 per annum, which covers two OM-D E-M1 Mark II bodies and up to six lenses. The Olympus PRO Service programme gives OM-D E-M1 Mark II owners priority customer service and help on hand when needed. Support can be accessed via phone, email or video call. The Olympus team will be on hand at the show where you can visit the Pro Service counter to find out more and sign-up. olympus.co.uk

An audience with For the duration of The Photography Show Olympus Visionaries and Ambassadors will be hosting free sessions on the Olympus stand (D91) and talking about their work, the Olympus system and photography tips and tricks. Sat 18 March 12:15 Marcus Clackson 13:30 Gavin Hoey 15:00 Steve Gosling

Sun 19 March 11:00 Tesni Ward 12:15 Steve Gosling 13:30 Damian McGillicuddy 15:00 Gavin Hoey

Mon 20 March 11:00 Tesni Ward 12:15 Peter Dench 13:30 Damian McGillicuddy 15:00 Mike Inkley

Tues 21 March 11:00 Damian McGillicuddy 12:15 Mike Inkley 13:30 Peter Dench 15:00 Tesni Ward

Olympus magazine’s 50th issue

© Mike Inkley

© Steve Gosling

© Marcus Clackson

Olympus magazine will be celebrating its 50th issue and to mark the occasion we’ll be bringing a limited number of exclusive printed copies to The Photography Show. Inside this issue we’ve got an interview with photography legend Tony McGee, business and marketing tips from professional wedding photographer John Nassari, plus your chance to win an OM-D E-M1 Mark II with M.ZUIKO 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO lens. To read the digital version and sign up to get it delivered to your inbox bi-monthly, visit olympusmag.co.uk – it’s completely free!

© Gavin Hoey © Mike Inkley

© Gavin Hoey

© Marcus Clackson © Mike Inkley

© Steve Gosling


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

36

Camera Club of the Year

in association with

Camera Club of the Year contest 2016-17

Three down, two to go. Five camera clubs will battle it out for the title of Camera Club of the Year and three have already made the final. If you want your club to join them you have to qualify by winning one of the remaining two rounds. Here’s how…

Welcome to Round 4 of the Photography News Camera Club of the Year 2016-17 contest. Your club’s target is to win this round and qualify for the final. It is as simple as that and the contest’s theme is a challenging one: action. See opposite for some expert tips from Fujifilm ambassador Jeff Carter. Qualify for the final itself and your club is in for something quite interesting, the details of which will be released simultaneously to the five finalists. However, what we can reveal now is that the final will be a unique event that will offer a tremendous creative challenge and a never-to-be-forgotten experience for the deserving finalists. This year’s contest is sponsored by Fujifilm which should give you a big clue as to what the final challenge could be. The club that emerges top of the pile after the final shoot-out will thoroughly deserve the honour and prestige of being our Camera Club of the Year 2016-17. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves here so let’s start with how you qualify for the final. Your club’s competition secretary (or whoever is going to enter each round) must sign up on absolutephoto.com. Terms and conditions are also available on the website. Any club or group is eligible to enter so long as

there are at least five members. Online groups, internal company clubs and those clubs not affiliated to the PAGB can also enter. Once you’ve signed up, go to the Members Area on the top menu bar, click on that and you will see Camera Club of the Year 2016‑17 in the drop-down menu. Select that, then register your camera club and follow the upload instructions. JPEG files should be at least 1500 pixels on the longest dimension, under 2MB in size and, preferably, in the sRGB colour space. A club can only enter one set of five images from five different members each round, while failure to enter five shots will mean the missing shot/s scores zero points; so it’s crucial to enter the full number of images. If, by mistake, six images are entered (it has happened this year already) only the first five will be scored. After the closing date each picture will be scored out of 20 points and the highest scoring club each month will qualify for the final. In the event of tied scores, we will ignore the highest and lowest scores and average out the three remaining scores. The highest score wins. If scores are still tied, all five scores will be averaged out. When the issue with that month’s result is published, the scores for every picture entered

will be published on the website so you can see how you’ve done. There’s no monthly prize apart from qualifying for the final shoot-out and once a club has qualified for the final it need not enter again. Of course your club can do it for the challenge and pictures will still be scored, but there’s no reward for winning in this instance. In effect, because each monthly contest is self-contained, ie. it’s not a league system over the period of the contest, you do not have to enter every month – perhaps it’s a theme

the club is less strong at or the club’s contest secretary has gone on holiday. Clearly it makes sense to give yourself as many chances to win as possible, however. So, good luck everyone. Read the entry details again, check out the theme on the opposite page and start working on your club’s entry. Remember, you need five strong shots with high scoring potential. Qualify for the final and your club could be joining us for a very special photography event with the title of Camera Club of the Year to be won.

Fujifilm’s latest mirrorless model, the X-T20 The X-T20 is a 24.3-megapixel mirrorless camera that can shoot great stills as well as both Full HD and 4K video. It features the same style of design with a centred pentaprism and large control as the X-T2 to give DSLR-type handling. The camera is founded on an X-Trans CMOS III sensor, the same as that seen on Fujifilm’s X-Pro2 and X-T2 flagship cameras, and so you can expect picture quality to be straight out of the top drawer with richly coloured, detailpacked and low-noise images. The native ISO range is 200 to 12,800 and that is expandable to ISO 51,200 at the high-speed end. Thanks to a tilting LCD monitor and the touch shot function of the X-T20, taking shots from low or high angles is made easier. Use the Auto Mode Selector and the camera will even choose the best settings for a variety of scenes. Of course many photographers like to take control and the X-T20 is fully equipped in that respect with richly featured exposure, whitebalance and autofocus systems. Ideal whether you are shooting static or fast moving subjects, the X-T20 has a refined AF algorithm offering improved accuracy especially with finely textured subjects. Also an AF-C custom settings option lets you choose one of five AF-C presets to suit the movement of your subject.

The AF boasts 91 focusing points in a 13x7 array, 42 more than its predecessor, the X-T10, and if you prefer there is the option to use 325 AF points. To suit different subjects, situations and personal preferences, the AF system can be set to use a single zone, a small number of zones or all 91, leaving the camera to decide what to focus on. Versatility is increased further with options for face and eye detection. The X-T20 is available in black or silver for £799 body only, or you can purchase it with the XC16-50mm f/3.5 OIS II lens for £899, or with the XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens for £1099.

fujifilm.eu/uk

Key features at a glance 24.3 megapixels

3in tilting touchscreen

JPEG and Raw

ISO 200-12,800, extended 100-51,2000

Takes 1x SD card

30secs to 1/4000sec shutter range in all modes

 ontinuous shooting at 14fps with C electronic shutter or 8fps with mechanical shutter

4K and Full HD video 350 frames battery life approx


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

Camera Club of the Year

37

in association with

Theme 4: Action Jeff Carter has been a professional photographer for over 20 years and set up MacLean Photographic in 1996, specialising in sports photography. He is currently the FIA media delegate for the World Endurance Championship and also the photo delegate for the world famous 24-hour Le Mans race. “My first piece of advice for anyone shooting action photography is get to know your subject,” says Jeff. “Before you even pick up a camera learn how to read the action that is going on in front of you. If you can anticipate what is going to happen next then you’ll see a marked improvement in the images you take. “Choose the appropriate shutter speed for your chosen subject. With the latest generation of sensors, don’t be afraid to push the ISO to keep the shutter speed high enough. I have pushed the Fujifilm X-T2 to 6400 and beyond with great results. “Modern AF systems are very reliable and can follow the action with ease. I use the X-T2 and it tracks subjects very well , but don’t be afraid to switch to manual focus. If necessary, prefocus on a spot on the track and wait for the subject to come to you. “Watch the background in your shots. A distraction, like a bright advertising hoarding, can ruin the best of shots so choose your shooting position carefully. “Finally, dress appropriately. If you are shooting outdoors make sure you are warm and comfortable, especially if you are not moving around a lot.”

© Jeff Carter

© Jeff Carter

Images The Fujifilm X-T2’s autofocusing system is very responsive and can track fast moving subjects, while the camera’s capable high ISO performance results in fine images whatever the lighting levels. © Jeff Carter

© Jeff Carter

macleanphotographic.co.uk

Closing date: Midnight, 6 April

© Jeff Carter

Congratulations to Dorchester Camera Club, our winners of Round 3 and the third qualifier for the final shoot-out. Street photography is a challenging subject, especially as so many elements of scenes are beyond the photographer’s control. Nevertheless, the quality of entries was very high and there was little to choose among the leading clubs, so a special well done to Dorchester CC. The overall scores are shown here and the individual scores can be seen on the CCOTY gallery on absolutephoto.com

© Helen Jones

Round 3: The Street results © Penny Piddock

© Barbara Jenkins

© Carol Tritton

© Stephen Jones

Scores

*Already qualified

Dorchester Camera Club

93

Great Notley Photography Club

91

*Exeter Camera Club

90

West Wickham Photographic Society

90

Earl Shilton Camera Club

89

Gloucester Camera Club

89

City of London and Cripplegate Photographic Society

87

Colchester Photographic Society

87

Maidenhead Camera Club

87

Ayr Photographic Society

86

Consett & District Photographic Society

86

Harlow Photographic Society

86

Seaford Photographic Society

86

Tonbridge Camera Club

86

Beckenham Photographic Society

85

First Monday

85

Harpenden Photographic Society

85

Norwich & District Photographic Society

85

Nuneaton Photographic Society

85

Halstead & District Photographic Society

84

*New City Photographic Society

84

Wisbech & District Camera Club

83

Blandford Forum Camera Club

81

Dronfield Camera Club

81

Peterborough Photographic Society

80

Birlingham Photography Club

79

Windsor Photographic Society

79

Dunholme Camera Club

77

Park Street Camera Club

74

Alba Photographic Society

72


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Interview

Whatever the weather Landscape photographer Tony Worobiec believes that you shouldn’t let the weather hinder your photography, in fact you should let it do the opposite. His latest book Photographing Landscape, Whatever the Weather offers help and advice on shooting, editing and how to make money Interview by Jemma Dodd

© Tony Worobiec

Why landscape photography? Simple, being outside experiencing the elements is spiritually uplifting. I cannot get enough of it. Who are your favourite landscape photographers? I have long been a fan of landscape traditionalists such as Shinzo Maeda and Eliot Porter, but I am equally drawn to more contemporary workers such as Joel Meyerowitz or Richard Misrach. All of these wonderful photographers show a remarkable capacity to reveal the hidden spirit of the landscape. What are the key ingredients for an epic landscape shot? Clearly the location is important. Lighting is the other key issue, but

something which is sometimes overlooked is the prevailing weather; it can prove transformational. For example, an urban landscape which under normal conditions appears quite unremarkable, can look amazing immediately after a thunderstorm. What time and weather conditions do you prefer to photography landscape in? The secret to landscape photography is to understand that every location will have its golden moment. All the seasons have unique qualities, although I must confess I do struggle a bit in summer. Weather for me is the crucial factor; broody grey skies can appear hauntingly beautiful when shot in daytime, adding a

unique pathos to the landscape, and yet they can appear equally as interesting when shot at night. The same applies to a landscape shrouded in mist, covered in snow or subject to heavy rain. Of all the locations you’ve shot a do you have a favourite? I live in Dorset, so not unnaturally I am rather fond of the county. If, however, I had a choice of just one location, it would have to be Death Valley. While it is famed for the wonderful Mesquite sand dunes, it has so much more to offer. To have this desolate basin surrounded by an impossibly high mountain range offers landscape photographers incredible opportunities for truly awe-inspiring photography.

Above Approaching dust storm, Tucumcari, New Mexico. Top right Spring flowers, The Alentejo, Portugal. Centre right Rising Dawn Mist, Factory Butte, Utah. Bottom right Mammatus clouds and abandoned school on the prairie, North Dakota.

Where do you want to shoot but haven’t yet? Having recently watched a documentary on the ‘rust-belt’ of America, I think I could happily make this my next project. My wife and I have had two books published on our documentation of the abandoned communities on the American High Plains; while this would be in a different part of the States, I suspect we would encounter very similar and equally challenging situations. When it comes to risk taking, what situations should people avoid? Clearly the more remote or hostile the environment, the more mindful one needs to be regarding potential dangers. As I now regularly run


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Interview

Do you have any landscape pictures that got away? Of course; just a few weeks ago I was photographing a murmuration of starlings at Studland in Dorset. Fascinated by their movement I failed to notice I was rapidly running out of memory. Just as they got to their final crescendo I got that dreaded ‘card full’ message; by the time I changed cards, the show was over. I was kicking myself all the way back to the car. Why did you decide to focus on this specific subject and offer such a broad insight in your book? While the quality of the light and the structure of the location are important, weather, and especially bad weather can inject a mood into the photograph that would otherwise be lacking. We in the UK are spoilt for choice, and while we often complain about the weather, it

Why do you feel there is a need for this book? What I have tried to explain in this book is that you cannot change the weather, but you are able to change your choice of location. By being aware that certain locations chime well with specific weather conditions, our options are expanded and therefore we should never return home without a bagful of shots. Certainly, those photographers who have seen the book seem genuinely enthused. Which came first – did you write techniques to go with the images or images to go with the technique? A bit of both; when I was reviewing my work, I recognised that a lot of it illustrated landscape taken in ‘challenging’ weather, but once I decided to do a book on the subject, I saw there were gaps. Moreover, I did tend to work on quite narrow themes which, for the purposes of this publication, needed to be developed.

© Tony Worobiec

Have you ever taken any risks or been in a tricky situation? I do remember back in the early 90s investigating the border area between Ireland and Northern Ireland, and deciding that I would like to investigate an abandoned farm property. There was an adjacent caravan, so I decided to knock on the door, just to see if anyone was around. As I received no answer I assumed it was safe to enter the cottage, but just as I was about to, two men emerged and subjected me to what I can only describe as a thorough interrogation. They quickly assessed I was a complete idiot and finally let me go. Phew!

is the sheer variety which offers us so many fabulous opportunities for interesting landscape photography.

© Tony Worobiec

landscape courses, safety is always something uppermost in my mind. We all have relative strengths and tolerances, and clearly it is important that we never exceed these. Simple precautions such as dressing appropriately for the conditions, letting someone know where you are going, and taking your mobile phone with you, should help to avoid disaster.

Of all of the landscape techniques, which is your favourite? I love fog! It’s just so transformational. One of the hardest things to achieve when shooting landscape is simplicity. When photographing through mist or fog, the aerial perspective incrementally reduces the background, allowing the photographer to feature elements that would otherwise go unnoticed. Who is the book aimed at? I hope that a broad range of landscape photographers will find this book interesting. It is worth noting that even newcomers to photography are capable of capturing truly magnificent weather shots, but because of their inexperience, they assume that their © Tony Worobiec

images have no commercial value. That part of the book hopefully encourages the reader to value their efforts and recognise that some agencies accept work from both the amateur and professional sectors. What’s your best landscape shot? My last photograph; I suspect we all feel like that. If you had to give just one piece of advice what would it be? Simple: you cannot change the weather, but you can change your location. When shooting landscape,

assess the weather and then select a location that chimes with it. Any future shoots coming up? Stemming out of this last book, I am currently discussing the possibility of doing a book called The Landscape Photographer’s Calendar. I am hoping to alert photographers that every month offers its own unique opportunities. Nobody should be staring out of the window on a dull day in February wishing it was a sunny day in May. Life’s too short. tonyworobiec.com

Buy the book Photographing Landscape, Whatever the Weather is priced at £15.99 and available from rhemediaphotography.co.uk


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Advertisement feature

Profoto photographers share their secrets at The Photography Show

Visit stand G71 at this year’s Photography Show to see Profoto’s range of lighting products and hear pro photographers talk about their lighting set-ups, shooting tips and more

© Rossella Vanon

© Tom Barnes

Rossella Vanon

ON THE LIVE STAGE 19 MARCH 11AM

Tom Barnes Advertising and commercial photographer Tom Barnes first started shooting at the age of five when his father gave him his camera at a family get-together. At 18 he moved to Sheffield for University where he first started shooting professionally. Fast forward to now and Tom has shot for the likes of the British Paralympic Association, Barclays, Samsung, the BBC, Channel 4, Channel 5, ShortList magazine, Aviva, Specsavers, Tesco, Sony and Virgin. He also won best in category at the 2016 AOP awards for his work with the British Paralympic Association, as well as being featured in Portrait Salon for the past three years. tombarnes.co

Live Shoots at stand G71 Sun 19 March Sat 18 March 4:30pm Pro-10 11am Pro-10 portraits portraits 2:30pm Pro-10 portraits

Beauty and fashion photographer Rossella Vanon has had her work published in Marie Claire and Elle and shot with brands Ottoman Hands jewellery, NYX cosmetics and Samira Jasat. In 2011 she was named Professional Photographer of the year and has been interviewed by a variety of publications about her work. More recently Rossella has published a book, Lighting People: a complete lighting guide for photographers shooting people. Originally shooting nature and then portraits Rossella says that fashion photography for her has been a journey rather than a destination. rvanonphotography.com

ON THE LIVE STAGE 20 MARCH 3PM

Live Shoots at stand G71 Sun 19 March 11am SoftLight: using soft light for fashion 3pm Creative Gel Lighting: using OCF Gels creatively

Mon 20 March 12pm SoftLight: using soft light for fashion

© Hannah Couzens

Hannah Couzens Hannah Couzens has run her high street portrait studio for the past 12 years. Her work ranges from celebrities, actors and musicians to corporate headshots and family portraits. After living and working as a photographer in New Zealand photographing everything from the All Blacks to real estate, she returned home and opened her first studio aged just 22. Hannah has gone on to win four business awards and is still the youngest candidate ever to achieve a licentiateship (aged 19) and associateship (aged 28) with the BIPP. Hannah uses Profoto D1s, B1s and B2s with just about every modifier you can think of! Light shaping is her passion. At The Photography Show Hannah will be speaking about the portability of the B1s and B2s and how the technology of highspeed sync no longer limits her creativity. hcphotography.co.uk B2/B1 HSS portraits: your key to wide aperture portraits with flash Sat 18 March 12pm and 4pm Sun 19 March 1pm and 4pm

Mon 20 March 11am and 2pm Tues 21 March 12pm and 2:30pm


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Advertisement feature © Paul Rogers

Paul Rogers

Until 30 April 2017 when you buy a Profoto B1 or B2 Off-Camera Flash kit you can get the Air Remote TTL (for Canon, Nikon or Sony) or Air Remote for free. Visit stand G71 to find out more

John Clements

Paul Rogers has been a professional photographer since 2001 and owns and runs Pellier Photography. Originally working as a sports photographer for his local paper, Paul soon progressed to weddings and more recently has become known for social event photography. In 2012 he was asked to help with some interior photography for the Hilton on Park Lane London, which then led to him shooting a handful of Hilton Hotels in and around London. In the last 18 months Paul has photographed 50 Hilton Hotel shoots across UK, Ireland and Europe.

Architecture lighting: presentation on lighting buildings with the B1 Sat 18 March 1:30pm and 4:30pm Tues 21 March 11am and 1:30pm

paul-rogers.co.uk

© Andy Kruczek

A very experienced presenter, combining his vast technical knowledge and real-world shooting experience, his workshop and seminar presentations excite people, with clear, concise, motivational, and very approachable style. gophototraining.co.uk

© John Clements

As a Profoto trainer Andy regularly works with a number of camera retailers to train and educate their staff

As a pro photographer, John’s client list includes those from the corporate world to the great British public. He has a wealth of experience in both people and non-people photography. In addition, formerly Nikon UK’s Advisor of Photography – for a number of years, a respected and privileged position – he continues to work in a consultancy capacity with a number of imaging companies. Author of over a dozen books, John has also road tested and written about equipment for a significant number of photo magazines through the years, including as a freelance technical editor.

Andy Kruczek Andy Kruczek knew from a very early age that he wanted to become a photographer, and soon realised that it was people he was most interested in photographing. His career really kicked off when he started shooting for the hair industry, but he now spends more and more time working on self-initiated projects for the fine art market. As a Profoto trainer Andy regularly works with a number of camera retailers to train and educate their staff and is also an ambassador for Phase One and an Adobe influencer. andykruczek.com

Light shaper workshop Sat 18 March 12:30pm and 3pm

Sun 19 March 12pm and 2pm

Light shaper workshop Mon 20 March 1pm and 4pm

Tues 21 March 11am and 1:30pm


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Interview © David White

Cheltenham International Salon of Photography The Cheltenham Camera Club Salon was set up in 2015. We caught up with Des Ward, chairman of the Salon to find out more and how you can enter Interview by Jemma Dodd

How does the competition work; can you talk us through the judging process and the awards? The competition is completely webbased, photographers upload their pictures, up to four images per person in each of the five sections; Colour, Monochrome, Creative, Nature and Travel. Colour and then Monochrome are by far the most popular sections, presumably because all images fall into one of those categories. This is followed by Nature and Travel where the authenticity of the image is paramount, you’re not allowed to alter these by, for example, cloning details in or out. The fewest entries come in the Creative section, but these have often had extensive and time-consuming work done to them, by way of montaging and other Photoshop techniques. These can be really Marmite images, some you love, some you hate.

The judging is done to an exacting level of detail. The room must be fully blacked out, the computer and projector carefully calibrated and the judges sat in comfy chairs with a keypad containing the crucial buttons two to five. As the images come up, the judges independently rate the image two to five. A five means it should definitely get accepted, but it is the total score from the three judges, which could be from six to 15, that counts. There were 2051 Colour images to judge last year, so they are split into four rounds. When all the images have been judged we determine the score an image needs to be accepted. We’re looking for around 25% of the images to be accepted, but it depends on how many images get each score. Often 11 or 12 are the accepted level and every image that reaches that score is accepted into the Salon. After that, the judges need to select from the top scoring images to determine the medals and ribbons. This time however, the judges confer, pour over the details of each image and come to an agreement on the Gold medals and other awards. There’s also a judge’s ribbon for each judge to pick, so that an image they think is particularly good can get an award, even if all three of them are not in strict agreement. How has the standard of entries changed since the first competition? I don’t think there’s an awful lot of difference between the standard of images in the salon last year and the images entered in the first year. The best images are still completely fantastic and rise to the top, there’s a huge swathe of images which are highly commendable and there are plenty of images which probably won’t make it, because they don’t fit the fashion of the day, or they’re

Right Reflective Anticipation by David White , PSA Gold, Monochrome Below Hilarious Moment by Bob Bishop, FIAP Gold, Travel -

© Bob Bishop

Why was the salon originally set up? What inspired it? We started the salon with several goals. Firstly, to get Cheltenham on the national and international map, photography-wise; we’re always looking for new members and this is fantastic publicity for us. We were also motivated to celebrate the club’s 150th anniversary in 2015, and the salon contributed hugely to that. In addition to this we wanted to encourage our members to improve their photography even more, and getting them involved with our own salon has indeed encouraged many to enter other salons and go further down the route of getting photographic distinctions. For 14 years we have run the fantastically successful Gloucestershire Young Photographer of the Year competition and I see our salon as a further extension of photography into the community.


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Interview

Tell us about the catalogue. How did the decision come about to produce this? We create a printed catalogue that every entrant receives, and we produce an audio-visual (AV) show of the award winners and selected accepted images. In return for getting the patronage from FIAP etc. we need to produce a catalogue showing the results and a selection of accepted images. When setting up the Salon initially we went with a printed catalogue to enhance our case for getting patronage and we review it every year, but we still currently feel that a catalogue where the entrants can see their name and images in print, provides the best incentive for them to enter and keep entering our salon. In fact we enlarged and improved our catalogue after the second year and have achieved a four star rating from FIAP. Getting a printed catalogue in the post and opening it to find one of your images is a special feeling. One of our members, Martin Fry FRPS creates a magnificent AV by

© Lynne Morris

The competition is open worldwide, was this a conscious decision to open it to everyone? The decision to make it a worldwide competition was an easy one. Our first decision was not to allow prints – many salons do allow prints, especially UK only ones, but as we were just starting we didn’t think we could cope with all the physical aspects. We do of course have prints in our own club competitions and there are always logistical problems, storing, sorting, labelling, returning etc. and we reckoned these could only be made worse by having a print competition where the entrants could be, at the least, at the other end of the UK. So once it was a digital, online only competition, there seemed no reason to restrict it to the UK, and of course patronage

from FIAP, PSA etc. was only going to come with an international competition. Having said that, we get about half of our entries from the UK, and the rest from overseas.

© Chau Kei Chekcy Lam

not technically good enough, or mostly because they just don’t hit the judges’ buttons – perhaps from entrants who are just starting with salons and are finding their feet. But every entry, whether it is awarded or accepted or not, is a learning opportunity for the photographer, it can help them work out which images do work – at least in this partly artificial world of salon judging.

© Jenny Hibert

Top right Pony Force by Chau Kei Checky Lam, RPS Gold, Colour Above Moving the Herd by Jenny Hibbert, PSA Silver – Story, Travel Right A Wild Goose Chase by Lynne Morris, FIAP Gold, Creative Below left Male Banded Demoiselle on Convolvulus by Trevor Davenport, PSA Gold, Nature Below right Caught in a Sea of Wildebeest by Alan Walker, RPS Gold, Nature

selecting and combining the images and putting them to appropriate music. The AV is the highlight of our award ceremony and we then take it round other local (and not so local) clubs to let them know about the Salon and encourage them to join in. We’ve done over 50 shows so far!

© Alan Walker

© Trevor Davenport

What advice would you give to anyone thinking of entering? I have four pieces of advice if you’ve never entered a salon. Firstly, if you’re not already a member, join a club – this will let you see how your images are thought of in club circles. Then if your images are a good club standard try them out in a salon (ours preferably). Make sure you follow the rules about image sizes and what you are allowed to do to an image in each section. Finally, don’t get disheartened if you don’t get accepted, it all depends on the judges on the day and the other images you’re up against. I would always try an image at least half a dozen times before giving up on it. During the selection process the images are only seen for a few seconds so the image must have immediate impact, if not it is easy for the judges to dismiss. The other key thing is originality, anything that is different makes the judge look that little bit longer and gives you a better chance of acceptance.

The exhibition Cheltenham Camera Club will be holding its 5th International Salon of Photography (CISP) this spring. There will be five categories; Colour, Monochrome, Travel, Nature and Creative. Entry is now open and ends on 23 April 2017. All entrants will receive a full colour A4 printed catalogue. cheltenhamcameraclub.co.uk/ wordpress/salon/


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Professional photo Pro focus

6 reasons why you should be reading Professional Photo It’s the only monthly print magazine aimed specifically at aspiring imaging pros and every issue is packed with advice to maximise your earning potential, marketing ideas and gear reviews You’re a busy person. You’re an aspiring or full-time professional photographer and that means most of your waking hours are spent shooting, emailing, blogging, accounting, uploading, editing, talking, travelling or organising. Any time you have left shouldn’t be wasted, so when it comes to researching equipment, getting new ideas or simply finding out how to work better, you don’t want to spend hours trawling through badly-written articles online. Instead you want to read articles that understand you

as a photographer, recognise the challenges you face and the decisions you have to make. In short, you want Professional Photo magazine. Recently redesigned and brought right up to date, Professional Photo is the go-to title for any aspiring or fulltime professional, with every issue coming packed with the advice you want and need. If you’ve never picked the magazine up before, or simply would like to know more about what we do, here are half a dozen reasons why you should grab a copy.

2 You’ll make better buying decisions Choosing the right equipment is an essential part of your job as a professional photographer. The last thing you want to do is to invest in the wrong kit, or buy something that lets you down just at the crucial moment. Professional Photo’s equipment tests and buying guides will make sure that never happens, and you can rely on them because our indepth reviews are carried out by working professionals like you. We’ll answer all your questions and help you make the right buying choices so you can avoid expensive mistakes. We only focus on kit for professional use, too, looking at cameras, lenses, lighting and accessories in every issue. Don’t buy another piece of kit before you’ve read the review in our magazine!

1 You’ll make more money We understand that professionals want advice and information that will help them grow their business and make more money. Every issue of the magazine features proper business advice that you can put into immediate action and quickly see the benefits. You may want to improve your website, for example, maybe develop a new area of your business or perhaps simply find ways that can help you work smarter. Whatever your needs, Professional Photo is the one magazine that will help you do this with every issue.

3 We understand your needs as a pro No other title on the market is keyed into the needs of the aspiring and working pro as well as Professional Photo. It may be a magazine, but it’s also a modern-day manual to guide you through the highs and lows of life as a professional photographer. As further proof, every quarter the magazine is supplied with a free copy of Pro Moviemaker, which is produced for the growing number of professional photographers who want to use their digital SLR or CSC to capture video footage for clients. Movie capture is becoming an essential skill for pros and Professional Photo will help you master the medium in the minimum amount of time.


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Professional photo © Sam Robinson

4 You’ll find inspiring ideas Inspiration and ideas are an equally important part of being a professional photographer, which is why we also feature interviews and articles from some of the world’s leading professionals to motivate you. Covering photographic genres as diverse as weddings and war zones (they are diverse, right?!) you’ll not only get to see some amazing imagery, but also have a glimpse into the lives and minds of the people who create them. More often than not, they’re all too willing to pass on their advice to help you in your quest to become a photographic great!

5 It’s out every four weeks! That’s right! Not six or 12 issues a year, with Professional Photo you get a new information-packed issue every four weeks, which means 13 issues a year. No other professional-focused title gives you this amount of information on such a regular basis, so if you want to stay informed and up to date, it’s the only magazine for you.

© Joel Santos

©Kingsley Singleton

6 Subscribe and never miss an issue Save money and guarantee that you get every issue of Professional Photo delivered to your door by taking out a subscription. Sign up with direct debit and you pay £13 every six months and that saves you over 50% on the cover price, plus you will receive four free issues of Pro Moviemaker throughout the year as part of your subscription. For more information, visit brightsubs.com/prophoto or call 01778 392497

© Sam Robinson

© Tom Miles

You’ll find more insight in the latest Professional Photo – the UK’s best magazine for full-time and aspiring pro photographers


Photography News Issue 42 absolutephoto.com

46

Recommendations

The ultimate magazine for next generation filmmakers If you’ve been tempted to give that little red video button on your DSLR a try, have been bitten by the bug for producing your own movies or are a professional photographer wanting to add filmmaking to your commercial offerings, then Pro Moviemaker is the must-have magazine for you. The quarterly mag is crammed full of no-

nonsense advice, filmmaking techniques, tips on making videos for money and lots more. Like indepth equipment tests to help you make the right buying choice, advice from experts in the industry and vital information about recording sound and editing your footage in post-production. Plus, industry news, a dedicated section on filming

with drones and the latest VR technology. Check out our website, promoviemaker.net, join us on Twitter @ProMoviemaker and on Facebook.com/ ProMoviemaker. Read on to find out more about what you can expect from Pro Moviemaker. promoviemaker.net

Learn from the best!

@ProMoviemaker

No.1 magazine for

As well as news on everything from equipment to training and filmmaking festivals, every issue of Pro Moviemaker has an inside look at the careers of the most successful commercial filmmakers. Learn what it takes to create incredible shots that can lift your movies into the realms of something special. And if you want to make movies as a business, there are inspiring tales of how to do it.

VIDEO

MAKERS!

Shoot like a pro

Techniques demystified

If you are interested in making money from your filmmaking, this is the section of the magazine for you. Our regular Ask the Expert feature poses key questions to a panel of experts on all sorts of subjects from buying the right kit to legal matters and business advice. And we keep you updated on the state of the industry, along with advice on crucial matters like improving your showreel, marketing, crowdfunding, hiring a crew and lots more.

Even experienced photographers can struggle with the learning curve needed to master filmmaking. From conquering audio recording and editing movies as well as techno-babble like ProRes and codec, we explain how to do things in a language that’s easy to understand. Plus how to use the kit in the right way, the subtle nuances of colours, how to make your shots less shaky and mastering complex camera moves, it’s all in Pro Moviemaker.

SUBSCRIBE Top gear! Most modern DSLRs or mirrorless cameras are ideal for making amazing-quality movies that can look every bit as good as the movies you see at the cinema. In fact, some movies have been shot entirely on them! But to deliver a more professional film, you’ll need to invest in a few extra gadgets. The gear section of Pro Moviemaker is packed with tests, buyers’ guides, head-to-head comparisons of cameras, lenses and more. We rate all the latest accessories and kit for its use as a filmmaking tool to help you make even better movies, from action cams to iPhones!

Sky’s the limit! Drones are big news as they can really add a fantastic new dimension to your movies, and they are increasingly affordable and easier than ever to fly. Every issue, Pro Moviemaker brings you the latest news, kit and features from the world of aerial videography. We cover the all-important legalities of flying drones in the UK and abroad, plus how many filmmakers are incorporating them into their work to improve their films and increase profit. We test fly the latest ’copters and look at all the must-have aerial accessories.

AND SAVE Get four issues a year for just £17.99, visit promoviemaker.net


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


PN’s FREE Guide to

Brought to you by

The Photography Show 2017 Stage Guide & Event Diary Explore the show

Whether you’re at the beginning of your photography journey or you’re looking to take the next step in your career, the range of seminars and demo sessions (focusing on both stills and video) will inspire and inform you.

Want to find the newest cameras, best kit or some inspiration on one of the incredible stages or in the workshops? Check out the comprehensive events diary and floor plan for more details!

Behind The Lens Professionals lead sessions that look at different genres, from wildlife and travel to fashion and street. All levels of photographer are welcome to attend. Super Stage* Featuring big names in photography. Louis Cole, Albert Watson, Alex Webb, Jill Furmanovsky, Frans Lanting, Clive Arrowsmith, Nadav Kander, Sebastião Salgado, David Alan Harvey and Julia Fullerton-Batten are amongst the line-up. Adobe Theatre Exploring the ways in which to process and edit to show off your skills and produce stunning images is the primary focus here.

Live Stage Photography experts demonstrate the essence behind taking unique and challenging shots; getting the lighting, settings and positioning right; and managing subjects. Video Theatre More popular than ever, this theatre hosts seminars which offer the skills and techniques needed to capture great footage on a camera; perfect for all levels of budding video maker. VR & 360 Discover the latest technologies in VR & 360° and how and where these are used by today’s leading image makers.

Mobile & Social Stage This stage aims to help you get the best from your mobile, understand the accessories available and learn what is achievable when using a camera for social sharing. Beginner’s Masterclass* Dedicated to entry-level photographers hosting experts who will provide easy to follow tips and tricks for improving your photography. Turning Pro* Join incredible professional photographers and gain essential advice for building a successful photo business.

*Session requires an extra activity ticket as well as an entry ticket to the show. If you haven’t pre-booked your tickets at photographyshow.com by 18 March you can buy them from the box office at the show. Subject to availability.

Saturday 18 March

Sunday 19 March

Combining Lightroom and Photoshop CC in your retouching workflow 10:30-10:45 The elusive quality

AT

10:30-11:00 Lighting for drones: how to enhance your footage

10:15-10:45

Monday 20 March AT

10:15-10:30

LS

Combining Lightroom and Photoshop CC in your retouching workflow 10:30-10:45 The elusive quality

LS

10:15-10:45

DZ

10.30-11.05

10.30-11.05

Choosing the right camera

TS

11:00-11:30

Making your photos look amazing with Lightroom CC

AT

11:00-11:30

Thresholds: looking at the past through the future

11:00-11:30

Creative styling and live lighting demo

VR & 360° LS

11:00-11:30

The world needs powerful images more than ever

MS

11:00-11:40

VT

11:00-11:40

What’s the story and how’s the sound? Completing the circle of sound… Coastal visions

11:00-12:30

The power of social photography

SS

11.05-11.40

Choosing a lens

11:30-12:00

10:15-10:45

Choosing the right camera

AT

TS

LS

10:30-11:05

AT

10:30-11:00 Lighting for drones: How to enhance your footage

DZ

11:00-11:30

Making your photos look amazing with Lightroom CC A different view

11:00-11:30

Multiple looks, minimal kit

11:00-11:30

The world needs powerful images more than ever

MS

11:00-11:40

Action cameras in film and photography

VT

VR & 360° LS

11:00-11:40

Big pictures, small cameras A lifetime of images

SS

TS

11.05-11.40

Choosing a lens

TS

In flight: DJI

DZ

11:30-12:00

In flight: PowerVision

DZ

11:45-12:15

Using Lightroom Mobile in your workflow

AT

11:45-12:15

Using Lightroom Mobile in your workflow

AT

11.50-12.25

Getting to grips with imaging software

11.50-12.25

Getting to grips with imaging software

12:00-12:30 360° wedding photography 12:00-12:30 Master dance photography 12:00-12:30 How to start and maintain a successful YouTube channel 12:00-12:40 Filming in 4K and 6K photo mode 12:00-12:40 Capturing the magic 12.25-13.00 Troubleshooting your photography: Common problems and how to solve them 12:30-13:00 Photoshop CC for photographers 12:30-13:00 Photography is fun. Drone photography is real fun 13:00-13:30 From VR to 3D 13:00-13:30 Shooting a fashion portrait with depth and drama

TS VR & 360° LS MS VT BTL TS AT DZ VR & 360° LS

13:00-13:30 The evolving power of photography and social media

MS

13:00-13:40 Scouting, producing, shooting & editing: Becoming a ‘shreditor’ 13:00-13:40 Expedition photography: Chasing swans from blizzards to Blighty 13:00-14:30 A lifetime of images

VT BTL SS

BTL

14:00-14:40 Aerial elements – what can drones add to your videography? 14:00-14:40 Connecting with your landscape

VT BTL

14:00-15:00 Build your team

PL

14:30-15:00 Mastering UAVs, from beginner to pro

DZ

14:30-15:10

Collaborative marketing for creative photographers

PS1

14.35-15.10

Software – the ultimate camera accessory

14:45-15:15

Fundamental imaging techniques of post-production

15:00-15:30 The art & tech of 360° videography 15:00-15:30 An insight into food photography

TS AT VR & 360° LS

15:00-15:30 My Instagram adventures with Eric the stormtrooper

MS

15:00-15:40 Short films in a nutshell – the role of the cinematographer

VT

15:00-15:40 Astrophotography for everyone 15:00-16:30 Many streets 15.15-15.50

How to market yourself effectively using social media

BTL SS TS

12:00-12:40 Aerial elements – what can drones add to your videography? 12:00-12:40 Making a name in photography

VT

12:00-12:30 Virtual reality for the creative mind

BTL

12.25-13.00 Troubleshooting your photography: common problems and how to solve them 12:30-13:00 Photoshop CC for photographers

AT

12:30-13:00 Mastering UAVs, from beginner to pro

DZ

13:00-13:30 From VR to 3D 13:00-13:30 The secret to relaxed children’s portraits 13:00-13:30 Seeing differently: Alternative travel photography

TS

VR & 360° LS MS

13:00-13:40 Beneath the surface: Underwater filmmaking

VT

13:00-13:40 Extraordinary images of extraordinary people

BTL

Contributing to Adobe Stock for photographers

13:30-14:00 In flight: DJI 14:00-14:30 Using mobile apps to create and publish your work 14:00-14:30 Virtual reality for the creative mind 14:00-14:30 Fundamentals of great fashion photography

TS VT

14:00-14:40 The art of long exposure landscape photography

BTL

14:30-15:00 Lighting for drones: How to enhance your footage

DZ

14.35-15.10

TS

14:45-15:15

Fundamental imaging techniques of post-production

15:00-15:30 The art & tech of 360° videography 15:00-15:30 Five minutes in Photoshop

AT VR & 360° LS

16:00-16:40 Demystifying HDR video

VT

16:00-16:40 Getting more from your camera 16:00-17:00 Pro happy hour – plus freelancer networking 16:15-16:45

Using mobile apps to create and publish your work

16.20-16.45 Tips for your first year as a pro

BTL PL AT TS

13:15-13:45

Using Lightroom Mobile in your workflow

13:30-14:00 In flight: PowerVision 14:00-14:30 Mastering the basics of Lightroom CC 14:00-14:30 A different view 14:00-14:30 Live catwalk show 14:00-14:30 Consistent branding in the age of social media 14:00-14:40 Stills to moving image: A guide for photographers 14:00-14:40 Shoot more. Edit Less

AT DZ

VT BTL DZ AT VR & 360° LS

15:00-16:30 An interview with Nadav Kander

SS

15:30-16:00 Making your photos look amazing with Lightroom CC

AT

VT BTL PL

15:30-16:00 In flight: DJI

BTL

14:00-14:30 Virtual reality for the creative mind 14:00-14:30 Boost your business with Facebook & Instagram 14:00-14:40 Make what’s in your head

TS AT VR & 360° MS VT

14:00-14:40 Close-up and macro photography

BTL

14:00-14:45 Final: 60 seconds to change your life

LS

14:30-15:00 Mastering UAVs, from beginner to pro

DZ

The right direction: Running your shoot and working with a team Fundamental imaging techniques of post-production

15:00-15:30 Capturing physical spaces in 3D – enhancing businesses with VR and virtual tours 15:00-15:30 Photograph like a thief! 15:00-15:30 Using iPhoneography as a creative tool 15:00-15:40 Aerial elements – what can drones add to your videography? 15:00-15:40 You can shoot stock too

TS AT VR & 360° LS MS VT BTL

15:00-16:30 A personal story – fine art and controversy

SS

15:30-16:00 Making your photos look amazing with Lightroom CC

AT

15:30-16:00 In flight: PowerVision

DZ

15:30-16:10

TS

Panel: Turning daydreams into dayjobs

16:00-16:30 Painting with light

LS

16:00-16:30 Social media isn’t perfect

MS

16:00-16:40 What’s the story and how’s the sound? Completing the circle of sound… 16:00-16:40 Unscripted moments: Discreet street photography

VT BTL

16:15-16:30

Closing keynote: David Alan Harvey

TS

16:15-16:45

Contributing to Adobe Stock for photographers

AT

DZ VR & 360° MS VT BTL

AT

16:00-16:45 Joe McNally’s lighting masterclass

LS

TS

16:15-16:45

AT

Contributing to Adobe Stock for photographers

BTL

DZ

Student to pro – Life in the photography business

14:00-14:30 Mastering the basics of Lightroom CC

14:30-15:10

14:30-15:00 Photography is fun. Drone photography is real fun

16:00-16:30 Capturing physical spaces in 3D – enhancing businesses with VR and virtual tours 16:00-16:30 Beyond the lens: Embracing the future with mobile photography 16:00-16:40 Aerial elements – what can drones add to your videography? 16:00-16:40 Bringing architecture to life

13:30-14:10

14:45-15:15

MS

Using Lightroom Mobile in your workflow

13:30-14:00 In flight: DJI

AT

14:45-15:15

Fundamental imaging techniques of post-production

13:00-13:40 Forgotten locations and hidden worlds

VR & 360° LS

15:00-15:40 In conversation with Lisa Barnard

MS

16.20-16.45 Tips for your first year as a pro

SS

TS

16:00-16:30 Visual storytelling through iPhoneography

Starting out with Lightroom CC

VT BTL

VT

16:00-16:40 What’s the story and how’s the sound? Completing the circle of sound… 16:00-16:40 Faces and places: Travel and documentary portraiture on the move 16:00-17:00 Pro happy hour 16:15-16:45

MS

15:00-15:40 The motivation behind undertaking video work

LS

VT

AT

VR & 360° LS

SS

TS

MS

13:15-13:45

13:00-13:30 From VR to 3D 13:00-13:30 The importance of the engagement shoot

MS

15.50-16.20 How a drone could improve your business

13:00-13:40 Stills to moving image: A guide for photographers

SS

15:00-15:30 Modern social media in your business

16:00-16:30 Lighten up

13:00-13:30 Charity picture raffle draw 13:00-13:30 Consistent branding in the age of social media

SS

15:00-15:30 360° product photography made simple

DZ

DZ VR & 360° LS

13:00-14:30 A morning with Sebastião Salgado

15:00-15:30 Shooting creative portraits using colour gels

AT

12:30-13:00 Lighting for drones: How to enhance your footage 13:00-13:30 A different view

13:00-14:30 Shoot what it feels like

VT

How to market yourself effectively using social media

TS AT

DZ

MS

15.15-15.50

12.25-13:00 A new angle on sports photography 12:30-13:00 Photoshop CC for photographers

AT

15:00-15:30 Modern social media in your business

BTL

BTL

12:30-13:00 Photoshop CC for photographers

15:00-15:40 How to film your next photo trip independently 15:00-15:40 Turn on the light – Your passion is calling: A creative’s guide to authenticity 15:00-16:30 Dialogues with nature

VT

12:00-12:40 Fashion, floods and circus

12:30-13:00 Mastering UAVs, from beginner to pro

13:00-14:30 Technique to emotion

MS

VT BTL

MS

TS

AT VR & 360° LS

MS

12:00-12:30 ​Capturing the colour of life in fashion photography

VR & 360° LS

12.25-13:00 What you need to know before you fly your drone

DZ

14:00-14:30 My Instagram adventures with Eric the stormtrooper

Software – the ultimate camera accessory

12:00-12:40 The Folklore Project: Recording Britain’s stories

13:00-13:30 Beyond the lens: Embracing the future with mobile photography 13:00-13:40 Taking to the air – Introducing drone footage to your photography business 13:00-13:40 The DIY photographer

14.00-14.35 Making the transition from enthusiast to professional 14:00-14:40 Professional filmmaking with CSCs

12:00-12:30 The art of flattery 12:00-12:30 Instagram: Your platform, your style and your journey to pro 12:00-12:40 Letting go of the camera

VR & 360° LS

TS

TS

12:00-12:30 Take a virtual tour!

TS

15:30-16:00 Mastering the basics of Lightroom CC

MS

AT

When calamity strikes…

15:30-16:00 In flight: Yuneec

16:00-16:30 Shooting the big day

Starting out with Lightroom CC Become an editorial superstar

11:50-12:25

DZ

16:00-16:30 Creating films for social media

11:45-12:15 11:50-12:25

MS

AT TS

SS

DZ

12:00-12:30 It’s not all about the numbers

15:30-16:00 In flight: Yuneec

VR & 360° LS

Dialogues with nature

Creating movie-style drama and storytelling in still images In flight: Yuneec

VT

12:00-12:30 Using iPhoneography as a creative tool

PS1

15.50-16.20 How a drone could improve your business

11:00-12:30

VT BTL

11:05-11:40 11:30-12:00

MS BTL

12:00-12:40 A guide to making short films

15:20-16:00 Is the photography industry dying? The future of the working photographer 15:30-16:00 Mastering the basics of Lightroom CC

16:00-16:30 A different view

The motivation behind undertaking video work Landscape reward

Bringing architecture to life

AT

AT

TS

11:00-11:40 11:00-11:40

MS

11:00-11:40

Starting out with Lightroom CC

13:15-13:45

14:00-14:30 Why you should create ‘behind the scenes’ content for your work 14.00-14.35 Making the transition from enthusiast to professional

The world needs powerful images more than ever

Demystifying HDR video

11:45-12:15

12:00-12:30 The freestyler: Capturing sports action and movement

PS1 AT

11:00-11:30

11:00-11:40

TS

13:30-14:10

VR & 360° MS

Creativity and safety in newborn photography

AT VR & 360° LS

Directing your portraits

DZ

SS

14:00-14:30 Contributing to Adobe Stock for photographers

11:00-11:30

VR & 360° LS

LS

The world needs powerful images more than ever

Pricing your photography and valuing yourself

13:00-14:30 My rock and roll career

14:00-14:30 Thresholds: Looking at the past through the future

Photo-based VR: Where can it take you?

TS

11:00-11:30

In flight: Yuneec

DZ LS

11:00-11:30

AT

11:00-11:30

11:05-11:40

13:30-14:00 In flight: PowerVision Future-proofing your photography business

TS AT

Using mobile apps to create and publish your work 360° product photography made simple

11:30-12:00

PL

13:50-14:30 Outdoor Photographer of the Year

Marketing and finding new business Using mobile apps to create and publish your work

11:00-11:30 11:00-11:30

TS

13:00-14:00 Women’s photography networking

Starting out with Lightroom CC

10:30-11:05 11:00-11:30

Personal projects attract new clients

VR & 360° LS

12:00-12:30 360° wedding photography

AT

13:15-13:45

10:15-10:45

Combining Lightroom and Photoshop CC in your retouching workflow 10:30-10:45 The elusive quality

11:00-12:30

BTL

Tuesday 21 March TS

Combining Lightroom and Photoshop CC in your retouching workflow 10:30-10:45 The elusive quality

11:00-11:30

Keynote: Clive Arrowsmith

Key SS - Super Stage BTL - Behind the Lens MS - Mobile & Social Stage DZ - Drone Zone VT - Video Theatre

LS - Live Stage AT - Adobe Theatre PL - Pro Lounge PS1 - Piazza Suite 1 TS - Toute Suite

Every effort has been made by the publishers to ensure that information contained regarding The Photography Show 2017 including session times is correct at time of going to press. However, Bright Publishing Ltd, The Photography Show and the exhibitors and advertisers included herein cannot accept responsibility for any loss, inaccuracy or omission resulting from the publishing of any information regarding The Photography Show 2017 in this publication.


Photography News 2017 Floor Plan

Bessel

Iris Albums

Just Limited

Photoxport/Noritsu

Brinno Photobook Light Blue Concept

Towerga Cameras

Travel

easyCover

Format Festival

New Filter

U

Fig Bags

National Trust

Pro Lounge

Welcome area café

Click Group

The Newborn Workshops

Lenses For Hire

ClickPrint

RK Photographic

Creativity Backgrounds

Topaz

GF Smith

System Insight

Benel

Zeiss

Photoguard

Photo-Me International

WhiteWall

Photoshop Digital

The Calendar Printing Company

Innova Art

Store

Behind The Lens

Innova Art

Nphoto

SWPP

Nikon

Sirui/Crumpler

AOP

Saal Digital

Kenro

Synology

Remember My Baby

Beauty Gate

LCE Store area/LCE

Ilex Press

CBL Distribution

MIOPS Trigger

Routeled

Longridge Mount Cutters

Plotagraphs

Kowa Optimed

Sole Mates

Visico Studio Equipment

LensPimp

Novachrome

AJ's

DS Labs

Aperture Books

Plastic Sandwich

Cats Protection

Feature

Eizo

Canvas Baby

Matterport

Big Crocodile Cake Smash Props

Fotoland Imaging Safaris

Women in Photo

Viewfinder

Light and Imagination

Kaleidoscope

Hasselblad

RØDE Microphones

Sunbounce/ Sunsniper

Sigma

Tetenal

Bouncelight

Vanguard World

Lowepro/Joby

Yuneec

Teamwork Digital/DTEK

Arcoalbum

London Camera Exchange

Vanilla Photobooks

Dewi Publishing

Life Media

Super Stage

Zenfolio

Print Foundry

Hahnemuhle Fine Art

Canson

Fotomaster

WD

Sony

Manfrotto

VR & 360

Lensbaby

Billingham Bags

Master Photographers Association

Fujifilm

Cameraworld

Bowens

Focal Amateur Sood Phoxi Point Photographer Studios Imaging Tog

Future

Kodak Extra

Photobooths

Panasonic

PowerVision

Fotospeed

Irix

Bob Rigby Photographic

Foolography

Nikon

Freedom Edits

Registration & welcome

Booked Images

Store

QNAP

M


Photography News 2017 Floor Plan

1901 Fotografi

USB Makers

Booth Revolution

Trōv Natural World Safaris

Baby Prop Shop

Video Village

EOS Mag Loxley Colour

LuxS

Ultimat

CEWE

Picscout

Coleg Gwent

Meeting Rooms Meeting Rooms Meeting Rooms

Adobe Stage

Versatrigger

Vallerret Photography Gloves

Hawkesmill England

Creative Photography Wales

Martin Newton Photography

Tom Morgan Picture Framing

Intellectual Property Office

robertharding

Live Stage

Rocky Nook

Dreambooks UK

LumaPix

SmugMug

Orangemonkie

Disabled Photographers’ Society

PhotoFinca

Shootproof

Loxley Colour

Bauer Magazines

Aaduki

PAGB

Guide Silly Dogs Jokes

NewbornART Academy

Gillis London

Canon Stage

Canon

Lencarta

Coetzer Nature Photography

Spéos

USB2U

Training by Lumiere

iStorage UK

Lumecube

TurnsPro Trained Eye

Costco

RSPB

Tailored

On Track Safaris

Natural Travel Collection

Albumprofessional.com

Wedding Video Albums

Direct Source

Mobile & Social Stage

Canon

Mac Group

Paramo Storage

Flaghead

Eternamedia

Frith and Co

Reflecmedia

theimagefile

Guild of Photographers

HHJ

Appleton Photo Training

Infocus

Snapper Stuff

Snapper Stuff

Paramo

GMC Magazines

Kula 3D Aerial Motion OTC Palette Gear Pictures

K&F Concept

Permajet

Fundy

Max Marketing Global

Rotatrim

Drobo

Panzer Cases

Profoto

Unitary Studios

Interfit BIPP

DJI

Colorworld Imaging

Adaptalux Sennheiser

Rotolight

SRB

Wildlife Heritage Foundation

Lomography

Loki

Epson

Camera Gear

The Flash Centre Kodak Pixpro

Olympus

SJ Cam

Calumet

Wacom

Pixapro

3 Legged Thing

Ricoh Imaging

Global Distribution

Royal Photographic Society

Phot-R

Color Confidence

Exhibitor Store

Pica Gear

Photovalue

JP Distribution

Video Theatre

Drone Zone flying area

Sense-Tech Innovation Company

Floricolor

Booth Experience

plot-IT

Barber Shop

Digital Photo Solutions

Patterson Photographic

Drone Zone viewing area

Pro Print Solutions

Contour Design

Compagnon

UK Optics

Speed Graphic Designer

dge

Sim 2000 Imaging

Lee Filters

s

Halsys

Eversure

y

Dorr Foto

Haida Photo

FBG

Nomad

MacWet

GotPhoto

Wildfoot

o

Multiblitz

ate sure

Visible Dust


Photography News 2017 Floor Plan


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

54

Interview

Britain in Focus: A photographic history A major exhibition and a BBC FOUR series explore the fascinating evolution of photography from its beginnings in the 19th century through to the modern day and the impact of social media. We caught up with the programme’s presenter and photographer Eamonn McCabe Interview by Will Cheung ©John Hinde Archive

Photography News: How did Britain in Focus: a photographic history come about? Did you come up with the idea or did the National Media Museum/BBC Four approach you? Eammon McCabe: The BBC originally approached me and asked if I would be interested in presenting three programmes on the history of British photography. As I am self taught, I have always been interested in finding out more about photography. I did an MA in Derby with the great John Blakemore back in 1988 but I was offered the picture editor’s job at The Guardian halfway through the first year of the course and never finished it. But the course whetted my appetite for finding out more about the subject and so when I was offered the chance to present this series on the history of British photography I was a little scared but very excited by the idea.

© Eamonn McCabe

PN: How long have you been working on the project? EM: From the very first meetings about it to the final voice-overs, about six months. PN: Britain has a long and rich photographic history, so how did you go about funnelling it down and choosing the photographs, pioneers and photographers to be included? EM: I worked with three different directors who had a segment of time to work with from 1820 up to Instagram today. We had an overall producer Alastair Laurence, who also made the first programme. The early days were pretty straightforward William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron etc, the influence of Queen Victoria and the pioneering work of George Fenton in the Crimea. The second programme features early newspaper photography from the Somme to the Sydney Street

siege up to the work of the Picture Post photographers Kurt Hutton, Bert Hardy and Bill Brandt via the glamour of Cecil Beaton. The last programme was the biggest challenge because of all the names we know and love who have been influential since the second world war. We felt the stories of Bailey and Don McCullin have been told many times so we left them out . Instead we see how Fay Godwin and Martin Parr work and a guy I had never heard of called Peter Mitchell who has been photographing the same fairground ride for fifty years in Leeds. The third programme ends with a great young photographer from Huddersfield called Molly Boniface (what a byline) who takes photographs with her mobile phone and puts them on Instagram. PN: Is the exhibition more about pictures depicting life in Britain, or is the focus more on the

development and technology of imaging through the ages? EM: The museum’s exhibition is about both really. PN: What was the toughest challenges you faced? EM: The old one of copyright… PN: Who, in your view, was the most influential British photographer? EM: To my generation, Don McCullin followed closely by David Bailey, who are my two big heroes. PN: What gives you most pride in the finished project? EM: The fact that BBC Four is devoting three hours to photography on television as part of a larger season devoted to the subject. PN: Why should our readers get along to see the exhibition? EM: To support the museum at Bradford and to try and keep it going

When I was offered the chance to present this series on the history of photography I was a little scared but very excited for as long as we can. I remember with great affection my time there as Fellow in Photography and have been greatly disturbed by what has been happening in the last few years with the RPS collection coming back to London. Also it’s a great show!


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Interview © John Bulmer

Opposite page, left Motor Racing at St Ouen’s Bay, Jersey, Channel Islands by Elmar Ludwig. Opposite page, right Heysel Stadium Disaster, 1985 by Eamonn McCabe. Left Durham miners, pictured with their ponies, 1965, John Bulmer. Below left Meall Mor; Glencoe, 1989 by Fay Godwin.

© The British Library

Britain in Focus: a photographic history The exhibition runs 17 March-25 June at The National Media Museum, situated in Bradford city centre and open daily 10am-6pm. Entrance is free. The exhibition features the work of photography’s pioneers including William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron and Alvin Langdon Coburn and also includes the work of John Bulmer, Jane Bown, Martin Parr and Eamonn McCabe. Britain in Focus also charts changes in technology through the years, from glass plates to film cartridges, black & white to colour, from paper to pixels. John O’Shea, senior exhibitions manager at the National Media Museum, said: “Throughout Britain in Focus we see the fundamental role photography and photographers have played in recording the last two centuries in Britain – not only major social changes and historic moments, but also everyday life. Equally the exhibition shows the development of photography over this time, pointing to the incredible pace at which technology, technique and subject matter have advanced, as its popularity made it the medium of choice for people to view and record their lives.” nationalmediamuseum.org.uk


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Technique

Dish of the day Lighting Academy

Giving a soft but sculpted look somewhere between a regular reflector and a softbox, beauty dishes are beloved by portrait photographers. Here we’ll take a look at them, as well as feathering techniques Words & pictures by Kingsley Singleton

So far in these Lighting Academy techniques we’ve looked at lots of ways in which using different modifiers can create beautifully lit portraits. And we’ve looked at how the position and power of your lights can create different looks. This time, we’ll combine the two, using a beauty dish and feathering techniques, to create a stylish image. They don’t come as standard accessories, like the softboxes and brollies supplied with most flash kits, but beauty dishes are an indispensable upgrade for portrait photographers, creating a refined, soft and sculpted look that’s beloved by pros and enthusiasts alike. Like all modifiers, this comes from the shape and materials used in their construction. What is a beauty dish? A beauty dish is like a regular reflector but shallower in shape, and within the middle sits a deflector. Thanks to the latter, light from the bulb reflects off the deflector into the parabolic dish, at once diffusing and focusing it. The light creates deeper shadows than a softbox, but with a soft transition, so it’s great for sophisticated low-key portraits and fashion work. The deflector in the construction also means that you can use a beauty dish closer to the subject than a softbox without getting overexposed highlights. The shape gives distinctive catchlights, too. Setting up To start off, we found a simple but interesting backdrop (a slightly reflective, striped curtain) and positioned Emma in front of it, but not too close, allowing some greater control of the fall off of light behind. Next I set up a single Elinchrom BRX 500 light on a stand directly in front of her, and angled it down by about 30°, so it was directed squarely at her face. The light was then fitted with an Elinchrom 44cm Softlite reflector beauty dish. This comes with a deflector set, allowing you to change the deflector in the middle and modify the colour

Dish with grid and fill light

and softness of the light, and I chose the white deflector for the softest look. Metering the light, at f/11, ISO 100 gave me a power setting of 2.5, which on the BRX 500 heads is a little over 1/16. After a few test shots to assess the effect though, it was obvious that the lighting was too broad for what I wanted. Feathering the beauty dish At this point you can either switch to a modifier that will restrict the light further or use feathering to control what parts of the scene or subject are lit by it. Rather than switch straight away, I tried the former, angling the light downwards so that less of it would fall on the backdrop.

There was an immediate improvement, but it’s important to remember, too, that you’ll need to check the power of the light (or your exposure) after moving it. After re-metering, the power needed to be increased very slightly to deal with some fall off of light at the edges of the beauty dish’s circle of light. However, the lighting was still a bit too broad. Adding a grid To get a much more restricted look to the light, I switched the 44cm Softlite reflector for Elinchrom’s 44cm Square reflector and Grid set (you can get a grid to fit the Softlite reflector, too). This reflector has a removable grid on the front, so it serves two purposes; without

You can either switch to a modifier that’ll restrict the light further or use feathering

Beauty dishes and grids In the pictures on the right you’ll see how adding a grid to the beauty dish lessens the throw of light onto the background, and, compared to the main image, how the shadows benefit from using a low-powered fill light. In the far-right pic, you can clearly see the effect that using a beauty dish has on the catchlights in Emma’s eyes. Dish with no grid or fill light

Dish with grid, no fill light

Beauty dish catchlights

Above The culmination of this shoot saw us using an Elinchrom 44cm Square Reflector and Grid Set. Thanks to its internal deflector, this offers a similar look to a regular beauty dish, and the removable grid easily let us control the spread of light onto the curtained background.


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Technique The importance of metering Whenever you change the type of modifier you’re using, change the power, the angle or the distance of the light from the subject, you’ll be changing the intensity of light that’s hitting them. Of course, this includes significant movement by the subject towards or away from the lights, too. What this change in intensity means is that, from one shot to the next, the subject will likely get lighter or darker, becoming too bright or too dim, if you don’t adjust power. You can prevent any problems by remembering to meter after each and every change. For example, take a look at the examples right. In this set-up, an Elinchrom Rotalux 130x50cm stripbox was used to light Emma, but in some shots, the light was feathered by pointing it away from her. The first set of pictures show the same power and exposure settings being used in each case, so as the light is swung towards Emma it goes from under to correct exposure and then under again as it’s swung away. In the second set, with each turn of the stripbox, a new meter reading was taken (the meter held in front her face) and the power of the flash adjusted accordingly. Consistency of exposure is important if you’re working with large numbers of files; with a limited number you can edit them individually, but larger numbers need batch-processing, and if there’s lots of variety in the exposure, this can’t be achieved.

Above Every time you change the position, power or angle of a light, the intensity of that light will be altered too, so it’s a good idea to check metering.

the grid, and with a central deflector fitted, it a gives soft, wide-angle illumination, but with the grid you get a more manageable but still soft pool of light. Re-metering the light, at the same exposure settings of f/11, ISO 100, I set the light at 2.3 (or 1/16 power). With the grid fitted and the light still angled down, I got just the sort of soft, directed light I was looking for, but made sure to meter again having changed modifiers. There was still something not quite right though; the shadows, while in a good style were a little too dark. Adding a fill light To improve the shadows, I decided to add a fill light, giving those darker areas a little lift. This was achieved using a second BRX 500 head, this time fitted with a 66cm softbox, and set up on a low-level stand below Emma’s position. It was important that this fill light didn’t wash out the defined look created by the key light that’d already been set up, so I set the power to its lowest, and, like the key light, the softbox was angled away slightly from Emma to feather the effect. A quick firing of the lights to check the metering confirmed this, and on reviewing the shots it added just enough fill light to lift some detail out of the darkest areas.

> Feathering the light without metering 1

2

3

4

Angled far left, 4.3 power

Angled left, 4.3 power

Straight on, 4.3 power

Angled right, 4.3 power

1

2

3

4

Angled far left, 4.9 power

Angled left, 4.5 power

Straight on, 4.3 power

Angled right, 4.5 power

> Feathering the light with metering

Left A beauty dish like Elinchrom’s 44cm Softlite Reflector provides deeper shadows and more definition than a softbox, so it’s a vital part of any portrait photographer’s kit. Like other Elinchrom modifiers, the type of deflector in the middle can be changed to alter the look.

Thanks to: This month’s model was the wonderful Emma Davis, and we shot on location at the beautiful William Cecil Hotel, Stamford, Lincolnshire.


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Interview © Joel Santos

Travel Photographer of the Year This year’s competition saw three UK photographers named as category winners. We caught up with two of them to ask about their winning shots and thoughts on the competition Interview by Jemma Dodd With over 20,000 images submitted by photographers across the globe the Travel Photographer of the Year competition sees a diverse range of images covering many aspects of travel from portraits to wildlife. This year’s overall winner was Portuguese photographer Joel Santos who won prizes including £4000, StaaG luxury leather travel goods and sterling silver accessories worth over £1250, £500 to spend on Páramo clothing and a Plastic Sandwich personalised leather portfolio case. Speaking to Chris Coe, founder of Travel Photographer of the Year, he informed us that popular countries to photograph tend to

include India and African countries Namibia, Tanzania and Kenya, as well as China. If you’re thinking of entering the next Travel Photographer of the Year competition Chris has this advice to offer: “Read the entry requirements for your category, and then read them again! Make sure your pictures fit the category theme – if it’s a landscape category, don’t send us people portraits. If you’re submitting a portfolio please make sure that the pictures work well together as a set. That’s not to say that they should all be shot in the same place at the same time – find a common element that meets the category theme and

compile your portfolio around that. Make sure that all images in a portfolio are strong – you’ll drop out early in the judging if you have even one weak shot in your portfolio. And please don’t try to replicate what won the year before – each year we will receive some entries which are very similar to the previous year’s winners. Yes, take inspiration from what won before, in terms of image quality, but please don’t recreate the shots!”. The Travel Photographer of the Year 2017 competition launches in April/May. Keep up to date with the competition at tpoty.com

Above Dallol, Danakil Depression, Afar, Ethiopia by Joel Santos, Overall Winner, Travel Photographer of the Year 2016. Right Images from Son & Dad portfolio, George Town, Penang, Malaysia by Alison Cahill, Winner, New Talent – Eye to Eye.


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Interview © Luke Massey

Luke Massey Luke Massey was named winner of the OneShot – Wildlife & Nature category with his image of an endangered Iberian lynx and bagged himself a six-day winter or summer voyage for two along the Norway coast, as well as a Torres Insulator Jacket from Páramo. What made you enter TPOTY? I admire the images in TPOTY year on year. I love travel and get to go all over the world seeing amazing things so it is great to see other people’s images from their own travels. This was only my second year of entering but with the high calibre of entries I am honored to have my image awarded alongside some truly stunning shots. You like to tell important conservation stories in your work; can you tell us more about the Iberian lynx? The Iberian lynx is the world’s rarest cat. In 2001 there were fewer than one hundred in existence. They feed mainly on rabbits and due to various factors the rabbit population in Spain and Portugal crashed, meaning the lynx population did too. Luckily, thanks to an EU funded project a captive breeding programme was started 10 years ago that has been quite successful, this has led to new populations of lynx being introduced across southern Spain and Portugal and there are now over 400 in the wild. Tell us about your winning image? I’m a bit lynx obsessed. When I first visited Spain to look for the lynx I was very lucky and saw six in just five days. However, I realised there was not much media coverage of the lynx’s plight outside of Spain. You’ve got all this PR in the UK for sexy exotic species further afield but the Iberian lynx is basically on our doorstep and on the verge of

dying out. I decided to do a long-term project on it with help from a grant from Wildscreen Exchange. It took two months to reconnect with the lynx in the wild. We were working with the captive breeding programme so were seeing lynx in captivity/being released but on this day I found two lynx together in the morning and was able to stay with them

Above Sierra de Andújar National Park, Andalucia, Spain by Luke Massey, UK Winner, One Shot – Wildlife & Nature.

way back to my guesthouse and discovered Son & Dad by accident, I thought it looked interesting and decided to take a look inside. I asked Elyas the owner if I could come by the next day and take some photos; he was really friendly and agreed. I spent a few hours with Elyas and his staff and took some photos, I was really nervous but they were all so friendly that I soon relaxed. I left for Indonesia and while I was there sent some of my photos from the shoot to Elyas and asked if I could return to spend more time with them as I’d like to do a photographic project on the shop. He agreed and just over a year later I returned to Penang and spent around three months on

and off at the barber shop trying to get a feel of the daily life there. They were amazing, very welcoming, friendly and funny and just let me do my thing. It was a great experience and a good learning curb in my photographic development.

© Alison Cahill

all day. Just after sunset the female laid down on the boulder and began to clean herself before heading out for the evening to hunt. I’d pictured this shot hundreds of times, a lynx sat perfectly on a boulder but I never expected to get it, sometimes everything comes together perfectly!

© Alison Cahill

Alison Cahill Alison Cahill, winner of the New Talent Portfolio – Eye To Eye category with her series of images documenting ‘Son & Dad’ won her a set of luxury leather travel goods from StaaG, a personalized leather portfolio case from Plastic Sandwich, Photo Iconic tuition and a Páramo Halcon Traveller jacket. Are you a regular entrant to TPOTY? Yes, this was my third year of entry. On my first attempt in 2014 I was a finalist for the best single image award in the Tribes category for my portfolio of photos on a Bali tattoo

artist at work. The fact that one of my images became a finalist encouraged me to continue with my photography which was in its early stages at that time. It also encouraged me to return to Bali to work further with tattoo artists there. In 2015 I became a finalist with commendation in the New Talent section of TPOTY for my storyboard about a tattoo artist from Nusa Lembongan, a small island south east of Bali. In my third attempt at TPOTY I’ve managed to win the New Talent section. How long did you work on this portfolio? I was actually in Penang, Malaysia getting a visa for Indonesia when I got lost on my

What were the technical challenges shooting in the barber shop? The barbers shop is very small and often very crowded, so trying to get an overall distant shot to convey the place was very difficult with the lenses I had; a Nikon 50mm prime f/1.8 and a 24-120mm f/4. This for me was the biggest challenge: trying to get some distance.


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Advertisement feature

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To really see your images in all their glory, print bigger. Epson’s SureColor SC-P600 A3+ printer is easy to use and delivers superb results as Roger Payne discovers My first taste of A3+ printing came a few years back when I sampled the delights of the Epson Stylus Photo R3000. As the owner of a DSLR with 20+ megapixels, I regularly had to downsize my images to print them out on my A4 unit at home. And while a high-quality A4 print can still cut it as a way to display images, there’s no doubt that when it comes to prints, bigger is most certainly better. Since I tried the R3000, I’ve never looked back and my orders to postal labs have become virtually non-existent. Epson’s replacement for the R3000 is the SureColor SC-P600, and I’ve ploughed through plenty of ink and paper over the past few weeks trying its considerable charms. I was pleased to find that much of what I liked about the R3000 remained, but there have also been some significant updates, which means you get even better prints. While the old machine could never be described as ugly, I also think the SC-P600 is smarter looking in its all black costume and is no larger than its predecessor, despite the extra features. The wonders of wireless If you’re thinking of making the switch to an A3+ printer and are feeling daunted by the prospect, don’t worry, you’re amongst friends here. I used to think a bigger printer demanded a broader knowledge of the technology, yet the SC-P600 is remarkably easy to get up and running – largely due to the improved Wi-Fi functionality. Connecting it to a home or office broadband router is easily achieved and is the best way to go for out-and-out flexibility. This is because you can park the printer anywhere, rather than having to be tethered to a specific location. Of course, you can still connect by USB or Ethernet cable, but I stuck with Wi-Fi. The necessary drivers come supplied on a software CD, but as an owner of an Apple Mac without a CD drive, I was still able to get set up quickly, downloading the necessary from the Epson website at epson.sn. The SC-P600 adds further Wi-Fi sophistication with the provision of Wi‑Fi Direct, which enables printing from

smartphones, tablets and PCs, plus it’s also compatible with Apple’s AirPrint and Google’s Cloud Print services. Ease of use Once up and running, I set to work. I’d already calibrated my monitor and would advise you to do the same, then chose to print all my images through Photoshop, allowing the software to manage the colours while I resized them before selecting paper type and image quality. I started with the standard 1440dpi output, which produces an A3+ print in just over two and a half minutes – that’s a good 30 seconds faster than the previous model – and found it to be more than adequate for most of my shots. I used the ICC profiles that came as part of the downloadable software and if I found an image that I wanted to print at the ultimate quality, I went for the 5760dpi option. I can safely say that the only rejects I had were user errors – the printer performed superbly. Another improvement is the 6.8cm touchscreen, which can be tilted for ease of use. While it’s probably a tad smaller than the rear LCD on your DSLR, it’s bright and very easy to use. Ink levels are always on display and it also has an easy-to-use menu system should you want to run simple maintenance checks or use different print media. It also takes you through ink cartridge changing, step by step. When it comes to printing on different papers, the SC-P600 is much like the R3000 before it. Normal printing papers are fed through the rear, but thicker media can be fed through the front of the printer via a dedicated tray. There’s even the capacity to attach rolls of paper via the feeder supplied, plus the ability to print on to CDs and DVDs. Print quality Trust me, from the moment your first A3+ print drops into the tray, you’ll be hooked. The print quality is truly exceptional. This is most likely down to the nine UltraChrome HD inks, the ninth colour being a Vivid Magenta to help produce an even wider colour gamut and the highest black density of any A3+

Above The smart-looking SC-P600 will look the part at home or in the office, and thanks to Wi-Fi connectivity, it can sit anywhere. Top right Print on various media, including thicker papers, rolls and even CDs and DVDs with the SC-P600. Right Boasting nine UltraChrome HD inks, the SC‑P600 outputs prints of exceptional quality time after time. Below The Wi-Fi Direct connection means you can print from a smartphone or tablet without needing to connect to a network first. photo printer. The subtleties and tonal gradations are also stunning. The ink droplets are as small as 2pl, so fine details are beautifully rendered. It’s the same when it comes to black & white prints, which are superb. I love the fact that you can add a tone to your monochrome work directly through the printer driver, which is just as good as any effect that I’ve spent ages faffing around with in Lightroom. Also impressive is the ink cartridge capacity. Each one holds 25.9ml of ink and, although the initial outlay will be higher than with an A4 printer, the SC-P600 will work out more cost-effective on a print-byprint basis. epson.co.uk


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Camera test Specs Price Canon EOS M5 body only £1049; with EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM £1149; EOS 5M with EF-M 18150mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM £1399 Sensor 24.2 megapixels with optical low pass filter Sensor format APS-C 22.3x14.9mm CMOS, 6000x4000pixels ISO range 100-25,600, movie 100-6400 Shutter range 30secs to 1/4000sec, B, flash sync 1/200sec Drive modes Single high continuous at 9fps with fixed AF, 7fps with AF, low continuous Metering system Evaluative, partial, centreweighted average and spot Exposure modes PASM, scene modes, scene intelligent auto, hybrid auto, 2c custom mode, movie Exposure compensation +/-3EV in 0.3EV steps, AEB Monitor 3.2in ClearView II touch screen, 1620k dots, tiltable up and down Focusing Dual Pixel CMOS AF, one shot and servo, face detect and tracking Focus points 49 AF points in 7x7 grid, single point AF and 1 AF 3x3 grid selectable Video 1920x1080 @ 24p, 30p and 60p, MP4 Connectivity Micro HDMI, USB 2.0, WiFi Storage media 1xSD card Dimensions (wxhxd) 115.6x89.2x60.6mm Weight 427g body and battery Contact Canon.co.uk

Above One of the ‘big sells’ of the Canon EOS M system is the ability to use the huge range of Canon EF and EF-S lenses via the lightweight EF-EOS M adapter (shown in the middle here).

Canon EOS M5 Canon was a late arrival to the mirrorless party so perhaps it was no surprise that its early CSCs were off the pace compared with their rivals. But read through the M5’s long specification and it promises much; so how does it stack up against its mirrorless rivals? Words and pictures by Will Cheung

While Canon didn’t rush into the mirrorless world, it was a safe bet that when it did that it would do it well and while the early Ms weren’t that outstanding, Canon made sure they had one massive advantage. This was in the form of an adapter that allowed the millions of Canon EOS owners already out there to use their existing lenses without losing functionality. It meant that launching a new system with a limited number of dedicated lenses was not too much of an issue because there were plenty of compatible lenses available – currently there are over 90 Canon lenses compatible with the EOS M system. Of course it is not all plain sailing because the EF lenses are bigger and heavier so the benefit of having a smaller bodyform was negated significantly, but it was nevertheless a valuable advantage. And one that still applies given that the range of EOS M lenses is small and still lacks lenses with the X factor. No f/1.2 telephotos or f/1.4 ultra-wides or even any highspeed, high spec zooms. The EOS M5 is in the shops at £1049 (currently you get an EF-EOS M adapter free) so it is top of Canon’s mirrorless range, which now comprises the M10 at entry-level and the just-launched M6 in the midrange, and much cheaper compared with the rival flagship models. Resolution is an attractive 24.2 megapixels with an APS-C CMOS sensor fitted with an optical low pass filter and working with Canon’s DIGIC 7 image processor to give low-noise images with good dynamic range and a shooting speed of seven frames-per-second with autofocus – you get 9fps with fixed focus. This processor also features Auto Lighting Optimiser to help deal with high contrast and Diffraction correction to help you get the best results when shooting at smaller aperture values where diffraction and image softening is a potential issue. The M5’s design is friendly to keen photographers with a control

layout that is familiar and very usable. The on/off switch on the left at the base of the exposure mode dial isn’t ideal and does mean a fractional delay in getting the camera ready to shoot; ideal being an on/off control that you can use as you bring the camera up the eye single-handed. The exposure mode dial does have a lock and to change modes the central locking button has to be pushed and held down as you do so. I must admit a preference for a dial that has the option of locking or freewheeling as seen on the latest Fujifilm and Olympus CSCs. On the right is an exposure compensation dial that is well designed to avoid accidental setting and two input dials, a front one around the shutter release and the other around the DIAL FUNC. button. I found the front input dial great to use while the rear one was slightly awkward with the raised monitor’s ridge getting in the way. The monitor is touchscreen and tiltable for low angle of above the head shooting. There is no sideways tilt option. One thing I found annoying with the monitor/EVF was when using the camera on a tripod. The monitor/EVF auto switchover sensor has a good working range and it’s very sensitive. It activates when your fingers get close and you have to wait a second or two before the live viewing image returns. You can solve this easily enough with the Display settings menu where you can turn off auto switchover or manually choose to use the EVF or the monitor. All you have to remember is to reset it to auto when you’re back off the tripod. Generally, though, I enjoyed using the screen and found it a speedy way of navigating the menu or to set features using the Q (quick) menu. The Q menu can be edited down to features you use most frequently. The info menu has a wide selection of settings that can be altered at a touch but this is not editable.

You can use the camera’s touch-and-drag feature that lets you move the AF point with your finger on the touch monitor The camera has no focus joystick to move a single AF point around the scene although you can use the rear command pad after pushing the AF zone selector. Or you can use the camera’s touch-and-drag AF feature that lets you move the AF point with your finger on the touch monitor. This works well even while the camera is held up to the eye and is quicker than a focus joystick. I am left eyed and there was plenty of room for my left thumb to slip between monitor and cheek to move the AF point around. Should you prefer you can limit the touch-sensitive working area to, for example, the top right or bottom left, which was my preferred setting. The touchscreen also works in other AF modes even in tracking mode when the AF system might need a helping finger. Overall, I liked the camera’s handling although the first few times I picked up the camera, I managed to turn on the movie recording unintentionally. The video record button is on the rear at the base of the protruding grip and I found easy to turn on with the pad of my thumb as I picked the camera up. So the first thing I did was rummage in the custom control menu and turned this control off so while I didn’t find this control very ergonomic Canon lets you do something about it. Aside from off, there are 23 other functions that can be assigned to this button. Generally, there is plenty of customisation potential for many of the EOS 5M’s controls and the visual prompts on the monitor help guide you through the process. Another control worth

mentioning is the DIAL FUNC. control. Here you can choose some key features like ISO, AF mode and white-balance that once registered you can scroll through rapidly by pushing the DUAL FUNC. button and then use the surrounding collar to select the required setting. The shutter button isn’t very responsive and there’s some shutter lag. In single frame mode, shooting Raw and Large JPEG, there’s a delay so you can’t take a rapid sequence of shots in single-shot mode if you spot a rapidly evolving scene in front of you. I found myself with my finger rammed down on the shutter button waiting for the camera to go – there’s gap of half a second or so. It could be frustrating and I missed the odd grab shot. A way round this is to set continuous high but even in this mode the camera can be hesitant, enough to miss a grab shot, and didn’t always shoot at its full continuous speed in AF mode. Shooting several frames in a burst also pushes up noise levels and there is no electronic shutter option. Shooting both Raw and JPEG in continuous high you get 16 shots before the buffer is full and the shooting is held up as files are written to card. That’s pretty good for a camera not dedicated to shooting action. No camera’s handling is flawless, just some are smoother, more reactive, more responsive or more tactile than others. The EOS M5 rates well in some areas and less well in others, but this is subjective. I found a few niggles but nothing serious in a capable camera.


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Camera test © Will Cheung

Performance: ISO

ISO 100

ISO 400

ISO 800

ISO 1600

ISO 3200

ISO 6400

ISO 12,800

ISO 25,600

Original image

The Canon EOS M5 was fixed to a Gitzo GT1555T travel tripod for this ISO set using the EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens. It was very late afternoon and the base ISO 100 exposure was 0.5sec at f/8. Incamera noise reduction was turned off and the Raws processed in Lightroom with no noise reduction. Noise started to appear in the shadows at ISO 400 which is perhaps at a lower speed than expected but overall quality

ISO 3200 – noise was evident in these areas too. I think ISO 3200 was about the limit for critical image quality and images got very gritty beyond this speed and resolution of fine detail suffered. Overall, the EOS M5’s ISO skills are good but not outstanding and you get better high ISO performance from other cameras. However images are still decent up to ISO 2000 and some work in software would clean up images to make them even better.

Original image

© Will Cheung

ISO 100 no NR

remained at a high level. Image quality was similar at ISO 800 so remained acceptable, just a little grainy in the shadow regions and areas of smooth tone. From ISO 1600 there was a gradual deterioration in quality, again with shadows suffering most where the grain patterning was clearly evident and fine detail suffered. The noise in the midtones and highlights was still quite fine at ISO 1600 but that changed from

ISO 6400 no NR

ISO 6400 Low NR

ISO 6400 Standard NR

Left London’s Tower Bridge was the setting for our ISO (top) and high ISO noise reduction tests. For the latter the tripod-mounted Canon EOS M5 was fitted with the 22mm f/2 lens. Shots were taken at ISO 3200, 6400 and 12,800 using all the NR options.

ISO 6400 Strong NR

ISO 6400 Multishot NR

Performance: High ISO noise reduction The EOS M5 has long exposure and high ISO NR features. Shots were taken at ISO 3200, 6400 and 12,800 using the available NR settings of low, standard, strong and multishot – the latter is available in JPEG only. Raw files taken with NR are the same as Raws taken without NR if processed through Lightroom or Photoshop. Use Canon’s Raw Photo Professional, however, and the NR strength selected in the camera is applied to processed files. The images shown here are straight out the camera JPEGs. The camera fitted with the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM lens was fixed onto a Gitzo tripod. The exposure for the ISO 6400 shot was 1/160sec at f/8. As usual with NR, it is choosing the setting that gives the best compromise between minimising noise while maximising detail. The multi-shot NR where four frames are taken by the camera and then merged in-camera. The process takes a few seconds and the camera must be kept steady so a tripod is ideal, but it gives the best result. That said, I don’t think the strong setting is that far behind in terms of noise reduction and it didn’t seem too aggressive when it came to handling fine detail. I’d be happy using this setting if I didn’t have a tripod handy.


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Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Camera test Performance: exposure latitude © Will Cheung

To assess the EOS M5’s Raws, a +/-4EV manual bracket was made. In Lightroom, the exposures were corrected by the degree they were over or underexposed. The corrected -4EV and -3EV shots showed increased levels of noise but this wasn’t unacceptable given the large amount of correction needed. Tonaiity and contrast looked good too. The -2EV and -1EV shots corrected perfectly well and almost identical to the correct exposure. The overexposed shots looked less successful after correction. The -4EV shot had flat grey highlights that could be corrected to a degree in Photoshop but garish highlights remained the stumbling block. The same applied to the +3EV where intense highlights had no recoverable detail. The overexposure limit is +2EV if you want acceptable images with highlights with some semblance of detail. In sum, exposure latitude is decent, more so with underexposure and the EOS M5’s Raws are comparable with its contemporaries.

-1EV

-2EV

-3EV

-4EV

+3EV

+4EV

0EV

Original image +1EV

+2EV

Images The EOS M5’s control layout is generally good, and there is a reasonable amount of customistation potential. I found being able to turn off the video record button entirely very handy.

Performance: Diffraction correction

Original image

© Will Cheung

The EOS M5 has Chromatic aberration, Peripheral illumination and Diffraction corrections Diffraction is an interesting one and it has appeared on several Canon cameras. Diffraction affects quality at smaller apertures. Light strikes the edges of the diaphragm blades, scattering and creating interference. Diffraction can make a massive impact and if quality is a priority a limit of f/11 is often a good idea. I shot JPEG images using the EOS M5 fitted with the 18-150mm and mounted on a tripod. One shot was at 1/30sec at f/11 and ISO 100, and then two pictures at f/36 and with Diffraction disabled and enabled. Well, the lens’s superior performance at f/11 was clearly evident and the f/36 shots were significantly softer. Was there any benefit using Diffraction correction? On the evidence of this test, with this camera and lens at the settings used, there is no benefit at all but as there is no slowing down of camera performance you might was well leave it enabled.

F/11 Diffraction Correction off

F/36 Diffraction Correction off

F/36 Diffraction Correction enabled


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Camera test © Will Cheung

© Will Cheung © Will Cheung

Above left We tried two lenses for this review, the 22mm f/2 and the 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3. The superzoom produced decent images but was not oustandingly sharp especially towards the longer end – this was shot at 141mm using an exposure of 1/125sec at f/7.1 with a tripod mounted camera. Above right A handheld exposure with the 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 lens at 1/80sec and f/6.3 at ISO 800. IS was turned on. Left Consistent and accurate exposures was a feature of the EOS M5. This was taken at 1/160sec at f/2 and ISO 1600. Below The EOS M5 has good high ISO performance although it is not market-leading. This was shot at ISO 1600 with an exposure of 1/80sec at f/2.2 using the 22mm lens.

If you are looking for a CSC to commit to, you could argue that the EOS M5 is not it with only seven dedicated lenses

Verdict

© Will Cheung

You can view the EOS 5M from any number of standpoints. Existing Canon system owners will see it as a compact route of using their EF lenses via the EOS M adaptor even if those lenses are bigger and heavier. Canon loyalists looking to downsize will look at the M5 and see that it is the best CSC from the company to date and a real option. Many people will see the M5 is from Canon and buy on that basis. As yet uncommitted mirrorless converts with more camera experience – if you are reading this, this means you! - might look at the EOS M5 and compare it with popular models from Fujifilm and Olympus and see that while it has potential it’s lacking in the lens department. If you are looking for a CSC to commit to, you could argue that the EOS M5 is not it with only seven dedicated lenses, none of them especially exciting or cutting edge. What’s more, there is no sign that this is going to change. Canon going public and telling the world that a 16mm f/1.8, 18-55mm f/2 and 50mm f/1.2 are around the corner would be a very good thing. It would be a sign of commitment from the brand that many people are looking for. As far as the Canon EOS M5 is concerned it is a good camera, significantly superior to its previous models, has plenty of potential and capable of a decent performance. 21/25 Features Lots on offer but not weather resistant and no electronic shutter 22/25 Performance ISO performance good, but not market-leading 22/25 Handling Excellent touch monitor and exposure system, decent AF Value for money Good value but lots of well priced rivals out there

21/25

86/100 Overall There’s much to like and worth a look if you’re CSC-bound Pros Touch screen, plenty of features, very good image quality up to ISO 1600 Cons Limited and unexciting EOS-M lens system, not weather resistant, minor handling niggles like indistinct shutter release, no electronic shutter


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Accessories test Buyers’ guide - TPS edition

Show toppers

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It’s going to be a busy year at The Photography Show with plenty of great products, deals and speakers to see. So to make sure you don’t miss out on any of the highlights, here are our picks...

Learn Photoshop with Adobe Ambassadors (FREE) Stand: Adobe Theatre

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If you were at last year’s TPS, you may have attended the Adobe Theatre, a learning experience for photographers and image makers with enlightening speakers. It’s back this year and, while it’s free, getting there early is advisable as it gets busy! Split into 30 minute sessions, classes run daily from Saturday 18 to Tuesday 21, and from 10.15 to 16.15. There are opportunities to learn techniques covering Adobe’s most popular packages, Photoshop, Elements, and Lightroom, and the content is varied, covering everything from basic editing skills to more advanced exercises. This year it’ll be presented by accredited Adobe ambassadors including Dave Mallows, Nat Coalson, Gavin Hoey, Eric Renno and Idan Nelkenbaum. photographyshow.com

Calumet RC2065 Rolling 2 Camera Case (£129) Stand: C120

There are loads of great photo accessories to see at Calumet’s stand, including the new RC2065 Rolling Camera Case Plus. This adaptable wheeled case can swallow four or five DSLR camera bodies, three or four additional lenses, including long telephotos, and other accessories like flashes, as well as a laptop. So, you won’t need to leave anything at home. The interior is highly adaptable, with adjustable dividers, and you can instantly turn the roller into a backpack using the included harness on the rear. The RC2065 usually retails at £169, but you can get £40 off at TPS. calphoto.co.uk

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Nikon D5600 (£729) & more. Stand: C11

2017 marks 100 years in the photo business for Nikon, and there’ll be plenty to enjoy on the company’s stand. The new Nikon D5600 really illustrates how packed with technology modern cameras are. Aside from its impressive 24.2-megapixel images and lownoise 100-25,600 ISO range, it’s capable of sharing pictures almost instantly using Nikon’s SnapBridge

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Bluetooth system. And there’s more cutting edge tech in the form of Nikon’s KeyMission action cams, which are defining how we record our adventures. All this is backed up by the Nikon School stage, where you’ll find a host of inspirational speakers, including the Nikon Ambassadors, David Yarrow, Leon Neal and Jeremy Walker. nikon.co.uk

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Pixapro Citi600 flash (£630). Stand: E91

Pixapro has a host of products for you to try out like the Citi600 flash, a revolutionary 600Ws, portable monolight with TTL and HighSpeed sync functions for Canon, Nikon and Sony cameras. With a user-friendly interface and a builtin 2.4GHz receiver you can use it in conjunction with Pixapro’s Pro ST-III TTL flash trigger and flash duration is as fast as 1/10,000sec. Also from Pixapro is the Glowpad 350S Slim-Profiled LED panel, a daylight balanced LED light for use by in stills and video. Then there’s Pixapro’s Pika200 Portable Battery Powered TTL Mini Flash, a 200Ws, compact and portable off-camera TTL flash with a clever, interchangeable flash-head designed to give you the power of a studio flash, whilst only measuring 16.8x7.5x5cm.

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essentialphoto.co.uk

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Gitzo and Manfrotto gear Stand: E41

2017 marks the Gitzo’s centenary, so go pay your respects to its wonderful Systematic tripod range. These are Gitzo’s top of the range legs and have become a firm favourite of professionals and enthusiasts alike. If you use heavy gear, they provide the support needed for sharp shots with new Carbon eXact tubes and ultra-stable feet. While you’re at the stand, check out Manfrotto’s Xume Filter Adapters; these consist of two quick release adapters (a filter holder and a lens adapter) which let you mount filters more quickly and precisely than with regular models. There’s also Manfrotto’s stylish new Windsor bag range, designed with a vintage look, genuine leather trims and elegant fabric, plus all the protection your gear needs. manfrotto.co.uk

gitzo.co.uk

Fujifilm GFX 50S medium format camera (£6200) Stand: D61

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The Fujifilm stand is your chance to try out the revolutionary GFX 50S medium-format camera and lenses. It’s now available with three lenses and key system accessories. The 50S is a 51.4-megapixel mirrorless camera similar in size and weight to a full-frame DSLR body, but with a huge 43.8x32.9mm CMOS sensor at its heart, producing 8256x6192px images and stunning, low-noise results throughout the 100-12,800 ISO range. You can use the 3690k-dot OLED EVF for composition, or swap it for the optional Tilting Adaptor EVF-TL1 for a different experience. Also on display will be Fujifilm’s new X-T20 and X100F cameras and the 100400mm telephoto zoom lens for X Series cameras. fujifilm.co.uk

Permajet Museum Heritage 310 (from £14) Stand: F91

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Permajet’s Museum Heritage 310 fine-art inkjet paper is the company’s best-seller in the UK and you can see it in all its glory at Permajet’s stand. Beloved by home-printers, this textured paper displays a lovely rough weave with naturally random undulations. Permajet’s ultimate matt inkjet coating technology has been applied to the 310gsm base and this results in superb highlight and shadow detail – the best ever seen in for such a media. The museumstandard, mid-white paper is totally acid-free, water resistant and has a scuff-resistant coating avoiding the ‘flaking’ effect seen on similar papers. 100% pigment and dye ink compatible, its available in sizes including A4, A3, A3+, A2 and 17in, 24in, and 44in rolls. permajet.com

ThinkTank Airport Helipak (£200) Stands: G101, F101

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The ThinkTank Airport Helipak lets you take your Phantom Quadcopter anywhere, so you’ll always have it at the ready. Its main compartment has been specifically designed for the DJI Phantom series, but with modular dividers you can reconfigure it depending on your model. As well as a drone, there’s space for other vital gear like a wi-fi range extender, charger, controller, 15in laptop, spare rotors, batteries, and up to a 7in LCD monitor. Despite all this, the bag measures only 35.6x52.1x22.9cm and weighs just 2.1kg, making it the perfect carry-on partner when travelling. Its contoured harness keeps it comfortable in the carry and a stowable, seam-sealed rain cover protect from the elements. snapperstuff.com


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Fotospeed square paper (from £18) Stand: G21

Fotospeed is now offering the chance to print directly onto square format paper, too. This, of course, is ideal for medium-format users, those who shoot with a square crop mode on a DSLR or CSC, or those who’ve made square format images in editing. Fotospeed has created a simple square printing template for use in Photoshop, Lightroom or other editing programs. No longer will you have to cut down larger sheets of paper, so it’s a cost-effective solution. At up to 12in height, it can be printed on most home printers, and there are 8x8in and 12x12in packs available in three different weights and finishes; Fotospeed PF Lustre 275 (in 50 sheet boxes), Fotospeed Platinum Etching 285 (25 sheets), and Fotospeed Platinum Baryta 300 (25 sheets). fotospeed.com

Canon EOS M6 (£840) & 10 more Stands: D141 & E131

Celebrating 30 years of the EOS system, Canon will be displaying more products than ever before. Visitors can experience first-hand products from the EOS archive, including the legendary EF 1200mm f/5.6L USM lens. Canon’s newest EOS additions will also be there to touch and try, including the new EOS M6, the 5D Mark IV, EOS 800D and EOS 77D. Plus, Canon’s Live stage and Education stage will play host to insightful talks from inspiring, industry leading photographers and videographers. These include Canon Ambassador Jeff Ascough and Canon Explorers Clive Booth and Andy Rouse. Guests will also get the chance to have an exclusive Q&A with the world renowned Sebastiao Salgado. canon.co.uk

Olympus E-M1 Mark II (£1850) & more Stand: D91

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Head to Olympus and you can try out big-hitters like the OM-D E-M1 Mark ll, and the entire range of Olympus M.Zuiko lenses. Like every camera in the OM-D line-up, the E-M1 Mark II is built to deliver brilliant image quality, high speed (that 60fps mode has to be seen to be believed!), and a host of creative options. There’s also the M.Zuiko Premium and Pro lenses designed to meet the needs of both professional and enthusiast photographers. You can also find out about, and get a huge 20% discount on joining the Olympus Pro service programme, discover the Check and Clean service to keep your O-MD in top condition and learn from Olympus Visionaries and Ambassadors. olympus.co.uk

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Sigma 12-24mm f/4 Art (£1400) Stand: F51

If you’re in the market for an new wide-angle lens at TPS, check out Sigma’s outstanding 12-24mm f/4 Art. This ultra wide zoom is Sigma’s third-generation 12-24mm optic and the sharpest yet, being optimised for today’s high-resolution full-frame sensors. As part of the prestigious Art range it’s uncompromising on image quality, weighing a sturdy 1150g and sporting the largest molded glass aspherical element in its class, as well as FLD (“F” Low Dispersion) elements which together minimise distortion, chromatic aberration and flare. As a result, image quality is excellent from edge to edge. Fittingly for outdoor applications, the lens is also dust- and splash-proof, and comes in Canon, Nikon and Sigma fits. sigma-imaging-uk.com

NanGuang Flexible LED 13 Light Panel (£680) Stand: G53

New from Kenro is the NanGuang Flexible LED Light Panel kit. The set includes two 30x60cm LED light panels, stands and frames. The panels can be bent and shaped around the subject to offer unique lighting effects, or fit into awkward spaces. With an output of 28.2W, and a thickness of just 2mm, they’re water and frost resistant, too, making them great for location work. Lighting is via 288 bi-colour LEDs (CRI 95), which can provide colour temperatures in stepless adjustment from 3200-5600K. The panels can also be attached to frames for more traditional positioning. The lights can be run off a 240V mains supply, or using Sony V-mount and NP-F batteries. kenro.co.uk


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Accessories test

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Rogue FlashBender 2 XL 14 Pro Lighting System (£120) Stand: C81

Seek out Color Confidence’s stand for the Rogue FlashBender 2 XL kit – winner of ‘Best Studio/Lighting Accessory’ in PN’s 2016 Awards. This speedlight modifier softens light from your flash, measuring 33x41cm to create a large light source. The kit comprises a FlashBender 2 XL Pro Reflector, a Pro Soft Box Diffuser (for even softer results) and a Pro Strip Grid (for a more directional look). Due to its flexible design, the FlashBender can be sculpted to throw light as you wish. Other highlights at the stand include the FlatHat 32in Collapsible Drone Pad, the X-Rite ColorMunki Display colour management device and BenQ’s stunning PV270 Pro 27in IPS LCD monitor. gb.colorconfidence.com

Profoto D2 1000 AirTTL 15 (£1500) Stand: C71

When you hear Profoto claim its D2 1000 AirTTL as the world’s fastest monolight flash it’s something you need to check out. It has a huge output of 1000Ws, giving it the strength to overpower available light in almost any situation, but its speed is the real eye opener. With a minimum flash duration of 1/50,000sec and the ability to shoot up to 20 flashes per second, you can look forward to amazing sports and action images, with completely frozen movement. But it’s just as useful for regular shoots like portraits, with the super-fast speed giving new level of crispness to flash-lit images. As part of Profoto’s AirTTL range you can control it wirelessly with ease, and it integrates perfectly with other AirTTL flashes like the B1 and B2. profoto.com

Bowens XMT500 flash 16 (£1200) Stand: E21

If you want to get creative with flash on location, you need a light like Bowens’ new XMT500. This all in one flash, which requires no external power supply, is engineered for great speed and durability. The flash includes full TTL exposure control, so you can shoot without metering, high-speed sync (at shutter speeds up to 1/8000sec) for working in strong ambient light, and very short flash durations. At speeds as high as 1/10,309sec you’ll be able to freeze motion with ease. The maximum 500Ws output can be controlled through nine stops of adjustment in 1/3stop increments, giving plenty of scope for working at wider apertures, too, and you’ll get up to 500 full power flashes from a single charge (charging from empty takes only four hours). bowens.co.uk

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Elinchrom ELB 1200 flash (£TBC) Stand: D111

At The Flash Centre’s TPS stand you’ll find Elinchrom’s full range of flash heads, kits and modifiers. And along with tried and tested gear, like the D-Lite and BRX systems, there’s the new ELB 1200. The unit features a large OLED control display making it easy to adjust settings and offers strobe, sequence and delayed flash modes. There’s also a dimmable LED modelling lamp and silent mode, making it ideal for video recording as well as stills. The ELB 1200 will be available in four kit options from mid 2017; including the ELB 1200 Hi-Sync To Go, which comes with a Hi-Sync Head and a 16cm/90° reflector; and the ELB 1200 Pro To Roll, with a Pro Head, a shallow umbrella and an 18cm/70° reflector with 30° Grid. elinchrom.com

Rotolight Anova Pro BI-S 18 LED light (£1440) Stand: D150

Powerful, adaptable LED lighting is vital for video work, but many stills photographers are embracing it, too. See what a top-class LED light can bring to your setup with the Anova Pro BI-S LED. This unit has a big 2770 lumen output (at 3ft), but uses far less power than a tungsten light of the same brightness. And of course it’s cooler in use, too. For accurate colours, the Anova Pro has a CRI of >96, so it can provide natural vibrant tones. But it’s not just a basic LED, the Anova Pro also has a series of creative CineSFX lighting modes, like Strobe, Lightning, Film, Neon and Gunshot, and using its Flash Sync mode it can be integrated with a regular studio setup, giving you the best of both worlds in one package. rotolight.com


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SRB P Size Elite Filter 19 Holder (£35) Stand: F71

Make sure you take a look at SRB’s new P Size Elite Filter Holder, made from high-grade aluminium, with an anodised finish. This filter holder fits P Size (85mm) square filters and the Elite filter range. The Elite Filter Holder simply clips onto the adapter ring on your lens using its unique mechanism; this makes attaching and removing the holder very quick and simple. P Size square filters can then be slotted in, and the holder will take up to two at a time. But the holder also accommodates SRB’s new Elite range, specifically designed for the holder, and using a threaded circular design. These screw into the centre thread of the holder, eliminating light leaks. There’s also a handy rotating mechanism at either end of the holder. srb-photographic.co.uk

Tether Tools Case Air 20 Wireless (£180) Stand: G92

To appreciate some products you need to see them in action. Tether Tools’ Case Air Wireless is one such piece of kit. Slotting onto your hot-shoe, and connecting via USB, the Case Air creates its own wi-fi hotspot. Sync to this with your PC, tablet or phone, and you’ll have full camera control and image review capabilities from up to 45m away. You can monitor the action in liveview, change exposure and focus settings remotely, and shoot video. There are also bracketing, HDR, time-lapse, and focus-stacking modes. The free-to-download app works on Apple and Android devices, and Mac and Windows PCs, and the system is compatible with a huge range of cameras, so take yours and give it a try. flaghead.co.uk

Novo Explora T20 kit 21 (£240) Stand: B91

As Novo’s top-of-the-range carbon fibre tripod, the Explora T20 kit comes with an Arca Swiss compatible anodised aluminium CBH-46 ball head, and provides a maximum working height of 189cm. But thanks having four legs sections it also closes to a very packable 53cm. Using the widest 23º leg angle, and with the included short centre column attached, you can shoot down to 28cm. Composed of 8x layer carbon fibre poles, and employing twist-type rubber leg locks, the tripod and head combo weighs only 2.3kg (1.70kg legs only), but has a maximum load capacity of 20kg. Check out the Novo Explora T20 tripod kit on UK Digital’s stand and if you like it you’ll be able to save £60 on the RRP. novo-photo.com

Lee Filters Big Stopper range (from £70) Stand: G81

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Using extreme ND filters creates great long-exposure images, and the best known is Lee Filters’ Big Stopper. But there’s more to Lee’s long-exposure range than that. The Big Stopper is a high-quality glass filter that cuts out 10 stops of light, so extending your exposure time from, say, 1/60sec to 15sec. But knowing photographers need variety, Lee has created the Little Stopper and the Super Stopper NDs. The Little Stopper reduces light by six stops (1/60sec to 1sec), so it’s useful when light is already quite low. Finally there’s Lee Filters Super Stopper ND with a strength of 15 stops (1/60sec to 8 minutes), which allows incredibly long exposures even shooting with wide apertures in full daylight. leefilters.com

Sunbounce Bounce-Wall 23 2 (£60) Stand: E62

Modifying flash is key to top results and the Bounce-Wall 2 is the smallest reflector in the Sunbounce Lighting System and an entirely unique product which can create lively and professional-looking studio light from any speedlight with a pivotable head. The Bounce Wall is designed and engineered to be lightweight, manoeuvrable yet robust, attaching to the tripod mount on your camera and extending up to 20in away using a foldable bracket arm. Reflected from the Wall, your flash is softened for a more natural, bounced look – but one you can get even in the open. The basic kit comes with a single 20x28cm silver reflector, but there are six different reflector finishes available in all, allowing you to create perfect lighting in a range of different settings. tetenal.uk.com


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First tests

First tests Accessories

We get our hands on the latest kit and share our first impressions – so you know whether or not to add it to your wish list Reviews by Will Cheung and Kingsley Singleton

Specs Prices £98.99 complete with SD adapter Capacity 128GB Class Grade 3, Class 10 Temperature proof Yes, operating temperature –25°C to 85°C Water resistant Yes, submerged for 30mins in five feet of water Sequential read speed 95MB/s Sequential write speed 90MB/s Contact samsung.com/uk/memory-cards

Samsung PRO Plus 128GB microSDXC £98.99 With cameras gaining resolution, and 4K video recording and memoryhungry apps on our smart devices, the need for storage cards with bigger and bigger capacity is greater than ever. Samsung’s latest introduction in its PRO Plus range is a 128GB capacity microSDXC card, so it’s compatible with tablets, drones and action cameras and comes complete with an SD adapter making it suitable for CSCs and DSLRs too. It is highly specified with an Ultra High Speed Class 10 rating and U3 compatibility with a quoted read speed of 95MB/s and a write speed of 90MB/s. I tested the Samsung card using the Blackmagic design Disk Speed app and in practice too. With the Disk Speed app, write speed was found to be 69.3MB/s and read speed 83.5MB/s which are good readings. I did some data transfer timings with it too. Using a 20GB folder on my MacMini, I timed how long that took to transfer to (write) and from (read) the Samsung card to give a MB/s time. That amount of data took 7mins

46secs to write so that worked out at just under 43MB/s while the read test notched up the much shorter time of 3mins and 58secs which translated to an impressive 84MB/s. I have tested Samsung’s four proof technology on previous occasions but with SSD and SD memory, so it was worth repeating with this microSDXC card too. The specs claim that four-proofness means the card can withstand being submerged in sea water for 72 hours, will work in a temperature range of -25°C to 85°C, survive a magnetic field of 15,000 gauss (equivalent of a high-field MRI scanner) and protect your data from harm going through an airport security X-ray scanner. I don’t have access to an X-ray or a MRI scanner so I made do with a powerful magnet and I left the card sitting next to it for 30 mins. I also tried upsetting the card by submerging it under fresh water for 30 mins and leaving it for an hour in a home freezer (-18°C). No problem in the water and freezer tests. I just dried

the card off first before slipping it into the adapter and took shots with it. It is slightly disconcerting doing these sort of tests because I don’t want to ruin or destroy the card but it is reassuring too, knowing that a card is capable of such reliability under modest duress. Anyway, I had no problem during or after my little tests and the card is still in full working order. WC

Verdict I have been using the Samsung microSDXC card in various devices including cameras – Canon, Fujifilm and Nikon bodies – with the SD card adaptor and in a Amazon Fire HD tablet on its own. The fact that this is a card with massive capacity is an obvious benefit and it does mean you can enjoy a seriously big still or video shoot on one card. In terms of storage on your smart device you can store over 30,000 songs or nearly 16 hours of Full HD content, so plenty enough for the next long-haul flight. The card proved totally reliable in the time that I have been using it so it can be highly recommended. Pros Capacity, write/read speed, comes with SD adaptor, robust Cons Nothing


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First tests

Sigma 500mm f/4 DG OS HSM £6000 A long telephoto lens is essential if you want frame-filling images of aircraft, nature or sports subjects and there is plenty of choice, although no option is cheap. Generally, telephoto zooms are cheaper and lighter than telephoto primes, primarily because zooms have more modest maximum apertures and may be less capable optically. When it comes to primes, the makers push the optical design boat out so not only are they designed to give the best performance but have impressively fast maximum apertures too. That explains why prime telephotos are expensive. This Sigma 500mm f/4 DG OS HSM is £5999.99 so you have to be a dedicated nature or sports shooter with deep pockets to even think about buying it, but compared with its Canon and Nikon rivals it is a bargain, being around £2400 cheaper. That saving is enough for the latest high-resolution camera body or to indulge yourself in a nice trip to test out your shiny new lens. The Sigma 500mm lens is a significant piece of glass weighing in at 3.3kg and measuring 38cm. It’s not a lens you tote around on the offchance of bagging a good shot. For comparison Sigma’s 150-600mm f/56.3 DG OS HSM Sports is a mere 2.8kg and measures 29cm. Despite its heft it is a handholdable lens, but not for long and only if you have to. I tried handholding only to test the lens’s OS and I got sharp shots at 1/60sec but got plenty of blurred ones too. The problem with handholding is not just the big risk of camera shake but accurate framing too isn’t easy as the lens waves around under the strain. This is obviously depends on the user’s physiology but I found I was wobbling around even after a few seconds, but I’m not a regular long lens user – and weak! Seasoned sports pros might be used to the weight and might prefer the freedom of handholding but for most people, a support is essential. I used it with a Novo MP20 monopod, a Gitzo Systematic tripod with a gimbal head. The substantial tripod foot makes for a good carrying handle and can

Specs Price £5999.99 Format 35mm, APS-C Mount Canon, Nikon, Sigma Construction 16 elements in 11 groups Special lens elements 2x FLD elements, 1x SLD glass element Coatings Sigma Super multi-layer coating, water- and oil-repelling coating on front element Filter size 46mm rear fitting

be click-stopped or left free-running. Sadly, Sigma didn’t make this foot Arca Swiss compatible which would been the obvious thing to do, so gimbal/ball head users will need an extra plate but there are two bushes to ensure a secure attachment – one bush is 3/8in so you might need an adaptor. An optional Arca Swisscompatible foot is available, the TS-81 and that costs £180. The gimbal head I tried was a Nest NT-530H and I also used a Wimberley Sidekick on Arca Swiss and Benro ball heads. With the Sidekick the lens was slightly off the tripod’s central axis but not enough to risk the combo toppling over sideways. No such issue with the gimbal and on this the lens proved very useable, giving good access to controls, great manoeuvrability and stability. I fitted the lens on a Nikon D810 and while its AF is capable it is not designed as an action-shooting camera so its AF tracking skills are less good than, say, the D5. Nevertheless, Sigma’s HSM is impressively quick, responsive and effectively silent. The memory function is useful and with four recall buttons around the barrel, easy to use. Sigma’s USB Dock, priced at £39.99, lets you update lens firmware, use the lens’s custom functions and also make fine adjustments to the focus and OS system. Full-time manual focus override is available and the smooth action of the

Original image

Aperture range F/4-32 Diaphragm 9 blades Internal focus Yes Manual focus Yes, full-time override an AF mode. MO (manual override) modes allows manual focusing even during continuous focusing. Memory and preset AF modes available Minimum focus 3.5m Focus limiter Yes, full, 10m to infinity, 3.5-10m Maximum magnification 1:6.5 Distance scale Yes, feet and metres Depth-of-field scale No

focus barrel means AF fine-tuning is quick. If the lens is resting on a beanbag you just need to ensure the focus barrel is clear. The huge front element means a screw-in filter is not an option and should you want to use filters, these screw onto a removable slot holder. A standard protection filter is supplied and that should be left in place. The whole point of a fast aperture telephoto lens is that it delivers great results at its wider values and this 500mm certainly delivers on that count. When the light gets low or F/4

you want to get maximum blur in the background, f/4 delivers impressive image quality. There is some vignetting at f/4 but stop down to f/5.6 and that goes and image sharpness goes up a significant notch. If you have the light or ISO performance to let you use f/5.6 it is worth going for. F/8 is even better especially at the edges and this and f/11 are the lens’s best two apertures for overall image quality. By f/22 and f/32 diffraction softens quality, but I can’t imagine many people using this lens at such small apertures. WC F/5.6

Image stabiliser Yes, Sigma OS, two modes. Mode 1 for general subjects, mode 2 for motorsports and subjects requiring panning Tripod collar Yes, optional TS-81 has Arca Swiss foot £180 Lens hood Supplied, LH1388-01 Weather-sealed Dust and splash proof Dimensions 144.8x380mm Weight 3.31kg Contact sigma-imaging-uk.com

Verdict

Above This set of images was taken on a calm, sunny day with the Sigma 500mm f/4 mounted on a Nest NT-530H gimbal head on a Benro carbonfibre tripod. Shutter release was done using 3sec shutter delay and a remote release. The camera used was a Nikon D810 and the resulting Raws were processed in Lightroom with default sharpening applied.

F/8

F/11

F/16

F/22

If you want a fast prime 500mm telephoto your options are limited and expensive. With that in mind, Canon and Nikon users need to check out this Sigma because its build quality, AF skills and optical quality are first rate and it’s very good value in its market. If you get one, just make sure your technique and supporting accessories let you make the most of this lens’s potential. Pros Great value, build quality, excellent sharpness at f/4 Cons Standard tripod foot not Arca Swiss compatible


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

77

First tests

Tether Tools’ Case Air Wireless £180

Specs Price £180 In the box Case Air Wireless, 3x USB leads (2.0 Mini-B 5-pin, 2.0 Mini-B 8-pin, USB 3.0 Micro B), lanyard Connection Wireless hot-spot Mounting Hotshoe or lanyard Range 45m Charging Via USB connection Battery life 6-9 hours

Above The Case Air is a really compact unit with good battery life and impressive working range.

App compatibility iOS, Android, Mac, Windows Size 67.3x40.1x14mm Weight 50g Contact tethertools.com

There was a tiny amount of lag, but not masses of it, and the novelty of setting up and shooting remotely relieves this, at least in the short term... Most photographers don’t shoot tethered; that’s to say with a tablet, phone, PC, or TV screen linked to their camera to aid in composition, focusing, exposure and review. And why would they? Modern camera screens are large, clear, and many offer touch inputs and magnification for precise adjustment. So where does that leave devices like Tether Tools’ Case Air Wireless? Well, there are occasions when tethering is very useful; like complex still-life or product setups; when you don’t want to disturb a wildlife subject; or you’ve set up in a place that’s tricky to keep going back to if you want to change settings. It’s also helpful when shooting for clients, as they can quickly review your shots via a bigger screen. The Case Air Wireless works by creating its own wi-fi hotspot and control is claimed at up to 45m away. To make a connection you switch the unit on, then go into the wi-fi settings on your computer or mobile device, selecting the ‘Case_Rxxx’ signal, and entering a password (written on the unit’s underside). Each unit has its own ID, so you can use multiple devices if required. From there, plug it into the your camera’s USB port (there are 2.0 Mini-B 5-pin, 8-pin,

and USB 3.0 Micro B leads included), launch the app, hit the eye icon and it provides a live-view image. This means the same unit is compatible with a huge range of cameras. The Case Air can either be mounted on your camera’s hot shoe, or, as it’s fairly light it can be left to dangle at the side using an included lanyard. There’s also a 1/4in thread for mounting it to an accessory holder. No claims are made for its durability when it comes to water, so it’s worth playing it safe there, and covering it with a plastic bag if you’re in the rain. Once you’re sync’d, you can remotely change all basic parameters, like aperture, shutter speed, ISO, white-balance, and exposure compensation. The shooting mode (aperture-priority, shutter-priority etc), is also up for grabs, along with metering, image quality, drive mode, and more. All are accessed with a tap from the app’s main shooting menu and another tap takes you back to live view. A smaller shortcut lets you control ISO, shutter and aperture alone for quickness, and another flyout menu lets you overlay a grid, histogram or focus peaking. There are also bracketing, HDR, time-lapse, and focus-stacking options; the latter handy for product and macro shots.

Focus can also be set, either by touching part of the scene, which adds a small green reticule to the focus point, or manually via ‘forward’ and ‘back’ arrow icons. Both methods work OK. The Focus Adjust increments of the manual route can be set to Small, Medium and Large; I used Small the most, but if working with smaller apertures it wouldn’t have been so necessary, and the speed of the Medium or Large settings becomes useful. Double-tap the display (or doubleclick on desktop), and you’ll get an enlarged view for critical focusing. The main frustration here is that the magnified view can’t be moved with a swipe; instead you need to use arrow icons. It’s clunky and feels about 10 years out of date. The touch AF isn’t the fastest, but on the D810 I tested the Case Air Wireless with, it wasn’t much slower than the regular contrast AF in live-view mode. The interface has a battery indicator for the camera, too, and I found that the D810 was a lot more thirsty than usual when controlled in this way, so extended shooting will require spares. The Case Air’s battery level is shown by an LED on the unit itself; it would be handy to see it in the

interface, too. It lasted well though, offering at least six hours of use in between charging via USB. In general, there was a tiny amount of lag in controlling the camera, but not masses of it, and the novelty of setting up and shooting remotely relieves this, at least in the short term. The lag increases as the distance from the Case Air to the device grows, so while the range is impressive, the live view is stuttery from about 40m. Beyond the quoted 45m, at around 60m, it was still usable, but the view really chugged. Camera control still worked fine though. I found the free CASE Remote app (v2.410) better on iPad than iPhone, where there’s no auto rotate, although both crashed on occasions. The signal would sometimes flicker before cutting out, but I found this improved when working outside. The desktop version was pretty much flawless, I found, and the best to use. Via the desktop app, you can integrate the Case Air with Lightroom (and other programs), and this was easy. You just need to set it to Auto Download, then pick a folder on your machine to use. Back in Lightroom, via the File > Auto Import settings, you can set up a watched folder, and see the images drop right in. KS

Verdict Despite minor grumbles, the Case Air worked very well. The range and amount of functions are impressive, allowing you to shoot in ways that would otherwise be impossible. You can also sync to Lightroom easily. Ultimately the decision to buy will be based on whether your needs entail this, as it’s not cheap, and many cameras with wi-fi functions already offer free apps that cover many of the Case Air’s functions. Pros Range, features, ease of use Cons Not cheap, app could be more user-friendly, no weather sealing


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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First tests Specs Price Sport Breathe £82; Curve Breathe £75; Double Breathe £150; Tripod Plate 50 Arca Swiss compatible £45; Tripod Plate 70 Arca Swiss compatible £55 In the box CR-3 connector (two with the Double), cam buckles, LockStar (two with the Double), polyester dust bag Pad material Nylon mono mesh, TPE foam, polyester and air mesh Pad thickness 0.65cm Strap length with pad Sport 167cm; Curve 167cm; Double 160cm Webbing 100% nylon, 2.5cm width Weight Curve 155g; Sport 185g; Double 350g Contact johnsons-photopia.co.uk

I tried the Curve, the Sport and the Double and really enjoyed all three, and for different reasons

Below left The classic BlackRapid pap strap goes across the body for security, comfort and fast use. Below right For wedding and event shooters, the Double is ideal giving quick and untangled access to two cameras.

BlackRapid straps From £75 Buy a new camera and it’ll come with a carrying strap, usually decent enough quality and probably boldly branded. Once fitted, many camera users will not give their strap another thought, but perhaps they should. Of course, there are many camera users who will appreciate and recognise the practical benefits of a different strap, and that can be from the perspective of comfort, appearance (who wants a logoed-up strap?) or usability. Or a combination of the above. The classic BlackRapid straps – the Curve and the Sport – run across the body from the left shoulder to your right with the camera attached to it via a connector screwed into the camera’s tripod bush. The camera hangs upside down so no strap attachments getting in the way while you’re shooting, and it glides up and down the strap so it can be brought up to the eye ready to shoot in one swift, fluid movement. Adjustable clip locks or ‘bumpers’ let you instantly limit the range of movement on the strap. Core to the BlackRapid system is the connector system. An FR-5 fastener screws into the tripod bush and a rubber grommet allows very firm tightening so it stays put once properly secured. This fastener is then slipped onto the Swivel SR3 clip that glides up and down the strap and is secured in position with a carabiner lock. The locking ring has a firm action and a good length of travel so it’s unlikely to unscrew itself through use. However, BlackRapid has taken a belts-and-braces approach here and each strap comes with a clip-on LockStar that physically prevents the locking screw from undoing itself. Optional fasteners are available, handy if you are likely to want to go from the strap to a tripod. For example, the Tripod Plate 50 lets you go from strap to an Arca Swiss tripod head without having to swap plates. For most, the likely concern is going to be with security. Having an expensive camera hanging upside down by a connector screwed into

the tripod bush doesn’t seem natural, and it does take a little getting used to. I knew the LockStar would prevent the camera becoming separated from the carabiner so the only weak point is the fastener into the tripod bush. To start with I found myself regularly checking that the bush was firmly attached as I was walking around but at no point did I detect even the slightest bit of loosening. Confidence grew with familiarity and I weaned myself off this and just checked tightness after a full day’s use and again there was no slackening. Whether the fastener or rubber grommet will loosen or perish after extensive and prolonged use only time will tell, but a regular occasional check will reveal signs of wear and tear and a replacement bought if there is any problem. Several models sit in the BlackRapid range to suit different needs. All feature high-quality breathable materials and the same width webbing for the strap itself. I tried the Curve, the Sport and the Double and really enjoyed all three, and for different reasons. The Curve and the Sport are great for general use with the former having a slightly slimmer profile at the shoulder and at the rear. If you are using a DSLR the Sport will do a better job with weight distribution. I tried both with a Nikon D800 and a 70-200mm lens and yes, the Sport was more comfortable with this weighty combination. The Double is like two Sports clipped together – the right strap is a Sport and the left is a mirror image so the design is slightly different. It means that that the Double is a good buy because it has the option of two different uses. In the case of the Double, both straps hang straight down and are joined with two cross straps front and behind making it a harness for those occasions when you want to shoot with two cameras side by side. I did a few shoots including a wedding and a concert and the Double proved

Above A supplied plastic clip cover, the LockStar, means the carabiner clip can’t be unscrewed. Inset Optional plates are available and mean you can unclip the camera and put it straight onto an Arca Swiss compatible tripod head without having to change plates. invaluable – and comfortable too over a long period. With conventional straps, there is the risk of getting tangled up or one camera slipping off the shoulder. With the Double, no tangles, no off-shoulder slippage and fast use. If there is any slight negative it’s that the harness can ruckle the sharp lines of your suit, shirt or blouse. I had a Nikon D800 with a telezoom on one strap of the Double and a Fujifilm X-T2 with standard zoom on the other. Switching between cameras was so quick and perfectly instinctive that I could concentrate on

the job in hand, rather than worrying that a camera was about to slip off the shoulder or having to untangle the camera first. I really enjoyed using these BlackRapid straps. Fast in use, secure, give good weight distribution, and are comfortable and practical too. Also the supplied fastener and the connecting carabiner are designed for quiet operation. Adding the Tripod Plate 50 meant getting the camera off the strap onto a tripod is easy. Finally, there’s the freedom of the top plate and right side being strap free. WC

Verdict Many photographers have a selection of bags to suit different situations, and there is no reason why the same shouldn’t apply to straps. You might have a conventional strap for general use and then for street work a Curve is a good option because it’s so fast and easy to use, while the Sport would suit heavier camera/lens combinations. The Double is brilliant when you need to use two cameras to save lens changing and becomes a single Sport strap when necessary. Free is good, so while the strap that came with the camera is very much a good thing, it is impossible to ignore the benefits of the BlackRapid straps. They are great to use and from £75, they are very good value. Pros Speed of use, no strap fouling the top-plate controls, build quality Cons Personal thing: I’d hide the logo on the shoulder pad with black tape or cut it off


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

83

First tests

Nest NT-520H MkII gimbal £300 Starting out in photography, most of us invest an affordable tripod which will probably come packaged with a ball-head, or maybe a three-way version. And that’s fine for most purposes, especially when you’re getting started. ‘But hey, what’s the head that guy over there’s using? It looks weird, but he seems really happy with his pictures...’. That, my friend, is a specialist tripod head; one of those things in life that just make your job a little bit easier. After all, you can’t expect one design to do everything perfectly; you don’t wear the same pair of shoes bowling and then to walk up a mountain. And it’s the same with tripod heads. So, while you’ll find specialist panoramic heads for shooting and stitching stunning vistas or geared heads that make tiny adjustments in macro photography a lot easier, what we have in the Nest NT-520H MkII is a gimbal head, which is designed for shooting with long lenses. The NT-520H MkII then is aimed at sports, wildlife, and action photographers, and really anyone who’s shooting with large heavy glass, or using spotting scopes. The trick is how it helps you balance the lens’s centre of gravity on the gimbal arm so it can sit there unlocked but ready to go. But in use it’s almost weightless when panning, tilting or following a moving subject. To do this, you first fit the included Arca Swiss compatible quick-release plate to your lens’s tripod bracket. There are two 1/4in connectors to do it, and, at around 15cm long you have some flexibility in placing it. Screwing in both of these to the mount on a Sigma 500mm f/4 Sport (also reviewed this issue), gave a very secure fit, and the D-rings on the connector helped, too; they’re large and smooth enough to be comfortable in use, and there’s a groove (albeit thin) if you want to tighten further. The plate then slides into its groove and is tightened by a decentsized locking knob. The only problem here is the lack of texture on the lock making it feel a bit slippery. As you’d expect, there’s also a locking pin to

stop the plate sliding out by accident. From here, it was easy to find the lens’s centre of gravity through a bit of trial and error. You just slacken the tilt control until the friction drops enough for the camera and lens to start tilting on their own. A slight readjustment, sliding the plate forward or back sets things right and once you’ve done it a few times, setting up takes no time at all. There’s also a vertical camera position control, wherein you flip a lever, raise the camera to the desired level and lock again. You can raise it through about 8cm, so it’s helpful for fine adjustment, and there’s a scale accompanying it. While the process isn’t all that scientific the scale does allow you to remember where you set a particular lens for the best stability or freeness of turn. After balancing, you release the 360º pan control and you’re ready to get shooting. Both the pan and tilt lock are large and easy to turn; although they seem to use the same rubber material as the plate locking knob, their greater size gives them much more grip. Each can be fully locked, but there’s no indication of when this is the case, so unless you can feel that the knob won’t turn any more you don’t know for sure; a couple of aligned dots, or a scale might help here, but really you just need to remember to check before mounting your lens to avoid any unexpected movement. There’s no bubble level in the head, which is an omission if you want to set up on the level for panning, but most legs come with them now, or you can buy one to slip into the camera hotshoe; so it’s not the end of the world. In use, the precision bearings in the pan and tilt mechanisms give a lovely smooth turn, with just the right amount of tolerance to keep long-lens movement under control. As mentioned previously, the tension can be tweaked but it seemed fine at the minimum to me. I also tried mounting a 70-200mm f/2.8 and here the rate of turn felt a bit sluggish, so it’s definitely suited to longer lenses. In terms of strength, the 10x carbon fibre really does its job and will support big loads. The maximum

Specs Price £300 In the box Nest NT-520H MkII head, padded transport case, quick release plate. Type Gimbal Quick-release plate Yes, Arca Swiss Construction Carbon fibre Max load 25kg Base Diameter 65mm Mount 3/8in Height 240mm Weight 1.336kg Contact nest-style.com

In use, the precision bearings in the pan and tilt mechanisms give a lovely smooth turn

Top When the camera/lens combination is correctly set-up, it’ll stay balanced yet ready to swing into action at any time for smooth follow-the-subject shots. Above and below Build quality of this Nest gimbal is first class, and it looks great too.

is 25kg, and it was completely untroubled by the combined 4.3kg of the D810 and Sigma 500mm f/4 Sport I used. What’s more, there was no discernible creep in mechanism when locked, so the camera could be held completely still at any angle. The metal section, which holds the plate got a bit scratched during testing, so that part will inevitably abrade, but it’s just cosmetic and shouldn’t affect the workings. Overall the NT-520H MkII had a high-quality, well engineered finish. It felt tight. Comparing shots with and without using the NT-520H MkII, the increase in sharpness was obvious, especially with the 500mm’s Optical Stabilizer turned off. What it also saves is a crick in your neck at the end of a day’s shooting, from lifting the whole weight of such a large lens. I’ll definitely be taking it on the airshow circuit this year. You’ll need a heavy duty tripod to support the weight of the head, and mounted lens, of course, but NT-520H MkII itself was quite light, and easy to transport at 1.336kg. It also comes with a padded case that can be worn on the shoulder. And in terms of price and specification it compares quite favourably with other models. KS

Verdict Gimbals are vital tools for long lens work, and once you use one you won’t want to go back. The NT520H MkII is a great example. It’s affordable, easy to use and gives superb results. Pros Affordable, great handling and definite improvement in longlens pictures Cons Slight handling issues, nothing major


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

85

First tests Specs

Cullmann FR60N speedlight £250

Price £250 In the box FR60N flash, padded case, stand Compatible cameras Canon, Nikon, Sony Guide number 60 Recycle time 01-2.6sec Colour Temperature 5600K (+/-200) TTL function Yes Power levels (manual) 1/128-1/1 Power increments 0.3EV Zoom (Manual/automatic) 20-200mm Flash exposure lock Yes Flash duration 1/300-1/20,000sec Stroboscopic mode Yes Wireless flash functions TTL, manual (M), stroboscopic mode (multi), slave (S1, S2) Wireless groups / channels 32 channels, 5 groups Max wireless range 100m (radio), indoor 12-15m, outdoor 8-10m (optical) Modelling flash Yes AF assist beam Yes

Above The Cullmann FR60N (N being Nikon-fit) felt well balanced when fitted to larger DSLRs, like the Nikon D810, but was a bit top-heavy on smaller bodies. Button layout was easy to master and control is simple thanks to the four function buttons below the LCD screen.

Triggering options Radio, optical, slave, PC sync lead Flash ready indicator Yes Auto power dump Yes Vertical rotation -7 to +90 degrees Horizontal rotation 360 degrees Power supply 4 AA batteries, external DC power supply Power Saving Yes Dimensions 64x76x190mm Weight (with batteries) 410g (530g) Contact intro2020.co.uk

Though the FR60’s button layout initially looks complicated, it proved very straightforward...

These days, third-party speedlights tend to be of a high quality. What that means is you don’t automatically have to go for the same make as your camera when you’re upgrading from the built-in flash. And you can save a fair bit that way, too. The Cullmann FR60 speedlight is one such model. It’s available in Canon, Nikon and Sony fits, with a C, N or S added to the name to signify that, and it offers full TTL metered shooting, wireless triggering (via a Cullmann CUlight Radio Transmitter, sold separately at around £100), a decent level of power (Guide Number 60), and lots of flash modes. The Cullmann FR60N is a fairly large and heavy speedlight (it’s over 530g with batteries), so when mounted on camera it felt a bit unbalanced on a smaller DSLR body like a Nikon D3400. But it’s right at home on larger models, like the D810 I tested it on. In the weeks I tested used it, build quality seemed very good and the unit has a solid feel, with no rattling or looseness to the swivelling head. Mounting the unit, you notice the locking ring that holds it in place in the hotshoe, which rather than the usual grooved disk design has deeper indentations, giving a better grip. Unlike some, it has enough separation from the body of the unit, so that it’s not fiddly to use. The swivelling head can be angled between about -7º and 90º, with stops at 75º, 60º and 45º, but there’s no

lock to keep it in place. Fortunately, the head is stiff enough for this not to be a problem and won’t move even when given a strong waggling. When rotating the head through its 360º turn, it’s almost too stiff, taking more force than expected to move it. But that’s certainly better than it being too free. As you turn the head, angle markings become visible, but I couldn’t see much use for these, and there’s no indicator to align with them showing where you are in the turn. As you’d expect, the FR60 has a pullout wide-angle panel diffuser and a bounce card above it and these both operate well, albeit with a bit of fingernail required to pull them out. To access the bounce card, the diffuser needs to be pushed in until it clicks, at which point the card comes out with it. I tested the FR60’s zoom range, which is stated at 20-200mm, shooting against a white wall to check how well the spread of light was controlled. Shooting at f/11 to prevent any vignetting from the lens, I got good coverage from about 35mm upwards. Below that there was some fall off at the edges, even with the wide-panel diffuser (which should widen the beam to 14mm). It wasn’t too bad, but the light wasn’t quite as smooth with the diffuser down. TTL performance was very good, giving excellent exposures in a variety of situations. For example, lighting was consistent whether the flash was directed at the subject,

bounced, or used off camera. A good performance there. In testing the flash’s colour temperature it proved to be accurate and consistent throughout the full 1/128 to 1/1 power range. Shooting with the D810 set to manual flash white-balance, and shooting with and without the flash engaged, there was very little difference in results, perhaps fractionally cooler. TTL mode (i-TTL on Nikon) is accessed via the mode button, cycling through manual (M) and strobe (RPT) modes. In TTL you can dial in +/3EV of flash exposure compensation, independent of the camera and there’s also Hi-sync which is automatically triggered when you push the camera’s shutter speed beyond the normal sync speed (with the Nikon D810 this means selecting the Auto FP mode under flash sync speed). This worked fine, though like all Hi-sync flash modes, flash power is much reduced. Though the FR60’s button layout initially looks complicated, it proved very straightforward, thanks in the main to the four function (Fn) buttons that sit under the main display. These control custom settings and, for example when you’re in the RPT mode, they individually control the number and speed of flashes; in Manual the Fn buttons control exposure compensation, slave modes and more. It’s a good system and means you don’t need to learn some arcane method of pressing two buttons at once, as one some other speedlights. The flash can be triggered optically

in its two slave modes, but the way to go is using the built-in wireless function. The Wireless Selection button, marked R allows you to set the channel (1-32), and group (Master, A, B, C, D or E). Within those, the handy Fn buttons again allow you to choose a mode, or alter the power. As a 2.4Ghz radio receiver, the system doesn’t need line of sight and has a maximum range of 100m. We didn’t have a CUlight Radio Transmitter to try at the time of testing. Power consumption and recycle times are reasonable, and with a brand-new set of good quality NiMH batteries, recycling took just under 3secs on full power. Below full it was virtually instantaneous, but like all battery powered guns, these times did drop away during shooting. To improve matters, you can get a CUlight PowerPack 4500 for another £250. KS

Verdict There are cheaper out there, but its build and features mean the FR60 feels reasonable value for money. You’ll need another £100 for the radio transmitter, but it’s well below first-party speedlights. Pros Handling, performance, builtin radio receiver Cons Not the cheapest


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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First tests

Tokina Fírin 20mm f/2 FE MF £799.99 Tokina is a long established and very successful Japanese optics company, although as a supplier of third party camera lenses the brand is not as popular as Sigma or Tamron. Whatever the reason for that situation, there has never been any doubt about the quality of its products and this manual focus optic could be the sign of things to come. What does Fírin mean? According to the Tokina website it is a variation of an old Irish word fírinne and used in the context of meaning ‘that which is real’. Tokina is using the word to represent the promise to users that it will help them capture the truth in their images. Your guess will be as good as mine why a Japanese company picks an old Gaelic word for its new mirrorless camera lens series, but the 20mm f/2 is the first in the family. The optical landscape has changed a great deal in recent times and manual focus is in vogue. We’re seeing some really fascinating products, mostly fast aperture lenses, wides and telephotos. This Tokina lens jumps on that particular bandwagon and it is available in Sony E-mount only. It is fully compatible with the Sony A7 series so you get manual assist, incamera five-axis image stabilisation and distance readout in the EVF. I tried the lens on a Sony A7. Despite its short focal length, the lens itself is quite long but balances well on the camera. On the lens itself the first thing to appreciate is the excellent printed depth-of-field scale. The focus has a long travel with nearly a half rotation to get from infinity down to the lens’s minimum 28cm focus distance. The infinity symbol focuses past the focusing index so if you are shooting a distant subject (the night sky?) at f/2 just make sure you check focus visually and don’t rely on the focusing scale. Very little travel is needed for infinity to 3m focusing and with the extensive depth-of-field of this ultrawide at f/4 you don’t even need to physically focus if you use the depthof-field scale. At f/8 you get sharpness from infinity down to 80cm. On our sample, the action of the focusing barrel could have been better. It had a slightly stiff action that made it sticky in use. It was taut enough to move the lens in the camera mount when focusing and give a jerky image in the viewfinder. It didn’t make for good handling but this might be our Right The build and finish quality of the Tokina 20mm f/2 is good. It’s not Zeiss-level but then it’s not at that sort of price level either. The aperture ring is click-stopped in 0.3EV steps and can be de-clicked for video shooting. The only disappointment on our sample was the focusing ring that could have been smoother and that would have made the lens nicer to use.

Specs Price £799.99 Format Full-frame Mount Sony E-mount, full-frame and APS-C

The optical landscape has changed a great deal in recent times and manual focus is in vogue early sample; obviously this is a point to check when you are in the shop. The same comment can’t be levelled at the front end aperture ring. It is positively click-stopped in 0.3EV steps with the option of aperture declicking available. Few lenses are provided with rectangular hoods so well done to Tokina for providing one for this lens. It firmly bayonets on and a visual check through the viewfinder showed that it is accurate too so only image-forming light reaches the front element. For the optical test I shot Raws using the A7 and these were processed through Lightroom using default sharpening. Ultra wide-angles are often best optically at the centre and less good at the edges even when stopped down to a smaller aperture. That was true with this Tokina although the edges were pretty good at all apertures and compared with the centre. Image quality was good at f/2 and fine detail was well recorded especially at the centre with the edges still decent. Small improvements at the centre and the edges were gained with stopping down and by the time f/5.6 was reached quality was impressive across the frame. For the optimum performance I’d suggest stopping down to f/8 or perhaps to f/11 if you need even more depth-of-field. Diffraction kicked in by f/16 and although it wasn’t too bad you can see the difference when comparing shots at f/11. There was noticeable vignetting at f/2 which lessened at f/2.8 and f/4 and had more or less gone by f/8. To sum up, this Tokina 20mm is perfectly usable for critical results at its wider apertures especially at the centre – and you still get ample depthof-field – but if you have the light or the tripod to allow shooting at f/8 and f/11 you see this lens at its best. WC

Construction 13 elements in 11 groups Special lens elements 3x super low dispersion glass elements, 2x aspherical elements Coatings Multi-layer Filter size 62mm Aperture range F/2-22, aperture ring can be de-clicked Diaphragm 9 blades Internal focus Yes Manual focus Only manual focus Minimum focus 28cm Focus limiter No Maximum magnification 0.1x

Original image

Distance scale Yes Depth-of-field scale Yes Image stabiliser Nothing in the lens, in-camera IS Tripod collar No Lens hood BH-622 supplied Weather-sealed No Dimensions 69x62mm Weight 490g Contact tokinalens.co.uk

Above This set of images was taken using the Tokina 20mm f/2 fixed on a Sony A7 and mounted on a Gitzo Systematic tripod. There’s full compatibility on the A7 so you get a magnified image when the manual focus barrel is rotated. The self-timer was used to fire the shutter and the resulting Raws were processed in Lightroom with default sharpening. F/2

F/2.8

F/4

F/5.6

F/8

F/11

F/16

F/22

Verdict Full-frame Sony users keen to go ultra-wide with a 20mm or 21mm don’t have a massive choice with options being the Samyang 20mm f/1.8 at £430 and the Zeiss Loxia 21mm f/2.8 at £1299, and now this Tokina which sits in middle in terms of price. So the Tokina f/2 Fírin is very good value and it’s a fine performer capable of highquality results wide open that get even better with stopping down. The Fírin series has potential so it will be interesting to see what optic emerges next in the series; but Tokina has had a fine start. Pros Optical quality, price, de-clicking option, rectangular hood provided Cons Focus barrel sticky on our sample


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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First tests

Manfrotto XPRO OVER monopod £170

Specs

This new carbon-fibre monopod replaces Manfrotto’s 695CX model and immediately impresses with a very high-quality feel. As a carbonfibre leg, it’s of course designed to be light, and at 620g, it’s certainly light enough to avoid being a burden. As a five-section monopod it closes to a mere 480mm, so will fit easily into or on the side of most bags. In use it gave very good results. I mounted a 70-200mm f/2.8 (via a ball head). If you need a smaller connection, the 3/8in screw moves down on a spring revealing a 1/4in thread – it’s a better system than screwing them on and off as you can’t lose it. Although the last of the leg sections is a little weedy at 11.6mm, the others are quite thick, and gave a very solid platform with no rattling or slipping, and only minor flexing. The rubber, textured handle gives an excellent grip, too. The total working height of 176cm gave me plenty of scope, and, at 6’4’’ I didn’t feel the need to extend it fully all the time. The extra did help with subjects above me though. As it uses Manfrotto’s Quick Power Lock design (lever type), and the locks are quite stiff and far apart, it’s not the quickest to set up, though that didn’t cause me any problems. The locks themselves need to be used with care as the part near the hinge will nip you. To be fair, you just need to adjust your hand position, and if it keeps happening it’s just carelessness. The advantage of these (and to be fair, most leg locks) is that you can easily tell if they’re closed (not

possible with twist versions) so there’s a degree of reassurance. You can also adjust the tension of the locks. The rubber foot adds traction and it can be swapped for a spike if required – sadly, this is not included. In terms of build quality, it’s difficult to assess in the short term, but the XPRO C5 shouldn’t disappoint. To put it through its paces in those stakes, I let both a ten and an eight year old take care of it on a threehour hike. The ’pod got pretty muddy and knocked about, but continued to perform, opening and closing with ease. I did need to save the Easy Link adaptor from falling off on a few occasions though. KS

Specs Price £170 In the box XPRO monopod, strap, Easy Link adapter Material Carbon fibre Lock type Lever locks Sections 5 Max height 176cm Min height 49cm Max payload 5kg Weight 620g Contact Manfrotto.co.uk

Verdict It’s not the cheapest, nor the lightest, but Manfrottos’s XPRO OVER does impress, adding portable, durable and usable stability to your shooting.

Above The Manfrotto monopod does not disappoint in terms of build quality.

Pros Build, handling Cons Set-up speed, price, no bag

Novo Explora MP10 monopod £55

Price £55 In the box Novo MP10 monopod, case, tools Material Carbon fibre Lock type Twist locks Sections 4 Max height 165cm Min height 53cm Max payload 15kg Weight 386g Contact Novo-photo.com

Above, left to right The Novo MP10 monopod has four sections that open via impressively strong twist locks. The rubber foot offers stability even on wet and slippery surfaces.

Most kit these days claims to be lightweight, and most of the time that’s true, but the Novo MP10 carbon fibre monopod is insanely light. In a good way. This four section monopod weighs only 386g, so you won’t notice you’re carrying it most of the time. Overly light tripods can be a problem, but with monopods, it’s not a factor, and with the MP10 fitted via a ball head, a light pressing down on my lens gave me all the stability I needed. The MP10 offers a choice of connector, to fix its base plate to the camera or a tripod head. There are 1/4in and 3/8in options via either end of a reversible screw. In terms of working height, at 165cm, the MP10 has all you’ll need for most subjects, unless you’re very tall. At 6’4’’, when shooting birds

above me I did have to crouch a bit. At the other end, the MP10 collapses to 53cm, so it’s easy enough to stow in a bag, a carry-on suitcase or strap to your rucksack. You can unscrew the foot to make it shorter if required. The MP10’s four sections open via twist locks. These are closely grouped, so you can release all of the sections in one movement for speedy setting up. They also lock with excellent strength, and I noticed no slipping, even when pressing heavily on the leg. One disadvantage of any twist lock is that you can’t tell if it’s open or closed so a marker would be handy, along with the open/close arrow that sits by the top lock. I also found that, with the unscrewable foot so close to the twist locks, I would often loosen it while opening the sections. Therefore

it’s quite possible for it to work loose and fall off. The rubber foot gave excellent purchase on wet, slippery surfaces, and if you want to swap for a spike, you just give the rubber a pull. A nice touch which means you don’t need to carry an accessory. The Novo MP10 also comes with a carry bag and strap. It’s not exactly first rate, with slightly sticky zips and plastic buckles, but a welcome addition for a £55 monopod. The MP10 has a foam handgrip,which was not as grippy as a rubber one, and more likely to wear. Like the Manfrotto above, I gave the MP10 to an eight- and a ten-year-old boy to test ruggedness. On a muddy walk, it fared well, though the sections started to feel a bit gritty. After a hose down, it was fine though. KS

Verdict The MP10 is a well-engineered and very keenly-priced model. It lacks a little height, but that shouldn’t be a concern unless you’re comically tall, and it’s amazingly light. Pros Price, weight, speed, extras Cons Foam grip, maximum height


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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First tests

Manfrotto Xume system From £36.90

Specs Prices Filter holder 49mm/52mm/58mm/62mm £9.95; 67mm £10.95; 72mm £11.95; 77mm/82mm £12.95 Lens adaptor 49mm/52mm/58mm/62mm £24.95; 67mm £26.95; 72mm £27.95; 77mm £28.95; 82mm £29.95; 77mm lens cap £13.95 Material Aluminium Thickness: filter holder 3.1mm Thickness: lens adapter 5.3mm Thickness: together and screwed into lens 5mm Contact manfrotto.co.uk

Filters are really useful accessories and can improve your photographs at a stroke. The benefits are clear but if you find using them a fiddle the Manfrotto Xume system might be just the thing for your camera bag. Simply, it is a magnetic filterholding system. You need an adapter ring that screws onto the lens’s accessory thread and then you need an adapter that you screw the filter onto. To use, all you do is offer the filter adapter up to the lens adapter and let magnetism take over; the filter is then firmly held in position. Simple and quick. You might be thinking the Xume system offers no benefit and is just as fiddly as using a normal screw-in filter because you have to screw the lens adapter into position then the filter has to go onto the filter adapter before joining the two together ready to take a picture. The clever bit, however, is that you can buy an adapter for each lens, so it can be left in situ, and then one filter adapter for each filter so that they can be left partnered up too. Then when you want to use a filter just offer the filter up to the lens and you’re ready to shoot. When you’ve finished shooting, just pull off the filter and you’re done. In principle, the concept is a good one but it won’t suit everyone. One issue is whether the magnetic force is powerful enough to securely hold a filter in position. You don’t want your expensive polariser parting company and meeting its death on the pavement. I tried the Xume system with a screw-in polariser, the heaviest one I could find in my collection. Shaking the lens quite vigorously didn’t manage to dislodge the holder from the adapter, so I ventured out. I decided not to push my luck to start with so I just attached the filter, took a few shots and then took the filter off. Incidentally, the adapter/ filter combination was too thick for the filter’s original case and it is also worth mentioning that should you want to detach the filter – especially if it is a polariser – from the holder ring it can be tricky. So far, so good, and my confidence grew so I decided to risk leaving the

filter partnered with the lens with the camera hanging from around my neck as I walked around. That was okay and I managed not to catch the filter and knock it off. Now happy that the filter is held firmly in position I took my ambition a significant step further and used the filter-adorned camera/ lens combination hanging on a BlackRapid strap so the camera was hanging loose by my waist. This is obviously much more risky but again I had no problem and didn’t hear the sound of breaking glass. To be honest, though, I was only doing this as part of a test and it’s not something I’d recommend. However, the fact it worked is to the Xume’s credit and the magnetic attraction is impressively powerful. The thing is, though, the Xume is not a system to suit everyone and it’ll be interesting to see who buys it. It might not appeal to those with a bagful of lenses especially if those lenses have different filter sizes. You’ll need an adapter ring for each lens or pairs of lens/filter adapter rings depending on what you own. It’s potentially expensive. Then there is the question of which filters and lenses Xume will suit. It adds about 5mm to the front of the lens and that is before adding a filter so there might be vignetting issues with wide-angle lenses. You wouldn’t use a protection filter in this manner because it’d normally be a permanent fixture to do its job effectively. And single colour filters aren’t that popular nowadays – unless you are shooting mono film. It’ll certainly hold no interest for those using graduate filters in their Cokin or Lee systems, so that leaves the polariser and screw-in extreme NDs. There’s potential with both. With the polariser it speeds up its use and you don’t even have to rotate the polariser in its mount because the Xume filter holder can be rotated in the lens adaptor. With screw-in extreme NDs it means you can add the filter after you have focused and composed without any risk of disturbing the camera or focus. That is a practical benefit. WC

In principle, the concept is a good one but it won’t suit everyone

Images, from top to bottom The Xume is easy to use. Screw the lens adapter into the lens, attach the filter to the filter holder, offer the latter to the former and magnetism does the rest. The grip is good too. Attaching the Xume lens and filter adaptors adds about 5mm to the lens front – and that’s before any filter is attached. A polariser will add a few more milimetres, so with wide-angle lenses there is the risk of vignetting. Popular filter thread sizes are covered in the Xume range, from 49mm to 82mm. A set of 77mm rings will cost £41.90.

Verdict The Manfrotto Xume is an interesting and potentially good idea but only if suits your needs, kit and capture workflow. If you use just one lens or perhaps a couple that share a common thread size and like to quickly add a polariser, then the Xume will suit you well and if this is you check the system out. Pros Quick to use, strong magnetic attraction Cons Suits few filters, risk of vignetting with wide-angles, costly with several lenses/filters


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

97

First tests Specs

Gitzo Systematic Series 3 3S L £700

Price £700 In the box Gitzo GT3533LS tripod, tools, spiked, regular and angled feet. Material Carbon fibre Leg sections Three Lock type Twist lock Attachment 3/8in Max height 152cm Min height 11cm Closed length 67cm Max payload 25kg Weight 2.04kg Contact gitzo.co.uk

Plainly this is a professional level tripod, with a price tag to match...

Top The redesigned twist leg locks are large and firm in use, locking with security, and preventing ingress of sand or mud. The legs also slide very smoothly. Above The GT3533LS has removeable feet, so you can use one of three included options: spikes, rubber or angling feet.

Above As a ‘Long’ model in the Systematic range, the GT3533LS has an impressive maximum height of 152cm, even without a centre column. Right The leg angle locks are simple and effective, easily pulling out to release, then slotting back in to lock. Unquestionably the first thing to address here is price. This Gitzo Systematic Series 3 3S L (GT3533LS) tripod costs around £700 and that’s a serious outlay for most of us. In perspective, it’s comparable to buying a decent lens, or a midrange camera body, so what would owning the GT3533LS bring to your photography that those upgrades would also provide, particularly if you already have a set of legs that’s working for you? Plainly this is a professional level tripod, with a price tag to match, so it’s aimed at those shooting often, and in demanding environments, whether pro or serious enthusiast. It’s designed to support heavyweight cameras and lenses, too. So if you only use your tripod once or twice a month, or have lightweight kit, there’s plenty of reason to look elsewhere. What you should be getting for all that cash is a highly durable, beautifully engineered, and totally practical camera support. So, do you? Durable? Certainly. I’ve spent several months with this model, and while its quality was quite plain from the get-go, things can often work loose or malfunction after you give them some regular hammer. Not here. I’ve been using the GT3533LS almost daily, and had no problems whatsoever: no sticking or loosening of the leg locks, no gumming up or

gritty action when sliding them out; I’ve used it in the sea and in mud, and a hosing down returns it to perfect condition (the G-lock Ultra twist locks having been redesigned since the last model to stop anything entering the mechanism and causing problems). Beautifully engineered? Again, these legs fit the (significant) bill. The three-section carbon fibre design uses Gitzo’s Carbon eXact tubes, which employ different fibre compositions in each section, optimising them for maximum stiffness. What this means is that, as they get thinner, they maintain rigidity and, technical jargon aside, offer an excellent level of stability. At a whopping 32.9mm thick at the top, and with just the three sections to worry about, this all helps create a highly stable shooting platform (fewer sections tends to mean greater stability) and is aided by the wide collar, which forces the leg joints further apart (another positive for vibration free shooting). This collar is also highly versatile, and, hence the ‘systematic’ part of the name, and can be used without a centre column, or with a sliding or geared version installed. With levelling bases and video adaptors also available, you can pick the setup that works for your photography. The collar also features an Easy Link attachment with a 3/8in thread, where you can install gadgets like

arms for holding lights, diffusers or clipping small subjects. I don’t use centre columns much even on tripods that have them, due to the way that shooting from them compromises stability, and with the GT3533LS’s maximum height of 152cm, there’s plenty of height without one. The ‘L’ in the name stands for long, so the top section is about 55cm. This means the closed length is high; at 67cm it’s one for your check-in baggage rather than carry-on if you’re shooting on your travels. Practical? I’ve had no problems whatsoever in setting up and using the GT3533LS. The twist lock legs work perfectly, and sitting close together, you can loosen both at once to free both two sections. They’re not small or light in the turn though, so might not suit smaller hands. The locks at the knuckles, which control the angle of the legs are large and easy to grip in even in gloves, simply pulling out to release, before you lift the leg to the desired level. Pushed back in to lock, you can close through the three angles available with little clicks. Admittedly it takes slightly longer to do this than pressing a lever and moving the leg in one motion, but it certainly requires less effort. Angling the legs out to their maximum gives a lowest shooting height of around 11cm, which I found fine for focusing close

and creating those ‘big’ foregrounds. As you’d expect at this price there’s a bubble level on the collar, too. The GT3533LS legs have a load bearing capacity of 25kg, so you can mount almost any combination of head, camera and lens. But they’re also very light – certainly lighter than they looks. The legs weigh just over 2kg, though this will obviously rise when a suitable head is mounted, like the GH3382QD ball head I mounted that weighs in at 770g. For shooting in a variety of conditions the GT3533LS legs come with a choice of three different feet, all of which screw in easily; there are 50mm rubber ‘cup’ feet which angle via an integrated ball, and give a very good grip, and also regular 33mm rubber feet, and spikes. KS

Verdict Using the GT3533LS is an excellent experience, but it does come with a significant price tag. That’s not to say it’s poor value though, as looked after it should last a lifetime. I’d certainly invest in one. Pros Build, features, handling... the Bentley of tripods Cons Price, not great for travelling


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Technique PART 7

Camera School

Here we lift the lid on all things camera related, showing how to get better results from your CSC or DSLR, and providing all the info you don’t find in the manual. So, stick with us and you’ll soon be wielding your camera like an expert. This month, how the shutter speed you choose affects movement in your shot... Words & pictures by Kingsley Singleton Shutter speed is one of the three fundamental components of exposure, alongside aperture and ISO. Like those settings, it has primary and secondary effects. The primary effect of shutter speed is, in concert with the aperture, to allow the correct amount of light to reach the sensor and provide a good exposure. But, again like aperture, it’s the secondary effects of shutter speed that are of more interest to creative photographers. How shutter speed works Shutter speed controls the amount of light recorded by revealing the camera’s sensor for a given amount of time. This time is either decided by you, or by the camera in response to other exposure settings. For instance in shutter-priority mode (S or Tv), you set the time that you want to expose the sensor for and the camera will open or close the aperture to compensate for this. But in aperture-priority (A or Av) you set the aperture, and the shutter speed responds, increasing or decreasing speed to create a good exposure. What shutter speeds can I use? Depending on the model of camera and exposure mode, you’ll be able to open the shutter for a very brief period (fractions of a second), or a very long time (minutes). Most DSLRs and CSCs offer a range of 30secs to 1/4000sec or 1/8000sec, but thanks to new models with electronic shutters, this top speed can be even faster, up to 1/32,000sec. There’ll also be a bulb mode allowing you to keep the shutter open manually for any length of time you need, and this will be accessed by a B on the mode dial, or found beyond the slowest speed in the shutter speed range. 1/60sec shutter speed

1/30sec shutter speed How shutter speed affects moving subjects Because of how the sensor is exposed by the opening and closing shutter, what you’re recording isn’t just the amount of light in the scene, but any movement or change in the light that’s visible during that time. So, if something is moving while the shutter is open it’ll either be recorded as blurred or sharp depending on the shutter speed and the speed of the subject. For instance, if you point your camera at the sea, and shoot one image at 1/125sec and one at 1/2sec, you’ll notice lots of motion blur from the slower shutter speed, but the waves will be kept relatively sharp from the faster one. The extra movement is recorded because the waves have had more time to travel across the frame. But it’s not only subjects that are moving in the scene which will be recorded as blur by 1/4sec shutter speed

1/1000sec shutter speed slower shutter speeds. If you’re hand holding the camera, instead of using it on a tripod, you’ll also find that movement in your position or the camera is recorded. This could be small movements or vibrations that you don’t even notice (camera shake), or a deliberate panning of the camera; either will be record as blur if the shutter speed is slow enough.

Above Fast shutter speeds freeze movement and slow ones blur it, but there’s no right or wrong setting. You should just pick a shutter speed that’s suits your intentions. On the left a 1/30sec speed it used for a panning effect, while on the right a 1/1000sec speed allows a sharp image.

What shutter speed to do I need? The shutter speed you need is entirely down to how you want the subject to look – sharp or blurred. Very fast shutter speeds can freeze even fast-moving subjects like a tennis ball in flight, and very slow shutter speeds can blur even slow-moving subjects like swaying branches, or shadows cast by the sun. However, in the majority of cases, when shooting hand held – as you would be for

portraits, or general photography – the fastest shutter speed available will give you the best results (if focused correctly, pictures will be sharp and free from motion blur). The exact speed you need to get a sharp shot once again depends on how steady you can hold the camera and how fast the subject is moving.

4secs shutter speed

Above Find a subject with a consistent rate of movement, like this waterfall, and shoot it at different shutter speeds. As the speed lengthens you’ll notice that the look of the moving water changes from sharp to blurred, due to the amount time it’s moving through the frame.

Shutter speed, focal length and camera shake And there’s another factor to take into account; the focal length of lens you’re using. Essentially it’s easier to get a sharp shot with a wide-angle than it is when using a telephoto lens. The wider the field-of-view, the less movement will be recorded per pixel, so if you’re shooting at 18mm and 1/15sec you might not see any blur, but if you zoom the lens into 55mm with the same speed, comparatively more movement will be visible, both from the subject and from you. When it comes to combating camera shake, image stabilisation in the lens or camera body will offset the worst of this, but in general you should try to shoot with a shutter speed close to or above the focal length you’re using, ie. 1/60sec with a 55mm lens. NEXT MONTH Find out why you can’t always get the shutter speeds you want, how to overcome that problem, and how to get more creative with shutter speed, using the fastest and slowest settings.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

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Competition

Editor’s letter

Welcome to the show, friends

WIN!

A Samsung memory card! Capture life’s special moments across all devices with the ultra-reliable Samsung PRO Plus 128GB microSD memory cards. Samsung’s latest cards feature recently upgraded fourproof features; they are water, temperature, X-ray and magnetic proof, so shooting in the most challenging conditions isn’t an issue. We have one massive 128GB Samsung PRO Plus microSDXC card and SD adapter to award to an eagle-eyed winner. Just complete the word search below, and you’ll find one word in the list that’s not in the grid. Email us on puzzle@photography-news.co.uk with that word in the subject box by 16 April 2017. The correct answer to PN40’s word search was Grid and the Samsung 64GB card was won by Maria Leekblade of Lyndhurst in Hampshire. Congratulations to her. samsung.com/uk/memory-cards/

I enjoy photography exhibitions, so I’m really looking forward to The Photography Show (TPS) at the NEC. Before going any further perhaps I need to clarify something. If you’re a regular reader and it’s before 22 March then welcome to the issue and there is still time to go to the show. If you’re reading this after 22 March, sorry but you’ve missed it so better luck next year. Or if you’ve picked up this copy at TPS, do come and tell us how much you loved it. Apologies for the rather convoluted welcome but this issue is an unusual one because of TPS. It is the UK’s biggest imaging exhibition hence it is massively well supported by the industry and that includes us. We’ve brought over 11,000 copies of PN to give away and we will still probably run out by Tuesday lunchtime – but that’s fine because there is no point taking loads back to the office. Our aim for the show is threefold – to increase brand awareness, to award trophies for the deserving winners of our 2016 Awards that recognise outstanding products and services, and to meet you. So if you are at the NEC right now and want to share something photography related or have an idea for a feature, please come back to the stand in the food gallery area. If you missed the show then drop me a line to willcheung@ bright-publishing.com. Feature ideas, wouldbe contributors willing to work for the glory, items of club news – anything is welcome and you will get a reply from me even if it’s a no. Of course I am at the NEC working but I’ll definitely sneak off and see what's worth buying. Rarely do I leave empty handed. Thinking back I have bought two cameras, two softboxes, a book and one portfolio box in the past few years. Last year was an exception and my credit card escaped serious harm because I didn’t spend much time walking the show.

I know many photographers come with their spending head on, but for many it is a mission to learn or get inspired – or both – and there are plenty of speakers and on-stand demos to enjoy. Whatever reason for attending TPS please enjoy the show. It is well worth supporting. Speaking of supporting, we are launching Photo 24 this issue and for full details please see inside. Photo 24 is a free event taking place on 23 June and everyone is welcome whatever your photographic skill level. Remarkably this is the fifth Photo 24 and it has evolved enormously in that time. We’ve learned what works and what doesn’t and that has been largely thanks to feedback from participants. Give it another five years and we’ll get it perfect. Maybe! To be honest, perfection is the holy grail but you can’t totally satisfy 250 photographers. But we can get close and I’m certain that this year’s Photo 24 will be the best yet. 2017 is a significant year for some big names in photography. Nikon is celebrating its 100th anniversary and it was 30 years ago this March that Canon launched its EOS system. I wasn’t around when Nikon started up but I was at the launch of the first EOS, the 650. It came nearly two years after the T80, Canon’s first AF SLR that didn’t actually autofocus! Very few cameras are horrible but the T80 was and light years behind the first AF SLR, the Minolta 7000. I sat next to the Canon PR man at the T80 launch dinner and, after a glass or two, I told him as much, which nearly started a fight. Fortunately for Canon it got it right with the EOS system and the rest, as they say, is history. I’m also history so see you again next time.

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Photography News is published 13 times a year by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photography News is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Photography News that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. While Bright Publishing makes every effort to ensure accuracy, it can’t be guaranteed. Street pricing at the time of writing is quoted for products.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

Advertisement feature Canon icons

Celebrate 30 years of EOS Check out Canon’s latest releases, chat with experts and get hands-on at The Photography Show If you’re heading to this year’s The Photography Show visit the Canon stand on D141/E131, where Canon will be displaying more products than ever before! To celebrate #EOS30years you’ll be able to get hands-on with the iconic EOS 650, the EOS-1 series, the EOS 5D Mark IV and more. Canon’s Live Stage will play host to a range of renowned speakers which include Canon ambassador Jeff Ascough, as well as Canon explorers Clive Booth and Andy Rouse. What’s more, the Canon Education Stage will deliver a series of technical and business focused sessions that you won’t want to miss.

Specs

You’ll also get to hear from SWPP award winner Sanjay Jogia and Instagram photographer Levanterman. The Canon team will of course be on hand to answer any of your questions and help you find the best camera for your photography. Recently, Canon announced the introduction of three new cameras to its EOS range, plus a new lens. Discover the EOS 77D and EOS 800D DSLRs, the EOS M6 mirrorless camera and the EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens. canon.co.uk

Specs

Price £829.99 (body only)

Price £779.99 (body only)

Sensor size/type 22.3mmx14.9mm CMOS

Sensor size/type 22.3mmx14.9mm CMOS

Resolution 24.2 megapixels

Resolution 24.2 megapixels

ISO sensitivity 100-25,600

ISO sensitivity 100-25,600

Shutter speed range 30-1/4000 sec Dimensions (wxhxd) 131x99.9x76.2mm Weight 532g

EOS 77D If you’re an advanced photographer looking for a lightweight DSLR the Canon EOS 77D weighs just 532g, yet boasts a 24.2-megapixel sensor. It also features Canon’s DIGIC 7 processor which allows you to capture images full of rich details. It features dual control wheels, allowing you to adjust settings such as shutter speed and aperture without having to access the camera’s menu. It also has a vari-angle LCD touchscreen to help you compose and shoot images with ease. The EOS 77D offers six frames-per-second shooting and a total of 45 autofocus points so you can easily focus and fire off a burst of shots. Even when using Live View the camera can focus in as little as 0.3 seconds. With built-in Wi-Fi and NFC you can transfer images to your smart device and control your camera remotely. You can purchase the Remote Controller BR-E1 (available separately) for £39.99, which allows you to operate the camera remotely via Bluetooth.

Specs

Shutter speed range 30-1/4000 sec Dimensions (wxhxd) 131x99.9x76.2mm Weight 540g

Price £219.99

Sensor size/type 22.3x14.9mm CMOS

Construction 12 elements in 10 groups

Resolution 24.2 megapixels

Filter size 58mm

ISO sensitivity 100-25,600

Dimensions (wxhxd) 112x68x44.5mm Weight 390g

Similar to the EOS 77D, the EOS 800D also offers 24.2-megapixel quality images and has the same DIGIC 7 processor. Aimed at beginners, the 800D has a guided interface to help you discover how your camera works. You can learn about settings and how they work as you take photos. It also offers Full HD video recording and a bright vari-angle LCD screen, giving you the option to compose your images using the viewfinder or the LCD screen. With the ability to rotate and flip out the screen you’ll be able to get creative and shoot at different angles to bring new perspectives to your photography. You can tap the screen to focus on your subject and take a shot without pressing the shutter. Again, like the EOS 77D the EOS 800D offers six frames-per-second shooting and 45 autofocus points to help you capture fleeting moments and speedy subjects.

Specs

Price £729.99 (body only)

Shutter speed range 30-1/4000 sec

EOS 800D

Diaphragm 7 blades

EOS M6 If it’s DSLR quality you want, but something a little lighter then the Canon EOS M6 is perfect. The latest mirrorless camera to join the EOS M range packs DSLR features into a compact body. With Dual Pixel CMOS AF the M6 has a super-fast autofocus and can track subjects automatically as they move. Combined with its continuous shooting speed of seven frames-per-second, this camera may be small, but it sure is powerful with a 24.2-megapixel CMOS sensor. You can also record Full HD video and keep footage sharp and in focus thanks to an in-camera 5-axis Image Stabilizer. The EOS M6 is available in black and silver, body only and as two kit options with the EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM or EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens.

Maximum aperture f/4 Minimum aperture f/22 Dimensions (wxhxd) 66.5x61.8mm Weight 215g

EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens This versatile lens is great for a variety of subjects and offers excellent image quality. It features a 4-stop Image Stabilizer to help eliminate camera shake in your shots, whether you’re shooting in low-light or at the lenses maximum focal length of 55mm. Thanks to its seven-blade circular aperture you’ll be able to create beautiful background blur and make your subject really stand out. The EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM also has a Servo AF with near-silent STM, so if you’re also an aspiring filmmaker you won’t notice the sound of the lens focusing in your videos.


Photography News | Issue 42 | absolutephoto.com

Photography News Issue 42  

Your free newspaper packed with the latest news, views and stories from the world of photography.

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