Page 1

CINE GEAR 2018 YOUR SHOW GUIDE SEE PAGE 12 definitionmagazine.com

June 2018

£4.99

REVIEWS ROSCO DMG MIX LIGHT GTECH T3 RAID STORAGE SONY A7 MKIII CAMERA FIILEX TRAVEL LIGHT

INFINITY WAR AND SOLO The cream of large format cinematography

L A V I T S E F LENS SHOOTER STARS

Our first talent compilation

WERE YOU HERE? Lynne Ramsay's dark tale

BBC 2.0

How the BBC reinvented itself

SPACE RACE 2

Augmented reality bites


definition_June.indd 2

04/05/2018 16:57


03 CINE GEAR EXPO

Definition goes to Hollywood: our first official visit to the show.

Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ UK

EDITORIAL EDITOR Julian Mitchell

01223 492246 julianmitchell@bright-publishing.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF Adam Duckworth CONTRIBUTORS Phil Rhodes, Adam Garstone SENIOR SUB EDITOR Lisa Clatworthy SUB EDITORS Siobhan Godwood, Felicity Evans

ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Matt Snow

01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.com

SALES MANAGER Krishan Parmar

01223 499462 krishanparmar@bright-publishing.com

ACCOUNT MANAGER Harriet Abbs

01223 499460 harrietabbs@bright-publishing.com

KEY ACCOUNTS Nicki Mills

12

01223 499457 nickimills@bright-publishing.com

DESIGN DESIGN DIRECTOR Andy Jennings DESIGN MANAGER Alan Gray DESIGNER Lucy Woolcomb AD PRODUCTION Man-Wai Wong

PUBLISHING MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

MEDIA PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS OF

Definition is published monthly by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Definition is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Definition that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. Prices quoted in sterling, euros and US dollars are street prices, without tax, where available or converted using the exchange rate on the day the magazine went to press.

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

Welcome

For this issue we welcome a whole lot of new readers; this is the first official issue where we are taking Definition to Hollywood. Well, Cine Gear Expo to be exact, but how much more Hollywood could that be, with the Expo populating the backlot of Paramount Pictures? As you enter the gates you can see the bench that Forrest Gump sat on and mused over chocolates, to your right is the huge wall seen in The Truman Show, there’s Bronson Gate, and then you enter the New York City backlot where the show is based. Definition has been around for 15 years and for sale in the USA for only a year now, but maybe this part of LA is our spiritual home. This is where the art of production is cherished most in the world – not to denigrate other worldwide production hubs, but just for sheer numbers of productions, it’s hard to argue with. If you’re going to the Expo please look out for us; hopefully you won’t be able to miss us. Pick up a Slush Puppie when you pick up an issue and stay for a chat. We’ll see you there.

JULIAN MITCHELL EDITOR @DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


definition_June.indd 4

04/05/2018 16:57


05

24 TITLE SEQUENCE 06 ALL THE FUN OF THE FAIR ITV announces Vanity Fair drama.

NEWS 08 CINE GEAR EXPANDING

The laid back Cine Gear expo in Hollywood is expanded to Georgia.

12 CINE GEAR PREVIEW

If you’re going to this great show take a look at our selective preview.

12

38

SHOOT STORY 24 SUPER HEROES AND DATA Infinity War and Solo: A Star Wars Story needed massive data plans.

28 NEVER REALLY HERE

Director Lynne Ramsay’s first digital movie goes dark and shadowy.

38 WALK ON WATER

DOP Chris Probst retells his early experiences with RED Monstro.

FEATURES 42 BBC 2.0

42

Six months on from the TV Centre return, the BBC is now resurgent.

52 GEAR GROUP

Lighting is the leading the reinvention race, we have examples.

58 THE LOOK OF LENSES

We summarise some of the new lenses and formats this year.

70 SPACE RACE PART 2

85

We carry on the series which looks at new types of camera recording.

52

GEAR TESTS 76 DMG ROSCO MIX LIGHT

This new light mixes a unique user interface with high end lighting.

81 G-TECH SHUTTLE WITH 3

The Thunderbolt 3 version of this popular mobile storage product.

85 SONY A7 MKIII

The new version of Sony’s full framed camera handles better.

28 @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

90 4K CAMERA LIST

Keep up to date with the latest. @DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


06

Fun at the Fair As part of its autumn schedule ITV Drama is serialising Vanity Fair on a grand scale, with shooting in and around London

scene from ITV’s Vanity Fair, which airs this September. Pictured is from Episode 4 in which Becky Sharp is teaching Rawdon Crawley to dance, and a small crowd gathers to watch. Camera operator is Roger Tooley and his Steadicam is holding a RED Dragon camera with Panavision lenses.

Director is BAFTA winner James Strong and DOP is Ed Rutherford. Filming started in Budapest, with the shoot then continuing in locations in and around London. The series will premiere on the channel internationally before premiering as an Amazon Prime Exclusive in the USA.

IMAGE Becky Sharp (Olivia Cooke) in a seemingly reluctant embrace with Rawdon Crawley (Tom Bateman) on the sea front at Deale, Kent.


07 © 2018 ITV DRAMA


08

NEWS INTERVIEW

THE ATLANTA STORY

Cine Gear LA is the trade show that doesn’t feel like a trade show, but now Cine Gear Atlanta is beckoning. We get the low-down from Cine Gear’s Julianne Grosso

Definition: What do you attribute the continued success of Cine Gear to? Juliane Grosso, Cine Gear: People really seem to like the atmosphere and appreciate the fact that we hold a show about the industry in an industry landmark location. Every year brings high-quality industry professionals together. So vendors and professional filmmakers and tradespeople alike can reap the benefits. Our top-notch educational programme continues to get great

ABOVE Atlanta’s the place to be: Cine Gear is expanding in the ‘Southern Hollywood’.

PINEWOOD BRINGS TOGETHER THE BEST IN BENEFITS OF A EUROPEAN STUDIO AND AN AMERICAN COMMUNITY DEFINITION JUNE 2018

reviews year after year. Sales are made. Deals are struck. New tools of the trade are introduced. It’s friendly and fun and brings out the best in our industry. Def: What is different for Cine Gear 2018, are there more seminars for instance? JG: Every year we expand our show by adding more exhibitors, educational seminars and industry events. We try to stay up to date on technology advancements and invite industry influencers to help unveil and introduce it to the production world. Def: Tell me about the thinking of extending Cine Gear’s reach to Atlanta. JG: With the recent rise of production in Atlanta, and the rest of the south, we decided to explore an idea. We put the word out and started talking about it with our exhibitors

and regular guests. In addition, we received so many requests from vendors and crews that work in Atlanta who could not attend Cine Gear Expo Los Angeles due to work schedules. And many of our vendors who have offices in Atlanta have been requesting an event there for years. After weighing it all up it was pretty clear that a lot of industry professionals would benefit, so we decided to go for it. Def: How will the Atlanta show differ from the LA show? JG: Naturally Atlanta will start out as a smaller and younger sister show to the one in Los Angeles – more of a regional show to start. However, the quality of offerings and expertise will be the same and who knows with time, what it will turn into? After all, the original Cine Gear Expo started out as a social event and look at us now. DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


INTERVIEW NEWS

THIS PAGE Cine Gear is coming to town – all thanks to Atlanta’s growing attraction for productions.

Def: Detail the perfect person who will hopefully visit Atlanta for Cine Gear. JG: Like in Hollywood it will be working crew-members above and below the line of any department from shows shooting in the area and businesses that work for production. Plus, we envision professionals from nearby cities and possibly some folks from Europe that might find it easier to travel to and from Atlanta. Def: As Atlanta productions have huge crews that then disperse when the productions finish, how do you plan engaging as many crew as possible in the city for the show? JG: It is a small world and word travels fast. Like Cine Gear started in LA, we will contact folks through the local vendors, guilds, societies and other industry organisations. Our print and online ads are already starting to get the word out. We feel that when you have studios like Pinewood invest in an area like Atlanta it really shows that the locale has come into its own. Yes productions start and end just like they do everywhere. But now there is infrastructure there to keep them coming back.

Def: What has been the interest so far from your customers about the new show? JG: No one can deny that Atlanta is becoming the ‘Southern Hollywood’. With so many television and features filming, a huge filmmaking population is building and they are very excited about the prospect of Cine Gear Expo Atlanta. Def: Back to Cine Gear LA, what are the plans going forward for the show. Can you grow it even more? JG: The expo has been growing each year since it started, no reason to stop growing now, after all, it’s only natural.

09

Def: The rumour is that the show will move to Universal for next year due to occupancy in Paramount, is this true? JG: There is nothing to yet confirm about the next year’s site, but we have moved locations in the past. No one knows what the future holds.

WHY ATLANTA, GEORGIA IS BECOMING THE SOUTHERN HOLLYWOOD According to Georgia’s Department of Economic Development, “Georgia’s Entertainment Industry Investment Act provides a 20 percent tax credit for companies that spend $500,000 or more on production and post-production in Georgia, either in a single production or on multiple projects. 10 percent Georgia Entertainment Promotion (GEP) uplift can be earned by including an embedded Georgia logo on approved projects and a link to their website.”

Def: Where do you plan to hold Cine Gear Atlanta? What will that site offer? What does the city offer visitors? JG: We will be at one of the leading studios in the world: Pinewood. It brings together the best in benefits of a European studio and an American community. Atlanta itself is a diverse community with great food and a vibrant nightlife. @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


10

NEWS INTERVIEW

TOP NEW KIT COMES TO LONDON f you couldn’t make it to Las Vegas for a hands-on with all the new kit, then make sure you get to London to see all that’s hot in filmmaking. Now in its third year, The Media Production Show (MPS) takes place on 12-13 June 2018 at London Olympia, and is ideally timed for some of the biggest names in the industry to present their latest products, technologies and services, many in their first UK outing. Changing formats and standards are impacting on the way that content is acquired, moved and stored. UHD, HDR, ProRes Raw, the transition to IP workflows and so much more will be covered in the free seminar stream, as well as on the show floor. Top names including Panasonic, Ikegami, Canon, Avid, Cooke Optics, Fujinon, Sharp and Rotolight are in attendance with their latest equipment. Many of the UK’s leading resellers and distributors such as XTFX, CCK, Jigsaw24, Digibox, Holdan, Altered Images and Global Distribution will also have a vast array of kit to pore over. The free seminar programme is one of the highlights of the show and goes from strength to strength each

UHD, HDR, PRORES RAW, THE TRANSITION TO IP WORKFLOWS

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

ABOVE Get to London’s Olympia to see the latest products and technologies at The Media Production Show.

year. There are leading experts across production, post, broadcast and live production lining up to share their experiences and advice. The programme includes masterclasses from cinematographer Kate Reid, documentary filmmakers Ed Perkins and Jim Greayer, and wildlife cameraman Hecktor Skevington-Postles. On the audio side you can pick up tips on what sound editors and mixers need from sound editor and AMPS Fellow Chris Roberts, plus freelance dubbing mixer, ADR recordist and sound editor Emma Butt, and production sound mixer David Lascelles.

Some of the most innovative ideas can be seen by hunting out some of the smaller stands at the show. This is often where you will find a genius gadget or fledgling technology that is set to revolutionise the industry, or make production life a little easier. Register for your free pass and keep up with the news at: www.mediaproductionshow.com

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 11

04/05/2018 16:57


08

NEWS CINE GEAR

THE ONES TO WATCH

CINE GEAR EXPO 2018

Started last century but now evolved in to a cutting edge technical and educational event, Cine Gear is increasingly a ‘not to be missed’ event in the sunshine of LA ine Gear Expo first broke ground in 1996 and especially in the last few years has grown to become one of the premier events for the technology, entertainment and media industries. Cine Gear Expo attracts over 16,000 professionals from more than 60 countries over the annual four-day conference. For those that exhibit and those that visit, they know that this is a different type of trade show. Compared to the huge events like NAB in Las Vegas, Cine Gear is a laid back super-networking event out in the Californian sunshine in the glamorous setting of Paramount’s backlot. You could call Cine Gear’s an organic growth. The Expo was created by people from the industry not professional event organisers. The event is more about focussing on the needs of the community and

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

draws the most dedicated specialists from all major department including Digital Media, Film, Entertainment, Post Production, Virtual and Augmented Reality, Government and Military, Sports, Live Events and even the academic world. Initially the Paramount backlot was the home for the hardware but slowly less sunshine laden spaces have been needed for workflow software, monitors and other tech that isn’t sunshine friendly. But the meat of the Expo is still content capture hardware, support equipment and the latest production services. At its centre Cine Gear is a ‘try-out’ event and increasingly a ‘knowledge’ festival. Invitees get hands-on training, gain knowledge and skills from world technology leaders and network with peers all within a professional and comfortable studio environment. The Expo is winning plenty of friends.

ATTENDANCE AT CINE GEAR EXPO IS NOW AROUND 16000 AND GROWING ABOVE Cine Gear 2018 is again at the Paramount backlot.

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


CINE GEAR NEWS

13

1. ARRI

1

Celebrating its 101st year in the film business, ARRI will be showing its range of digital cameras including the new LF large format camera with the new range of Signature lenses that have been designed for exclusive use with the new camera. Also on show will be their new wireless system, high-end lenses, professional camera accessories and growing stable of lighting including the latest SkyPanel S360 LED light. Products include the ALEXA 65, ALEXA SXT, ALEXA Mini and AMIRA cameras, Master Anamorphic lenses and SkyPanel, L-Series and M-Series lights. A major new software update for the Skypanels will also be on show with updated FX and extended colour control. There is also a new stage mode with smooth dimming to zero. www.arri.com

2. BLACKMAGIC DESIGN

There was a time a few back that Blackmagic launched a new camera nearly every year, maybe those times are back as they have just updated their pocket cinema camera with a 4K version. The all new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K has a similar handheld form factor to its predecessor with full 4/3 HDR sensor, automatic dual native ISO with up to 25600 ISO for low light performance as well as a claimed 13 stops of dynamic range. The new camera is looking to eliminate external recorders, as it features a USB-C Expansion Port, this allows customers to record using the internal SD/UHS-II and CFast recorders or directly to the same external disks they will use for editing and colour correction. The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K will be available from Blackmagic Design resellers worldwide later this year for only US$1,295. www.blackmagicdesign.com

2

3. CANON

There is only one camera to see on the Canon stand at Cine Gear. That’s the new Canon C700 FF. The FF stands for full frame and we can welcome Canon in to this exclusive club. Being able to downsample in full-frame format with high frame rates is key to keeping the full-frame aesthetic with FF. Also the size of this full frame camera is significantly smaller than its competitors. Other products lined up to be displayed on the stand include the EOS C700, EOS C200 and a range of high-end lenses such as the CN E18-80mm T4.4L IS KAS S and CN-E70-200mm T4.4L IS cine-servo lenses, as well as professional reference display monitors. The EOS C200 is the first Cinema EOS camera to feature Cinema RAW light format. It’s been designed to take the complexity out of delivering high-quality footage, with benefits including an advanced AF system that provides reliability and accuracy when shooting 4K, and a high-quality LCD panel and Dual Pixel CMOS AF. www.canon.co.uk

3

4. COOKE

For over 100 years, Cooke has been at the centre of the filmmaking business. This is a company steeped in tradition that has been listening to the community it serves for generations, and while it’s hugely aware of its legacy it’s also remarkably forward looking and is constantly pushing the frontiers of technology to offer new and innovative products. On the stand at Cine Gear will be one of these, /i Technology, which enables film and digital cameras to automatically record key lens data for every frame shot and provide it to post-production teams digitally, a process that is invaluable to post-production teams and which greatly speeds up the editing process. Visitors will be able to handle and experience the likes of Cooke S7/i Full Frame Plus and Cooke Panchro/i Classic prime lenses, Cooke S4/i, Cooke Anamorphic/i, Anamorphic/i SF (‘Special Flare’ - pictured) optics and the Cooke S4/i and miniS4/i lenses with and without coatings. www.cookeoptics.com

4

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


14

NEWS CINE GEAR

5

7

6

8

5. CW SONDEROPTIC

CW Sonderoptic will be demonstrating three new focal lengths of super large format Leica Thalia lenses for the Cine Gear crowds in LA. The 24mm, 55mm, and 120mm lenses bring the set to nine lenses that offer character-rich and emotional images on any camera from Super35 to Full Frame and beyond. The lenses will soon be available in ARRI’s LPL mount as well. Also on display will be the full Leica M 0.8 series of iconic, compact, high-speed lenses. Now a set of nine lenses, from 21mm f/1.4 to 90mm f/2.0, the M 0.8 series offer a look with some vintage characteristics like field fall off and flare quality. CW is delivering a mount to allow use of the lenses on ARRI’s Alexa Mini and Amira cameras. A mount for RED cameras is already available and a mount for the new Sony Venice camera is in development. cw-sonderoptic.com

6. DUCLOS

Duclos Lenses is a great destination for high quality motion picture lens service, sales and accessories. It’s a quality service to the industry’s professionals who own and rent top-of-the-line cinema optics. They also have the test equipment and experience required to optimise and maintain all of your lenses. It’s a family owned and operated business who not only appreciate and respect customers in a way only a small business could, but also thrive off of our customers satisfaction and repeat business. The Duclos Lenses booth will be showcasing it’s brand new Duclos 1.7x Expander, as well as their line of professional motion picture lens accessories and solutions. A brand new array of optics designed from the ground up, the Duclos 1.7x Expander effectively increases the image circle of the taking lens, providing a narrower field of view while maintaining resolution throughout the field. www.ducloslenses.com DEFINITION JUNE 2018

7. FUJIFILM

Fujifilm UK is showcasing its entire range of cine lenses, which cover all types of shooting, from high-end cinema down to independent documentary. The PL-Mount Premier HK lenses are the ultimate cine zoom lenses, with super-fast T-stops and a generous range of focal lengths. Meanwhile the Cabrio ZK and XK series are also PL-mount lenses and are ideal where smaller, lighter lenses might be preferable, or where you need a lens with a huge variety of focal lengths all in one package. Finally, weighing less than 1kg each and boasting T2.9 throughout, the E-Mount MK lenses bring all the quality and character of the Fujinon Premier and Cabrio lenses to an entirely new audience of independent production and emerging filmmakers. Also on the stand will be a GFX medium-format stills camera with a full range of GF lenses, and visitors are very welcome to come along for a demonstration. www.fujifilm.com

8. LEE FILTERS

Lee Filters ProGlass Cine range of neutral-density filters has been designed to meet the needs of all cinematographers — whether shooting digitally or on film. They are very neutral, eliminating infrared pollution and ensuring all colours remain accurate and true. This simplifies workflow, saves time and enables cinematographers to focus on their creative goals. Martin Fuhrer, BSC — Director of Photography commented. “I recently got the opportunity to test the new LEE Pro Glass Cine IRND’s in snowy mountain landscapes. I was extremely impressed by the true stop every ND gave me throughout the whole range right up to ND2.1 Every time I changed the filter I deliberately preset the stop to check the accuracy and it was always spot on without fail.” www.leefilters.com DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


16

NEWS CINE GEAR

9

9. NBCUNIVERSAL LIGHTBLADE

10

10. MOTION IMPOSSIBLE

11

The LightBlade LB800 is the latest professional lighting tool from NBCUniversal in partnership with Cineo. The LB800 represents the latest technological advances within the LightBlade product line, with new features and even greater flexibility. Like all LightBlade fixtures, the LB800 uses proprietary phosphorconverted white light LEDs, as well as phosphor-converted saturated colour LEDs. These work together to create a balanced, naturallooking spectrum featuring Cineo’s deep-red colour rendering technology. The saturated colour LEDs use the exact same dies as the white LEDs, so all light emitting elements of the LightBlade products carry identical thermal stability and perform over time with consistent colour quality. Additional features include support of both 8-bit and 16-bit DMX data, as well as multiple colour space personalities. LightBladeLed.com Set up in August 2014 by BAFTA award-winning cameraman Rob Drewett and experienced product design engineer Andy Nancollis, Motion Impossible (MI) is an equipment manufacturer and production company that has as its remit a passion to create new and innovative ways to move cameras in film, TV and 360° VR. The company is the creator of the Mantis Dolly system, which moves and stabilises VR/360º and film cameras, and MI’s filming side, MI Films. At the show they will be showing their new Agito platform. Whilst the Mantis has already made its mark within the VR/360° market, Motion Impossible has made it its mission to continue the development of the product for the broadcast market. This has culminated in the launch of Agito – a robotic dolly system that can make recordable moves on the ground. motion-impossible.com

11. MY CASE BUILDER

If only there was a service where you could design your own foam for a new case or even just buy the foam as you have a case already or design a piece of foam with exact measurements. My Case Builder is offering just that with their own online App but you’re not restricted to using their App, you can get them to import your technical drawings. You can also choose what foam you want, whether it’s black PE foam (polyethylene) or charcoal ester foam (polyurethane) this one’s best for delicate light item where PE foam is more dense. You can even choose what cutting method is best for your case. Water jet cut, knife cut, die cut and wire cut are the methods, it depends what you want your case for. My Case Builder will even design your case foam for you and of course they sell cases as well. www.mycasebuilder.com

12. PAG

12

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

def-june18-012-020 (cine gear) v2 NEW.indd 16

PAG will spotlight its unique and revolutionary intelligent linking batteries for high-end cameras and accessories. PAGlink is one of the industry’s most technologically advanced portable power system, available in V-Mount and Gold Mount formats. Linking batteries combines capacities for longer run-time and a higher current draw (12A) - ideal for powering a camera and multiple accessories simultaneously. The 150Wh PL150 battery offers 50% more capacity than the 96Wh PL96, with no increase in size. Two linked PL150s provide 300Wh. PAGlink means no more time-wasting camera reboots on set. Linked battery charging, developed by PAG, is more efficient and results in smaller, travel-friendly chargers, such as the new pocket-sized Micro Charger. PowerHub is a power distribution plate for camera accessories. It is used sandwiched between 2 PAGlink batteries. PowerHub is smarter than built-in battery D-Taps because it lets you choose the outputs: D-Tap, Lemo, Hirose or USB, and it keeps accessories powered-up when you hot-swap batteries. paguk.com DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM

24/05/2018 10:07


definition_June.indd 17

04/05/2018 16:57


18

NEWS CINE GEAR

13

15

14

16

13. PANASONIC

Cine Gear Expo 2018 will see Panasonic display the latest innovations in film and TV production. Panasonic will showcase the full VariCam line-up – the flagship VariCam 35, the compact VariCam LT and the VariCam Pure, which provides 4K uncompressed Raw at up to 120fps, all of which can be configured to meet a variety of production scenarios. In 2017 a number of productions shot with VariCam aired, including ITV Studios’ The Moorside in the UK and The Deuce for HBO. The VariCam is also proving popular with Netflix, with productions including Orange is the New Black and Master of None all being shot with the VariCam series. The recently launched AU-EVA1 will also be on show. Thanks to its newly-developed 5.7K Super 35mm sensor, dual-native ISO sensitivity and lightweight design, EVA1 fulfils a wide range of run-and-gun and handheld shooting styles. www.panasonic.com

14. PANAVISION

Panavision is one of the leading camera rental facilities in the world. Dedicated to supporting the future of film, the company provides service to features, TV, commercials and music videos. Panavision is dedicated to growing and supporting the future of cinematography with new products and innovations, and at this year’s Cine Gear it will be showcasing its latest technologies, including new products from its camera, lens and grip departments. Focusing on 8K large format, the DXL 2 will be on display and available for demos. Visitors will be offered the opportunity to shoot with newer, wider focal lengths from the range of T Series anamorphic lenses, which offer a large sweet-spot and closer focus. Meanwhile Grip and Remote Systems will be demonstrating the revolutionary SuperTechno 75, with motorised base and triple telescopic column. panavision.com DEFINITION JUNE 2018

15. P+S TECHNIK

P+S TECHNIK will show their anamorphic lens series ‘Evolution 2X’ as well as their scope of lens rehousing to visitors of Cine Gear Expo 2018. “NAB Show 2018 showed us already that the demand for anamorphic lenses is still increasing”, says MD Anna Piffl. “We are ready to provide professional solutions here while keeping in mind larger sensors.” Since 2017 they have delivered the Evolution 2X anamorphic lenses (for S35 format). Over 100 lenses with the focal length 40mm, 50mm, 75mm and 100mm have already been delivered. The success of the Evolution 2X lenses, which are matching the look of the original KOWA, encouraged them to make the 135mm a perfect match. The 135 mm has new front anamorphic elements, to reach the light intensity and a compact design. www.pstechnik.de

16. QUASAR SCIENCE

In just a few years, Quasar Science has become an essential brand within the Motion Picture and Photography Industry. With the rise of RGB-enabled fixtures, this Lighting Technician created company has been working on its own full colour system, ‘RGBX’. This five colour mixing system adds high output RGB diodes to Quasar’s Crossfade 2000k and 6000k white light diode set to produce both high quality broad spectrum tunable white light, and bright ultra-saturated narrow spectrum colour. The first fixture in the lineup to utilise RGBX is the new Rainbow Linear LED Light. This slender, high output light source is ideal for everything from 3 point lighting setups to assembling massive arrays and large area lighting rigs. Unbeatable in tight spaces, the self-ballasted Rainbow comes in 600mm 1200mm and 2400mm lengths. Digital control interface, Wireless and wired DMX connect, Lead/Follow mode, Auxiliary DC input, Onboard FX, and much more. www.quasarscience.com DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 19

04/05/2018 16:57


20

NEWS CINE GEAR

17

17. RED

Red Digital Cinema will be showing their range of cameras and sensors. The company has settled on a hardware solution with the DSMC2 Weapon body now carrying their 8K sensors as well as a new sensor called Gemini. Aptly named as Gemini has an automatic dual sensitivity. The Gemini was designed to shoot in space so has this low-light ability but the company wanted to evolve the camera for more normal lighting conditions. It’s a S35mm sensor with a 5K performance and will be able to take advantage of the Weapon hardware and shoot Redcode RAW as well at the same time Apple ProRes or AVID’s DNxHD/HDR. The new camera forms part of the Red Epic-W range and is available online from red.com. www.red.com

18. SCHNEIDER

18

Visit the Schneider-Kreuznach booth at Cine Gear Expo and you’ll be able to find out more about the company’s extensive lens and filter portfolio. Learn how to handle new filter lines like the Radiant Soft or RHOdium Full Spectrum ND, and find out how it’s possible to tell your story in a new emotional, sensational or technical way.
 This is also a golden opportunity to get hands on with the highly innovative Xenon FF-Prime Cine-Tilt, which has just been voted best prime lens in our sister title Pro Moviemaker’s Gear of the Year Awards 2017. Unleash the focus with the first dynamic tiltable lens set and pay attention to the creamy and organic out-of-focus areas of the six-lens Xenon FF-Prime set. Schneider works closely with DOPs to provide great and useful tools to create individual possibilities of storytelling, so go along and say hello and find out what the company might be able to do for your business. schneiderkreuznach.com/en

19. TERADEK

19

20

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

At Cine Gear 2018, Teradek will be showcasing the latest in zero-delay wireless video systems: the Bolt XT. Completely reimagined, the XT combines great wireless performance with smart design to give cinematographers incredible flexibility on set. Real-time 1080p60 video offers pristine image quality, and powerful software features like a built-in 5GHz spectrum analyzer and 3D LUTs allow professionals to monitor the feed with complete confidence. The Bolt XT receiver features a newly-integrated NATO rail, while the transmitter includes an ARRI Pin-Loc for fast and easy mounting on set. Available battery plates include Gold or V-mount for the Bolt 1000/3000 XT, as well as Sony L-series or Canon LP-E6 plates on the Bolt 500 XT. Bolt XT is compatible with all 3rd-gen Bolt 500, 1000 and 3000 models, as well as 703 Bolt, 10K, and Sidekick II units. teradek.com

20. ZEISS

At Cine Gear this year Zeiss will be showcasing a large portfolio of full-frame lenses, including the Cinema Zoom CZ.2 range and new Compact Prime CP.3 XD range. Thanks to their interchangeable mounts and full-frame coverage, these lenses are believed by many filmmakers to be as close as it’s possible to get to the ultimate futureproof investment. The Zeiss Cinema Zoom lenses feature exquisite optics in a robust, durable package. Affordable, flexible and offering the highest quality, the Zeiss Cinema Zoom lenses are an invaluable addition to any film set. Meanwhile the new Zeiss CP.3 and CP.3 XD lenses offer the perfect combination of high image quality and reliable usability. They exhibit the clean, crisp characteristics Zeiss is known for, together with ground-breaking lens data technology in the XD versions, designed to speed-up and simplify the workflow on set and in post-production. www.zeiss.com DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 21

04/05/2018 16:57


22

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE PRO AV

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE FOCUS As Canon enters the full-frame cinematic world with the new C700 FF camera, Pro AV organised a full demo day to introduce the new model and format

en years ago Canon introduced a full-frame stills camera that shot video – the video world promptly turned on its axis. Shooters wanted the full framed 5D Mark II look so much they would forgive the camera’s video shortcomings like its lock-in to 30p and its total lack of focusing and exposure aids. Also the way it ‘binned’ pixels to produce a H.264 file was brutal and a H.264 post route wasn’t workable.

BELOW Director and DOP Brett Danton with the new Canon C700 FF.

Now the professional video world is more legitimately investigating full-frame or largeformat cinematography. Pro AV is at the forefront of this new era for cinematography with the introduction of Canon’s latest full frame camera, the C700 FF (as in ‘full frame’). To show customers exactly what the FF might mean for them, Pro AV’s Hemel Hempstead branch threw open its doors after it secured one of the only C700 FFs available in the world. PRO AV ADVICE Nick Millen from Pro AV explained the excitement of the new fullframe camera. “The C700 FF is the most economical entry into this burgeoning large-format club and interestingly the camera trumps a lot of the others in terms of spec. Being able to downsample in full-frame format with high frame rates is key to keeping the full-frame aesthetic. Also the size of the camera is significantly

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

THE C700 FF IS THE MOST ECONOMICAL ENTRY INTO THIS LARGE-FORMAT CLUB smaller than its competitors.” This is an important point for people who are eyeing up this new format market. You can achieve the full frame at the full resolution of 5.9K, but you can also have a 4K from the full frame or even a 2K from the full frame. Other cameras require a crop of your image. As the experts at Pro AV also reminded us, Canon has all its glass, which is large-format ready if you choose the Cinema range or maybe the L Series range. You could look at the new CN-E20mm T1.5 L F, which has been designed with the C700 FF DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


PRO AV ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

23

camera in mind. The L Series glass is there if you want a special shot as you have focal lengths from 11mm to 800mm. With the wide nature of the new sensor at 38mm you also can look to anamorphic use, and indeed, at Pro AV, there were Cooke /i Technology lenses available to open the camera out to more character lenses and the emotional world of anamorphics. FOCUS IS THE WORD At their large-format open day, Pro AV designed their set with a number of elements in mind to demonstrate to their high-profile clientele the benefits of the new FF camera. By far the most important was the increased need for careful focus with large-format cinematography. The set therefore thrust lights in front of the camera to layer a shot through to the scooter and dining tables behind it. Play with the FF’s focus and you could easily produce some beautiful bokeh moments, but then imagine those moves with a fast lens wide open and how you would then deal with the focus issues. Canon’s ace up its sleeve for the new camera is its widely accepted Dual Pixel autofocus system. In the movie and high-end drama world the phrase autofocus is almost unheard of, with focus pullers evolving their art with hugely technical systems that currently involve

placing sensors on actors to improve their electronic focus systems. Pro AV’s experts explain: “The preconception of autofocus by highend cinematographers is based on the legacy of autofocus using contrast. The only way that system knows it is sharp is to go beyond the point of maximum contrast and gives you an image that hunts. Canon’s Dual Pixel system doesn’t use that and is based on phase difference. Every pixel is split into two, the left eye and the right eye and the processor works out the phase difference between each half of the pixel and then determines whether the lens needs to be driven towards infinity or to near focus to achieve the maximum sharpness. It can do that dynamically thousands of times per second so as your subject moves, if you’re in autofocus, the lens can move to track. There’s no other system that has the same level of sophistication or accuracy.” One of the high-end crew at the C700 FF demo day was director and DOP Brett Danton. He is sure that Canon’s Dual Pixel technology will win many people over from the movie and high-end drama world. “It’s crazy to know that this type of autofocus is achievable, if you’re going to monitor the 5.9k down sample in HD then you might have a problem seeing focus, with the Dual Pixel system you have this amazing eye tracking ability that should really help – at the end of the day it’s going to all about the focus but also the conversion of crew to this technology.”

ABOVE The new remote panel for the Canon C700 FF.

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

TOP AND ABOVE Pro AV held a full-frame open day to introduce users to the format and to the Canon C700 FF.

MORE INFORMATION:

www.proav.co.uk

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


24

SHOOT STORY INFINITY WAR

Beyond Infinity As the number of Super Heroes and Star Wars films increase so does the camera data WORDS JULIAN MITCHELL IMAGES DISNEY

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


INFINITY WAR SHOOT STORY

f you're even a little bit invested in the MCU, Marvel Cinematic Universe for all you non-believers, you would have already seen Infinity War and maybe more than once. The idea here in play is basically more - more action, Super Heroes, plot twists, deaths (sorry) and of course cameras and camera data. As I write this, the film is touching on a billion dollars income worldwide and we’re not even passed a week yet. Everything is maxed out in the MCU. We’re also on the edge of the newest Star Wars movie, Solo: A Star Wars Story. Shot again with the ARRI Alexa 65 by DOP Bradford Young but this time with ARRI’s Prime DNA lenses. Infinity War was shot with Panavision's Ultra 70 series. Bradford was poetic with his love for the ARRI glass on Solo, “Lenses and format have to be ready to adapt to my particular taste. DNA glass is a revelation and revolution in my journey to anchor my artistic residue into a particular story – truly my way of seeing, thus my way of feeling. No other glass has afforded me this opportunity. It’s a true gamechanger!” Marvel has always been big fans of the ARRI Alexa 65 look and lens choice, it’s the biggest camera sensor out there after all. They demand of their suppliers like Pinewood Digital that the amount of data is dealt with, that’s over 30MB per frame and of course with digital you always shoot more than you need. Pinewood have been here before and well versed in scaling up what they already have. That mainly means more ways to transport and receive the data and then to process the data and pass it on, it’s a data factory. But ironically beating that 30MB per frame is the way Pinewood manage their film scans which now come out at over 100MB per frame being scanned at 4K 16-bit. The great thing for Pinewood here was that much of the shooting was done at Pinewood Atlanta so having control of the process inside their own studios made it that much easier, it was just more data than they had ever processed before. 65 THE MAGIC NUMBER Here are some interesting facts that show that the Alexa 65 is doing its bit to keep cinema alive. The 65 now has 72 feature film credits in three years, with 41 of them using Alexa 65 as the main unit 'A' camera. Also since @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

1950 there have been roughly 160 theatrically released 70mm films of which Alexa 65 now accounts for 33%. Since Alexa 65's inception 70mm analogue film production has also grown, illustrating an overall growth in the larger format in general. Also Ant-man and the Wasp is also using Alexa 65 and ARRI DNA lenses and there’s a new Spiderman movie coming next year. As the number of large format cameras increase you may think that productions would look elsewhere for their new camera aesthetic especially as the number of lenses out there are huge now. But if you have seen previous Alexa 65 productions like The Revenant or Rogue One: A Star Wars Story you will appreciate the medium format look and that shallow depth of field that someone at Marvel and LucasFilm is so in love with. So who is the winner here? Probably ARRI Rental as Infinity War’s main camera unit shot with 14 Alexa 65s and the other unit shot with nine. For Infinity War nearly half the Alexa 65 cameras in existence were in use. Hold on, weren’t there only around 30 cameras in the whole world! “That day was the biggest on-set data shoot ever,” commented Thom Berryman from Pinewood Digital, “The biggest day that we had was getting on for 40 TeraBytes for the two units. But we had planned for this as we could see there were

25

ABOVE The latest

Star Wars, Solo, shot on the Alexa 65 camera and used the ARRI DNA lenses.

LEFT Infinity War at

one point used 23 Alexa 65 cameras across two units.

THE BIGGEST DATA DAY WE HAD WAS GETTING ON FOR 40 TERABYTES FOR THE TWO UNITS JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


26

SHOOT STORY INFINITY WAR

WE HAD TO MOVE 40TB A DAY TO THE MARVEL DATA CENTRE IN LAS VEGAS going to be some very data heavy days quite far out. We were able to plan with Marvel and then push through some huge capital expenditure and buy multiple SANs. We then operated a new workflow where we had to run two SANs simultaneously which were striped together to deal with the amount of data for rendering and playback. 40 TeraBytes became 80 TeraBytes in the processing which seems a strange way of going about things, the last thing you’d expect to do when you have more data than you’d ever had before is to double it. But that worked out quite well for us.” The cameras did record to Codex recorders and the production did have four Codex Vaults but all they used those for was for off-loading data in to their system. “So DITs and data wranglers on-set were passing transfer drives to us which we ingested. When we were in Atlanta and they were shooting on the stages there were deliveries of drives twice a day. We also have a 4K DCI screening room and the Directors, the Russo brothers, came over at wrap to review the morning’s rushes.” LAS VEGAS WRINKLE The workflow at Pinewood Atlanta was going very well from the theory of the new workflow to the way transfer drives were being ingested,

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

but Marvel forgot to tell them a certain extra step. “We actually had to move the data every day across the country to a data centre in Las Vegas. We had a 10GB connection between our facility and this data centre and were sending up to 40

ABOVE Apart from Infinity War being shot and processed, there were other films going through Pinewood.

TeraBytes a day across to them, Marvel store all of their own digital negatives there and then use it for VFX pulls.” It was lucky that Pinewood had that connection so they could put the media in the right place on the other side of the country. Pinewood were also managing the grading of the dailies and the archiving to LTO tape. What was different about this production was that they were dealing with other films’ productions at the same time, this is the MCU after all and other films like Guardian of the Galaxy 2 and Black Panther were also in the system or parts of them were. Edits and VFX approval was needed by the other side of the country from the executives in Atlanta. To come are Ant-man and the Wasp which is still in production and the new Spiderman movie is starting up as well as a new Avengers production. If you’ve seen Infinity War you will recognise the beautiful city of Edinburgh in some of the scenes. Pinewood had to pack up their technology and take it on the road to Scotland from Atlanta. To deal with the location Pinewood had to take over a whole floor of a hotel in the city, this couldn’t be any hotel but one that had doors big enough to fit it all in. Amazingly everything was managed on location to duplicate what people were used to in Atlanta. Everything but the Las Vegas centre transfers which were handled by sending LTO tapes to Atlanta and then on to Vegas. DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 27

04/05/2018 16:57


28

SHOOT STORY YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

In Plain Sight It’s a testament to the creatives involved in You Were Never Really Here that a warped time frame produced such a great looking film WORDS JULIAN MITCHELL IMAGES WHY NOT PRODUCTIONS ot the most prolific director, Lynne Ramsay last made a full-length movie in 2011 (the horror-parenting film We Need to Talk About Kevin). Back then the gear list almost encapsulated the period setting with Panaflex Millenium and Platinum film cameras with C and E series lenses, and an appearance from Canon’s 5D Mk II DSLR, which was the digital camera of the moment. Her and DOP Tom Townend’s initial feeling for You Were Never Really Here was 35mm and anamorphic lenses – that’s until the accountant got involved and the ARRI Alexa, with a myriad of glass, became the more affordable choice. “I wanted to persuade Lynne that digital could easily emulate film and the only difference between the two was that the camera wouldn’t have a mag of film on the top of it.” That film-to-digitalconversion conversation was commonplace around five years ago, but Tom still fields the ‘I want to make it look like film’ question all the time when shooting on digital. However, Tom reckons that digital is 80% of what he shoots now. “Lynne was resistant to the idea initially because it was not what she was used to. We actually shot a test on Kodak 500T film alongside the Alexa, day and night, just on a street corner and took that into a grading suite to really prove that the look of 35mm could be emulated, and we added grain as well. That satisfied Lynne and I promised her there was no difference in working practice. As it happened, of course you don’t have to re-load every ten minutes and the camera will keep on rolling, something that she really embraced. It suited her and Joaquin Phoenix to shoot without

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

interruption just to see what would happen. I think she mildly regretted it when she came to the edit. If she’d had the discipline of film imposed on her the natural breaks would’ve come with that. “From my point of view I don’t treat them differently from each other, I meter everything, but interestingly 800 ASA on a light meter does not automatically translate into the correct exposure as it should be on the Alexa. Why that is I don’t know. It’s a guide at any rate. We only ever had one monitor on set which was Lynne’s and my monitor, and I would occasionally look just for some sort of assurance of what it was we were shooting. “The ARRI Alexa was a budgetary decision that was foisted on us from on high. The production happened very quickly so there weren’t many decisions made on the look we wanted. I’ve known Lynne for twenty years, in fact she was leaving film school just when I was joining. In no time at all we were scouting for locations so in a way the discussion was not so much about a look but more about, does this location work for both our needs? There was no obvious reference film we both wanted to emulate, it just kind of happened, and it happened so quickly that there wasn’t time to do the usual navel gazing as you usually do in big productions. I think this had to do with how well Lynne and I know each other.” The quickness of the production decisions were down to lead actor Joaquin Phoenix, who initially couldn’t do the movie but then had a hole in his schedule – only if the film could start almost immediately. The novella the film is based on describes Phoenix’s character as someone who is hiding

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE SHOOT STORY

29

LEFT Joaquin Phoenix showed admirable lack of vanity, and was not concerned by how he was lit.

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


30

SHOOT STORY YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

in plain sight, looking completely anonymous and blending in with his surroundings. “When you’re filming someone walking along the street they’re obviously the focus of the shot and there is no real way of making them blend in with their surroundings, and I guess an equivalent of that is to keep them in shadow. One of the really liberating things was having a lead actor who doesn’t really have any vanity. There was never a question of presenting him in his best light, he simply didn’t care. A lot of the time Lynne encouraged the fact that his face would be in shadow, it would help the story as you wouldn’t know what was going on with the guy.” HAPPY ‘LOCATION’ ACCIDENTS The film was around 90% location shooting; the only builds had to do with tax relief. “They were a couple of builds, which was one way of accessing the tax break money that New York offers if you occupy stage space for two days out of your production. As it happened there were a couple of scenes that it made sense to build rather than to look for a location. “A fair portion of the film is night exterior and that look was further dictated by what resources we had. DEFINITION JUNE 2018

We had to go with what was there and then build on that. It was really a case of finding a location and seeing if it worked. For instance, there was an office location on the second floor of this building and we knew that we wouldn’t be able to light through the windows, so it became a scheduling issue more than anything else – could we guarantee we would be able to shoot the scene during certain hours of the day and not get stuffed by the sun going down, things like that. So it was all kind of pragmatic, but there were happy accidents along the way – there’s a scene in a spa, and when we first went to look at it we knew we needed a single light bulb (in the script it described a single light bulb dissolving through to a midday sun

IT WAS ALL KIND OF PRAGMATIC, BUT THERE WERE HAPPY ACCIDENTS ALONG THE WAY ABOVE Judith Roberts shares a scene with her screen son Joe (Phoenix). BELOW Night

shoots took advantage of New York’s potentially tricky ambient light.

in another location). When we got there it was indeed a single light bulb, but it was one of those super blue energy-saving light bulbs. We liked the fact that a sauna or spa was a very intense, cold blue colour; we liked the fact that it was not what you’d expect. When we shot there we just added blue lighting, which was fun to do.” Night scenes in a 24-hour city like New York are always going to be difficult to shoot with the high ambient light spillage, but then perhaps useful to avoid noise from pushing the sensor. “I never went above 1280 ISO but that was really just to get a healthier stop. I had no desire to shoot anamorphic to really test the mettle of the focus department. If I gave them a 2.8/4 split at night, that seemed a better bet than shooting wide open. A lot of the lenses we were using just wouldn’t perform at below 2.8 anyway. “It was an alphabet soup of lens choices. Panavision Anamorphic DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 31

04/05/2018 16:57


32

SHOOT STORY YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

lenses with a mixture of C-series, a couple of E-series and then AL Series. It wasn’t a huge set of lenses but we carried two 50mm and a couple of 75mm lenses, only because the C series in those focal lengths have nice characteristic and flare. But the ALs, which were much bigger and heavier, didn’t have any of the slight aberrations or slightly weird focus drop-offs across the frame. Depending on the situation, I would go for the well-behaved lens or the ill-disciplined one.” Tom’s locations sometimes didn’t help with close focus on the anamorphics but he used a 55mm macro lens – it was even inscribed on the lens that it was ‘eye focus only’, as in ‘don’t trust the focus scale’. “That was an invaluable lens on certain occasions when we wanted to be close but also relatively wide angle.” CAMERA MOVEMENT Tom’s usual mode of transport for his camera is a dolly, even if he’s only using it as a tripod substitute, mainly as it’s so much easier to adjust the height. In fact, the first AD on the shoot named Tom’s type of camera movement as ‘heavy camera’. “This mainly meant that it was pretty firmly bolted to the ground for most of the time and it only ever panned

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

THE MOVIE BUILDS THE NARRATIVE WITH VISUALS

ABOVE Most of the

movie was filmed on location, with built sets used for a couple of interiors. BELOW Ekaterina

Samsonov plays Nina, who becomes a key part of Joe's story.

if it needed to. That was sort of the style just because Lynne isn’t a fan of hugely choreographed shots, and also just the way the scenes were played out. It didn’t make much sense to plan anything elaborate because things would change on the day. There are a couple of Steadicam shots and a couple of handheld shots but that’s about it. We did have a 30-foot Technocrane locked off but it was the only way to get the camera in to its position, as we had to go over the property of someone who wouldn’t give us a permit. We just parked the base of the crane in a backyard and hoisted the camera over.”

The movie is very light on dialogue scenes and so builds the narrative with the visuals. For a DOP this can be good news as you’re not setting up return shots, which take time. “It was a quiet set most of the time – you could only have the lead actor in the room, quite often you’d set a frame and then see what would happen.” The lighting design didn’t call for any type of separate design for Joaquin, partly because of his lack of vanity. Tom would start with where the light would naturally be coming from, which is easy when you have windows but didn’t help when

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 33

04/05/2018 16:57


34

SHOOT STORY YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

people decided to have their backs to those windows, “Even then I would try and make it realistic, I didn’t use any filtration at all and there was no great need with the lenses we used. Some of the flaring actually acts as its own diffusion. Having someone who is not concerned with how they’re being lit is pretty liberating because it meant I could bounce light off the floor to get it in to his face, which some people would object to but in this instance nobody was complaining. Also there was no imperative to always see the actor’s eyes or have an eye-light or anything like that. But we had the usual tools, so if you needed a single source coming through the windows we would have an 18K and bounce it off an Ultra Bounce or something like that. I did try to keep the lamps out of the room as much as possible, just

I COULD BOUNCE LIGHT OFF THE FLOOR TO GET IN TO HIS FACE, WHICH SOME PEOPLE WOULD OBJECT TO DEFINITION JUNE 2018

because they would disturb the spirit of the set a little bit. Also, they were pretty small rooms most of the time so you’d run out of elbow room fairly quickly. GRADING TIMELINE With actor Joaquin Phoenix suddenly being available, the film’s scheduling brought it into the realm of a showing at Cannes – that meant a grade at quite short notice (an understatement really, as there were still two days’ worth of shooting left before the grade even started). “Some scenes had deliberately not been shot in principle photography – they were the underwater scenes, as there was no tank facility in New York, and a couple of other scenes where Joaquin didn’t have a beard, which he had grown for a subsequent role. Lynne also wanted to work with Jean-Clement Soret at Technicolor as she had worked with him before, in fact that project was the only time she had experienced digital grading. Jean-Clement was available for five days and that was just before it was scheduled to go to Cannes with the edit still being fiddled with, and unfortunately I was away. So I ended up spending a day with JeanClement when we literally just went through the whole film, and would

TOP Brutal yet dreamlike, the film attracted rave reviews at Cannes. ABOVE Lynne Ramsay (director) and Tom work through creative decisions on set.

stop occasionally with me making a comment about the general look of any location, whether it should be a little bit darker, colder, that kind of thing. Pretty much ‘old school’ photo-chemical printing terminology, nothing to do with secondary power windows or anything like that.” Tom had worked with JeanClement many times anyway, so he wasn’t worried about what he could or couldn’t achieve. After Cannes, Tom and Jean-Clement went back to the film for another two days, “but at that point everyone had settled in to the look so there was no feeling to change much. I have to say that it doesn’t look hugely different from the dailies, but that’s doing Jean-Clement a disservice as it makes it sound DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 35

04/05/2018 16:57


36

SHOOT STORY YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

like he didn’t do anything, which isn’t true at all because of course there’s a huge amount of incredibly subtle balancing going on, especially when a sequence is cut and also just with the nature of the lenses we were using, changing from one focal length to another – you get different colours and different contrast values. All those little things really need to be ironed out, and I was more than happy to leave him to his own devices in that respect.” For Technicolor’s Jean-Clement, his first, pre-Cannes meeting covered balancing events such as lighting on location. “Sometimes you are caught out by the lack of light, or too much light. I reassured Tom that I could help or disguise that. After the film came back from Cannes it was a luxury to revisit it with Lynne and be able to change my mind about scenes. We changed a bit on the black and white sequence, adding more grain and pulsing to the camera, which Lynne supported and Tom explained how realistic that could be.” As Tom had mentioned earlier, Lynne was surprised how close they

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

could get to a film look having shot digitally. “I have graded thousands of projects, including film, and I could give her something as if she had been shooting on film. That really comes with experience, and if you’re careful not to crush blacks and keep highlights soft – some of the characteristic of film. Also how you reintroduce grain is of great importance: for instance, grain in the highlights is slightly more yellow and grain in the low lights is slightly more blue. You can then really fool your audience that the film was shot on film. “The minute Tom and Lynne came in to the room they said that they had wanted to shoot on film but weren’t able to, so that was the

ABOVE LEFT The

film contains little dialogue, so visuals did much of the heavy lifting.

ABOVE RIGHT Only

two interiors were built sets, to take advantage of New York tax breaks.

BELOW Phoenix and

Samsonov share a tense scene as the film’s plot begins to unfold...

PEOPLE WHO PERHAPS WANT MORE WARMTH AND HUMANITY USUALLY CHOOSE THE FILM LOOK brief. Interestingly, that request is something I hear a lot, still. But I think it depends on the projects. I work in advertising a lot and some projects which are sharp and hightech embrace the digital look; people who perhaps want more warmth and humanity usually choose the film look, and sometimes look to degrade the image to achieve that.” With some movies taking six weeks to grade, having two weeks really demanded that the group of creatives realised, from day one, what they wanted. This was the case with You Were Never Really Here, Jean-Clement again: “Lynne and Tom knew exactly what they wanted and came straight to the point, which is just the opposite to the advertising world where you need to see everything as you’ve only got 30 seconds, so need maximum impact. “The grade didn’t major on the power window-type work but there was a little tracking for stabilisation purposes; with a two-week window you have to tailor what you can do in post. Normally, you set the look for the first two weeks then adjust the details for the rest of the process.” DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 37

04/05/2018 16:57


38

SHOOT STORY EMINEM MUSIC VIDEO

Walk On Water

When a new camera comes on to the market we always like to find an early adopter: welcome DOP Chris Probst, RED Monstro 8K and Eminem WORDS JULIAN MITCHELL IMAGES RICH LEE

OP Chris Probst has been a keen user and observer of the RED camera since the RED One. He’s followed the often ‘hopscotch’ manner that the company launches its products with: new sensors followed by new bodies and then it’s the turn of another sensor. “I think the DSMC2 form factor is going to stick for a while; this is the Weapon body. The Monstro sensor is in fact the third one that has been put in there having had Dragon, then Helium before. “The body upgrades have improvements in processing performance and also form factor which is better for accessories and general ergonomics. They’re now at a really nice balance of speed, power, processing and size. But here we have DEFINITION JUNE 2018

Moore’s Law in practice with CMOS technology and that’s why they are able to launch new sensors every year and a half.” Chris has early adopter status with RED, and is treated well by the company with discounts and the chance to use new products before others can get their hands on them. This is why, when it came to shooting a video for Eminem, the Monstro 8K was an obvious choice: he’d been using it for months already, and felt familiar with the platform. Chris has received in the past thousands of dollars of discounts from RED on a sensor upgrade so that in effect the upgrade was free. This type of regular sensor upgrade is in opposition to say ARRI who have had the same sensor for their main

ABOVE Chris’s early adopter status meant that he got his hands on the Monstro months before others.

Alexa camera for the best part of nine years. It’s only now that the LF has appeared that these techniques which are compatible with full-frame or larger cinematography are appearing. SENSOR SUMMARY For RED users the regular updating of sensors and bodies might be frustrating and to a point confusing DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


EMINEM MUSIC VIDEO SHOOT STORY

39

I'M ACTUALLY USING LENSES THAT ARE 40 YEARS OLD ON THE EMINEM VIDEO

but Chris’s opinion is that RED are just keeping parity with what the technology is doing. “Dragon was a really great sensor being used in RED and Panavision’s DXL cameras; this was initially 6K but then up to 8K with a different cut. A lot of people are still shooting on Dragons. However, for Helium they were able to make manufacturing improvements for the photosite design. They were able to shrink the size of the photosites from 5 microns down to 3.6 microns and the result was less noisy, with more sensitivity and better dynamic range. That’s a improvement in performance. “For Monstro they went the other way; they took the improvements that they learned and instead of shrinking the sites as they did with Helium, @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

they made the Monstro sensor the pixel pitch of Dragon, which was five microns. What happens when you have a larger photosite is you have a bigger bucket that light can fall into. That increases sensitivity and dynamic range. For instance, the ARRI Alexa’s main sensor has a pixel pitch of eight microns which is two-and-ahalf times larger than the Helium. “The Monstro sensor has done something really remarkable. By keeping it at five microns and then offering 8K we get into this area that is beyond full-frame in the horizontal. Monstro is 40.96mm by 21.60mm so a little shorter than full-frame but a little wider, so they’re calling this a kind of VistaVision spec. That gives you some options though, as what happens is you start to

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

ABOVE Camera settings from the Eminem shoot with the Monstro 8K.

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


40

SHOOT STORY EMINEM MUSIC VIDEO

THE EARLIER I JUMP INTO NEW TECHNOLOGY THE BETTER IT IS FOR ME AS I’M AT THE FOREFRONT OF THIS NEW THING

straddle the line between almost full-frame and medium-format. That impacts not only the imaging but also the lens choices that will cover that. “When you get in to mediumformat, one of the things that people like about it is for the same equivalent field of view of say Super 35mm, you’d use an 80mm lens for a wide shot, whereas in Super 35mm that’s a close up. So you get the same field of view, that’s relative, but the compression you have, that exaggeration of perspective has changed. So you’re getting a relationship with the environment you didn’t get before with the compression, plus your depth-offield falls away quicker so you get that shallower depth-of-field with medium-format. So now we have a sweet spot in terms of lenses, we have a multitude of lenses that will cover the image circle of VistaVision or full-frame. These are lenses from the stills world and a lot of new lenses are coming out supporting these various gate dimensions for all these different digital cameras.” So we’re experiencing a renewed interest in vintage glass that has been DEFINITION JUNE 2018

VistaVision and all those formats. So that opens up a choice for me now; I’ve got lens coverage so that’s not an issue but what do I want to do for resolution and depth-of-field? “For me, medium-format is a mixed bag of nuts. You get this compression but also you’re at such a larger format that depth-of-field can become a struggle. But apart from that my feeling is that the earlier I jump into new technology the better it is for me as I’m at the forefront of this new thing. I can rent my cameras more and so they pay for themselves early on. Also with RED, early adopters are rewarded with better deals for the next one and other preferential treatment on the back end. Also I’m heavily invested in the technology so I can understand how it will benefit my work. Being informed about how these cameras function and not believing the marketing hyperbole is important.”

rehoused to work with full-frame or these various formats which are coming out. Companies like TLS in the UK are benefiting from this popularity and indeed Chris is already working with them to finetune their rehousing designs. SHOOTING IN THE WILD WEST All this new technology is in theory great but there are dangers to be aware of before you jump into the experimental water. “Ironically you may think you’re trailblazing with this larger sensor and the resolution but I’m actually using lenses that are 40 years old on the Eminem video. I have a set of rehoused Canon K35s that came out of the 1970s, but they are full-framed lenses so they cover

IMAGES Chris used a set of rehoused Canon K35 lenses on the Eminem shoot.

EARLY ADOPTER Chris’s familiarity with the platform and his thorough understanding of the technology is a big part of why the Monstro felt like a natural choice for Chris when he was shooting the video for Eminem. “All this technical stuff fades away into the background when I’m on set. I understand the parameters and they’re on my mind, but if I want to do something artistic or creative or solve a technical problem or a visual problem where for instance a VFX needs more resolution, I can fix that.”

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 41

04/05/2018 16:57


42

FEATURE BBC TELEVISION CENTRE

BBC 2.0

Television Centre in London enjoyed iconic status as the home of the BBC before the building was sold in 2012 and the Corporation moved out. Now the Beeb is back on site – and it’s 4K ready... WORDS JULIAN MITCHELL PICTURES STUDIOWORKS

BELOW AND LEFT The versatile new studio space at Television Centre is equipped to deal with a variety of programme types, from panel shows to sitcoms, from light entertainment to chat shows.

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

or those brought up in the UK, the BBC’s Television Centre was known as the place where the Corporation lived, where it made its programmes and where all the fun happened. The building was originally opened in 1960, and was the biggest TV production facility of its kind in the world at the time. The site has been undergoing major redevelopment works since 2012 when it was sold by the BBC to the property company, Stanhope plc. Last September, BBC Studioworks, a commercial part of the BBC, reopened three state-of-theart studios as well as post-production facilities on the site, to create the centrepiece of a newly transformed vibrant and creative media quarter in London’s White City. Now, the new broadcast facility is being used by broadcasters and independent production companies to make all kinds of content, in a versatile

environment boasting the latest in broadcast technology. There’s even room for a studio audience – should you need it! TC1 is the flagship studio at 10,800 square feet, with seating for 600. It’s fully 4K-ready, including 4K cameras and 4K glass (with a couple of minor tweaks it could produce a 4K show tomorrow) cabled in SDI and fibre for normal SDI workflows or IP-based workflows. All this fulfils Studioworks’ desire for a fully futureproofed studio. The other two studios are upgradable to 4K as well, with work, ensuring ‘a foot in both camps’ and not too much of a stretch for TC2 and TC3 to run 4K productions. Conversations with production companies about 4K productions have taken place, and, Studioworks say, ‘We’re ready when they are...’ 4K FUTURE PROOFING Television Centre’s audio and video

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


BBC TELEVISION CENTRE FEATURE

43

A VERSATILE ENVIRONMENT BOASTING THE LATEST IN BROADCAST TECHNOLOGY

routing required future-proofing to support 1080p50, UHD1 and other HDR formats, and emerging IP standards. Imagine Communications provided a Platinum IP3 routing platform solution across the three studios to enable the most challenging applications in a live production environment. The powerful signal routing, distribution and monitoring capabilities of Platinum IP3 have been selected to allow Studioworks to adopt any future technology innovations. The routing solution features one 28RU frame dedicated to Studio TC1, and one 28RU frame handling studios TC2 and TC3. In addition to Imagine Communications SDI routing for traditional HD contents, Sony provided the IP infrastructure, enabling 4K. Speaking about the technology fitout project, David Conway, managing director at Studioworks, said, “The broadcast infrastructure and kit we have selected needs to be robust and flexible to meet the demands of our customers. Having undertaken 18 months of customer consultations and technical evaluations, we believe we have established a technology ecosystem that meets our customers’ requirements both now and in the future.” For cameras, visions mixers and monitors, BBC Studioworks employed Sony’s ‘open standards’ approach to integrate 4K IP solutions with existing HD facilities, offering @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

optimum value and choice for incoming productions. Sony studio cameras, including HDC-4300’s and XVS switchers, and more than 200 monitors, including OLED screens, have been installed across the three TV studios. There is also a range of Fujinon lenses. Across the three studios, Television Centre provides over 22,000 square feet of shooting space as well as fantastic new postproduction facilities, all served by an array of flexible technical and support areas. The revamped TC1, TC2 and TC3 studios range in size, and can accommodate all genres and styles of programming, from sitcoms and panel shows, to major ‘shiny floor’ entertainment and event shows – live and pre-recorded. The facility now boasts a range of new technologies to the benefit of Studioworks’ clients, with major investments made in equipment ranging from the aforementioned 4K studio cameras and lenses, to the latest in gallery control desks. All this helps to make Television Centre an industry-leading production hub. FUJIFILM LONG TERM Elom Bell, the procurement manager from Studioworks, explained the technical situation they were in when looking for new gear for the studios. “It was a strange situation when we were re-equipping, as major formats like UHD and HDR were on the horizon so we had to employ a lot JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


44

FEATURE BBC TELEVISION CENTRE

of research. We spoke to BBC R&D and some BBC technical people to try and understand the direction of the broadcast market, and certainly 4K, but it also included IP and HDR workflows. We did many trips to trade shows and factories and got many products on demo. Fujinon was part of a wider process to try and understand the market. “Because of a challenging budget we needed to balance cost with quality. For us, looking at the Fujinon lenses helped us hit the cost point very well; we trialled some of their products for a few months in Elstree on all of our productions including A League Of Their Own and Strictly Come Dancing. We put the lenses on normal static cameras, on Steadicams, on jibs just to make

BELOW It wasn’t

just cameras that needed bringing up to date – so did mixing desks.

WE LOOKED AT EVERY CONCEIVABLE MANUFACTURER OF CAMERAS AND ALL THEIR SENIOR ENGINEERS CAME ALONG

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

sure that the freelance operators were happy with them. We got the thumbs up from everyone involved and while that was happening we put a tender out, and Fujinon were the successful bidder in the tender as well. That meant the balance of cost and quality for the procurement side was favourited, too. “We looked at every conceivable manufacturer of cameras and all the senior engineers from those manufacturers came along. We also had demonstrations for camera operators and lighting directors. It was a clean slate, really, and there was no competitive advantage to what we had used before. It was my job to consider all options and it wasn’t just based on cost – you’ve got to make sure you get the right quality as well. We’re talking equipment like vision mixers, broadcast monitors, audio desks, routing, comms systems – we took about a year researching before the tenders went out.” CAMERA TESTING When you already have sets or can build new ones easily it becomes easier to produce repeatable testing for equipment. This is exactly what

happened on a conventional set from soap opera Eastenders. “We lit that with new lights and shot it with new cameras and lenses – we tested all of the cameras on the market in all the modes using the exact same camera positions and distributed them along the same signal paths, and viewed them on the exact same monitors. We were looking for ease of use, ease of set-up, also compatibility with other equipment. Performance on the day was quite key, we had a couple of very esteemed guys from the vision world to help us judge the products. “To be honest what was quite refreshing was that the manufacturers all sent their bright sparks engineering-wise and they were very honest, as some of their products were only just passing beta stage. A couple of 4K cameras weren’t fully functional, you could see the direction they were going in and they still looked great, but some of the functionality wasn’t quite there yet, where some of the others were much further ahead. Beta software and cameras were fine as we didn’t need them for another year, when the studios opened.” At this stage, Studioworks were

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


BBC TELEVISION CENTRE FEATURE

fundamentally looking for a very good HD camera but with an upgrade path to 4K, HDR and IP workflow being a bonus. LENS TESTING For the glass choices the BBC were looking to the future. “Lenses are quite different for us, we took a different view on those. It’s a significant investment but if you treat a lens right it’s going to last you ten to 15 years. We thought that in five years time most workflows would be 4K and HDR so we wanted our lenses to not require any upgrades, as we were looking at the investment long term. So it was imperative that they did have to operate in 4K and HDR modes – these were key requirements. That’s the direction of travel, definitely. “So the way we looked at the lenses was to look at standard studio configurations, which is around eight to ten cameras and sometimes that scales up. There will be a mix of different types of lenses, although we don’t use primes. We do tend to use a mixture of barrel lenses for wides and mobile cameras, and cameras that are closer to the talent. Studio box lenses are 27X, mostly, which

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

make up the majority of those lenses. In each studio we’ll have one or two of what are called ‘stadium’ lenses, so anything from an 80X box lens upwards, and they’re really good because what you can do is have a long shot and crash zoom in to get a close-up on the same lens. There is a lot of range in those lenses. The average production will have at least one of those, and the bigger shows, like Strictly Come Dancing, will have two and sometimes three of them. I think The Voice is the same as well because of the flexibility it gives that camera position. “Operators tend to bring their own specialised cameras such as Steadicams, that’s the same for jib and crane operators – cranes are obviously hired in but the operators are still freelancers.” LOOKING BACK “I think we’re in a good position six months down the road. We’ve got the configuration where we wanted it. Since 16 April, we have ITV Studios Daytime live morning shows in studios TC2 and TC3. This is while ITV Studios HQ on London’s South Bank is being redeveloped. Also in

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

our facility in Elstree we host an array of other broadcasters.” With regard to BBC Studioworks’ recent credits at Television Centre – by the end of April this year, the company had facilitated over 200 episodes of television since reopening the studio space in September 2017. Recent productions in 2018 so far include BBC One’s The Graham Norton Show and Sounds Like Friday Night, ITV Studios’ daytime shows Good Morning Britain, Lorraine, This Morning and Loose Women, plus some Holywood-style excitement in the form of an Avengers: Infinity War fan event.

45

ABOVE The studio

space has room for audience shows.

BELOW The upgrade means BBC clients have top tech at their fingertips.

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


46

FEATURE ASCENDING STARS

Our first talent compilation lists the rising stars of European-based cinematography

ow do you pick one talented DOP from another to compile a list like this? It has to do with their credits, their word-ofmouth credibility but mostly what they bring to the screen. With all our stars we have noticed certain ways that they work that pushes the art a little bit further on. New ways of framing for instance, using the new technologies of lighting in ways that change the direction that lighting is headed, new ways to move the camera and perhaps new ways to use colour. For sure our list is compiled subjectively but then researched from opinions emanating from the industry. We then had to decide when an ascending star legitimately becomes just a star of DEFINITION JUNE 2018

cinematography. Does your first movie credit stop you being a rising star or does a Netflix, Amazon or Hulu commission have the same effect? It’s perhaps not that cut and dried, as some BBC programming has been part-funded by US companies and will naturally settle on Netflix, for instance. Just by reading these bios from our list you will get a sense that our stars had been destined to ascend in this industry by some of the awards they have already been given, so easy for us you could say to identify them. But we still needed confirmation from the industry; and not just from their peers and set-buddies but also from creatives further up the workflow, as in grading rooms and editing bays. So it is with great pride that we

present our first talent list. We will listen to our readers as to how we can perhaps elongate our lists to other areas of the industry and other talent groups. But most of all we will be keeping an eye on this carefully compiled set of talented people and wish them the best of luck in their ascending life in one of the best industries in the creative world.

DOES YOUR FIRST MOVIE CREDIT STOP YOU BEING A RISING STAR? DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


ASCENDING STARS FEATURE

Richard Stoddard

Richard won the BAFTA Cymru for his work on feature The Passing/ Yr Ymadawiad directed by Gareth Bryn. He shot feature Just Jim directed by Craig Roberts, That Good Night starring John Hurt and the remake of The Watcher in the Woods directed by Melissa Joan Hart. He picked up the BAFTA Cymru for television drama Hinterland/Y Gwyll, with his other drama including Being Human and ITV’s Bancroft. Richard has worked with directors including Ed Bazalgette, Daniel O’Hara, John Hayes and Steve Bendelack. Kit wise, he always uses his ARRIHEAD 1 geared head, and prefers shooting with anamorphic lenses, in 2.35:1 aspect ratio. @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

47

Chloë Thomson

A cinematography graduate of the National Film and Television School, Chloë has shot a number of award-winning films, and her work has been screened at festivals including Cannes and Sundance. In 2017, Chloë was named a BAFTA Breakthrough Brit and shot Requiem for BBC1 and Netflix. Previous credits include Ellen, her first feature-length TV drama, for Channel 4, which won a BAFTA Cymru and a Broadcast award for Best Single Drama; and Damascus Cover, her first fiction feature film. Shorts include Natasha Khan’s I Do, which premiered at Tribeca 2016, Jonah (Best Cinematographer, Underwire 2013) and Volume (Best Short Film, BIFA 2012). JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


48

FEATURE ASCENDING STARS

Kate Reid

Kate is an award-winning cinematographer whose drama credits include Call the Midwife, Trust Me, series 2 of Marcella and the new BBC One six-part series Press, for which she was series DOP. Her work has been screened in competition at festivals such as Sundance, Berlin and SXSW and she won the Underwire Award for Best Cinematography in 2015 for the film Nazi Boots. Kate has shot two independent features, numerous shorts and her documentary credits include Ava DuVernay’s Venus Vs., and the Emmy Award-winning TV series Years of Living Dangerously. She strives to put story at the heart of her cinematography, whatever form she is working in. Kate studied cinematography at the UK’s National Film and Television School having previously worked as a camera assistant on features such as Batman Begins.

Si Bell

Originally from County Durham in the UK, Si began filmmaking in his teens, working as a clapper loader and shooting short films in evenings and on weekends. His work on features Electricity, Orthodox and Tiger Raid attracted critical attention, and he was named a Screen Star of Tomorrow by Screen Daily in 2014. As well as films, Si has also shot drama series including Ripper Street, Fortitude and Hard Sun. 2018 will see the release of both In Darkness – a Universal feature film starring Natalie Dormer – and Butterfly, an original three-part drama for ITV starring Anna Friel. He will next be shooting the opening block of Britannia 2 for Sky Atlantic and Amazon. His favourite pieces of filmmaking kit include his Leica Summilux lenses and the ARRI TRINITY rig.

Luke Bryant

Luke was nominated as one of the BSC’s Emerging Cinematographers 2017 for his work on the short film Present. In the last 18 months he’s completed a number of features, including Dead In A Week (with Tom Wilkinson and Christopher Eccleston), The Buddy Games (with Josh Duhamel and Olivia Munn) as well as two episodes of Sky Arts’ Urban Myths series, second unit on Netflix’s Black Mirror and the upcoming E4 show Dead Pixels. Recent shorts include the The Hope Rooms (with Andrew Scott and Ciarán Hinds) and the Oscar shortlisted SLR (with Liam Cunningham.) He’s not a huge gearhead, but doesn’t leave home without his Sekonic light meter. DEFINITION JUNE 2018

Benedict Spence

Benedict began his career in factual entertainment, shooting programmes for the BBC, MTV and Sky. In the past years he has moved into music videos, for artists such as Beth Ditto and Leona Lewis, and now into TV commercials for clients such as Sony, Carphone Warehouse and Asda. “I now try and split my time between commercials and scripted TV shows; last year I shot Series 3 of Witless for the BBC and GameFace for E4/Hulu. I love the pace, creativity and camaraderie of a scripted set but also the attention to detail and thought of a commercial set. Looking forward I would love to work on a comedy/action film; one of my all-time favourites is Grosse Pointe Blank (1997). But to be honest I just feel very lucky that I am kept as busy as I am and that I have kind directors who believe in me as a cinematographer!” DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


ASCENDING STARS FEATURE

49

Stephen Murphy Urszula Pontikos

Urszula’s first feature Weekend premiered at SWSX in March 2011 and became an instant hit, scooping the Audience Award. By the end of the year the film had picked up over 20 international awards. It also appeared in many critics’ Best of 2011 lists. Since then Urszula has won the Sundance Cinematography Award in 2014 for her second feature Lilting (Hong Khaou’s directorial debut). Other credits include Second Coming starring Idris Elba and Nadine Marshall, directed by Debbie Tucker Green. As well as features, Urszula has set the look of numerous TV dramas including critically acclaimed Humans and Marcella. In 2015 Urszula was invited to join the British Society of Cinematographers. Urszula also shot Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool (featured in March 2018’s Definition).

Stephen is best known for his work on series four of BBC drama Line of Duty. In the last year he has also shot the first episode of series eight of Vera for ITV, stepped in for additional photography on Yorgos Lanthimos’ film The Favourite, and shot second unit on the DC/SyFy drama Krypton. In 2014 Stephen was invited to join BAFTA as a full member. His favourite gear includes Panavision C and B series anamorphic lenses, the Panavision Millennium film and ARRI ALEXA Mini cameras and any large tungsten fresnel light.

David Procter

With a background in direction and having trained at Ravensbourne and the UK’s National Film and Television School, David honed his cinematography skills with short films, but he soon diversified into documentary, commercials and music promos, shooting second unit for DOPs such as Robbie Ryan BSC and Anthony Dod Mantle BSC ASC DFF. His first documentary, Red Sands won Film of the Festival at Raindance. In 2010, he began collaborating with BAFTAnominated director Simon Ellison; their first fiction collaboration, Jam Today, won Best British Film at Encounters and the Ron Holloway Award at Tirana. David has won a Grand Prix and multiple Gold, Silver and Glass Lions at Cannes. He has been talent spotted in BAFTA’s Academy magazine and nominated for a Channel 4 Talent Award.

Diana Olifirova

An award-winning cinematographer based in London, Diana specialises in narrative, commercials and music videos. Her recent short film All of Me received the Best Emerging Cinematographer Award from the British Society of Cinematographers. She completed an MA at the UK’s National Film and Television School in 2015. Her work has been screened at festivals worldwide including Edinburgh International Film Festival, BFI Film Festival, Palm Springs International Film Festival, Underwire Film Festival and Lift-Off Season Awards 2017. As a member of the Ukrainian Society of Cinematography, she brings a unique viewpoint to her work. Fascinated by light, people, art, movement and life, Diana tells stories using composition that evokes emotion and connects the audience to the story.

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


50

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE G-TECHNOLOGY

KEEPING PACE WITH PROGRESS

As the filmmaking world becomes ever more data hungry, companies such as G-Technology are providing the solutions required to keep pace, as three headline launches at NAB 2018 demonstrated

hanks to rapidly evolving technology, filmmakers are now faced with a range of options at the shooting stage, enabling ever-higher resolution and quality thresholds to be achieved. The NAB Show in Las Vegas involved lots of talk about such things as 8K productions, while 4K is now an accepted norm across the board in professional cameras, with Raw poised to become a more mainstream format and VR requiring the use of multiple cameras. Highlights of NAB 2018 included RED launching its new Gemini 5K S35 sensor with REDCODE RAW file format, while Apple’s announcement of its groundbreaking ProRes RAW and RAW HQ codecs further promoted the feeling that Raw is about to gain the prominence within filmmaking that it’s long had in still photography. Even though the data rates of the new codecs are impressive, they will still push the limits of storage media. None of these exciting developments could be taking place without the necessary storage solutions being available, and against all the hullaballoo around the show floor G-Technology was unveiling three groundbreaking new products. All offer Thunderbolt 3 connectivity and insane read speeds of up to 2800 MB/s – that’s an eye-watering five times faster than the 560MB/s speed DEFINITION JUNE 2018

reached by the G-DRIVE mobile SSD R-Series – along with comprehensive five-year warranties. Each new product comes with USPs that make it perfect for a particular sector or job requirement, and their development was only possible since G-Technology, alongside the likes of SanDisk, is part of the giant Western Digital set-up, enabling access to a vast reservoir of technological expertise. The company has more patents than anyone in the world apart from Google and Apple, and that allowed G-Technology’s product developers to acquire input and resource from across the entire business. In turn that situation has allowed great strides in data storage to be achieved in a short space of time. THE POWER OF THREE For those looking for a ‘pick up and go’ data storage product the G-DRIVE mobile PRO SSD is the perfect choice. A portable powerhouse designed for editing on the go, the product is rugged, drop proof and crush proof although, unlike the smaller R-Series, it’s not waterproof since the TB3 port itself can’t be made watertight. That small consideration apart, this new product, which utilises an aluminium enclosure for protection and heat dissipation for consistent writes – bleeding out heat as fast as it

TOP The G-DRIVE mobile Pro SSD. ABOVE The G-SPEED Shuttle SSD.

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


G-TECHNOLOGY ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

can be added – offers blisteringly fast 2800R/2200W speeds, making this what is considered by G-Technology to be the fastest portable SSD on the market. The design of the new mobile Pro SSD is based on the latest NVME PCI Express technology that matches high-speed media to the high-speed potential of Thunderbolt 3. It will be available in 500GB and 1TB capacities, with 2TB to follow. The cost of the initial two capacities will be £569.95/$649.95 and £899.95/$1049.95 respectively, available in the summer. Based on the classic G-DRIVE design, the G-DRIVE Pro SSD is a workhorse designed for intensive daily use. At its heart is an Enterprise-class SSD with an endurance rating of one Drive Write Per Day. With a traditional SSD you measure life in the amount of terabytes that you can write to it, which would normally be around 500TB, but with an Enterprise-class SSD that number rises to 14,000TB. So if you’re a video editor sitting at a work station who will be hammering your storage device day in, day out, with high-res content being read and written, this is the SSD you want to be working with. It’s possible to achieve a higher speed in a single drive chassis than with a fully loaded 8 bay 96TB G-SPEED Shuttle XL, which tops out at 2000MB/s, while a further benefit @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

NONE OF THESE EXCITING DEVELOPMENTS COULD BE TAKING PLACE WITHOUT THE STORAGE SOLUTIONS is that there are two TB3 ports on board the G-DRIVE Pro SSD, allowing daisy chaining if required to boost capacity. The device is small enough to drop into your bag and comes in capacities from 960GB, with further capacities of 1.92TB, 3.84TB and 7.68TB. Prices are £1,199.95/$1399.95, £1,799.95/$2099.95, £3,549.95/$4099.95 and £6,569.95/$7599.95 respectively, with the product available now. At the top of the range and designed for filmmakers working on huge, data-heavy projects, is the G-SPEED Shuttle SSD – 8 SATA SSDs in a portable RAID unit. Designed to be the ultimate powerhouse for high-speed, high-res editing and consistent 2800 reads and writes, this is a bulletproof edit station to go. In user terms this equates to the capacity to move a terabyte of data in around seven minutes, blisteringly fast, enough to keep up with even the

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

likes of a RED 8K camera, without any kind of a slowdown or low bandwidth issues. Furthermore, there’s no need for proxies; you can simply edit multistream Raw footage directly from the drive, making it the perfect tool for bleeding-edge 8K and VR jobs. One of the key benefits of this new unit is its ability for SSDs to be swapped out for any higher capacity units that might become available in the future, while there’s also an ev Bay adapter that will slot into an available drive bay, enabling data from a wide range of ev Series drives and readers to be quickly offloaded. Despite the fact that the capability of the G-SPEED Shuttle SSD makes it suitable for the most demanding storage and editing requirements it’s still small enough to be considered eminently portable, and to ensure its safety in the field there’s a dedicated Pelican case available. The 8TB model is £4399.95/$5099.95, while the 16TB version is £6569.95/ $7599.95, with the Peli case costing £259.95/$299.95, available now. Three amazing products utilising the full potential of the Western Digital expertise – exactly the kind of powerful, adaptable and reliable devices the modern filmmaker requires to run an efficient and highspeed workflow supporting today’s high performing cameras.

51

ABOVE The G-DRIVE Pro SSD is small enough to be dropped into a bag, and comes with capacities up to 7.68TB.

MORE INFORMATION:

www.g-technology. com

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


52

GEAR GROUP LED LIGHTING

WHITE LIGHT WHITE HEAT

A week in professional lighting is like a year in any other industry niche. There is a white heat of technology emanating from this place and it won’t stop for some time yet

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


LED LIGHTING GEAR GROUP

ARRI SKYPANEL V4

NBCUNIVERSAL DMG LIGHTBLADE MINIMIX LB800

The ARRI SkyPanel is the big success story of the new breed of LED light technology and better news for users and owners is that firmware updates are regular and full of useful additions to your already fabulous fixture. SkyPanel Firmware 4 is packed with ten new features including Extended Colour Control. Finding the perfect colour can sometimes be a daunting task. With Extended Colour Control in SkyPanel Firmware 4, this process becomes more intuitive. Simply pick a starting colour such as a digital gel, HSI value or colour temperature and use the eight new colour adjustments to push the colour in the desired direction. These colour parameters include warmer/cooler, saturate/desaturate, +/- red, +/- green, +/- blue. +/- cyan, +/magenta and +/- yellow. These controls are available via the onboard control panel or DMX. Every SkyPanel is made up of one or more light engines. The S60 has two light engines, while the S360 has 12. SkyPanel Firmware 4 allows the user to control individual light engines via new DMX modes. Each light engine acts as its own mini SkyPanel with parameters like CCT & RGBW, HSI or x,y coordinates. This precise level of control enables new programing possibilities with the SkyPanel. Additional lighting effects include explosion, welding, process and fluorescent flicker. That makes a new total of 17 preprogrammed lighting effects. Explosion is the perfect effect for muzzle flashes and explosion effects. Welding mimics the sparks of a high intensity welding source. Process sends light shooting down the surface of a SkyPanel to imitate the effect of a street light passing over a car - this effect works especially well with the S120. And finally, the fluorescent flicker effect recreates the hum and flutter of a malfunctioning fluorescent bulb.

The NBCLightBlade story continues with the introduction of the LightBlade LB800, the latest professional lighting tool from NBCUniversal in partnership with Cineo. The LB800 represents the latest technological advances within the LightBlade product line, with new features and even greater flexibility. Like all LightBlade fixtures, the LB800 uses proprietary phosphor-converted white light LEDs, as well as phosphorconverted saturated colour LEDs. These work together to create a balanced, natural-looking spectrum featuring Cineo’s deep-red colour rendering technology. The saturated colour LEDs use the exact same dies as the white LEDs, so all light emitting elements of the LightBlade products carry identical thermal stability and perform over time with consistent colour quality. Additional features include support of both 8-bit and 16-bit DMX data, as well as multiple colour space personalities. Controlling the colour space for each zone can be accomplished in either HSI + CCT mode or RGB + CCT. The LB800 can store and recall multiple fixture settings for quick access to frequently used lighting parameters. For dynamic lighting effects, the LB800 can be configured in ten independent zones, with complete DMX/RDM control over each zone. For advanced use, all parameters for each zone are completely configurable via RDM. The LB800 includes the same intuitive graphical user interface as LightBlade LB1K, delivering predictable, repeatable results. The fixture can be controlled locally or remotely with wired or built-in wireless CRMX control. Specifications include variable CCT 2700K-6500K with presets at 2700K, 3200K, 4300K, 5600K and 6500K. Variable saturated colour with presets of red, yellow, green, cyan, blue and magenta. Fixture size is 24” x 48” x 5” (.6m x 1.2m x 11.4cm).

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

def-june18-052-056 (gear group)v2 NEW.indd 53

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

53

Rated at 100W output, the Mini Mix is a 205x885mm panel, which can be usefully used to light small corners of a film set or sit-down interviews. It can also create accent coloured backlights or illuminate blue or green screens effectively using highly saturated light. The Mini Mix’s output pattern can be controlled to a certain degree by the removable diffusion panels. Further control is offered thanks to compatibility with DMG’s add-ons for the company’s existing SWITCH lights, including dome, snapbag and grid accessories. In general it is a diffused softlight with a beam angle near 180˚. Currently, a larger version, the SL1 Mix (twice as long and is rated 200W), is also available and an even larger version, the Maxi Mix, is in the works. A machined aluminium frame holds the panel, and steel helical inserts protect the threads. The latching mounting points will be familiar to users of other flat-panel and fluorescent lighting. A handgrip and balland-socket mount compatible with ⁵⁄₈in lighting spigots fits the central latching point. The controller and power supply can be seated either side, or be mounted elsewhere. The control system is really the heart of the Mini Mix. White mode offers control over colour temperature from 2850K to 7500K with magenta-to-green correction available either as a percentage of the maximum or expressed in terms of plus or minus-green filters. This makes matching difficult practical possible. Emulating filters from Rosco’s range, Gel mode offers the option to base the simulation on light sources at either 3200K or 5600K. For arbitrary colours, there’s a mode which makes full hue and saturation control available. For the full low-down on the DMG Mini Mix, read the review by Phil Rhodes on page 76. JUNE 2018 DEFINITION

24/05/2018 10:09


54

GEAR GROUP LED LIGHTING

FIILEX KINO FLO Q8 TRAVEL LIGHT CELEB 850

MOLE VARI-COLOR JUNIOR LED

Punching like a heavyweight is the Fiilex Q8 Travel Light. Weighing in at 7.25kg including the detachable yoke, it certainly stretches the definition of travel. It’s no lightweight, easy to carry unit, but it is rugged, thanks to solid metallic build and rubber bumpers front and rear. It would handle some abuse on location as well as in the studio. Fiilex claims that the Q8 has one of the longest ranges in the industry: a zoom angle that can go from a 12° spot to a 60° flood. It also boasts a customised 20cm fresnel lens. Right across the range, it holds a beautiful quality of light, and there’s also the option to flood a wide space or focus a uniform beam into a tight spotlight with defined edges. The Q8 uses a wrapping system, unlike many other LED panels. Diodes are densely packed together in the reflective lens to provide a powerful array with an intense light. You can get a glimpse of the beautiful engineering under the bonnet through the wide cooling vents. The cooling fan, when on, is noisy. The AC/DC adpater can be bolted onto rigging or a C-stand using the included clamp. Alternatively, it can be powered by most 48V DC batteries. The Q8 offers the option to change the colour temperature from 2800-6500K and magenta or green hues can be added to blend in with the environment. No colour or special effects are included. Fiilex’s Q8 Travel Light ably demonstrates the power that the latest generation of LEDs can produce. At more than £2600, it isn’t cheap, but the quality of its light and its build makes it worth the outlay. If you have the money, it’s a very good option.

Mole-Richardson’s approach to the revolution in lighting technology is to make their lights look like the ones you used before. This is perhaps a matter of conversion to make it more comfortable to start using LED technology than ‘older’ fixtures gaffers are perhaps more used to. Mole-Richardson is calling its new conversion lights Variable-Color. These are solid-state LED fresnels. The company is being bullish about its ability and at the same time underlining this conversion aspect by saying, “This line combines the light quality, output and control synonymous with the Mole name, while adding the flexibility of variable white light colour temperature control and green/ magenta correction.” The new line is made up of undoubtedly great-looking fixtures and they are immediately identifiable as MoleRichardson products, so a big win for the marketing department. The line also includes multiple user interface options such as touchscreen operation, DMX, built-in Lumenradio and Bluetooth capability. There is also a Mole app coming later this year which sounds like something you need for a garden pest! Mole-Richardson has also already published its road map for the production and we will see throughout 2018 that the Vari LED family will be expanded to include the Vari-Baby, Vari-Junior, VariStudio Junior, Vari-Senior and Vari-Tener LEDs. With a range from 2700-5600K, this variable colour temperature is now available in selected Mole-Richardson LED fixtures. The lead line is high output, unparalleled optics and rich, full colour with the flexibility of variable colour temperature and a claimed 35,000 hour lamp life from the onboard LED module. Also featured is universal A/C input voltage from 90-250V. Basically a great tool for both broadcast and the film industry.

For the full low-down on the Fiilex Q8 Travel Light, read the review by Phil Vinter on page 89. DEFINITION JUNE 2018

Kino Flo continues its march forward with 360° colour LED technology with an upgrade to the Celeb line of fixtures. This upgrade will add full colour operation to the existing model range with the addition of a new larger fixture – Celeb 850. This model is seen as an alternative to ARRI’s S120 larger-sized SkyPanel. This 850 will offer twice the surface area of the popular Celeb 450. Although brighter than the lightweight Select system recently introduced, the Celeb line will now have an identical operating system providing the ability to produce over 2,000,000 colours including gel and green/magenta hue manipulation. This will mean that once a DOP or a technician has used the system they will be able to operate any fixture in the colour range. The operating system offers the flexibility to easily create moonlight, sodium street light or almost any effects colour. This offers creative control to the DOP on set on the fly. However, on top of this it should be recognised that the main focus of all the new Kino Flos is to offer really good white colour reproduction from daylight to tungsten and beyond. The Kino Flo system is of course all about the great skin tones and colour reproduction to camera. Another factor in upgrading the brighter Celeb line to the 360° colour system is to expand the Kino Flo range of high-quality colour matching fixtures so there is a toolbox of different fixtures that are all compatible and match on set. Kino Flo has avoided the temptation to overrun (or boost the output) the fixtures so that they all have very good colour life. As we move forward in experience with LED technology it is now being appreciated just how critical running temperature is to maintaining colour life over time. Kino Flo has committed to setting this balance to ensure long life and consistency.

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 55

04/05/2018 16:57


56

GEAR GROUP LED LIGHTING

QUASAR SCIENCE ROTOLIGHT RAINBOW LINEAR NEO 2

STELLA PRO RANGE

In just a few years, Quasar Science has become an essential brand within the motion picture and photography industry. With the rise of RGB-enabled fixtures, this lighting technician created company has been working on its own full colour system, RGBX. This five-colour mixing system adds high output RGB diodes to Quasar’s Crossfade 2000K and 6000K white light diode set to produce both high-quality broad spectrum tunable white light and bright ultra-saturated narrow spectrum colour. The first fixture in the line-up to utilise RGBX is the new Rainbow Linear LED Light. This slender, high output light source is ideal for everything from three point lighting set-ups to assembling massive arrays and large area lighting rigs. Unbeatable in tight spaces, the self-ballasted Rainbow comes in 600mm 1200mm and 2400mm lengths, and featuring digital control interface, wireless and wired DMX connect, Lead/Follow mode, Auxiliary DC input, Onboard FX and much more. Features include the company’s X-fade White Light which gives a full range of high-quality broad spectrum light and allows colour saturation without the muddy effects of RGB derived white light. It includes Kelvin presets at 2000° (2800°), 3200°, 4000° (5000°), 5600° and 6000°. Also featured is RGB which is a full 360° palette for fully saturated colour or mixed with X-fade white light for soft beautiful pastels. It includes colour presets for blue, cyan, green, yellow, orange, red, magenta and purple. There’s no need to pull out your phone or have a Wi-Fi network. The Rainbow comes equipped with an onboard control panel allowing you to set Intensity, CCT, Saturation, Hue, FX and much more. Onboard effects with adjustable parameters include Fire, Police Light, Short Circuit, Paparazzi and Strobe.

The Stella Pro range first came to our attention when we were looking for a light that would fit a drone. This isn’t an easy thing to do and needs a certain amount of engineering, small and light enough unit and, of course, plenty of light power! The Pro 10,000c illuminates with a commanding 10,000 lumens and delivers 20,580 lux at one metre with available fresnel. At full power the diminutive Stella Pro 10,000c delivers the equivalent light output of HMI units four times its size. Powered from AC or DC, a digital screen reports power levels while an easy-grip magnetic control ring makes adjusting output potentially simple and repeatable. Consistent with all Stella Pro lights is the Chip on Board ‘COB’ array that promises to provide a smooth, evenly dispersed, 120° native beam with high CRI and TLCI ratings of 90+ and 93 respectively. Durability and all-conditions portability are something that Light & Motion see as hallmarks of the Stella Line. The 10,000c features IP54 water resistance to be fully capable for demanding broadcast outdoor shoots or providing powerful illumination for heavy payload drones, lighting sets or landscapes. Stella Pro 10,000c includes a 50° optic, barndoors, C-stand mount and power supply.

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

If you know the Rotolight AEOS, then think of the firm’s NEO 2 as a smaller, more portable version with virtually the same list of impressive features but at around a third of the price. It’s not as powerful, though. The NEO 2 is ideal for filmmakers on location who also might want to take some stills as it is a very portable bicolour LED continuous light with a built-in high-speed flash function that has zero recycle time. As a filmmaking tool, it’s equally impressive, considering it’s such a small light. It only weighs 354g so can be used on your video camera’s coldshoe as an on-camera fill light or on top of a light stand as an offcamera source. It takes six AA batteries or can be powered from the included mains adapter. The flicker-free light output is 200 lux at around a metre, which is a decent amount of light especially indoors or outdoors in gloomy conditions. Or even in sun as a fill light if you get it up close. With a diameter of 14.5cm, it’s not a hugely soft light source. But get it in close and the light quality is directional and crisp. The unit comes with additional diffusers and gels so you can soften it and tweak the colours even more. But don’t expect a diffuser panel to create a wonderful soft light compared to a much bigger light source, and it does cut the power. On the back of the panel is a big LED display. Two knobs let you adjust the intensity and colour temperature of the light from 3150-6300K. Pushing the knobs enters the menus. Just like the AEOS, there is also a range of built-in special effects such as, fire, lightning, police light, strobe and TV flicker. To modify the light even further, Rotolight offers optional extras like barn doors and a softbox. At a great price of £300, it’s a well-built bit of kit that has multiple uses and is small enough to tuck into just about any bag. Even if you never intend to use the flash facility, it’s a powerful and controllable movie light that doesn’t break the bank.

KEY FEATURES • High Output COB ‘chip on board’ LED • Certified 90 CRI, TLCI 93, Daylight Balanced • FL-1 Standard Certified Lumen output • FL-1 Standard Certified 120° wide, smooth beam angle • Range of modifiers: press-on light modifiers including: 50° Focus Optic, 25° fresnel, GloBulb DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 57

04/05/2018 16:57


58

FEATURE LOOK OF LENSES

THE LOOK OF LENSES

Fresh from the NAB show we look at the latest lens technology and thinking as new physical formats are let loose WORDS PHIL RHODES he goals of lens designers have changed. In the past, clarity and precision were the priority. Now, older glass that’s comparatively lacking in contrast and sharpness is snapped up by cinematographers keen to take the edge off digital origination. Ed Moore, director of photography on episodes of Vera and Shetland, describes the situation simply: “Most DPs are

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

desperate to use any kind of old, weird lens... vintage anamorphic is terribly popular. I’m not criticising that, I’ve done it myself. There’s the perception that digital is too clean and that introducing unpredictable artifacts from older lenses is going to help with that. It’s to do with authorship, now that things get graded without us – having a look that’s sort of built into the shot.”

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


LOOK OF LENSES FEATURE

Cinematographer Cathal Watters, ISC, considers lenses in a way that epitomises current thinking. Veteran of the beautifullyphotographed Peaky Blinders and recently engaged on feature film duties in both the US and his native Ireland, Watters could call upon practically any tool available to the modern cinematographer. An owner of Zeiss’s popular Super Speed lenses, Watters’ experience also includes the Angenieux Optimo 24-290mm zoom, ARRI’s Alura zooms, Ultra Primes, anamorphics – in short, a shopping list of the best lenses in the world. But for the feature Papi Chulo, shot in Los Angeles in 2017, Watters chose a very different path. “I knew all the modern anamorphics, so I got this three-lens set of LOMO anamorphics. One of them was in [terrible condition]. I couldn’t pull focus on the 35mm – you could set focus but you couldn’t pull it. But it was beautiful. I’d ping light into it, and the characteristics were just beautiful, they were softer than the modern anamorphics.” A few weeks later, on another collaboration with Peaky Blinders director David Caffrey, Watters found himself considering the same option again for, “a murder mystery over six half-hours. We’re going to shoot it on Super Speeds, but I suggested I get the LOMOs I had in LA... I’m going to shoot the cop world on anamorphic and the other world on Super Speeds.” These are not lenses for every job. “I tested the two sets – all of them are different. Even with the 35mm, one was massive, one was small. I’m contemplating getting an Alura – it’s really nice glass.” Bill Bennett, ASC, is a veteran of commercials for a long list of major automotive manufacturers, and echoes Watters’ comments. Having recently photographed footage for ARRI’s launch of the Alexa LF

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

59

RIGHT AND BELOW

Bill Bennett works with an ARRI Signature prime on Joy Ride. Pic credit Ken Dooley.

SOME FEEL IT’S STARTING TO LOOK TOO SHARP, TOO CLINICAL, TOO CONTRASTY

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

camera, Bennett was among the first to use the new Signature Primes created to serve that camera and its full-frame imaging sensor. “ARRI made the decision to move away from ultra-sharp, ultra-contrasty lenses towards lenses that were specially designed to be a little bit smoother in contrast. The Ultra Primes and Master Primes were designed in the film era, when film was the organic, smoothing part of the imaging chain. “These digital sensors have the potential to be much sharper. Combine them with ultra-sharp, ultra-contrasty lenses like Master Primes and some cinematographers feel it’s starting to look too sharp, too clinical, too contrasty. There’s no secret that a lot of cinematographers have taken to using older, classic lenses made 60 years ago. Super Baltars, Speed Panchros, that sort of stuff, to compensate for the super electronic digital look.” All of this has been going on since the dawn of digital cinematography, though the new popularity of full-frame sensors, has meant that these widely-held feelings about excessive sharpness have met the need for more coverage head-on. Bigger chips are the first thing mentioned by lens expert Matthew Duclos, of the eponymous Los Angeles optical workshop. In his world the emergence of full-frame has created a demand for ways to use existing lenses on larger-format cameras, regardless of their ability to provide a vintage look. “At the moment, one of the biggest trends is larger format lenses,” Duclos confirms. “We first had the [expander] concept maybe three years ago when the RED 8K

@DEFINITIONMAGS

VistaVision camera came out. A friend, Phil Holland, had one of those cameras and he had a lot of Super 35 glass that he wanted to use. It didn’t take that long to come up with the concept – it’s exactly the same as the concept of the tele extender. The part that took time was refining the design to balance performance and versatility. It’s very easy to make an extender, it’s difficult to make an expander that maximises the image quality.” The application, though, was relatively prosaic compared to Watters and Bennett’s desire for oldworld charm. “The Fujinon Premiere zooms were the poster child for our expanders,” Duclos says, “since they start at T2.” The loss of brightness caused by spreading the same image out over a larger imaging sensor is equivalent to the loss of nearly a stop of light, so users need to start with a reasonably fast lens to begin with. For people who want to start out with a lens that can already fill a full-frame sensor, Duclos is quick to mention a comparatively recent release. “The Sigma primes are extremely popular,” he says. “I think the price to performance ratio is nearly unbeatable. They’re the closest anyone’s come to a modern set of Master Primes. They’re compact, lightweight, fast, the image quality is excellent. I don’t think anyone has come even close.” From this we can see that the market for cinema-style lenses, which has been surprisingly buoyant for decades given a very narrow audience, shows no signs of slowing. At the same time, the move toward very large sensors in high-end cameras can mean that a favourite lens set is no longer an option... JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


60

FEATURE LOOK OF LENSES

1

2 4

3

1. ARRI SIGNATURE

With the Alexa LF camera recently announced, ARRI’s Signature Primes should come as no surprise. Cinematographer Bill Bennett, ASC, was among the first to work with them on the motocross montage Joy Ride. Pushing £20,000 apiece, the Signature Primes are an option for the high end. Thankfully, that’s where the most skilled focus pullers are found, since Bennett warns that, “there’s been a tendency in digital production to wing it, to not do any rehearsals, not give the focus pullers any time to make marks.” That, he concludes “would be a mistake, on these large format cameras.”

2. COOKE S7/I AND PANCHRO/I CLASSIC

Cooke’s really-big-chip option emerged in June 2017, with the announcement of the S7/i Full Frame Plus lenses. With eight focal lengths so far listed, the 16, 21, 27, and 65mm S7 lenses were shown at NAB 2018 on the Alexa LF, Sony Venice and RED Weapon 8K cameras. The range is priced to compete with ARRI’s Signature series, continuing Cooke’s inclination toward the high-end DEFINITION JUNE 2018

option. Despite the large-sensor coverage, the front diameter of the S7, at 110mm, is no larger than the S4, and the S7 range maintains a T2.0 minimum aperture. The company’s Panchro/i Classic primes, a resurrection of its widely-adored Speed Panchro lenses, were also shown at NAB, with the 135mm seen in public for the first time.

3. NISI F3

Chinese manufacturer NiSi has been manufacturing filters for a decade, rising to prominence in the west more recently. NiSi’s filters are coated on the outside of the glass as opposed to enclosing the filter between two glass layers, an approach that’s admired for its near-ideal neutrality. The F3 series therefore comes a surprise, launched at NAB as a full set with pre-orders being taken. The 35, 50, 75 and 100mm lenses are each a T2.0, with the 25mm at T2.1, and all with full-frame coverage. With consistent layout and a choice of mounts, the range bears close comparison to Sigma’s primes. The lenses are so new that qualified opinions are hard to find. Mike Tapa, of UK distributor MTF Services, tells us that during

NAB 2018, “they had a couple of American kids that went out and shot a few bits and bobs and showed that the following day on their stand. Nobody’s shot anything serious with them... To me they seemed to give quite pleasing flares.” Pricing, either way, is keen. “The 25 and 100 are £2499 excluding VAT. All the others are £2099 and you can get the set for £9999... It’s a bit of a no-brainer.”

4. SCHNEIDER XENON

Schneider, with its Xenon series, is a more established player in the world of full frame lenses, recently adding the wide 18mm option to the range. Cinematographer Adam Beck, an owner, shot a feature with them in January on pro sports, including ice hockey. Having used the lenses on gimbal and drone, Beck admires their size and weight. “They’re very consistent. I think the heaviest is the 18mm, which is point seven of a pound heavier than the 35, 50, 75, and 100, which all weigh the exact same at 2.6lb.” Beck leverages the larger coverage of the Xenon lenses on the RED Dragon: “I try to shoot everything 6K, for downsampling purposes.” DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 61

04/05/2018 16:57


62

FEATURE LOOK OF LENSES

5

5. ZEISS

Zeiss announced its CP.3 primes at last year’s NAB; the XD-suffix lenses include an electronic interface “based on” Cooke’s /i protocol. There are now ten lenses in the range, from 15mm to 135mm, achieving T2.9 at 21mm and below, and T2.1 otherwise. At around $5000 apiece, including the electronics, we’re spared the expense of the highest-end full-frame options while maintaining quality at a level that’s compatible with many productions. Zeiss’s lens options retain a keen following. Cathal Watters chose Zeiss Super Speeds for Peaky Blinders, and he shares the widely-held desire for a less pristine look. “I know the Super Speeds, what they give. I did a thing last year on Ultra Primes and they’re a certain look, but it’s a little too clean for me. I prefer the older look, the Super Speeds.”

7

6

6. CANON

Canon’s new super-fast CN-E20mm T1.5 L F 4K cine prime lens is compatible with the newly launched EOS C700 FF, as well as the EOS-1D C and other full frame cameras. The new 20mm is consistent with the rest of the Canon EF Cinema lens range, offering Canon fans familiarity with the gear position, front diameter, total length and rotation angle. The lens also has a professional grade, 300° focus rotation angle.

7. SIGMA

8

Sigma’s 2016 entry to the world of cinema lenses made sense given that its cinema lenses are derived from its stills photography glass. That has allowed the company to maintain a modest price point, though at the risk of controversy over having described the zooms as ‘near parfocal’. This might be ultra-caution in the light of very high resolution modern cameras, which could reveal very tiny errors. Overall, the engineering and ergonomics have been warmly received. New at NAB 2018 was a wide-angle zoom, the 14-24mm F28 DG HSM Art, offering APS-C coverage (£1200). It’s not from the cinema range and lacks movie ergonomics and mount options, but is likely to find favour among DSLR users shooting both stills and motion.

8. ATLAS

Founded specifically to produce a range of 2:1 anamorphic lenses, the Atlas Lens Co. has announced six primes in its Orion range. Specifications are complete on only three of them – the 40mm, 65mm and 100mm. None is heavier than 7lb or longer than 10in, and close focus is 24in on the 40mm and only 42in on the 100mm. While not tiny, they’re compact compared to many existing anamorphics, and with a 31mm image circle they cover the Alexa Open Gate area. At around $8000 apiece, they’ll widely be considered a good deal. DEFINITION JUNE 2018

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 63

04/05/2018 16:57


64

FEATURE LOOK OF LENSES

9

11

10 12

9. FUJIFILM

When we spoke to William Wages, ASC, about his work on The Forgiven, discussion centred around the use of Fujifilm’s well-regarded 19-90mm and 85-300mm Cabrio zooms. Used for almost the entire production, Wages felt that, “the 19-90mm for A-camera covers the focal lengths for 90% of what you’ll ever do with an A-camera. The 85-300mm on the B camera is the same thing.” This approach was, Wages said, a huge time-saver. “When you change lenses it’s a three-minute operation. But make-up and hair hears it, the script supervisor hears it, I will go in and tweak something so that three-minute procedure becomes seven minutes, ten minutes. If we’re on the [zoom], we reach down, zoom it a little bit, you’re good to go and we won’t even cut.” Many of Fujifilm’s most recent innovations concern its UA-series broadcast products, a reaction to the requirements made by 4K television production. At NAB 2018 two new portable lenses were shown, the UA46x9.5B and UA46x13.5B, as well as an existing range of portable and big-box broadcast lenses. DEFINITION JUNE 2018

10. CW SONDEROPTIC (LEICA)

Serving both high-end stills photography and motion picture work, the manufacturer of medium-format Leica lenses seems wellplaced to service the push towards bigger chips. Leica’s Thalia lenses, based on the Leica S medium format glass, produce a 60mm image circle that’s enough to satisfy not only the Alexa LF, but also the mighty Alexa 65. Thalia is to be available, in LPL mount, toward the end of 2018. The range includes nine focal lengths from 24 to 180mm, a sensible push upward in focal length to offset the wider field of view intrinsic to big-chip cameras. Going the other way, the Leica M and M-P rangefinder cameras, capable of both still and motion-picture work, now have the option of a PL mount adaptor for compatibility with common lenses.

11. ROKINON

A set of five full-frame lenses with cinemastyle ergonomics for around £8700 including tax is a clear bid for the entry level. The Xeen package includes the 24, 35, 50 and 85mm lenses at T1.5, and the 14mm at T3.1, which

were joined at NAB by the new 16mm T2.6 and 20mm T1.9 options. Perhaps the most interesting recent addition to Rokinon’s range, though, are the 14mm and 85mm SP-series lenses, intended for high resolution photography. When Canon released the 5DS series cameras, 50 megapixels seemed like a lot, although with 8K devices now exceeding 30 megapixels on fairly small sensors, the need for sharp glass can only grow.

12. P+S TECHNIK

Appealing to the world’s interest in both anamorphics and historic lenses, P+S Technik first showed what it called a ‘remake’ of the KOWA anamorphics at Cine Gear 2017. Called KOWA Anamorphic Evolution, the range includes 40, 50, 75 and 100mm lenses. Given its history of rehousing historic glass, and already offering 1.5x anamorphics for those without 4:3 cameras, many of the company’s products line up closely with the current interest in lenses with character. A set of four KOWA anamorphics currently sells for £52,000 (plus VAT); with the range set to include longer and wider options. DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 65

04/05/2018 16:57


66

FEATURE LOOK OF LENSES

13. PANAVISION

13

Seamus McGarvey, BSC, chose Panavision’s Sphero 65s on the award-winning The Greatest Showman. The movie is an epic spectacle, with extensive and elaborate song and dance numbers, and kinetic camera movement, but the story starts with a more intimate portrait of P.T. Barnum (played by Hugh Jackman). “I felt the Spheros were right for The Greatest Showman because they have more personality to them, and beautiful aberrations that I love,” he says. “We were making a period film, and the Spheros don’t have the scientific feel that I’ve experienced with large format. I love how the skin tone reads, and there was a certain amount of falloff at the edges which was perfect. They just felt ‘period’.” On CBS’s new television series Instinct, the producers found inspiration in the visuals of BBC television series Sherlock, so cinematographer Joe Collins (who shot episodes 2-12) mated the Panavision DXL camera with large-format Primo 70 lenses. Collins had his lens set customised, making them softened but maintaining true blacks. “One of the reasons we went with this format was because of their shallow depth-of-field,” he says. “Primo 70s are incredibly sharp but have a really nice bokeh.”

14. ANGENIEUX

Angeneiux’s Optimo zoom range was updated at the end of 2017 with a new 36-435mm lens, the Optimo Ultra 12x FF/ VV, supporting interchangeable rear optics. Three configurations are supported: the smallest covers Super 35mm sensors up to 31.1mm diagonally, while a larger 34.6mm option exists for sensors slightly exceeding Super 35mm dimensions. Finally, option ‘FF/ VV’ casts the full 46.3mm image, satisfying full-frame sensors. Clearly at least a conceptual descendant of the workhorse 2001-vintage 24-290mm zoom, the new lens is hugely capable. Pricing is hard to find, but consider that the established 24-290 pushes $100,000.

14

ACCESSORIES

IB/E Optics, famous for its adaptors allowing ENG-style zooms to be used on Super-35mm cameras, has produced the essentially competing S35x8K expander, which, the company says, lets “most S35 PL lenses” work on sensors as large as the RED Dragon 8K. Making lenses such as the popular Fujinon and Angenieux zooms available to full-frame cameras seems likely to be a popular idea. Finally, Chrosziel’s servo module for the Zeiss 21-100mm zoom seems designed to make the lens more suitable for people DEFINITION JUNE 2018

using it on a shoulder rig, placing the zoom controls on a handgrip such as those often used with cameras like the FS7. Having already shipped a version for the Fujinon MK series zooms, the company seems keen to expand compatibility to other lenses, and reports being in discussion with other manufacturers. In the end, the sudden scarcity of big-chip glass provoked a few years ago by the abrupt move to big-chip cameras has probably now been overcome. With crisis averted, there’s perhaps enough breathing room to have some fun. DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 67

04/05/2018 16:57


68

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE SAMSUNG

LIFE IN THE FREEZER High end DIT Joe Jamieson is the perfect person to test Samsung’s Portable SSD T5 with his busy workflow in extreme conditions. He tells us how he got on

digital imaging technician’s responsibilities entail being aware of what’s happening on‑set, how fast and how much is being shot and knowing when is a good time to step in and reload the cameras. Managing the data flow to avoid bottlenecks and being aware of the different situations that certain workflows can bring is all part of the job and that only broadens with the experience of working with these ever-evolving set-ups. Being aware and managing that data however is only half the battle when quite often the Achilles heel in the whole process lies in the speed of the drives you’re using. Spinning disk drives are still as much a part of our workflow as they were when digital film made for the big time. Fundamentally DEFINITION JUNE 2018

hard drive technology is the same and that most often causes the bottleneck, all whilst the advancement of higher resolutions and raw formats continues. Straight out of the box the Samsung Portable SSD T5 1TB is impressive. Its incredibly elegant and tiny form factor belies the huge workflow-changing punch that lies within. It’s a real step forward in technology, offering a rock solid user experience. Buspowered whilst being extremely fast, the Samsung Portable SSD T5’s design balances the perfect form factor with blistering speed and sizeable secure storage. As previous case studies have mentioned, it is an SSD drive that’s actually having an impact and changing workflows onset and beyond.

ABOVE Heading into the frozen depths with the Samsung Portable SSD T5.

SPEED TESTS “I put the Samsung Portable SSD T5 through a couple of real-world tests where it helped me increase the speed and ease of my workflows instantly,” begins Joe Jamieson. “The first was quite a tough test with regard to the size of the data I was working with – shooting highspeed 4:3 ARRIRAW on an ARRI ALEXA XT. The turnaround was tight so we had the editor on-set; he needed not only a copy of the transcodes but a full copy of the ARRIRAW files after each set-up. The Portable SSD T5 was the only reason this was possible without interrupting and ejecting the bigger RAID drives. Its speed allowed both of us to shuttle 2.8K ARRIRAW (each roll averaging around 300GB) with absolute ease and without DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


SAMSUNG ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

69

IT SHOWS HOW WELL SSD MEDIA CAN BE EXECUTED AND HOW SEAMLESSLY IT CAN BE INTEGRATED

compromising our already heavy workflow – the SSD T5 giving me speeds that easily exceeded the Thunderbolt RAIDs (transferring 100GB approximately every 4.5min) all within a footprint nearly 30x smaller! “I use a Mac Pro system onset which doesn’t have the latest USB3.1 spec, yet this doesn’t hinder the Portable SSD T5’s capabilities,” continues Joe. “I was still getting read/write speeds around the 430MB/s mark from the portable drive, which allows plenty of bandwidth to work uninterrupted off the drive. Using the newest USB-C enabled MacBook Pros however unlocks the SSD T5’s full potential with an average write speed of 475MB/s and a read speed in excess of 500MB/s! The fact that it works so well with both USB3 specs only strengthens its versatility and usability throughout a production pipeline, from on-set, to edit, to post.” LOW TEMPERATURES “The second test was on location with a high-profile motoring TV @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

programme in sub -20° temperatures where I used it for both rushes reviewed in the field and as my shuttle drive,” explains Joe. “The show uses a multitude of cameras, including drones, and from a director’s point of view, it’s obviously hard to know when you’ve got what you need when you can’t see what all the cameras are seeing so quite often footage will be reviewed. Everything is shot in 4K UHD so playing back that footage uninterrupted off the master drives can sometimes be pushing the limits of the drive’s capabilities. “Couple that with the bitterly cold temperature and you start seeing playback issues. The Samsung Portable SSD T5 delivers over double the data rate of the rugged RAIDs so playback was instant and seamless. Even in such harsh conditions it allowed me to be on-set and showing the director what he needed to see – in fact the laptop battery succumbed before the drive had a chance to! “Inadvertently I also found it’s helped in areas I hadn’t even anticipated. I work a lot with a

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

ABOVE Subzero

temperatures pose no problem for the Samsung Portable SSD T5; not so with the laptop.

drone operator who uses an Inspire 2 paired with the Zenmuse X7 lens set-up. He subconsciously (or maybe consciously) has a sense for when I close the last Pelicase at the end of a shoot before asking me for a copy of some of his nicest shots for his reel. “He is one of the most talented drone operators out there and like the rest of the camera people captures a lot of epic stuff so it’s more or less pointless trying to sort through it, it’s all TV gold!” says Joe. “Previously this wasn’t the quickest of requests with more than a terabyte of drone footage from a week’s worth of shooting, but I found the Portable SSD T5 a game changer. It created a full copy in just over 40 minutes, which is an absolutely mighty performance when you’re dealing with such large amounts of data – the drone operator was also incredibly impressed at how fast he could copy it off. “As capacity increases and costs come down,” concludes Joe, “I’d like to think the Samsung Portable SSD T5 is an example of more good things to come. It shows how well SSD media can be executed and how seamlessly it can be integrated into a range of workflows, bringing instantaneous improvements across the board.”

MORE INFORMATION: www.samsung.com/uk/ssd/ JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


70

FEATURE AUGMENTED REALITY

SPONSORED BY

SPACE RACE 2

In the second part of this new series we introduce bleeding edge technology from an awardwinning British company who are blending the real world with the virtual one WORDS JULIAN MITCHELL

ast month we looked at volumetric capture where multiple cameras capture the ‘volume’ of a space in a 360˚ environment. The advantages are hugely realistic capture and fantastic representation of clothing and faces, mostly avoiding the ‘uncanny valley’ effect that we have seen in other CGI capture. Having captured in 360° you can then change your views at will, moving the camera where you want it within the volume of space. The downsides are that you are stuck with the lighting that you capture which is usually purposely flat. You have to capture DEFINITION JUNE 2018

def-june18-070-074 (space race 2) ljc NEW.indd 70

in a dedicated studio which is expensive to build, maintain and commercialise. Also to convert your huge amount of capture data takes a large amount of processing power and time. But it’s early days. We’ll follow the technology and what early adopters like Intel and Microsoft do with it. Intel has recently volumetrically captured a full scene from a Western film with horses and buildings included – to do what with we don’t know. A company which has been on the edge of new capture for a while is Ncam Technologies. Its only piece of hardware is a camera sensor bar

ABOVE Tackle difficult lighting with Ncam Technologies third ground-breaking product: Extreme.

that attaches to professional level broadcast cameras to effectively capture space data including depth and camera controls. Really a software company, Ncam has moved on from just using the depth tracking camera device to offer the highest quality camera tracking, pre-visualisation and augmented reality services. The real challenge is to bring the world of VFX in to a realtime environment and they’re further down that road than you might think. REAL DEPTH Sensing depth was obviously something that Ncam offered DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM

24/05/2018 10:05


AUGMENTED REALITY FEATURE

SPONSORED BY

71

THE REAL PARTY TRICK WAS TO SEE A PRESENTER IMMERSED IN AND INTERACTING WITH A VIRTUAL WORLD from day one but one of its new products, first seen at NAB in 2016 as a prototype, is now mightily impressive. Interestingly the demo at the show also included volumetric capture as an asset, but the real party trick was to see a presenter immersed in and interacting with a virtual world. You may have seen this before on other virtual set demos but Ncam’s Real Depth allows the presenter to walk around digital assets – exacting depth information is working in real time. Real Depth provides a unique automated technique for sensing depth. By extracting depth data in real time, subjects are able to interact seamlessly with their virtual surroundings for the most realistic and synergetic visual engagement. It is this real-time aspect which pops up a lot in Ncam’s product description. CEO Nic Hatch explains Real Depth within the Reality camera tracking world: “Ncam Reality is our camera tracking product range and Real Depth is a new option within that. Typically,

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

broadcast graphics would always be behind you or in front of you but usually you can’t interact in terms of behind and in front. But that ability is what we’ve come up with.” For the NAB demo Ncam had a presenter on a virtual golf course – then they bring in the volumetrically captured golf pro who goes on to explain the shot with inserted moving graphics. Using Ncam’s Unreal Engine plug-in, they can bring in the golf pro asset and then add the graphics on top. The golf

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

def-june18-070-074 (space race 2) ljc NEW.indd 71

@DEFINITIONMAGS

pro talks through the shot (audio was captured with the volume) as the graphics illustrate club speed, launch angle and other supplemental information. The presenter is walking around the course and the golf pro, behind and in front. Nic continues: “The cloth on the volume capture is really good. His feet are almost perfect, the cloth on the trousers is great, the camera can go around it and do whatever you want as it’s three-dimensional – with Real Depth you can go behind the

ABOVE He’s behind you! With Real Depth, the presenter can walk around the digital golf pro, including behind him.

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION

24/05/2018 10:05


72

FEATURE AUGMENTED REALITY

virtual asset – usually broadcasters have to be careful not to overlap the virtual asset.” An impressive enough demo would have had a presenter walk around a digital asset, but Ncam threw in a volumetrically captured asset to interact with a human presenter – again, it’s very impressive when you see it live. “The graphic overlays are all in our Unreal Engine plug-in. The content is done by Nvizible, the VFX company in Soho. They do mainly visual effects works for films, like Eddie The Eagle, Kingsman, Bond. But they are moving more into real time, especially as they do a lot of pre-vis (through their Nvizage brand) for Fantastic Beasts and also as a rental partner for Ncam on films such as Solo: A Star Wars Story.” REAL AND VIRTUAL LIGHT Ncam’s Real Light is designed to solve the common challenge of making augmented graphics look like they are part of the real-world scene. Real Light captures realworld lighting, and renders it onto augmented graphics in real time, adapting to each and every lighting change. That’s a simple explanation, but this technology magically blends real and virtual light in ways you can only imagine. Real Light is about capturing the real light and using it to light the computer graphics.

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

def-june18-070-074 (space race 2) ljc NEW.indd 72

That on its own is pretty mindblowing. For the NAB demo we saw a virtual sphere lit only by its own virtual light. It didn’t change when other light was introduced on to its location, so not realistic; it’s not being picked up by any other light. It doesn’t feel like it’s part of the environment, it was very clear it was out of place. If you add Ncam Real Light into that situation you get a reflection from the real world. This was the jaw-dropping moment. You can also add different effects like shadow and real-time real-world reaction to coloured light for instance. The technology is ultimately moving towards the realisation of real-time VFX, meaning “we can start to do more realistic VFX in real time,” says Nic. Extreme was Ncam’s third new product. This is a new option for its camera tracking products and provides enhanced camera tracking for severe lighting conditions, especially stage lighting including strobing effects. Ncam Extreme is

SPONSORED BY

BELOW It’ll light up

your world – Real Light can capture real light and use it to light computer graphics. Above is Ncam Extreme.

THE REAL CHALLENGE IS TO BRING THE WORLD OF VFX INTO THE REAL TIME ENVIRONMENT

for when you have a difficult lighting condition; Ncam Reality works in low light and bright light as well but when you’ve got something like a pulsating light or strobe light it can get a bit harder to track. At NAB, Ncam was showing that even with heavy strobing lights they can still manage to track because they are using infrared tracking. It’s infrared lights on infrared spectrum so they’re able to track and bypass any hazards they might have with the lights. You can see how very useful it would be for concerts and live events – also talent shows and game shows would definitely use it.   NCAM’S WIDE APPEAL Ncam is marketing its products on three distinct fronts. Speak to some Hollywood directors and you will know that Ncam’s pre-visualisation enables unprecedented help to large productions which used massive blue or green screen sets, allowing the CGI sets to appear on screen

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM

24/05/2018 10:06


definition_June.indd 73

08/05/2018 10:45


74

FEATURE AUGMENTED REALITY

while actors are performing. For broadcast and events Ncam’s AR technology is allowing sophisticated additional live graphics to augment the action or products launch. Then there’s the magic of Real Light. Nic Hatch looks to the future: “Our scope’s quite wide because we are about pre-visualisation, we are about broadcast, which is real-time VFX, real-time graphics – it’s just the quality is lower, we need to get it higher. We think Real Light will make it more creative, make it easier so people start to adopt it. As this progresses it’s going to be quite interesting because we’ll get more and more accurate lighting. “So all that data you begin to collate and use you can then reuse for really intriguing things in the future for live VFX in television and TV episodics, where your level of

VFX isn’t too high. That’s going to be our sweet spot in the next few years and then you’ll see film doing some live VFX. We already are to some extent, for instance if you remove the green screen and put up an LED monitor wall with pre-shot plates, you can imagine an actor in front of a New York street scene on the video wall and then you get all the interaction of the lighting which can look really good. Nobody wants green screen so it’ll be interesting to see where it goes. “Ultimately, we’ll be able to go out on a location, record all the light data from say a city street or a forest dynamically as lighting does change no matter what people think. We can bring it back in to the studio to drive any video walls and lights to light the talent perfectly. It’s just data capture and then copying that

IT’S JUST DATA CAPTURE AND THEN COPYING THAT REALWORLD DATA IN TO CG DATA AND BLENDING THE TWO DEFINITION JUNE 2018

def-june18-070-074 (space race 2) ljc NEW.indd 74

SPONSORED BY

IMAGES Ncam Technologies CEO Nic Hatch keeping things real with Real Depth, Real Light and Extreme.

real-world data in to CG data and blending the two worlds. There are so many things you can drive with that data.” For Ncam this is just the beginning of where this new virtual capture technology will take them. You can also tell by the people who visited the NAB stand that the commercial world is accelerating the demand. Next month we will look at what the virtual set companies are doing and meet some home-grown previsualisation technology. DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM

24/05/2018 10:06


definition_June.indd 75

08/05/2018 15:14


76

USER REVIEW DMG MINI MIX

DMG MINI MIX Rosco’s buyout of French company DMG has resulted in a new programmable LED light with phone app user interface WORDS PHIL RHODES opular as LEDs are, they aren’t anywhere near replacing big movie lights. The biggest point source is probably the rare and expensive Mole Tener LED, at 1600W, while the biggest HMIs are fifteen times that. Still, development of LED tools for the film industry is helped out by the massive R&D spend targeting domestic and commercial lighting, and it seems very likely that one day, every light on a film set will be based on LEDs – and it’s increasingly clear that they will also offer programmable colour. Rosco’s launch of a light implementing exactly that suggests that one of the world’s top filter companies has seen change coming and is keen to pre-empt it. Rosco acquired DMG Lumière in September 2017, presumably with an eye on their Mix series of LED panel lights which provide both conventional white light and full colour mixing effects. To date, though, lights capable of doing

RIGHT The MiniMix has a great phone App and user interface. Finger pickin' good.

BELOW The DMG

Mini Mix lights with various Rosco gels.

both white and coloured light really well have been comparatively rare, often sacrificing the colour quality of the white light as a necessary compromise to offer colour mixing. It’s worth a quick recap on why this is difficult. There is no such thing as a white-emitting LED; there are only blue LEDs topped with a phosphor, often chosen so that the blue light from the LED and yellow light from the phosphor

combine to create white. Crucially, the phosphor can’t convert light to a deeper blue than the blue of the LED, and converting blue light all the way to red light, at the other end of the spectrum, is hard work. It’s also not possible to create good quality white light by mixing red, green and blue LEDs. Instead of a continuous spectrum of white light, the result would have three sharp spikes, and struggle to properly illuminate anything other than colourless subjects. These issues can be dealt with through careful design, though, and doing so well is key to the success of a light such as Rosco’s new baby. MINI MIX The device under review is the Mini Mix, a panel 205x885mm (8x23in) rated at 100W output. It will find a use lighting anything from the smaller corners of a film set to a

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


DMG MINI MIX USER REVIEW

sit-down interview, with a useful ability to create accent coloured backlights or illuminate blue or green screens effectively using highly saturated light. Removable diffusion panels offer a degree of control over the output pattern, and the light is compatible with DMG’s add-ons for their existing SWITCH lights, including dome, snapbag and grid accessories. In general it is a diffused softlight with a beam angle near 180˚. The larger SL1 Mix is twice the length and is rated 200W; an even larger version, the Maxi Mix, is planned. The LED panel sits in a machined aluminium frame, with attention to detail in the physical construction. Steel helical inserts protect the threads, and the latching mounting points will be familiar to users of other flat-panel and fluorescent lighting. A handgrip and ball-andsocket mount compatible with ⁵⁄₈” lighting spigots will fit the central latching point, while the controller and power supply can go either side, or be mounted elsewhere. The physical layout depends on whether the user wants to snap the controller and power supply (or battery) onto the back of the unit. This arrangement is fairly common among LED lighting, and means @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

that a working light may need five parts – the mains lead, power supply, controller, the intermediate cable and the light itself. The ability to snap it all together integrates the individual parts nicely, though, and it’s only a factor if it’s dismantled. The light’s party piece is its control system. White mode offers control over colour temperature from 2850K to 7500K with magentato-green correction available either as a percentage of the maximum or expressed in terms of plus or minus-green filters. Magenta-green correction is important because, alongside colour temperature, matching difficult practicals becomes possible. Gel mode emulates a selection of filters from Rosco’s range, with the option to base the simulation on light sources at either 3200K or 5600K. For arbitrary colours, there’s a mode which makes full hue and saturation control available. APP The Mix series naturally includes DMX control, but also talks to the MyMix smartphone app over bluetooth without requiring any extra hardware. The Android version of the app used in this review, marked version 0.9, was described

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

as “in beta” by the company and was a little incomplete, with only a few of Rosco’s gels and lacking the interesting Source Match option which allows users to select a colour from a photograph taken with the phone’s camera. There are issues with how accurate that can ever be, given that a smartphone’s camera is not a precision colorimeter, but it’s an interesting feature nonetheless. In general, the app seems well designed, with large active areas for dragging to control the various parameters or the option of numeric entry for specific numbers. It’s also intended to talk to Rosco’s presence on the internet, delivering updates for the app and new firmware for the lights (sensibly, updates to the lights must be manually confirmed). Users can also save and share colour swatches, an idea which might particularly find favour with big lighting teams on big productions. The feature set, then, is pretty comprehensive, but that’s only useful if the output has good colour quality. Sheer output, measured one metre from the face of the light, is around 2470 lux at 3200K and 2210 lux at 5600K, equivalent to about an f/11 at 1/50s exposure on an 800 ISO camera. Intensity is controllable

77

ABOVE Various screens from the new App with colour space details.

THE APP SEEMS WELL DESIGNED, WITH LARGE ACTIVE AREAS FOR DRAGGING JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


78

USER REVIEW DMG MINI MIX

THE MIX SERIES USES ADDITIONAL ORANGE AND LIMEGREEN EMITTERS TO EXTEND THE RANGE OF COLOURS

down to 0.1%, although, as with many LEDs, there’s a small step between the lowest level of output and none at all. The output was tested at 7500K, 6500K, 5600K, 4000K, 3200K and 2850K using the UPRTek CV600 meter. Measurements included colour temperature accuracy and the quality of the white light according to the television lighting consistency index (TLCI,) a more stringent measure than the older colour rendering index (CRI). Each colour temperature was tested at 1%, 25%, 50% and full power, to identify any problems with maintenance of colour over a range of intensities. These tests were carried out in white-emitting mode, although the colour-emitting mode, with the saturation set to zero, performs equally well, avoiding any issues when using carefully desaturated colours. TLCI The Mini Mix achieved TLCI of at least 91.2 at all 64 of the test points. For perspective, the TLCI specification suggests that above 85, “errors are so small that a colourist would not consider correcting them.” This low point coincided with the lowest available colour temperature of 2850K, at intensities below 25%. Otherwise, TLCI was in the mid to high 90s for almost all tests, a very good result. Results at 5600K were particularly good, reading uniformly over 97. Colour temperature accuracy was also very high, within a few tens of the ideal; many lights have errors DEFINITION JUNE 2018

ABOVE The remote

control for the new Mini Mix light system.

BELOW Finding the

right colour has become much easier with the new DMG Mix GUI.

of a hundred or more, which may be visible, but the Mini Mix does not. The crucial red and blue output are best represented by the CRI test patches called R9 (red) and R12 (blue), which should ideally be at 100% exposure relative to other test colours after compensating for colour temperature. At 3200K, the Mini Mix achieves 81 R9 and 94 R12, a good result. At 5600K, R9 increases to 88 while R12 falls off to 74. This is the only result in the test series which is anything less than excellent; a little more deep blue wouldn’t hurt, and the number really only seems low in comparison to the otherwise high performance. There isn’t really a standard for the assessment of coloured lighting, although the mark one eyeball revealed a reasonably close match for Rosco’s colour filters based on comparison with a swatchbook. The Mini Mix is among the top few devices currently available that combine colour and white output. The technology used is interesting, with clusters of six LEDs under the interchangeable diffusion panel. As well as the conventional

red, green, blue and white LEDs, the Mix series uses additional orange and lime-green emitters to extend the range of colours the light can create. Several of the LEDs are visibly based on the blue-driven phosphor technology, which produces a smoother, less spiky and more controllable output spectrum. The multi-emitter approach would make the light’s gamut on a CIE diagram into an irregular pentagon rather than the conventional triangle, improving the available range of colours, and is presumably the reason for the high colour quality performance. The company tells us that the Mini Mix costs €2490 (about £2200). This is an ambitious price for a 100watt light, and the feature set puts the Mini Mix into competition with the likes of Kino Flo’s Celeb 250. The Celeb is more expensive, but also 50% more powerful, to the point where the Mini Mix costs 15% more per watt. Still, given its feature set, excellent colour quality, and that neatly-done smartphone app, Rosco’s new light could hardly do more to justify the price tag.


definition_June.indd 79

04/05/2018 16:58


definition_June.indd 80

08/05/2018 10:47


G-TECH SHUTTLE XL USER REVIEW

81

G-TECH SHUTTLE XL Now the Thunderbolt 3 connection has started to populate studios, we look at G-Technology’s popular Shuttle XL with ‘3’ on board WORDS ADAM GARSTONE

-Technology has long been a favourite here at Definition Towers. Its various disk drive offerings combine great build quality and reliability with value for money and reasonable – if not blistering – speed. The company has recently updated some of its existing product line to Thunderbolt 3, in line with the latest Macs from Apple, so we thought we would have a look at the top-of-the-line G-SPEED Shuttle XL. The review unit included six 8TB Enterprise-class (‘Beam me up, Scotty’) disks, with the last two slots in the case fitted with G-Technology’s caddies for its excellent Evolution Series mobile drives. The Shuttle XL is extremely ruggedly built. The case is made of high-density black plastic, with a sturdy carrying handle integrated into the top – worthwhile as the unit weighs over 10kg. There are generous cooling fans in the rear, along with an IEC mains power inlet (a single PSU – no redundancy here) and the two Thunderbolt 3 sockets. The front of the unit has a perforated, hingedown front panel, behind which sit @DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

the eight drive locations (the unit is available with all eight populated with hard disks, if the mobile disk slots aren’t of interest to you). Capacities are available from 24TB to 72TB with the slots, and 32TB to 96TB fully populated with drives. G-Technology is always generous with cables, and in this case the Shuttle XL comes with UK and European mains leads as well as a Thunderbolt 3 cable. The unit comes pre-configured as RAID 5, which is a bit odd as

THE SHUTTLE XL COMES WITH UK AND EUROPEAN MAINS LEADS

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

RAID 5 is generally disparaged for modern, large disks. In the past, RAID 5 was fantastic – it didn’t lose you too much of your disk capacity to make the array tolerant to a single disk failing, and the speed was pretty good, too. Unfortunately, the size of modern disks brings a problem – I’ll go through the maths in the next paragraph or two. If you aren’t interested then please skip ahead, but just remember that if you leave the Shuttle XL in RAID 5 mode, and a drive fails, then you stand a good chance of losing all your data.

ABOVE Now with two Thunderbolt 3 sockets, the eightbay Shuttle XL.

THE MATHS The reason for this lies in the maths of rebuilding a disk array. RAID 5 allows one drive to fail and the array will keep working – yay! But at this point you have no redundancy at all – if another drive fails you will lose all your data. So you replace the faulty disk, and the clever JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


82

USER REVIEW G-TECH SHUTTLE XL

THE SITUATION IS WORSE, OF COURSE, IF YOU HAVE AN EIGHT-DISK ARRAY

ABOVE Does

the includion of Thunderbolt 3 turn the Shuttle XL into a speed machine?

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

RAID controller rebuilds the array. To do this it must read all the data from the surviving disks (five in the six-disk review unit). Although these are Enterprise-class (‘Fire photon torpedoes’) disks, they still have a non-recoverable error rate of 1 in 1015. To rebuild the array, the controller must read about 3.5x1014 bits from the surviving disks, so you stand around a one-in-three chance of getting an unrecoverable error, the rebuild failing, and losing all data. The situation is worse, of course, if you have an eight-disk array, but at least G-Technology ships the units with those Enterprise-class drives (‘Ahead, warp…’ OK, I’ll stop with the Star Trek references now). With error rates ten times worse, consumer class drives are pretty much guaranteed to fail in this scenario. If I was using the Shuttle XL in a data-critical application, perhaps as on-set storage for a DIT, then I

would format it as RAID 6, but in a small edit or grading suite, where re-importing the footage is always an option if something goes wrong, I would probably use RAID 0, for the extra storage space and speed. Fortunately, the application you use to configure and control the Shuttle XL is generally an excellent app – providing a simple set-up of RAID level, monitoring of both the runtime and NVRAM logs, system voltages and temperatures, and so on. The Shuttle will work with a Mac without the G-Tech driver being installed, but don’t do it – amongst other things you’ll have problems with the Mac sleeping (it crashes without the driver installed). SPEEDS There wasn’t a great deal of difference in performance between the Thunderbolt 3 version and the old Thunderbolt 2 version – the speed

being limited by the disks rather than the interface. RAID 0 was, unsurprisingly, the fastest, with writes at over 1.2GB/s and reads well over 1GB/s. RAID 5 slowed down reads to about 900MB/s, and the drive hit around 800MB/s for RAID 6, both with marginally slower write speeds of about 1.1GB/s. In a small, boutique postproduction environment, or perhaps in a DIT set-up, the inclusion of the Evolution mobile disk slots makes the transfer of rushes much cleaner. With a fleet of the mobile drives ferrying footage back and forth, slotting the drive into the unit and setting off a copy is much simpler than having flying USB leads – well, flying about. The G-Technology G-SPEED Shuttle XL starts at just over £1900 plus VAT for the 24TB drive with two ev Series Bay Adapters, to just over £7600 plus VAT for the 96TB, eightdrive version. DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 83

08/05/2018 10:47


definition_June.indd 84

08/05/2018 10:21


SONY A7 CAMERAS USER REVIEW

THREE’S THE MAGIC NUMBER irrorless cameras, such as those in the Sony A7 series, have won over swathes of users thanks to their full-frame sensors, small size, great low-light performance and stunning video footage at affordable prices – certainly compared to cinema cameras. And it’s because of this that filmmakers have tended to put up with their handling foibles and obvious inadequacies in certain areas. Irritants include woeful battery life, single card slots, odd placement of the Rec button, no touchscreen and complicated menus. And if you use the camera for stills as well, then a lack of dedicated AF-ON button, slow frame rates, tricky tethering and slow AF mean things haven’t always been ideal.

The Mark II versions of the A7 series went further towards what a pro needs, but they still had handling quirks and odd choices of spec. And Sony continued to complicate things by offering three different versions of the camera. The A7R II was high-resolution but crippled by poor slow motion, dropping down to SD for fast frame rates. The A7 II was the everyman camera that nobody really fell in love with, while the A7S II was the filmmakers’ choice, thanks to internal 4K recording, fast frame rates, decent codec and great low light performance. Then the A9 came along, with a super-fast stacked sensor to give ridiculously quick frame rates for stills and video, amazing autofocus and much improved handling. On paper it promises so much, but Sony crippled it for video by not enabling it to shoot in any S-Log or HLG gammas.

SONY HAS TAKEN LOTS OF WHAT IT HAS LEARNED FROM THE A9

MARK III Now Sony has taken lots of what it has learned from the A9 and produced a pair of Mark III versions of the A7 series. It’s spearheaded by the 42-megapixel flagship A7R III, and

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

85

The Mark III versions of Sony’s full-frame A7 series iron out lots of handling quirks WORDS AND IMAGES ADAM DUCKWORTH

joined by a clone A7 III which offers a 24.2-megapixel sensor. This is the ‘basic’ A7 model but one that shares many things with the A7R III, including a body design borrowed from the A9, as well as being significantly cheaper. A video-centric A7S III may well join the duo at some point, but until then the Mark III versions make more sense for shooting video than an A7S II due to the newer tech, speed and useability. In terms of sensors, the R version is the same 42-megapixel unit of the old A7R II, but is now capable of much more thanks to improvements in incamera processing that also applies

ABOVE There is a rumour of a video-centric A7SIII forming a trio of new cameras.

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


86

USER REVIEW SONY A7 CAMERAS

ABOVE Both cameras have eerily similar video spec.

IF YOU DON’T USE AF AS A MATTER OF PRINCIPLE, YOU MIGHT BE MISSING OUT

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

to the A7 III. The stills frame rate is now upped to 10fps, and the R can record up to 76 compressed Raw files in a continuous burst, while the lowermegapixel version can shoot 89. Most pro video shooters stick to manual focus and both cameras offer peaking and all the usual focus aids from Sony’s mirrorless cameras. But they have such good video AF that it can be used reliably, in situations where even the best focus puller would struggle. Here, the more basic A7 III aces its big brother as it uses an advanced hybrid system, and there is a noticeable improvement over the A7R III. Both struggle a little in low light, but both are very good at acquiring focus on a moving subject and tracking it. The screen still tilts, but is now a touchscreen so is ideal for doing focus pulls during video, or just touch-tofocus in stills or video mode. If you don’t use AF as a matter of principle, you might be missing out. Both new Sony A7 series cameras have two USB connections, one standard USB-2 but the other is the fast USB-C. This makes it ideal for tethering via USB-C, or even for

downloading cards or charging up the camera from a laptop; while tethered, you can use a remote release in the other USB-2 slot. Best of all is a bigger battery – you’d need at least a handful of the batteries in the old A7 series to see you through a day’s shooting. The new lithium battery is more than twice as big and lasts for a lot of shooting, thanks to the camera’s more efficient use of power. You’d still want to carry a spare for an all-day shoot, though. One of the biggest benefits of mirrorless cameras is their video capabilities, helped by impressive five-axis stabilisation (which has been improved on both cameras). It’s not quite in the same league here as on the Pananisonc GH5 or Olympus OM-D EM-1 MkII, but these have smaller sensors.

SIMILAR VIDEO SPEC Both Sony 7-series camera have eerily similar video spec as they shoot in 4K to 30p and now in 120fps super slow-motion, in full 1080 HD. For the A7R III, it can record from the full width of the sensor or cropped into a more traditional Super 35 size. The 4K footage is actually improved slightly when using the Super 35 crop as 5K footage is captured then downsized, rather than as in full-frame 4K where the more lossy pixel-binning is used. It also means that you can use Super 35-size lenses. If shooting in 1080, then full frame offers a far better image quality than the Super 35 crop (and rolling shutter is better than on the A7 II series of cameras). The A7 III samples a 6K image to deliver 4K video in its highest-quality XAVC-S codec up to a maximum bitrate of 100Mbps, still in 8-bit, in full frame without a horizontal crop in 24 and 25p. But at 30p there is a minor 1.2x crop. In HD, even at 120fps, there is no crop at all. And thanks to its lower megapixel sensor with larger photosites, it is excellent at low light, high-ISO shooting. It’s slightly disappointing there is no 4K 60p recording on either camera, and that all footage is 8-bit 4:2:0 rather than the 10-bit 4:2:2 many had hoped for. If you record to an external monitor, you get 4:2:2 clips but still at 8-bit. Perhaps that’s what’s coming on the A7S III. Both cameras also record in S-Log 2 and S-Log 3 to maximise dynamic range and Hybrid Log Gamma for easy HDR use, although S-Log 3 isn’t recommended on an 8-bit camera. DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 87

08/05/2018 15:21


definition_June.indd 88

08/05/2018 10:49


FIILEX LIGHT USER REVIEW

89

FIILEX Q8 TRAVEL LIGHT While the jury is still out whether ‘travel light’ is the right description for the Q8, we all agree on the quality WORDS PHIL VINTER f you’re looking for a light that will punch like a heavyweight, then the Fiilex Q8 Travel Light is a knockout. Describing it as a travel light is perhaps a little bit of a stretch when it weighs 7.25Kg/16lbs including the detachable yoke, but its solid metallic build and rubber bumpers front and rear certainly give it a rugged, robust feel that would stand up to rough handling on location as well as anything the studio could throw at it. The Q8 boasts a customised 20cm/8in fresnel lens and a zoom angle that can go from a 12° spot to a 60° flood. Fiilex claims this is one of the longest ranges in the industry, and it holds a beautiful quality of light throughout, with the option to flood a

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

wide space or focus a uniform beam into a tight spotlight with defined edges. In contrast to many other LED systems, the Fiilex employs a wrapping system that densely packs many diodes together inside the reflective lens, creating a powerful array that provides an intense light. There’s a little bit of physical noise when the cooling fan kicks in, but the wide air vents provide a window into the beautiful engineering under the bonnet. The light is DC powered via a bulky AC/DC adaptor that can be bolted onto rigging or a C-stand using a clamp that comes included, in either the horizontal or vertical positions. It can also connect to the majority of qualified 48volt DC batteries. There are no colour or special effects options, but there is the option to change the colour temperature from 2800-6500K, and magenta or green hues can be added up to 0.25 in either direction to blend in with the environment. The interface on the back is really simple to use with a springloaded illuminated on/off switch, and three large knobs are included for

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

colour temperature, hue and power/ brightness. A simple, self-lit display shows colour temperature, power, hue and a DMX indicator. The light has an incredibly smooth drop-off at the bottom end of the dimmable range, going down to 0.1 before falling out. The scrolling mechanism is quite fast on the colour, hue and brightness buttons and it would be nice to have the option for more finite control, but if you want to alter these functions quickly it’s great. The light comes with the option to add barn doors and the case also includes a magnetic ring that can be used to attach gels, filters and scrims. It’s got an IP rating of 24 so will stand up to a bit of rain, too. As with all lights of this class, it’s DMX ready with up to 512 lights, and you can do firmware updates through an on-board port. This is an excellent light and it really highlights the power you can squeeze out of the latest generation of LEDs. It’s not a cheap product, but it’s highly engineered and provides a great source of light. If you have the money, it’s a very good option. Price is £2635 or $2995.

AIR VENTS PROVIDE A WINDOW INTO THE BEAUTIFUL ENGINEERING

LEFT A clear,

simple screen displays essential information. JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


90

4K CAMERA LISTINGS

DEFINITION’S 4K CAMERA LIST

We’ve decided to take the brakes off the list as far as capture resolution is concerned. Now our starting point is 4K; after that the sky’s the limit

ARRI ALEXA LF 90FPS

14 + STOPS

LPL MOUNT

4448x3096

ARRI ALEXA MINI SxS / SXR

ARRI’s long awaited large format camera arrives with a package of camera, new lens mount and new Signature lenses. Expect plenty of use by Netflix. Sensor tech is still the ALEV-III technology with big photosites.

SPECIFICATION

200FPS

14 STOPS

PL MOUNT

2880x1620

SxS

New features include the EXT Sync function, which allows sensors and operational parameters of up to 15 ALEXA Minis to be synchronised to a master ALEXA Mini. Slaves can assume parameters like frame rate, shutter angle or ND setup of the master.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

CMOS, 36.70x25.54 mm - 4448x3096, ø 44.71 mm

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

CMOS, 16:9 (1.78:1), 23.8x13.4mm – S35

FRAME RATES

ARRIRAW: 0.75 - 90fps ProRes: 0.75 – 60fps

FRAME RATES

Up to 200fps in ProRes

LATITUDE (STOPS)

14+

LATITUDE (STOPS)

14

LENS MOUNT

LPL with PL-to-LPL adapter

LENS MOUNT

PL, EF, B4 w/ Hirose connector

EXPOSURE INDEX

EI 800

DIGITAL SAMPLING

2880x1620, uncompressed ARRIRAW/1920x1080

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

16 bit linear ALEXA Wide Gamut/Log C colour space. Output colour spaces: Log C, Rec 709 or Rec 2020

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

3.2K: 3200x1800; 4K UHD: 3840x2160 (up-sampled from 3.2K); 4:3 2.8K: 2880x2160 (up to 2944x2160)

RECORDING RESOLUTIONS

Sensor modes – LF Open Gate 4448x3096; LF 16:9 3840x2160; LF 2.39:1 4448x1856

WEIGHT (KG)

2.3 (camera body with titanium PL lens mount)

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


4K CAMERA LISTINGS

ARRI ALEXA SXT EV 120FPS

14 STOPS

PL MOUNT

2880x2160

ARRI ALEXA SXT W

SxS/SXR

SXT ALEXAs get the sensor from ALEXA, the electronics from the A65 and the colour management from AMIRA. In-camera rec is ProRes 4K UHD/CINE. A direct response to requests for cutting-edge digital capture with traditional elements of the film cameras.

SPECIFICATION

91

120FPS

> 14 STOPS

PL MOUNT

2880x1620

SxS

Based on the ALEXA SXT Plus, the SXT W has replaced the SXT Plus and Studio models with an industrial version of the Amimon chipset for wireless transmission. ARRI has ruggedised the W mainly for feature work.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

16:9 or 4:3 sensor mode. 4:3 output only for ARRIRAW and ProRes 2K recording

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

16:9 or 4:3 sensor mode. 4:3 output only available for ARRIRAW and ProRes 2K recording

FRAME RATES

At 16:9 – 0.75-120fps/60fps max when recording 2K ProRes/speeds adjustable with 1/1000fps precision

FRAME RATES

At 16:9 – 0.75–120fps/60fps max when recording 2K ProRes/speeds

LATITUDE (STOPS)

14+

LATITUDE (STOPS)

+14

LENS MOUNT

54 mm stainless steel LDS PL mount

LENS MOUNT

PL

DIGITAL SAMPLING

2880x2160 uncompressed ARRIRAW

DIGITAL SAMPLING

2880x1620, Uncompressed ARRIRAW/1920x1080

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

SxS PRO 64GB; SxS PRO+ 64GB; SxS PRO+ 128GB; LEXAR 3600x CFast 2.0 cards 256GB; XR Capture Drives 512GB; SXR Capture Drives 1TB & 2TB

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

16-bit linear internal image processing in full ALEXA Wide Gamut/Log C colour space. Target output colour spaces: Log C, Rec. 709 or Rec. 2020

WEIGHT (KG)

6.5 (SXT EV body with PL mount)

ARRI ALEXA 65 60FPS

> 14 STOPS

XPL MOUNT

5120x2880

ARRI AMIRA SXR/XR

With a sensor larger than a 5-perf 65mm film frame, ALEXA 65 heralded the start of large format. Now shooting as a main production camera for Netflix, Amazon and the rest. Only available exclusively through their global network of rental facilities.

SPECIFICATION

200FPS

14 STOPS

PL MOUNT

2880x1620

CFAST

Amira is now split up into standard, advanced and premium. Features include in-camera grading with preloaded 3D LUTs, as well as 200fps slow motion. From reportage and corporate films to TV drama and low-budget movies. Multicam mode too.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

ARRI A3X CMOS sensor, 54.12x25.58mm active image area. Open Gate aspect ratio of 2.11:1 (6560x3100)

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single CMOS, 16:9 (1.78:1), 28.17x18.3mm – 35 format

FRAME RATES

Capable of recording 20-60fps (open gate) using new SXR media. XR drives allow 27fps

FRAME RATES

Up to 200fps in ProRes

LATITUDE (STOPS)

14+

LATITUDE (STOPS)

14

LENS MOUNT

ARRI XPL mount with Lens Data System (LDS)

LENS MOUNT

PL, B4 mount w/ Hirose connector

DIGITAL SAMPLING

1.78 crop mode (5-perf 65mm): 5120x2880 and 1.50:1 crop mode – 4320x2880

DIGITAL SAMPLING

2880x1620, uncompressed ARRIRAW/1920x1080

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

Codex SXR Capture Drive 2000 GByte capacity Max. frame rate capability: 60 fps (Open Gate) Recording time: 43 minutes at 24 fps

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

HD 1920x1080, 2K 2048x1152, 3.2K ProRes 3200x1800 4K UHD 3840x2160

WEIGHT (KG)

10.5

WEIGHT (KG)

4.1 (camera body with PL lens mount)

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


92

4K CAMERA LISTINGS

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN POCKET CINEMA 4K 60FPS

13 STOPS

MFT MOUNT

4096X2160

CFAST/SD

New Pocket Cinema 4K, a handheld digital film camera with full Four Thirds HDR sensor, dual native ISO with up to ISO 25600. Unique new USB-C Expansion Port.

SPECIFICATION

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN MICRO STUDIO 60FPS

11 STOPS

MFT MOUNT

3840x2160

N/A

Tiny Ultra HD resolution camera that can be used in HD and Ultra HD video formats – includes 6G-SDI connections, colour corrector, talkback, tally indicator and PTZ control.

SPECIFICATION Full size Four Thirds sized sensor with 4096x2160 resolution.

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single CMOS, 13.056mmx7.344mm

FRAME RATES

Records 4K images at up to 60 frames-per-second and windowed HD at up to 120 frames-per-second.

FRAME RATES

HD 1080p23.98, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 50, 59.94, 60 Ultra HD 2160p23.98, 24, 25, 29.97, 30

10-bit ProRes and 12-bit RAW recording

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN URSA 60FPS

15 STOPS

PL/EF MOUNT 4608x2592

CFAST

Now with the new sensor option that it desperately needed. This is a big camera with an even bigger monitor. Our advice is to upgrade to the new 4.6K sensor.

SPECIFICATION

3840x2160, 1920x1080

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN URSA MINI 15 STOPS

PL/EF MOUNT 4608x2592

CFAST

A lightweight version of URSA but with the 4.6K Super 35mm image sensor. Shoots up to 60 fps, has a bright 5in fold-out viewfinder, dual Raw and ProRes recorders.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

25.34x14.25mm – 4.6K 22x11.88mm – 4K

FRAME RATES

23.98, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 50, 59.94 and 60fps supported

DIGITAL SAMPLING

DIGITAL SAMPLING

60FPS

CinemaDNG RAW 3:1 – 180MB/s CinemaDNG RAW 4:1 – 135MB/s

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

11 STOPS

MFT MOUNT

3840x2160

N/A

Another live UHD broadcast camera but with a teninch viewfinder, Micro Four Thirds lens mount and fourhour battery pack. Switchable between HD and UHD.

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single CMOS, 12.48x7.02mm

FRAME RATES

Ultra HD 2160p23.98, 24, 25, 29.97, 30

DIGITAL SAMPLING

No on-board recording SDI video output. HD/UHD switch 1x 6G-SDI 10-bit 4:2:2 via DIN 1.0/2.3 connector

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN URSA MINI PRO 60FPS in 4.6K

15 STOPS

EF MOUNT PL MOUNT B4 MOUNT 4608x2592

CFAST

As well as a newly activated secret Bluetooth ability, there’s an app for multicam recording and more. BMD is even giving away the source code for custom apps.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

25.34x14.25mm – 4.6K, 22x11.88mm – 4K

FRAME RATES

23.98, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 50, 59.94 and 60fps supported

DIGITAL SAMPLING

60FPS

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

DIGITAL SAMPLING

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN STUDIO 4K

Lossless CinemaDNG RAW, 3:1 and 4:1

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

25.34x14.25mm (Super35)

FRAME RATES

23.98, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 50, 59.94 and 60 fps supported.

DIGITAL SAMPLING

4608x2592, 4608x1920 (4.6K 2.40:1), 4096x2304 (4K 16:9), 4096x2160 (4K DCI), 3840x2160 (Ultra HD), 3072x2560

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


4K CAMERA LISTINGS

CANON EOS C200 50FPS

15 STOPS

EF MOUNT

4206X2340

93

CANON EOS C300 MARK II

CFAST

The newest member of Cinema EOS and the first to support the new RAW recording format – Cinema RAW Light. Newly developed Canon Dual DIGIC DV6 processors allow recording internally to 4K UHD/50P MP4, 4K DCI RAW and 120fps in HD without crop.

SPECIFICATION

59.94FPS

15 STOPS

EF/PL MOUNT

4096x2160

CFAST

Mark II has a brand-new Super 35mm, 4K sensor offering 15 stops of dynamic range (we measured 12). This sensor doesn’t have a global shutter, unfortunately, but read-out speed has been doubled over that of the C300 Mark I to reduce rolling shutter artefacts.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super 35mm type CMOS, 9.84 megapixels 4206x2340

FRAME RATES

25p, 50p. RAW: 1-60fps. HRAW: 1-60fps, 62-120fps

LATITUDE (STOPS)

Claimed 15 stops with Cinema RAW Liight

LENS MOUNT

EF

DIGITAL SAMPLING

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super 35mm type CMOS, 9.84 megapixels

FRAME RATES

59.94i/59.94p/29.97p/23.98p

LATITUDE (STOPS)

Claimed 15 stops with Log2 (we measured 12)

LENS MOUNT

EF (PL is an optional upgrade)

4206 x 2340

DIGITAL SAMPLING

4096x2160, 3840x2160, 2048x1080

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

128GB card 15 Mins (4K Cinema RAW Light 1Gbps VBR)

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

4K at up to 410Mbps/10-bit with XF-AVC H.264 codec

WEIGHT (KG)

Approx. 1.430

WEIGHT (KG)

EF Mount: 1.77; PL Mount: 2; EF Mount: 1.85

CANON EOS C700 120FPS

N/A

CANON EOS C700 FF

EF/PL/B4 MOUNT 4622x2496 CFAST / CODEX

Canon’s latest EOS cinema camera is their highest spec yet and offers 4.5K Raw up to 60p by adding the optional custom-made CODEX recorder and you’ll get 4K Raw at a very usable 120fps. 4K internal is to CFast cards to XF-AVCMXF or ProRes codecs.

SPECIFICATION

60FPS

15 STOPS

N/A

5952 X 3140 CFAST 2.0/SD - CODEX

The new FF is Canon’s flagship full-frame Cinema EOS camera. Thanks to a newly developed CMOS sensor, the camera is capable of recording up to 5.9K and supports multi-format recording, shooting with EF, PL and anamorphic lenses.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single CMOS, 4622x2496

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single CMOS, 38.1mmx20.1mm

FRAME RATES

59.94i/59.94p/29.9p/23.98p/50.00i/50.00p/25.00p

FRAME RATES (Raw)

Raw mode: 5952x3140/5952x2532: 10-bit 4096x2160/2048x1080: 12-bit

LATITUDE (STOPS)

Not yet measured

LATITUDE (STOPS)

15

LENS MOUNT

EF (PL and B4 mount adapter options)

LENS MOUNT

Canon EF Mount with Cinema Lock/PL Mount (Cooke/i Technology compatible)

DIGITAL SAMPLING

XF-AVC/MPEG-4 AVC/H.264/ProRes/Raw

XF-AVC - Intra: 810Mbps, 10 min 160Mbps, 50 min. XF-AVC Long GOP 50Mbps: 165 min ProRes: 4K, ProRes 4322HQ 10 min. 2K ProRes4444 25 min (25.00P) EOS C700 FF EF: Approx. 3440g (7.6lb)

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

10-bit/12-bit option for Raw /4096x2160/4512x2376

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

WEIGHT (KG)

n/a

WEIGHT (KG)

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


94

4K CAMERA LISTINGS

RED RAVEN 120FPS@4.5K

16.5+ STOPS

EF MOUNT

RED SCARLET-W 5K

4608x2160 RED MINI MAG

120FPS@4.K

RED’s introduction to their brand of digital cinematography has a 4.5K DRAGON sensor. Capable of capturing footage with REDCODE RAW in 4.5K full format at up to 120fps, or in 2K FF at 240fps. Also now in Apple stores with FCP-X editor.

16.5+ STOPS

NO MOUNT

5120x2700 RED MINI MAG

SCARLET-W combines RED’s camera design by including integrated mounting points, interchangeable lens mounts with simultaneous REDCODE RAW and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD recording formats, intelligent OLPF system and in-camera 3D LUT outputs.

SPECIFICATION

SPECIFICATION SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

RED DRAGON CMOS, 9.9 megapixels, 4608x2160

FRAME RATES

REDCODE RAW in 4.5K full format (at up to 120fps, or in 2K FF at 240fps)

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

RED DRAGON CMOS, 13.8 megapixels, 5120x2700, 25.6x13.5mm size

FRAME RATES

50fps at 5K full format (5120x2700), 60fps at 5K 2.4:1 (5120x2160). 120fps at 4K full format (4096x2160), 150fps at 4K 2.4:1 (4096x1728)

DYNAMIC RANGE

16.5+ stops

LENS MOUNT

EF

DYNAMIC RANGE

16.5+ stops

EFFECTIVE PIXELS

4608x2160

LENS MOUNT

The camera does not ship with a lens mount

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

Captures in both .R3D and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD file formats. 4.5K (4608x2160) and 24fps at 3:1 REDCODE

EFFECTIVE PIXELS

5120x2700

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

4:1 REDCODE for 5K full format (5120x2700) at 24fps

WEIGHT (KG)

n/a

WEIGHT (KG)

1.59 (BRAIN with Integrated Media Bay)

RED EPIC-W 30FPS@8K

16.5+ STOPS

NO MOUNT

8192x4320 RED MINI MAG

The easiest way to get into 8K cinematography and if you’re an existing user you can upgrade to the DSMC2 body for simultaneous codec recording.

SPECIFICATION

RED WEAPON 8K VV 60FPS@8K

17.5+ STOPS

PL/EF MOUNT

8192x4320 RED MINI MAG

RED’s new MONSTRO sensor on-board the WEAPON hardware offering over 17+ stops of dynamic range. This is the ultimate RED camera. Stunning achievement.

SPECIFICATION MONSTRO, 35.4 megapixels, 8192X4320, 40.96x21.60 mm

FRAME RATES

REDCODE – 30fps at 8K (8192x4320), 100fps at 6K 2.4:1 (6144x2592). PRORES – 422 HQ, 422 and 422 LT at 4K (4096x2160) up to 29.97fps

DYNAMIC RANGE

16.5+ stops

HELIUM, 35.4 megapixels, 8192x4320, 29.90x15.77mm

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

75FPS@8K

16.5+ STOPS

PL/EF MOUNT

8192x4320 RED MINI MAG

Don’t underestimate the engineering feat of these 8K cameras from RED, a breathtaking achievement. 8K WEAPON brain with the HELIUM sensor.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

RED WEAPON 8K S35

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

HELIUM, 35.4 megapixels, 8192x4320, 29.90x15.77mm

FRAME RATES

REDCODE – 60fps at 8K (8192X4320), 75fps at 8K 2.4:1 (8192X3456) – 12:1 PRORES – 422 HQ, 422 AND 422 LT at 4K (4096x2160) up to 29.97fps

FRAME RATES

REDCODE – 60fps at 8K (8192x4320), 75fps at 8K 2.4:1 (8192x3456). PRORES – 422 HQ, 422 and 422 LT at 4K (4096x2160) up to 29.97fps

DYNAMIC RANGE

17+ stops

DYNAMIC RANGE

16.5+ stops

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


4K CAMERA LISTINGS

PANASONIC AU-EVA1 60FPS@4K

14

EF MOUNT

5720X3016

95

PANASONIC PURE

DUAL SD

120FPS

A new 5.7K cinema camera positioned between the Panasonic Lumix GH5 4K mirrorless camera and the VariCam LT 4K cinema camera. Has the dual native ISO of the LT and 35. Also has V-Log and records to SD cards.

SPECIFICATION

14+ STOPS

PL MOUNT

4096x2160

CODEX

The Panasonic VariCam PURE is co-developed with Codex to place their V-RAW recorder directly on the camera. What you get is a very compact, 4K Raw-only camera package for features and high-end drama.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super 35 5.7K - 5720x3016

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super 35mm MOS sensor. Approx. 8.9 million pixels

FRAME RATES

59.94fps/50fps for 4K/UHD. Up to 120fps/100fps for 2K/Full HD. 240fps/200fps (cropped) for high-speed

FRAME RATES

4096x2160/59.94p, 50p, 29.97p, 25p, 24p, 23.98p 3840x2160/59.94p, 50p, 29.97p, 25p, 23.98p

LATITUDE (STOPS)

14 (claimed)

LATITUDE (STOPS)

14+

LENS MOUNT

EF

LENS MOUNT

PL

DIGITAL SAMPLING

Dual Native ISO of 800 & 2500

DIGITAL SAMPLING

4096x2160 (4K), 3840x2160 (UHD)

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

4.2.2 10-bit – Video Codec up to 400 Mbps V-log & V-gamut. 5.7K Raw output (future update)

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

With 2TB capture drive – 4K 12 bit/23.98 fps: 100 min With 2TB capture drive – 4K 10 bit/120 fps: 22 min With 2TB capture drive – UHD 12 bit/23.98 fps: 106 min

WEIGHT (KG)

1.2 (camera only)

WEIGHT (KG)

5.15 (with CODEX recorder)

PANASONIC DVX200 120FPS

12 STOPS

N/A

4096x2160

SD VARIED

PANASONIC VARICAM LT 60FPS

EF/PL MOUNT

14 STOPS

4096x2160

P2 VARIED

For indie filmmakers. A fast zoom lens (13x zoom lens from Leica Dicomar) with variable frame rates up to 120fps, 12 stops of DR, V-Log, NDs and 5-axis STAB.

Panasonic’s latest VariCam for the drama market. Same sensor as the 35 but no more de-coupling. You can ‘easily’ change lens mount to PL.

SPECIFICATION

SPECIFICATION

PANASONIC VARICAM 35 120FPS

PL MOUNT

14 STOPS

4096x2160

P2 VARIED

Panasonic’s latest high-end VariCam with its decoupled philosophy and famous dual native ISOs. 5000 ISO is a game changer for night shoots –no noise.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Four Thirds-type MOS 4096x2160

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super35mm MOS, 8.9 megapixels

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super35mm MOS, 8.9 megapixels

FRAME RATES

DCI 4K: 24p UHD 4K: 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p

FRAME RATES

4096x2160 – 59.94p, 50p, 29.97p, 25p, 24p, 23.98p 3840x2160 – 59.94p, 50p, 29.97p, 25p, 23.98p

FRAME RATES

4096x2160 – 59.94p, 50p, 29.97p, 25p, 24p, 23.98p 3840x2160 – 59.94p, 50p, 29.97p, 25p, 23.98p

DIGITAL SAMPLING

12

DIGITAL SAMPLING

14

DIGITAL SAMPLING

14

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

@DEFINITIONMAGS

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


96

4K CAMERA LISTINGS

PANAVISION DXL2 UP TO 60FPS AT 8K

16 STOPS

PL MOUNT

8192X4320

VISION RESEARCH FLEX 4K

SSD

1000FPS

The Panavision DXL2 is a software updated new version of the DXL. An optimised RED Monstro sensor gives 16 stops of dynamic range and 1600 native ISO.

CINEMAG

Phantom Flex4K is a high-speed camera providing flexibility with its frame rate capabilities. Capable of shooting from 15fps up to 1000fps at 4K and almost 2000fps at 2K/1080p. The new GS is the global shutter version and can save to ProRes 422.

SPECIFICATION

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

16-bit, 35.5-megapixel CMOS. 40.96mmx21.60mm (Diagonal: 46.31mm). Resolution is 8192x4320

FRAME RATES

Upto 60fps at 8K Full Frame (8192x4320), 75fps at 8K 2.4:1 (8192x3456)

LATITUDE (STOPS)

16

LENS MOUNT

PL

COLOUR PROFILE

Light Iron Color 2

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME WEIGHT (KG)

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single CMOS chip, 27.6x15.5mm

FRAME RATES

9.4-megapixel sensor and greater than 8-gigapixel/ sec throughput, with 24-1000fps at 4096x2106p

LATITUDE (STOPS)

17

LENS MOUNT

PL, Nikon F, Sony B4, Canon EF

DIGITAL SAMPLING

4096x2304

SSD (up to 1 hour on a single TeraByte magazine)

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

12-bit depth uncompressed Raw/4GB, 32GB Internal RAM/1TB and 2TB external hot-swap storage/4.9s at 1000fps at 12-bit at 2160p/3 main 3G HD-SDI outputs

4.5

WEIGHT (KG)

5.9Kg (without lens or viewfinder)

JVC GY-HM170/180 25FPS

17 STOPS OPTIONAL MOUNTS 4096x2304

N/A

N/A

3840x2160

SDHC/SDXC

With a 12x optical zoom lens and low pricing, these 50Mbps camcorders offer switchable HD and 4K performance. GY-HM180E adds a 3G-SDI output.

SPECIFICATION

JVC GY-HM250E 25FPS

N/A

N/A

3840x2160

SDHC/SDXC

This is a no-apologies broadcast professional camera with XLRs for the audio, sophisticated live streaming and full screen graphic overlay capabilities. 4:2:2 added.

SPECIFICATION

30FPS

N/A

MFT MOUNT

4096x2160

SDHC/SDXC

JVC’s indie cinema 4K camera has a low price, a big sensor and a Log setting but no 4K high-speed options. Price and streaming options will appeal.

SPECIFICATION SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

AltaSens Super 35mm 13.5-megapixel CMOS

3840x2160/25p

FRAME RATES

v2 software adds 4096x2160 Cinema 4K and 2048x1920 Cinema 2K recording modes. 4K stops at 30p, HD goes to 120

4:2:2 50Mbps HD (24p-60p) 4K Ultra HD recording (150Mbps, 24p/30p)

DIGITAL SAMPLING

4:2:2 50Mbps HD (24p-60p) 4K Ultra HD recording (150Mbps, 24p/30p)

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single 1/2.3in CMOS sensor, 12.4 megapixels

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Single 1/2.3in CMOS sensor, 12.4 megapixels

FRAME RATES

3840x2160/25p

FRAME RATES

DIGITAL SAMPLING

4:2:2 50Mbps HD (24p-60p) 4K Ultra HD recording (150Mbps, 24p/30p)

DIGITAL SAMPLING

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

JVC GY-LS300

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


4K CAMERA LISTINGS

SONY FS5 29.97FPS

11 STOPS

E MOUNT

3840x2160

97

SONY FS7 & FS7 II SDXC

59.94FPS

Sony’s PXW-FS5 is a small, light, flexible camera with a great sensor, nice handgrip and a good range of available lenses. Of course, its size and price lead to some compromises, look hard at your client list to see if they will matter to them.

11 STOPS

E MOUNT

4096x2160

XQD/SD

Sony has now introduced the FS7 II with built-in variable NDs, locking lens mount and Rec. 2020 colour space as an option. Version 4 firmware improves operability of low speed zoom with the handle zoom button. Overall camera stability is improved.

SPECIFICATION

SPECIFICATION SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super 35mm, single-chip Exmor CMOS 17:9 4096x2160 – 16:9 3840x2160

FRAME RATES

XAVC-I mode: 4K 59.94P VBR, bit rate 600Mbps, MPEG-4 H.264/AVC

LATITUDE (STOPS)

11

LENS MOUNT

E

XAVC QFHD: MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 4:2:0 Long profile

DIGITAL SAMPLING

4096x2160

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

XAVC-L QFHD 100 mode. Approx. 65mins with 64GB memory card. Now exports to HLG for HDR.

RECORDED BIT DEPTH FORMAT AND TIME

XAVC-I mode 4K/QFHD 50p. When using QD-G128A (128GB): Approx. 26mins, QD-G64A (64GB) 13mins

WEIGHT (KG)

0.83 (body only)

WEIGHT (KG)

Approx 2.0 (body only)

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Exmor Super 35mm CMOS, 3840x2160

FRAME RATES

XAVC QFHD (3840x2160) at 29.97p, 25p, 23.98p 100Mbps/60Mbps

LATITUDE (STOPS)

11

LENS MOUNT

E

DIGITAL SAMPLING

SONY F5 120FPS

14 STOPS

PL/FZ MOUNT

4096x2160

SONY F55 SxS

Features built-in recording modes to deliver 4:2:2 colour, along with 16-bit linear Raw 2K/4K recording and 120fps recording without cropping, needs external recorder.

SPECIFICATION

59.94FPS

14 STOPS

PL/FZ MOUNT

4096x2160

SONY VENICE SRMEMORY

Features an 8.9-megapixel Super 35mm image sensor, capable of capturing 4K, 2K and HD. New AXS-R7 recorder out with the new X-OCN recording format.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super 35mm equivalent single-chip 4K CMOS

FRAME RATES

MPEG-2 HD422, MDPEG4 SStP, XAVC 2K/HD and 16-bit Raw 2L/4K. In v8 firmware there is a new codec with higher bit rate

DIGITAL SAMPLING

14

@DEFINITIONMAGAZINE |

@DEFINITIONMAGS |

60FPS

TBC

PL/E MOUNT

6048X4032

SXS/AXSM

Sony’s new hope to get more features and high-end TV. A full-frame camera with a licence arrangement to enable full-frame and anamorphic shooting.

SPECIFICATION

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

Super 35mm equivalent single-chip CMOS with global shutter

FRAME RATES

XAVC 4K: 4096x2160 at 23.98p, 25p, 29.97p, 50p, 59.94p XAVC QFHD: 3840x2160 at 23.98p, 25p, 29.97p, 50p, 59.94p

DIGITAL SAMPLING

14

@DEFINITIONMAGS

SENSOR – FORMAT AND SIZE

New 36x24mm sensor with a maximum resolution of 6048x4032. Various imager modes to support shoot modes

FRAME RATES

Up to 60fps at 4K but using the full frame license and 6K you’ll get only 30fps

DIGITAL SAMPLING

tbc

JUNE 2018 DEFINITION


NEXT MONTH

LOST IN SPACE MAJOR NEW SCI-FI SERIES FROM NETFLIX

REVIEW

Kinefinity’s MAVO camera is available as S35mm or large-format.

REVIEW

Rainbow Linear LED lights from US company Quasar Science.

GEAR GROUP

Just in time for the large-format world, we focus in on focusing.

SPACE RACE 3

More new ways to capture footage on its way to digital immersion.

ALSO…

Take a walk on the pro side of VR/AR, audio and lighting.

ON SALE 21 JUNE 2018 ALSO AVAILABLE ON THE APP STORE

DEFINITION JUNE 2018

DEFINITIONMAGAZINE.COM


definition_June.indd 99

04/05/2018 16:58


definition_June.indd 100

04/05/2018 16:58

Profile for Bright Publishing

Definition June 2018  

Definition June 2018