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INSPIRATION

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Welcome

WILL CHEUNG FRPS, EDITOR

Will has worked in photo mags for nearly 30 years and been taking pictures for even longer. His photographic interests are very broad, from nature to portraits.

Welcome to the issue, and thanks for buying Advanced Photographer. Your support is greatly appreciated. People play a major part in this month’s issue with both of our Inspire portfolios featuring this most popular of photographic subjects. As you would expect, though, the images on show in this magazine are not just ordinary snapshots but refreshingly creative and visually challenging. I also found them totally inspiring and felt them worth showcasing in this magazine. I hope they fill you with inspiration too. Kathryn Scorah’s amazing images are visualised and then created in post-production, while Heather Buckley’s are formed in-camera. Both approaches are valid and require effort, talent and hard work, but as you see here the results are totally worthwhile. In Photo Kit, we have the first of a three-part major review of the latest APS-C DSLRs vying for your money, plus we have the full test of the Fujifilm X-T1, another new camera with a ‘back to the future’ feel. I have to say, it’s rather lovely and I’ve already earmarked a load of medium-format film kit ready to part-exchange for one. I might sell a kidney to make up the deficit. Joke! Anyway, I hope you enjoy the issue and see you next month.

Will Cheung FRPS, Editor

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Contents

“In any situation where people gather and perform, there are plenty of opportunities for great images,” says Heather Buckley who took this shot at Brighton Fringe Festival. “Performers are used to having their picture taken, so you can be confident about directing them in some way to get the shot you want. The more you practise approaching people the easier it gets, and the more opportunities you get to get in close and direct your subject.”

WWW.HEATHERBUCKLEY.CO.UK

26 INSPIRE: Practise your social skills

The cover story...

Canon EOS 5D Mk III, EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM at 16mm, 1/200sec at f/16, ISO 400, flash fired

18 CAPTURE: People pictures

SEE PAGE 91 FOR DETAILS

Inspiration, technique, opinion 6 UPFRONT New kit and

photo opportunities are springing up all over the market right now. What will tickle your fancy?

10 STREET LIFE: INSPIRE We’ve all felt shy

44

LIGHTING ACADEMY: Mix flash with ambient light

4 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 42

26 PICTURE PERFECT: INSPIRE For Kathryn

Scorah, photographing her subject is just the start, then there’s the background and some post-production to create her painterly images.

about shooting people pics on the street, but not Heather Buckley. She encourages you to grab your kit and your courage with both hands, then take the plunge.

35 EXPOSED Editor

18 ALL THINGS TO ALL PEOPLE: CAPTURE

36 TOP SPOT One of the UK’s best loved university cities, Cambridge is the perfect destination for a day of architectural or people photography.

Before you hit the streets, read this. So you go out armed, ready to shoot every man, woman and child.

Cheung’s pre-empting spring; he’s been having a cleaning up and clearing out. From collectors’ fairs to binning slides, he’s clearing the decks.

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Contents

40 TRAINING DAY: Learning to flash with Calumet

56 EPIC TEST: APS-C DSLRs

36

TOP SPOT: Cambridge

80 FULL TEST: Fujifilm X-T1

Photo Kit: the latest gear tested 40 TRAINING DAY It’s

never too late to learn, but where are the best places to do so? We have the answers. This issue, Calumet Photographic has us flashing in no time at all.

44 LIGHTING ACADEMY Lighting expert John Denton mixes up a healthy dollop of flash with a smattering of ambient light.

50 RAW MASTERCLASS

Still in tidying mode, editor Cheung cleans up an image in Lightroom with cloning.

89 SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS Save your legs and

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114 NEXT ISSUE Put letters after your name, answer the call of nature and ogle another three APS-C DSLRs.

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56 APS-C TEST: PART 1 The only way to find out which APS-C DSLR is the best for you is to test them all. Thankfully, we’re doing it for you. Over the next three issues, resident techie Dr Fyfe puts 11 to the test.

71 TOKINA LENSES If you’re after a wide-angle zoom or maybe a macro, read this review and you’ll soon realise why Tokina’s have a loyal following. 80 FUJIFILM X-T1

Launching yet another model in its popular X-series, Fuji is bucking the trend a little, as this mirrorless

miracle looks rather like a DSLR. Does its performance live up to its looks though?

91 TAMRON SP 150600MM F/5-6.3

A huge zoom range without a huge price tag – this superzoom could be just what action and wildlife photographers have been waiting for.

94 PERFECT PHOTO SUITE 8

The question isn’t whether to use it as a stand-alone bit of software or as a plug-in, but whether version 8 is worth you putting your hand in your pocket.

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INSPIRATION

People special

Street photography has seen a resurgence of interest in recent years. Brighton-based Heather Buckley’s images show her love for the genre, and she hopes to inspire others to overcome their inhibitions and have a go WORDS TIM MCCANN PICTURES HEATHER BUCKLEY

10 ADVANCED ADVANCEDPHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOGRAPHERISSUE ISSUE42 42

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INSPIRATION

People special

While Heather will often engage with her subjects when photographing them, she will also look out for candid opportunities, such as this street entertainer taking a well-earned break at Brighton’s Fringe City event, using a low angle perspective to give the composition impact. Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM, 1/180sec at f/4 at 18mm, ISO 400, fill flash

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CAPTURE

People special

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CAPTURE

People special

POWER TO THE PEOPLE Capturing wonderful pictures of fellow human beings is one of the most fun and creative challenges any keen photographer faces. Here’s some advice to help you achieve greatness

© WILL CHEUNG

WORDS WILL CHEUNG PICTURES VARIOUS

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INSPIRATION

Light fantastic

The big skies and lonely promenades of windy and out of season English seaside resorts are the canvas on which Kathryn Scorah creates her dramatic character portraits WORDS TIM MCCANN PICTURES KATHRYN SCORAH

A TROUBLED PAST “The bridge, which is local to me, provided the background to this shot. I went for the repeated patterns of the lights and balustrades that gave a feeling of depth within the picture. I was able to visualise where I would place the subject, focusing on that point.” 26 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 42

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INSPIRATION

Light fantastic

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TOP SPOT

Spurn Point

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TOP SPOT

Spurn Cambridge Point Twilight is a great time for shooting buildings. Better still is if you have some sky detail to blur during a long exposure. Canon EOS 5D, 17-40mm lens at 22mm, 30secs at f/4.5, ISO 100

Cambridge It’s one of the country’s most famous cities and tourists flock to it during the summer, so now’s a great time to visit WORDS WILL CHEUNG PICTURES WILL CHEUNG & IAN FYFE

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LIGHTING A C A D E M Y

ABOVE A manual metering reading was used to assess ambient light levels and then stopping down slightly made sure the mood in the background was retained in the shot.

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LIGHTING A C A D E M Y

LIGHTING A C A D E M Y

Part 42

Professional photographer John Denton shows you what can be done when you mix ambient light with flash WORDS & PICTURES JOHN DENTON

1

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As I write this piece I’ve just returned from the annual pilgrimage to London that is the SWPP Convention. It was a great time for me as it’s a chance to talk to lots of people, present a few classes, take some great images and maybe drink a few pints too. In this article I have picked out some of the images I took and will go through the lighting involved. If you’d like a video of me in action then you can see a piece I recorded, along with my model Della Maylan, for Sandy Puc. Sandy is an award-winning photographer from the US. Her website is http:// sandypucphotography.com. The video is on my blog, http://bit.ly/1d9Pt8p. The first event of the week was a class out on location on London’s South Bank. We met at the back of the National Theatre and collected our permit to shoot and asked the person handing it over to mark on our map exactly where we could work. I always find this is a good defence against overzealous security as you start shooting. As the light was disappearing quickly I started with some ambient light shots but soon moved to supplementing existing light with flash. This whole area is a concrete mess in many ways but it makes it fantastic for photography, especially as there was a light covering of rain which gave everything a sheen. For the main shot here (left) I wanted to use the compositional elements of the handrails to guide the eye through the frame and finish with the red lights of the background building against the blue sky. As I positioned Della I was watching not just for her position in the frame but also the way the light from a street lamp to camera right was hitting her. This would be my rim light. To camera left I positioned a solitary Elinchrom Quadra Ranger with a softbox, high and angled down to feather across Della’s body. Metering the whole scene gave me 1/60sec at f/4.5 and ISO 400 and only closed down to f/5.6 so I didn’t lose the subtle street lighting and the red light on the background. Shooting from low down and angling the camera up has given a nice perspective, elongated Della’s legs and given the structure I wanted to the image. As twilight was quickly disappearing I decided to use it for artistic effect. 2 I positioned Jade so she was highlighted in the gap of sky between the tall buildings. Metering the sky gave me a starting point of 1/200sec and f/4.5 at ISO 400. I stopped down f/7.1 to underexpose the sky and give real drama to the rolling clouds. This meant Jade was no more than a silhouette so I needed flash. Two Elinchrom Quadra Rangers were used, the main light to camera right, the fill to left.

The main was fitted with a Maxi Lite Reflector while the fill was fitted with a small softbox to give an edge to Jade’s clothing and wrap around her slightly. My Gossen DigiSky meter measured the light hitting Jade from each flash. The key light was adjusted to give f/7.1, the fill to a little less, at f/5.6 Lying down on my belly gave me a dramatic angle and a focal length of 18mm on my Nikon D300 – a nice wide field of view. I adjusted the white-balance to 4000K and we were in business.

2 ABOVE & RIGHT The manual meter reading of 1/200sec at f/4.5 was deliberately underexposed with an aperture of f/7.1 set to enhance the drama of the brooding sky. The flash output was adjusted to match the set lens aperture.

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RAW MASTERCLASS USING SPOT REMOVAL REMO OVAL

START IMAGE

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RAW MASTERCLASS USING SPOT REMOVAL

RAW MASTERCLASS

HEBDEN BRIDGE

Adobe Lightroom is very powerful and the need to go into Photoshop to finish off an image is rarely necessary. It’s even good at getting rid of unwanted ‘stuff’ as we show here WORDS & PICTURES WILL CHEUNG

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ISSUE 42 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER 51


PHOTO A B S O L U T E

I LOVE THE CONTENT OF THIS MAGAZINE! SNOWBASIC, 21 JAN - CANADA

It’s perfectly suited to the iPad with lots of interesting photography features and videos to explore KEVEALING, 10 JAN - UK

Amazing images and interactivity with great videos also. Great stuff! LEDLEY26, 19 DEC – UK

I love the multimedia format with print, video and sound ROSIEBARCELONA, 30 DEC - USA

Find out why people are talking about Absolute Photo magazine.

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PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT is naturally very important to advanced photographers and therefore also very important to Advanced Photographer magazine – so every issue we’ll be reviewing a wide variety of the latest photo kit. We’ll be including items that are relevant to the main technique features in each issue so cameras and lenses will feature heavily, but so too will accessories and software. Look out for this badge of honour in our comparison tests

56 APS-C MONSTER TEST

Starting this issue, resident techie Dr Fyfe puts 11 APS-C DSLRs to the test.

71 TOKINA LENSES After a wide-angle zoom or maybe a macro? Find out why Tokina’s have a loyal following. 80 FUJIFILM X-T1

Launching yet another X-series model, Fuji is bucking the trend, as this mirrorless miracle looks rather like a DSLR.

91 TAMRON SP 150-600MM

A huge zoom range without a huge price tag – just what action and wildlife photographers have been waiting for.

94 PERFECT PHOTO SUITE 8 Is version 8 worth putting your hand in your pocket for?

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ISSUE 42 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER 55


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Photo Kit

APS-C DSLR GROUP TEST

APS-C DSLRS: PART 1

There’s a huge choice of APS-C DSLRs available, with an equally huge price range. We start a three-part comparison of 11 from the current crop with a close look at how four flagship models perform WORDS & PICTURES IAN FYFE

The Advanced Photo System type-C sensor – more commonly known to you and me as APS-C – is the most commonly used sensor format in DSLRs. A quick Google tells you that no fewer than 25 APS-C format DSLR models are currently available, ranging from simple entry-level models up to those with sophisticated technology aimed at advanced enthusiasts and in some cases even professionals. In the pursuit of high-quality images, the temptation is to dismiss the lower-end models and gravitate towards the most expensive. But is that really necessary? To find out, we’ve taken 11 APS-C cameras from across the spectrum and tested them side by side – over the next three issues, we’ll look in detail at what each has to offer and how they perform. In the next two instalments, we’ll look at mid-range and entry-level models, but this time we start with top-end prosumer APS-C DSLRS. Compared with cheaper models, the extra cost of these top-end cameras provides you with extras in both functionality and form. Their metering systems are often more advanced, making for more consistent and reliable exposures, and they come equipped with more advanced autofocusing systems, designed to cope easily with moving subjects. Combined with faster continuous shooting speeds, this makes them more suited to sports, wildlife and action photography. In fact, for these types of photography, this class

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of camera may well be a better option even than full-frame – the crop factor of the sensor means that focal lengths are effectively multiplied by 1.5x (1.6x for Canon), giving you extra value at the long end of telephoto lenses. The drawback used to be that fewer very wide-angle lenses were available. It’s not even all about performance though – the extra cash buys you a camera that’s more solidly built and resistant to the elements, while a bigger body leaves space for more direct access buttons and dials. This means that handling is less reliant on menus and therefore quicker and more intuitive. The pitfall of this is that the bodies are bigger and heavier, making them more of a burden to carry. All of this is true of all four cameras we’ve tested in this group: the Canon EOS 7D, Nikon D7100, Sony A77 and Pentax K-3. But we’ve tested them side by side to compare how they handle, and how they perform in terms of resolution, exposure, low light and white-balance performance.

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Photo Kit TOKINA LENSES

SIX OF THE BEST Tokina has fewer lenses in its range than most other independent manufacturers, but what it lacks in quantity, it makes up for in quality – particularly its super-wide zooms. We take a close look at them all WORDS & PICTURES RICHARD HOPKINS

Tokina has been manufacturing lenses, binoculars and telescopes for more than 50 years. Now part of the Kenko Tokina group, it has close ties with the giant Hoya Corporation that supplies optical glass to just about every lens maker on the planet. Tokina takes a slightly different tack, concentrating less on price and more on quality with fewer innovative and high performance designs. Tokina’s AT-X range (Advanced Technology-Extra) has a strong and loyal following, particularly since the award-winning Tokina 1116mm f/2.8 made its debut in 2007. From that success, Tokina has built a reputation as a specialist in high performance super-wide zooms, for both full-frame and APS-C cameras. Some high grade telezooms would be most welcome, and a new Tokina 70200mm f/4 with image stabilisation has been announced for sale later this year.

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A few tasty big-aperture primes would also go down nicely, and fit Tokina’s premium brand profile rather well. We can only hope. Meanwhile, Tokina has plenty to keep wide-angle and macro fans happy. Starting with the widest, the Tokina 10-17mm fisheye evolved from a joint venture with Pentax. Zoom fisheyes are rare, but the variable focal length extends its versatility enormously and it’s equally at home on both full-frame and APS-C formats. The renowned Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 has always been a big seller. One of the sharpest lenses in its class, and nothing else offers a fast f/2.8 for APS-C cameras. It’s now better than ever with the MkII version. The Tokina 12-28mm f/4 is a kind of non-identical twin, swapping one stop of aperture for a much more extensive zoom range – longer than any rival. Both these lenses

have strong but different appeal, so not an easy choice. Tokina’s 16-28mm f/2.8 is one of two full-frame super-wides, with a distinctive bulging front element. It’s big and heavy, but also very sharp, and way cheaper than anything similar with f/2.8. Finally the Tokina 17-35mm f/4 is a lot smaller, and a much more conventional alternative. In the prime lenses sector, the Tokina 100mm f/2.8 macro stands alone in the range. While it lacks higher-end features like image stabilisation and weatherproofing, it’s well specified and competitively priced. All Tokinas have recently had a subtle cosmetic revamp, and the black finish is now smoother. They’re classylooking lenses, quite Nikon-esque in the styling of the rubberised rings and gold lettering. All UK-supplied Tokina lenses come with a three-year warranty.

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Photo Kit FUJIFILM X-T1

Fujifilm X-T1

Mirrorless cameras are rapidly closing the performance gap with DLSRs, and Fujifilm’s latest mirrorless offering includes some stunning technology to help it challenge DSLRs head on

WORDS IAN FYFE PICTURES IAN FYFE & WILL CHEUNG

KEY FEATURES £1049 BODY ONLY 16.3-MEGAPIXEL X-TRANS II SENSOR 2360K DOT 0.77X EVF ISO 100-51,200 (EXTENDED) 8FPS WWW.FUJIFILM.CO.UK

VIEWFINDER The viewfinder being central, rather than on the left, makes the X-T1 different from other X-series models. With a magnification ratio of 0.77x, it’s the biggest of any camera, including all full-frame models. Fujifilm also claims it’s the fastest EVF in the world, with a delay of just 0.005 seconds. The graphic user interface has also been redesigned to give an at-aglance view of settings, and the settings that are displayed can be customised.

82 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 42

UHS-II COMPATIBILITY The X-T1 is the first camera in the world to support the new UHS-II standard in SD cards. These cards have a second row of connection pins, raising the theoretical data transfer rates to a maximum of 312MB/s. UHS-II cards are few and far between at the moment, but are coming online from companies such as Toshiba, SanDisk and PNY. In the meantime, the X-T1 is still compatible with your existing SD, SDHC or SDXC cards.

WI-FI While previous X-series models had wireless connectivity that allowed transfer of images to smart devices or computers, the X-T1 is the first to feature Fujifilm Camera Remote. This allows you to use the Wi-Fi connection to control the camera with your smartphone. Control is fairly comprehensive – you can adjust shutter speed, aperture, exposure compensation and ISO sensitivity from afar, as well as apply Film Simulation modes, flash, or turn on the self-timer.

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Photo Kit FUJIFILM X-T1

After fantastic success with the X-series in professional, enthusiast and entry-level circles alike, Fujifilm could have taken its laurels and well and truly rested on them. But instead, it’s taken the X-series concept in a new direction, repackaging it in a body styled like a film SLR and giving it an extra injection of speed – the result is the X-T1, and it means business. Everything about the X-T1 speaks of quality, and once it’s in your hand, it feels sturdy, comfortable and classy. As with the other X-series cameras, most of the handling takes its lead from the film days, with all the exposure settings controlled with dials, and there’s something truly delightful about the way this strips everything back. There’s no mode dial, for example. For aperture-priority mode, you set the shutter speed dial to auto and use the aperture ring. For shutter-priority, it’s the other way around. Set both to auto, and you’re in program mode, or specify settings on each for manual. It’s so simple and intuitive. This is the same as the X-Pro1 and X-E2, but the X-T1 has more on its topplate – ISO and drive mode dials on the left shoulder, a metering mode switch under the shutter speed dial. There’s almost no reason to enter the menus at all. Perhaps the only handling downside is that the back-plate buttons, specifically the AF-L, AE-L, Focus Assist and Q buttons, are quite hard to find by touch when you have your eye to the viewfinder, since they’re so flush to the back plate, and all the buttons lack a little positivity. One problem with the layout of the X-Pro1 and X-E2 cameras has been addressed on the X-T1, and that’s the position of the exposure compensation dial. On the other cameras, this overhangs the corner above the thumbgrip and is easily knocked, especially when taking the camera out of a bag. On the X-T1, the same dial is further recessed onto the top-plate so there’s no overhang, and this makes it less vulnerable, but it still doesn’t entirely solve the problem. There were still one or two occasions when I accidentally added 1/3EV of exposure compensation. It’s better, but still not ideal and is frustrating because the shutter dial next to it holds the answer – it has a mechanism that allows it to lock on auto. The same mechanism to lock the compensation dial on zero would solve the problem. Possibly the biggest talking point of the X-T1 is the viewfinder. Not only is it in the centre rather than on the left, as it is on the X-Pro1 and X-E2, but the specifications make for high expectations: a magnification ratio of 0.77x and a claimed lag time of just 0.005 seconds. It really is huge and extremely clear, and there’s genuinely no significant delay –

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ANATOMY OF...

Fujifilm X-T1 FROM THE TOP There are plenty of dials on the X-T1, some of which are double-decked. The lower deck on the left dial is the drive mode selector 1 , which includes multiple exposure, panorama bracketing, continuous and single shooting. On top of this is the lockable ISO dial 2 . Also stacked are the metering mode selector 3 and shutter speed dial 4 ; the latter locks in the auto position, but otherwise turns freely. The exposure compensation dial 5 is further from the edge compared with other X-series models – still no lock, though. There is also a customisable function button 6 , a dedicated movie record button 7 and a Viewmode button on the side of the pentaprism 8 to switch viewfinder modes.

3

1

7 5

2

8 4

6

FROM THE FRONT Although not the kind you can wrap your hand right around, the grip 1 is more substantial and DSLR-like than on the X-E2/X-Pro1. Tucked away at the top is the front command dial 2 , although with the other controls, this is rarely needed. Within reach of your fingers and just below the blue AF assist lamp 3 is a programmable function button 4 . On the other side of the lens mount is the focus mode switch 5 , well placed to operate with your left thumb, and further up is a PC flash sync socket 6 . The standard kit lens for the X-T1 is the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS XF 7 .

2

3 6

1

4 5 7

FROM THE BACK In a complete change from previous X-series design, the electronic viewfinder 1 is placed centrally for a steadier hold when it’s lifted to your eye. Also a first for the top end of the X-series is a tiltable LCD screen 2 , which can flip up and down. There are separate AE-L 3 and AF-L 4 buttons, with the back command dial in between 5 – this is mostly useful for changing settings in the quick menu, accessed by the Q button 6 , which doubles as a Raw conversion button in Playback mode. Next to your thumb is a Focus Assist button 7 , which magnifies the central area in manual focus mode so you can make the most of the focusing aids.

AT-A-GLANCE SPECS PRICE £1049 body only CONTACT www.fujifilm.co.uk SENSOR 16.3-megapixel X-Trans II CMOS with EXR II processor IMAGE DIMENSIONS 4896x3264 pixels ISO RANGE 200-6400 (100-51,200 expanded, JPEG only) AUTOFOCUS MODES Single, continuous, manual EXPOSURE COMPENSATION +/-3EV in

1

5 3

7

4

6 2

1/3EV steps, AEB +/-1EV in 1/3EV steps SHUTTER 30secs-1/4000sec METERING PATTERNS Multi, spot, average SHOOTING SPEEDS Single, continuous L 3fps, continuous H 8fps, self-timer LCD SCREEN 3in tiltable with 1040k dots STORAGE MEDIA SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-II compatible) DIMENSIONS (WXHXD) 129x89.8x46.7mm WEIGHT 440g (including battery and card)

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