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PERFECT WEDDING PRESENT(ATION) WHEN I GROW UP, I WANT TO BE A… NIKON DF: NOT JUST A PRETTY FACE? Profit from an amazing album workflow

Turn a childhood passion into a career

Find out if beauty is more than skin deep

ISSUE 89 £4.50 www.photopromagazine.com

A PHOTOGRAPHER'S GUIDE TO

TWITTER

How 140 characters can transform your business

NEW YEAR'S REVOLUTION!

Make 2014 the best yet Top tips on how to make this year your most profitable ever

HASSELBLAD AD MASTER SHARES UNMISSABLE LIGHTING SKILLS FULL TEST OF PROFOTO'S GAME-CHANGING B1 FLASH CARRYING IT OFF IN STYLE: BAGS AND CASES ROUND-UP

FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY:

BE A SUCCESS! Inside information on how to make it big in the world of fashion IT TAKES TWO: GET DYNAMIC SHOTS OF WEDDING DUOS PP89_001 (COVER)rp subs.indd 1

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CONTENTS SAVE 50% ISSUE 89

Regulars

006 INBOX

016

The new year’s just the time for launches, openings, exhibitions and competitions. Get your fill of the newest of the new here.

016 PORTFOLIO: GEORGE WILLIAMS

COVER Zooming to the front of the starting grid is George Williams, whose childhood passion for photographing cars is turning into a successful career. 022

022 PROJECT: HISTORY BOOKS

15 years’ dedicated shooting of one of the world’s oldest monuments has resulted in a fascinating book documenting a year.

Pro Academy

032 LIGHTING MASTERCLASS

COVER Building a reputation for his shots with a touch of the unexpected won Milosz Wozaczynski a coveted Hasselblad award. Find out how he did it.

040 BREAK INTO FASHION

COVER All you need to know to get a start in fashion photography from someone who’s walking the (cat)walk.

046 JUST THE TWO OF US

COVER Get it together and you too can produce stunning bridal, couple portraits.

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Business Matters

055 BUSINESS MATTERS

How will your New Year’s resolutions boost your profits?

058 TWEET FOR SUCCESS

COVER Social media whizz, Donal Doherty turns his attention to Twitter in his latest marketing series.

064 TIME TO SPRING CLEAN

Dust yourself down, get the cleaning cloths out and polish your services until they gleam, ready for a profitable 2014.

071 AFTER THE BIG DAY

COVER Your job doesn’t stop after the reception. Then it’s time for the allimportant album creation.

077 HDSLR MOVIEMAKER

A snappy run-through of time-lapse technique, plus a snapshot of the latest news stories.

Gear

082 NIKON DF

COVER We’re going back to the future, taking a trip down memory lane and going back to school with the retro-styled Df. Wonder how its school report from Mr Duckworth will read…

091 PROFOT0 B1

COVER Last issue reviewer Andy Kruscek tantalised us all with news of this innovative take on flash. This issue he reveals all with an exhaustive, lay it bare, warts and all test.

096 BUYERS’ GUIDE

COVER Your expensive kit deserves to be carried around in style – we’ve got practical bags and cases galore for you to choose from.

114 NEXT ISSUE

Medium-format and tripod tests await.

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PORTFOLIO | GEORGE WILLIAMS

Automotive photography is notoriously one of the hardest areas of them all to break into, but George Williams has made a flying start, teaching himself the basics and marketing to attract the clients he needs WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES GEORGE WILLIAMS

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PROJECT

STONES WITH A

STORY Stonehenge is one of the most enigmatic and recognisable monuments in the world, and it presented an irresistible challenge to photographer James O Davies, who has spent years capturing its different faces WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES JAMES 0 DAVIES

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PROJECT

As a field photographer for English Heritage, James has unrestricted access to Stonehenge, and many of his shots show the stones standing powerfully alone, without crowds of tourists.

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PRO ACADEMY

ESSENTIAL PRO SECRETS REVEALED

Providing you with the essential skills, techniques and ideas you need to make it as a successful professional photographer

032 LIGHTING MASTERCLASS Hasselblad Master Milosz Wozaczynski reveals all about his lighting technique.

040 FASHION FORWARD All you need to know

046 COUPLED You too can produce stunning portraits of the bride and groom.

to get ahead in fashion photography.

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PRO ACADEMY

FIRST STEPS INTO B E G I N N E R S ’ FA S H I O N

FASHION Breaking into the world of fashion photography is hugely challenging, but it is possible. Deborah Selwood outlines how she’s doing it, and describes scribes the work that ggoes oes on be behind the scenes WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES DEBORAH SELWOOD

he world of fashion photography looks so glamorous and exciting from a distance, and it doesn’t take much to understand why it should prove to be such a tantalising avenue to explore for so many who are searching for a career behind the camera. But it’s the sheer volume of people who are tempted to look in this direction that presents the biggest challenge: quite simply there aren’t enough openings to go around, and while it’s considerably easier now to network with others who are similarly just starting out there are no shortcuts that will guarantee you a foot in the door. All of which should make the experience of Deborah Selwood so interesting to others looking in this direction. Her career to date has been marked by a series of great achievements and equally severe setbacks. Coping with everything thrown at her, she has emerged the other end with a spread of steady clients and a growing portfolio of exceptional material. She’s experienced the highs and the lows, and has survived through her considerable work ethic, her dedication to learning her trade and the determination to learn from the great names of the past and present.

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“My interest in photography started in my early teens,” she says. “I was never without a camera. I took a lot of band photos and landscapes back then, and my dad had a recording studio so we knew stacks of musicians. My introduction to the world of fashion started when I was 18 and was spotted by a model agency. I ended up working with numerous fashion and commercial photographers and became increasingly interested in what they were doing on their side of the camera. I would help out setting up the shoots and assisting with set design, wardrobe styling and darkroom work, and I also assisted on as many shoots as I could.” It was a logical step for Deborah to head to college to study photography, and on leaving she set up her own part-time business, Gecko Studios, in 2002. Raising a family and studying law through the Open University preoccupied her for a while, and then she went into photography full-time in 2008. All was going well, but then disaster struck in 2010 when Deborah injured her neck in an accident and spent six months receiving intensive physiotherapy. It could have meant the end of her photographic career altogether

since it was almost impossible for her to undertake physical work, but typically she battled back, using the enforced free time she had to study the work and careers of others in the business that she admired. “I wanted to find out what steps they had taken to get where they wanted to go,” she says. “I researched agents and publications that I loved and where I felt my style would suit, and found out as much as I could about both them and the photo editors who worked there. I also spent time building up my friends and contacts on Facebook, particularly make-up artists, hairstylists, designers, stylists, models, magazine editors etc.” Having got back on her feet again, Deborah then experienced luck of a rather different kind when, against all her expectations, she was named one of the two fashion apprentices at Mark Cleghorn’s Photographer Academy (PT4U) in 2012. It marked the start of a whirlwind year of intensive training, one of the most demanding things she’s ever done, but it gave her an invaluable crash course in the business and encouraged her to enter more competitions and to seek to earn distinctions from the MPA.

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BUSINESS MATTERS

BUSINESS MATTERS 058 THE TWITTER GENERATION

064 SPRING CLEAN FOR 2014

Tweeting for marketing success

SCOTT GAIR, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAWYER

Something for nothing veryone is looking to save money. Loads of people are after something for nothing, and professional photographers are often on the receiving end of that. If you don’t have a written contract in place then you may end up on the losing side! I often receive calls from photographers who tell me that they have done various jobs for clients, and they subsequently find out that their client has given the images to a third party to use, or they are using them for all sorts of purposes that the photographer didn’t anticipate when he or she was pricing up the job. One of the first questions I ask the photographers is “Do you have a written contract?” Invariably, and rather sadly, the answer is too often no. It occurs to me that a significant number of professional photographers are taking on jobs without having any terms agreed or form of contract accepted up front. I once spoke to a photographer who was being paid a very healthy five-figure sum per year (for several years!) from a certain client to do their stock photography, but didn’t have a written contract in place. Can you imagine going to work as an employee of a business on, say, a £20,000 a year job and not asking for a written contract? We wouldn’t accept that normally, but so many professional photographers I speak to seem to go about their daily business without any contracts, which doesn’t seem to be very reflective of a professional approach to business. I cannot emphasise enough the importance of agreeing terms with clients before taking on a job. It’s often said that if you don’t have a written contract then there is no contract in place, but that’s a common

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Make some room for growth

misconception. It is possible to have verbal contracts, but the problem is evidencing that contract. The fact is that it’s difficult to prove the terms of a contract if it isn’t in writing, so best practice is to ensure that the terms of your gig are written down, in one document, signed or acknowledged by your client. If that isn’t possible, then a string of emails setting out the basic terms is better than nothing. If you get a properly prepared contract drawn up it’s often possible for you to tweak that to cover your various commissions so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel for every job you take on. The contract should cover a number of important issues, but at the very least include the payment terms, deposit, what images you will provide and by when, the usage terms for the images and moral rights. Not only will this help you turn your mind to these important issues before taking on a job, it will inevitably save you a lot of time, energy and probably money in the event that there is a disagreement or uncertainty about what you were expected to do. If you keep your contracts in a safe place you can also refer to them when preparing your tax returns to see what you were paid rather than sift through bank accounts and receipts. One dispute with a client can be a very expensive lesson to learn when there is no contract in place. Don’t make the same mistake that so many others do – get one drawn up! QScott Gair is an intellectual property lawyer at Mayo Wynne Baxter and a professional photographer. Send your questions for this column to sgair@mayowynnebaxter.co.uk.

If you get a properly prepared contract drawn up it’s often possible for you to tweak that to cover various commissions”

056 PLAN YOUR 2014 MARKETING PERFECTLY 071 CREATE THE RIGHT ALBUM FOR YOU & YOUR CLIENT

DANI RIOT, FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER AND FOUNDING PARTNER OF NEGATIVESPACE

Plan for the year ahead he tradition of the New Year’s resolution goes all the way back to 153 BC, when Janus, a mythical king of early Rome, was placed at the head of the calendar. With two faces, Janus could look back on past events and forward to the future. Janus became the ancient symbol for resolutions. But in the modern day, resolutions tend to be less about finding forgiveness from others and more of a personal lifestyle change. By choosing one blanket statement of your intent, however, it’s really no surprise that research suggests that there is only a 12 per cent success rate. That means a massive 88 per cent of us get to the end of the year no better off than when we started! Making such blanket statements and promises within business will more often

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BUSINESS MATTERS MASTER MARKETING

TWEET YOUR WAY TO

SUCCESS

Donal Doherty’s new series shows you how to get your name in front of the right people, and starts off with a look at the benefits of Twitter and its potential for marketing, lead generation and customer service WORDS DONAL DOHERTY PICTURES DAVID DU CHEMIN & DAVID HOBBY

n these modern times, marketing is one of the most fundamental things that any photographer will need to understand and get on top of. The days when a little local advertising, and maybe your phone number in the Yellow Pages, would have done the job are long gone, and now you need to learn the skills that will put your name out there and inform the world that you exist and can offer a great service. The positive news is that many of the most effective marketing channels open to you are effectively free, but the fact that you will need

With 230 million users signed up, Twitter is a social behemoth, and it’s hard to ignore the platform’s huge potential as a marketing channel. As with other social media, people use Twitter to connect and share. Users have just 140 characters or less to do so, and conversations cover the breadth of human experience. So how do you insert your photography business into that interaction and make your input invaluable? We all have a limited amount of time at our disposal and so I would suggest identifying where your target customer hangs out online

CREDIT: DAVID DUCHEMIN

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to learn how to use them in the right way to get your message across is not so good. Before I became a photographer I had a successful career in marketing and PR, and I’ve used many of the things that I learned at that time, in particular how to get the most out of social networking, to build up a flourishing operation from scratch. In this new series I’ll be looking at all aspects of marketing and showing you how to apply the basic principles to your own business, and I’m starting off this month with a review of one of the most dynamic social networks of them all, namely Twitter.

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GEAR

ESSENTIAL PRO GEAR REVEALED

All the vital gear you’ll need eed to be a successful professional photographer

096 BUYERS’ GUIDE: BAGS AND CASES

We’re taking a look at the latest products that are designed to protect your valuable cameras and accessories.

082 NIKON DF

It’s back to the future as Nikon looks to its past for design inspiration for the new Df.

091 PROFOTO B1

Andy Kruczek reveals all in an exhaustive test of this innovative take on flash.

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GEAR

www.calumetphoto.co.uk

ON TEST:

Nikon Df Nikon has acknowledged its heritage by launching the pro-spec Df, which bears a striking resemblance to its SLR classics of yesteryear. Adam Duckworth discovers if its performance matches its looks WORDS & PICTURES ADAM DUCKWORTH

NIKON DF SPECIFICATIONS CONTACT www.nikon.co.uk PRICE £2749 with special edition 50mm f/1.8 lens RESOLUTION 16.2 megapixels SENSOR 36.0x23.9mm CMOS LENS MOUNT F mount EXPOSURE MODES Programme automatic, aperture-priority, shutterpriority, manual, bulb, time IMAGE STABILISATION None MANUAL FOCUS Yes FLASH X-SPEED 1/200sec NUMBER OF FOCUS POINTS 39 with 9 cross-type sensors ISO RANGE 100-12,800 (expandable to ISO 50-204,800) LCD SCREEN 3.2in fixed with 921k dots

f there has ever been a digital SLR that has set the photo world buzzing with both excitement and controversy, the new Nikon Df is it. Instead of focusing on technical innovation in the way that most new launch high-end cameras do, the Df is a retro-styled model, harking back to the classic Nikon F3 of the 1980s. No video, no Wi-Fi, no GPS, no dual card slots, no articulating screen and definitely no art filters. Yet it’s no dinosaur. It’s fitted with the same top-ofthe-range full-frame sensor as the D4. Nikon claims it’s all about getting back to the raw emotion of pure stills photography. The company is promoting this ideal with an advertising campaign that seeks to hammer home the old-school, feel-good factor of a photographer alone with his no-frills camera. It’s a message that has wide appeal for those who have been clamouring for a ‘digital FM2’ for years, namely a basic, small camera with mechanical dials to change all the key parameters, but fitted with a digital sensor, LCD screen and autofocus. You’d think the prayers of lots of traditional photographers had been answered. But as soon as it was announced, there were cries that it was too big, too bulky, too old school or not traditional enough and, of course, way overpriced. Knee-jerk reactions, particularly that at £2749, it’s just a piece of expensive retro nonsense aimed at the hipster set with more money than sense. Even if that price did include a special-edition 50mm f/1.8 retro lens with a silver line around the lens barrel like the original Nikkors of old. But to see the Df as nothing more than a trinket for the fashion-conscious is way off the mark. It’s a uniquely capable camera that is being targeted at pro users as well as well-funded amateurs. And it has a particularly unique advantage, which could make it the ideal camera

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for photojournalists, travel photographers and unobtrusive wedding pros. That massive advantage is its sensor. It’s straight out of the flagship D4. Simply put, this is the best low-light sensor available at any price today. And until now, it’s only been available in the big and bulky D4 which nowadays can be had for around £4200 – still significantly more than the Df and in a far bigger body. The sensor may only offer 16.2 megapixels of resolution – less than half that offered by the sensor in the D800, a camera that costs less than the Df – but the D4 sensor is the king of low light, and 16.2 megapixels are more than enough for most users. As cameras for photojournalists, or one to use in the low light of a church interior or maybe on your travels in a foreign temple, the D4 and now the Df offer the perfect solution to low-light issues: super low noise, great dynamic range and not too many pixels to clog up hard drives. If you want the ultimate low-light camera at the cheapest price, the Df is it. No question. Although Nikon simply says it uses the same sensor as the D4, it has been suggested that the Df may actually outperform the D4 at low ISO settings. As the Df frame rate is 5.5fps – half that of the D4 – suggestion is that the processor handles the signal more efficiently and hence gives cleaner results at lower ISOs. Our test of a D4 versus a Df in identical conditions at all ISO settings proved this not to be the case. Up to ISO 12,800 the sensors were virtually identical. It was only at ISO 25,600 that the D4 was clearly ahead. And shooting at ISO settings like these is very, very rare. RIGHT Incorporating the retro styling of Nikons of old, the Df is particularly stylish, with an impressive secret weapon – the best low-light sensor available.

SHUTTER SPEED RANGE 30secs-1/4000sec STORAGE MEDIA SD, SDHC, SDXC, UHS-I compatible DIMENSIONS (WXHXD) 143.5x110.0x66.5mm WEIGHT 765g (including battery and memory card)

To see the Df as nothing more than a trinket for the fashion conscious is way off the mark. It’s uniquely capable, targeted at pros and well-funded amateurs

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GEAR

BUYERS’ GUIDE: Bags and cases Looking to protect that expensive camera kit? Whether you’re after a shoulder bag, speedy access sling, pouch, backpack or heavy-duty rolling case suitable for overseas jobs, you’ve come to the right place…

WORDS GAVIN STOKER

The days where a camera was the only tool a photographer carried are long gone. Nowadays you’re just as likely to be lugging around a tablet, smartphone, chargers, multiple lenses, laptop and possibly an extra camera body or two. So, when you’re spending your hard-earned cash on such big-ticket photographic kit, it’s a

false economy to stint on how you choose to transport and protect it; whether we’re talking protection from prying eyes, knocks when out and about, or the unpredictable British weather. We’ve rounded up the latest recommendations regarding bags and cases of all shapes and sizes from a host of manufacturers and suppliers.

It’s not just about the bag itself. Consider your present kit and how it might expand. Don’t just buy for now; think about all those little extras you might want to make space for – a smartphone and a tablet, media cards, filters and batteries, possibly personal effects too. So, the question really is: what’s your bag?

Nikon ‘Original Goods’ range From £5.99 approx Want to stick that Nikon gear into a subtly branded Nikon camera bag? The manufacturer has recently unveiled a new 40+ strong range of options under the Nikon Original Goods branding. If you can’t decide whether a hand-carried bag, shoulder bag or backpack best suits your kit then opt for the three-in-one Nikon 3 Ways Shooting Bag for £149.99. Boasting what it calls a ‘doctor’s bag design’ with internal dimensions of 300x340x200mm, this frame-supported item made from 600 denier polyester with 3D mesh comes with an inner pouch, rain cover and is available in black and navy. For a more casual accoutrement there’s the polyester black or beige Nikon Casual Shoulder Bag for £51.99 with removable internal padding to protect your camera and a front pocket. Also check out the doctor’s bag style Nikon Urban Boston SLR Bags with zippered openings and internal dividers available in small, medium and large, priced £67.99-£144.99.

• www.nikon.co.uk

Benro Ranger Pro & Smart Series Shoulder Bags From £35.34 There is a multitude of bag options available via Kenro, of which the Benro branded Ranger Bags and Smart Series Shoulder Bags are the latest offerings. The Ranger Pro series is a water-repellent backpack aimed at nature and wildlife specialists. Claimed to provide even weight distribution, and featuring a larger upper compartment and a front rain and dust cover, the packs come in three sizes in the 400N, 500N and 600N models. The latter offers capacity to hold two SLRs, six to eight lenses, two flash units and one 17-inch laptop. Retail prices range from £129.90 to £149.94. There are also the new Smart Shoulder bags, described as durable, with bright piping and ergonomic shoulder straps. The storage compartment includes a detachable divider, and there’s a side pocket and a front pouch. Again there are three variations in the 10, 20 and 30 models, with prices ranging between £35.34 and £48.

• www.kenro.co.uk

Booq Python Slimpack £109.57 The Booq Python Slimpack promises to keep your kit safely waterproofed whilst at the same time making sure it’s accessible. The premium bag has space for two DSLRs and up to four mid-size lenses, one large zoom lens, a tripod and a ten-inch tablet. Removable padded dividers in the main camera compartment mean photographers can arrange the interior to their liking in order to best fit and protect cameras, lenses and accessories such as chargers. A top-access camera compartment ensures users can quickly access their gear, while a rubberised bottom and water-repellent exterior coupled with a removable rain poncho claims to keep the bag and your equipment dry in wet weather. What’s more a variety of YKK zippered exterior pockets open up to reveal concealed slots and additional storage for other essentials, maximising the effectiveness of the minimalist design and saving you the need to carry an extra bag.

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GEAR Think Tank Photo TurnStyle Sling bags From £59.99 Think camera bags, think Think Tank. The manufacturer has just unveiled a new sling bag collection named TurnStyle, aimed at DSLR and mirrorless camera system users and described as being lightweight with easy access. The bags can be rotated to let photographers get at their gear and they each also feature a tablet pocket. The hybrid bags can be worn as shoulder sling bags or belt packs for increased versatility. The customisable interiors will hold a DSLR with 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, or alternatively a CSC. Features include a sealed rain cover in the bottom pocket, fully customisable interior dividers, breathable air mesh back panels and a wide shoulder strap. For outdoor photographers, Think Tank’s new outdoor photography bag division, MindShift Gear, has released the Contact Sheet – a 3.5x5ft tarpaulin like sheet designed to provide a waterproof barrier from the elements.

• www.thinktankphoto.com, www.mindshiftgear.com

Peli Backpacks £319 for the U160 Half Case Camera Backpack Tough gear via which to transport your kit is the pitch for Peli products. Although well known for its heavy-duty rolling cases for photographers who want to take absolutely everything with them on a shoot, Peli also offers smaller items, for example the Peli Urban Elite and Sports Elite Backpacks. Peli backpacks are equipped with several pockets and a rigid front plate to securely transport ereaders, tablets and notebooks. The Sports versions are lighter weight products designed to provide comfort when travelling outdoors or for long distances. Each pack has additional pockets for smartphones, headphones, water bottles and the ilk. Brand new to the range is the Peli U160 Half Case Camera Backpack. This incorporates a large waterproof and, it is claimed, crushproof case to protect your cameras and lenses. Within the case are cushioned dividers to protect the items in your kit from knocking against each other. Naturally these dividers can be configured as you see fit. Tripod attachment straps, a chest clip and removable waist belt also feature.

• www.peliproducts.co.uk

Fujifilm Christopher and Robert bags From £99.95 Fujifilm has launched a range of classic design camera bags for its X-series CSCs. These have been designed in collaboration with Millican, the Lake District based outdoor and travel bag brand. The manufacturer claims that the interestingly named Christopher (£199.95) and Robert bags (£99.95) – larger and smaller carry options respectively – boast weatherproofing, vintage styling that matches the retro feel of the X cameras themselves, plus are designed for ‘everyday adventure’. Both bags feature a hooded lid for added security and have been fashioned from ten per cent cotton canvas with a weatherproofed outer fabric. If you want to know where to buy one, head to your nearest John Lewis, which had an exclusive at the time of writing.

• www.fujifilm.co.uk

Manfrotto Advanced and Professional bags From £25 The Advanced bag family comprises 21 options in six different styles, said to boast premium Italian design. Aiming to deliver easy use when on the go, photographers can choose from shoulder bags, holsters and slings. In addition there are three different types of backpack available. For carrying nothing but camera gear, there’s the Gear Backpack, while the Active Backpack can cope with both camera equipment and essential personal items. Funkier still is the Tri Backpack, which can be innovatively worn in three different ways. Meanwhile the Professional bag range offers 16 designs to select from, in five different styles. All look minimal yet elegant. The Pro range provides protection where photographers need it most, namely at the heart of the bag where camera and lens are traditionally stored. The Camera Protection System prevents damage to your kit if the bag is dropped and the outside protection is provided via a multilayered Exo Tough Construction. With the promise of easy-to-use zips and durable metal fastenings, the Professional series offers holsters, slings, shoulder bags, backpacks and trollies with feet to keep your precious gear off the ground.

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NEXT ISSUE Cover credit: Deborah Selwood

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Editorial team Editor Terry Hope 01959 563007 terryhope@bright-publishing.com Technical writer Ian Fyfe 01223 499456 ianfyfe@bright-publishing.com Sub editors Lisa Clatworthy, Hannah Bealey, Siobhan Godwood Advertising team Business development director Dave Stone 01223 499462 davestone@bright-publishing.com Sales director Matt Snow 01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Maria Francis 01223 499457 mariafrancis@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Mike Elliott 01223 499458 mikeelliott@bright-publishing.com Design team Design director Andy Jennings Design director Dean Usher Design & production manager Grant Gillard Web team Flash developer Ashley Norton Web developer Mike Grundel

BEST OF BAILEY

We catch up with the iconic photographer as he prepares for his massive new NPG show

SET YOURSELF UP AS A WINTER WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER LOCATION LIGHTING TOP FOOTBALL STARS REALISE THE MARKETING BENEFITS OF PINTEREST USE DIFFERENT FORMATS TO DEVELOP A VALUABLE USP MAKE MONEY FROM PET PHOTOGRAPHY

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Publishing team Managing director Andy Brogden Managing director Matt Pluck Editorial director Roger Payne Head of circulation Chris Haslum Subscription and back issues Subscribe online: www.photopromagazine.com Email: subs@photopromagazine.com Subscription hotline: 01371 851896 News-stand distribution COMAG, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 7QE 01895 433600

Printed in the UK by The Magazine Printing Company using only paper from FSC/PEFC suppliers www.magprint.co.uk Photo Professional is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photo Professional is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Photo Professional that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

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114 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 89

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Photo Professional Issue 89  

23-page sample version

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