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EDITORIAL

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Senior sub editor Lisa Clatworthy Sub editors Siobhan Godwood, Felicity Evans

ADVERTISING

Senior sales executive Chris Jacobs 01223 499463 chrisjacobs@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Lee Fifield 01223 492240 leefifield@bright-publishing.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Cathy Moore, Charlotte Griffiths, Charlotte Phillips, Daisy Dickinson, Elodie Cameron, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Siobhan Godwood

DESIGN & PRODUCTION Editorial designer Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong 01223 499468 manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com

MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK find us @cambsedition CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

This month’s cover illustration, depicting the Clare College Bridge, was created by Flo Thomas. See more of Flo’s illustrations on Etsy at HeydayDesignsUK or at heydaydesigns.co.uk

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

Welcome ur long, hot summer feeling like a distant memory already (did we imagine it?), we’re now well and truly into autumn. But while punting and picnicking by the river might be off the agenda for a while, I recommend a stroll around the city centre – burnished in rich autumnal colours, Cambridge is at its most beautiful at this time of year. The events calendar really gets going in October too, giving us plenty of reasons to get out and about. One of my top picks is the Cambridge University-organised Festival of Ideas: a dynamic and thought-provoking series of debates, workshops, talks, exhibitions and performances. A celebration of arts, humanities, social sciences and Cambridge’s reputation as an incubator of worldchanging ideas and innovations, it’s a chance to get under the skin of some of the most pressing issues faced by society. We’ve rounded up some highlights on page 18. Sunday Papers Live makes a welcome return as well, promising a day of scintillating talks, live entertainment, roast potatoes, Bloody Marys, slippers and squishy sofas – if that sounds like heaven, you can get the low-down on page 21. Another cultural highlight, the Cambridge Film Festival, is back toward the end of this month too, bringing its typically eclectic mix of blockbusters, indie, classic, foreign and factual films between 25 October and 1 November. Read some of our top picks on page 25. In the mood to hunker down with a cosy feast this month? I can recommend heading up Victoria Road for a visit to the revamped Carpenters Arms, now serving fantastic pizzas and bubbling pots of comfort food in the mould of its sister pub the Salisbury Arms – read our review over on page 42. Also in our food section this month, we chat to Bill Sewell, proprietor of the wellloved Michaelhouse Café, which celebrates its ten-year anniversary this month. Turn to page 49 to find out more about how this local institution was born, and get inspired by some of Bill’s favourite recipes from over the years. We’ve also been meeting the movers and shakers from Cambridge’s craft beer scene, which continues to flourish, plus Alex pours forth more beery fun with a recipe for ale soda bread. There’s theatre, gigs, exhibitions and plenty more inside too – enjoy the issue and see you next month!

Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

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CONTENTS 9 l ARTS & CULTURE Exhibitions, art shows and theatre highlights to enjoy this month

18 l FESTIVAL OF IDEAS

Talks, exhibitions, performances and hands-on activities designed to expand your mind

21 l SUNDAY PAPERS LIVE

See the Sunday papers brought to life – with added Bloody Marys! – at this genius local event

22 l BOOK CLUB

Find out more about this month’s top read: Patrick Gale’s Take Nothing With You

25 l FILM FESTIVAL

The annual city wide celebration of all things cinematic returns

26 l AFTER HOURS

Comedy, festivals, gigs and more nightlife fun to seek out this October

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31 l LISTINGS

Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this month

42 l REVIEW

35 l FAMILY

We head up Victoria Road to sample the pizzas, pots and pints on offer at the Carpenters Arms

41 l COMPETITION

The staff at The Gog highlight the seasonal produce to seek out this month

Ghoulish Halloween fun, and a helping of colourful kids theatre at the Junction We’ve teamed up with Guernsey’s glorious Bella Luce hotel to give away a luxury minibreak!

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45 l NATURE’S LARDER 46 l FOOD NEWS

The latest news from Cambridge’s buzzing food scene

49 l INSIDE BILL’S KITCHEN

83 l COMPETITION

Win yourself a top of the range bicycle from Rutland Cycling

84 l FASHION

We round up the top trends of the month and show you how to recreate them

53 l DIZZY BREW HEIGHTS

86 l INDIE OF THE MONTH

Cambridge’s craft beer scene is fermenting nicely: we speak to the brewers at the forefront

In the spotlight this month: local design company Loci

93 l OPEN SEASON

Continuing the beery fun, Alex shows how to make an irresistible ale soda bread

With school open day season in full swing, we consider how to see past the bells and whistles

61 l CHEF’S TABLE

101 l SCHOOL SPOTLIGHT

This month Alex is all about the pumpkins – without a jack-o’-lantern in sight

62 l DRINKS TROLLEY

Wine tips, boozy happenings and our favourite hidden drinking dens in the city

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81 l BEAUTY

Make-up tips fit for ghouls, ghosts and, of course, gals

We celebrate a decade of deliciousness at Cambridge institution Michaelhouse Café

58 l MAKE THE BEST

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65 l WEDDING SPECIAL

Planning your big day? Get inspired with our showcase of top local suppliers

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Sancton Wood School’s headteacher on why screen time isn’t all bad

107 l INTERIORS

Angelina casts her eye over the new homeware trends, from matt black to terrazzo flooring

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GET CURIOUS ABOUT THE SECRET LIFE OF FLIES Discover how genome sequencing is revealing much more about the world around us with the latest exhibition and events programme at the Wellcome Genome Campus

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hy do some brown trout migrate to the open ocean, whilst others don’t? How do robins ‘see’ the magnetic fields of the Earth? Why are red squirrels vulnerable to the squirrel pox virus, when grey squirrels are not? The answers are hiding in their genes! Humans have long sought to classify and interpret the natural world, to better understand how things are related to each other. Now our ability to analyse the genetic information of all living things, encoded in their DNA, is enabling us to explore these similarities and differences in greater detail than ever before. Curious Nature – the latest exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Genome Gallery – explores the Wellcome Sanger Institute’s 25th anniversary project to sequence the genomes of 25 species found in the UK. The exhibition explores how sequencing the DNA of these species will help to build a picture of biodiversity in the UK, helping us to better know the environment we live in, and also to understand and tackle our impact upon it. The exhibition is designed to spark your curiosity about the natural world through touch, sight and sound. Young visitors

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can also pick up an exhibition explorer guide to discover more! The family-friendly exhibition is open the third Saturday of every month during the Wellcome Genome Campus Open Saturdays, as well as during the Genome Lates, a series of talks looking at some of the themes raised in Curious Nature.

between the malaria parasite, mosquitoes and humans. l Curious Nature and the Genome Lates run until 20 April 2019. Both the exhibition and the talks are free but booking is required. wgc.org.uk/engage

GENOME LATES: OCTOBER

Flies: At best we tolerate them, but more often than not we swat them without a moment’s consideration. But should this be the case? Join us at 6.30pm on Friday 5 October to discover why we should give flies a break, in a talk with two fly experts. Dr Erica McAllister from the Natural History Museum, author of The Secret Life of Flies, will share some fascinating insights and research into these neglected beasts and how studying the museum’s collection in new ways is revealing long-hidden answers. Wellcome Sanger Institute’s Dr Mara Lawniczak will then shed some light on mosquitos – also a type of fly and one of the planet’s most dangerous animals. She will discuss malaria research, and how genomics is helping us to better understand disease transmission and the interactions

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Culture Club ART EXHIBITIONS • THEATRE • BOOK CLUB • FESTIVALS • SUNDAY PAPERS LIVE

Cystine by Stefan Eberhard. Find out more about RAREfest on page 14.

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T HE T HIN K ING DR IN K ER S: PU B CR AW L

Go on a pub crawl through time with the Thinking Drinkers this month at the Junction, who’ll be serving up a laugh-a-minute booze fuelled history lesson on the 25th. A celebration of drinking dens, from Victorian gin palaces and winedrenched, ancient Greek symposiums, through Wild West saloons and secret speakeasies, to that bastion of Britishness the pub, this is an intoxicating bar-hop around the world and through the ages. You’ll learn, you’ll laugh, and you’ll get five free drinks – which makes the ticket price of £17 an absolute bargain! 18+ only. junction.co.uk

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HOMERTON 250 FESTIVAL While it might be new in the University of Cambridge’s terms, Homerton College reaches the ripe old age of 250 this year, an occasion that’s being marked with a busy programme of events throughout the year. The pinnacle of the celebrations, taking place on 27 October, is the Homerton 250 Festival, which will serve up a dynamic day of music, science and drama – offering a chance to see the college as you’ve never seen it before. Join in with workshops, immerse yourself in storytelling, enjoy live music and be wowed by science demonstrations at the free, day-long event. Highlights are sure to include the masterclass and discussion with Dame Evelyn Glennie – the world’s premier solo percussionist and an Honorary Fellow of Homerton College. Be sure to seek out the ‘messy chemistry’ sessions too, and explore the sensory Quiet Room. If you’re feeling energetic, there are dance workshops and even zorbing to enjoy, plus a host of craft stalls and food to sample – including an Alice in Wonderland themed lunch in Homerton’s Victorian Great Hall. For those more active in mind than body, consider the celebration’s three Burning Questions: What is the future of healthcare? What does it mean to be human? How do we drive change? All will be explored during the festival. One of the festival aims is to let the public ‘look under the bonnet’ of a Cambridge college. “The public can visit most Cambridge colleges and look at the buildings,” says Matthew Moss, a Fellow of the College who is leading the 250th celebrations, “but we wanted to do something slightly different for our big anniversary, and showcase some of the intellectual and extra-curricular life of these amazing institutions, in a way that all ages can access.” homerton250.org O C T O B E R 2 018

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The box office is now open for the winter edition of the Cambridge Literary Festival, which runs 23-25 November, with a couple of delights occurring before this main festival weekend. As ever, the programme is deliciously diverse, from politics and architecture to murder and monogamy. Up first, on 17 October is MAN Booker winner, Olga Tokarczuk talking about her writing and her noir novel, Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead, then on 23 October, comedy legend Eric Idle discusses his ‘sortabiography’ Always Look on the Bright Side of Life, which tracks his journey through childhood, Monty Python, film, theatre, TV and encounters with Princess Leia and the Queen. For details on this and the rest of the programme, visit the Cambridge Literary Festival website. cambridgeliteraryfestival.com

WE CATCH UP WITH ALEXANDER VAN INGEN, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF THE CAMBRIDGE-BASED ACADEMY OF ANCIENT MUSIC – A WORLDCLASS PERIOD INSTRUMENT ORCHESTRA MAKING WAVES FOR ITS INVIGORATING APPROACH TO EARLY MUSIC HOW WOULD YOU SUM UP THE ETHOS AND MISSION OF THE AAM?

The Academy of Ancient Music (AAM) explores, preserves and reveals music of the baroque and classical eras, playing on ‘period’ instruments of the time. These eras produced some of the most powerful and personal music ever written. Some of it is well known, some of it is still being discovered in archives and collections – here in Cambridge as well as elsewhere! AAM brings this music to life on the concert stage, in the recording studio and in the classroom, using historically-informed performance practice and instruments to present this music as the composers themselves would have heard it in the 17th and 18th centuries. WHAT AT TRACTED YOU TO THE ORCHESTRA?

Vibrant current practice coupled with strong heritage – the Academy of Ancient Music has an exceptional 45-year history at the forefront of the period-instrument revolution, and gives a wonderful fresh sense of ‘now’ and living for the moment in its performances. This really is music for everyone, and AAM has a strong willingness to engage with new media and other outlets to give a bigger audience access to what we do. WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR HIGHLIGHTS WITH THE AAM SO FAR?

Bringing AAM to the forefront of online music – AAM is now the most listened to period-instrument ensemble online; a terrific concert season through to summer 2018, and developing perhaps the most exciting season yet for September 2018 onwards; opening the Edinburgh International Festival with Nicola Benedetti (having premiered that programme at Saffron Hall, just outside Cambridge) this summer; our work with other first-class musicians such as Carolyn Sampson and the choir Tenebrae; and seeing the rebirth of AAM’s education and outreach programme, AAMplify. THERE’S A BUSY FEW MONTHS AHEAD – TELL US ABOUT THE UPCOMING PROGRAMME IN CAMBRIDGE.

Our programme in Cambridge this year is outstanding, featuring the BBC Singers in October in a French programme; clarinetist Michael Collins playing Mozart’s clarinet concerto in November; brilliant young vocal ensemble VOCES8 join us for Handel’s Messiah in the magical Trinity College Chapel in December; and going in to 2019, young Dutch superstar-in-the-making Lucie Horsch playing recorder concertos with us in February; and cellist Nicolas Altstaedt plays and directs Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C in March. Outside concerts, I’m looking forward to a new pilot project with Addenbrooke’s Hospital which will explore the creative process and cognitive function; developing further musicological research links with the University of Cambridge as part of our activity as orchestra-in-residence; and to our work with Cambridge’s schools and the Fitzwilliam Museum. aam.co.uk

F ROM RUSSI A W I T H L OV E

Bringing world class classical music to the city year after year, the Cambridge Orchestral Series continues on 9 October with the Russian State Symphony, conducted by Valentin Uryupin. The orchestra will perform Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5, which masterfully builds suspense before a thunderous finale, as well as Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 1, which will bring pianist Barry Douglas to the fore for a dazzling showcase of ferocious musicianship. Khachaturian’s exuberant Masquerade Suite also gets an airing. Tickets from £17. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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W E ’ R E GOI NG TO GR ACEL A N D

Enjoy the irresistible sounds of Paul Simon’s Graceland brought to life this month by the London African Gospel Choir, who’ll be performing the album in full at the Junction on the 6th. It’s now 30 years since this seminal record was released, inspired by a bootleg cassette of South African township music which Simon had stumbled across. Smitten, he travelled to Johannesburg and recorded with some of the cream of South Africa’s musicians – an epic session which resulted in Graceland. A global phenomenon, the album spawned iconic singles You Can Call Me Al, Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes and The Boy in the Bubble, selling around 15 million copies worldwide. Tickets from £19.50. junction.co.uk

AUSTENTATIOUS What would happen if Eleanor and Marianne stowed away on a pirate ship and ran away to sea? If Pemberley was invaded by aliens? Or if Mr Darcy formed an 18th century rock group and took on Wickham in an epic, leather-studded Battle of the Bands? Let your imagination run riot and see what entertaining results emerge when five actors in Regency costume act out a spontaneous Jane Austen-style drama based on audience suggestions. Expect a mad miscellany of modern culture and Austen-style mannerisms and motifs. Turn up early for a chance to drop your suggestion for the show’s title into a box: previous suggestions have included Sixth Sense & Sensibility, Double 0 Darcy and Mansfield Shark. The show’s on 17 October at West Road Concert Hall and tickets are £18.50. junction.co.uk

E V EN S T R A NGER T HINGS The award for this month’s kookiest cultural offering goes to One-Man Stranger Things at the Corn Exchange on 24 October. Exactly what it says on the tin, this one-man show of the Netflix sci-fi megahit serves up a treat for fans of the show, with the promise of so much laughter your nose will bleed (just like poor old Eleven). It comes our way courtesy of Charles Ross, who’s also known for his one-man take on Star Wars, which was a huge Fringe success that went on to tour across more than 180 cities. Expect mind-bending voicethrowing, frenetic physicality, a good helping of 80s nostalgia and the odd Demogorgon. Tickets are £24. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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RAREFEST

Coming to Cambridge next month, RAREfest is an innovative new event geared towards educating the public about rare diseases through hands-on exhibitions, inspiring performances and talks with expert speakers. The scale of the issue might surprise you: though individually rare, collectively, rare diseases affect one in 17 people, with over 50% affecting children, 30% of whom heartbreakingly won’t survive past their fifth birthday. Awareness of the support and treatments available to these people is lacking. Within the same survey by OnePoll, it was reported that respondents thought only 38% of rare diseases have no treatment, when in fact 95% of rare diseases have no approved drug treatments. All of this tells us that even now in 2018, rare conditions are still not being diagnosed, treated or supported effectively – and this is where RAREfest comes in. The event is organised by the Cambridge Rare Disease Network, and aims not just to educate but to engage and empower by showcasing who is doing what to help improve the quality of life of those affected by rare and

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undiagnosed conditions, bringing together key rare disease stakeholders in a powerful outreach event. It begins on Friday 30 November with a launch event that will give three speakers the stage: each with a fascinating story to tell – and each with a rare disease. Hear from the first disabled man with muscular dystrophy to lead expeditions to the North and South Pole, plus a performance by a musician whose rare blindness means he memorises all his pieces from Braille, as well as a Cambridge grad living with brittle bone disease, who has taken her stories of living with a rare condition to the BBC Ouch stage and Edinburgh Fringe Festival to give a light-hearted glimpse into her world. On Saturday 1 December, the Guildhall will transform into an interactive exhibition, showcasing pioneering science, technology solutions, charities, artists and healthcare teams. Amongst the cutting-edge tech gadgets to try will be Bright Sign’s glove, which can convert sign language into speech; Microsoft’s Torino Project for teaching blind children to code; and ReScape’s Virtual Reality headsets,

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which help people manage chronic pain and anxiety. “This is a science, technology and arts festival with a difference”, says Jo Balfour from Cambridge Rare Disease Network. “We hope to share with people some of the innovative and exciting research and projects which are being carried out in Cambridge and beyond. There’ll be hands-on and interactive exhibits, talks from Cambridge experts Dr Giles Yeo and Dr Anna Middleton and others trying to find treatments and cures, cutting-edge technology that helps people live more independent lives, a film festival and artists and charities whose work raises awareness.” “There’s something for everyone whatever their age – virtual reality, robots, sculpture, genetics games, microscopes, research into premature ageing and rare eye conditions and much more,” she continues. “Anyone can come along with their family, friends and colleagues to learn, play, listen, discuss and be amazed by this little known area of science and health that affects up to 3.5 million people in the UK.” camraredisease.org/rarefest

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©STEFAN EBERHARD

A R T U N EQUA L L ED

Now in its eighth year, Art Unequalled is Ely’s celebration of all things art. Its second outing this year takes place on 27 and 28 October at The Maltings, on Ship Lane. Over the weekend, you’ll be able to admire handmade works by individual artists from the region and across the UK in a wide range of styles and forms, including sculpture, glass, print, textiles, ceramics, jewellery, wood, mixed media

and more. There will be a chance to talk to makers about their work and watch while they demonstrate their expertise. Many will be happy to discuss and accept individual commissions if there’s something specific that you want. Entry is £2, under-15s free. The exhibition is open 10.30am to 5pm, both days. Check the website for details of exhibitors. artunequalled.co.uk

SE W K N I T CR A F T OPENS Make, create and have a good old natter at King Street’s newest addition: a crafting hub offering a host of workshops, evening and day classes, activities for children and demonstration days. Called Sew Knit Craft, you’ll find it at number 58, the spot which for the last four years has been home to Sew Creative. All the previous staff have stayed on so their expertise continues to be available to customers, and staff are on hand all day to answer your crafting queries and share techniques. Irena Spence, the new owner, is a partner in a law firm in Cambridge, and has lived and worked in the city for over 30 years. She says: “I’ve always been mad about crafts and this new venture allows me to indulge my passion. I’ve always dreamt of owning a craft shop and when the opportunity presented itself I jumped at the idea. I was taught to knit when I was five by my eldest sister and have loved everything to do with crafts ever since. I have recently discovered quilting and have to admit that I am hooked. Now I want to share it with as many other people as I can. That’s the best thing about crafting – there are so many gorgeous things to work on.” Sew Knit Craft stocks a wide range of fabrics, sewing machines and wool as well as patterns and general haberdashery; a new and wider variety of stock items is already being introduced.

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The Art Insider RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH

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ctober has long offered a dizzying amount of cultural activity in the city, with the arrival of the University of Cambridge’s Festival of Ideas. Fabulous, rich in range and with an intoxicating range of speakers, exhibits, talks and workshops – where to start? I’m making a beeline on the 20th for Tara Westover, author of bestselling memoir, Educated, in conversation with columnist Hadley Freeman. What does it mean to be independent – not just economically, but intellectually? Go for Westover’s incendiary home-truths; cultural antidotes to a skewed world. “The problem with failing to enforce your boundaries with people is that you aren’t just choosing them. You are failing to choose yourself. You aren’t so much empathising with others as you are failing to empathise with yourself, to recognise your own needs as legitimate. All human relationships are made stronger by healthy boundaries. In the end, independence reveals itself as the means by which we are able to choose the terms of our interdependence.” These are wise words indeed and many artists would do well to take note – in the past month alone I’ve seen at least one super-talented Cambridge artist worrying aloud on social media about appearing ‘too pushy’ for wanting to introduce a deposit scheme to clients, to prevent time wasted on consulting for commissions that lead nowhere. It’s often a blurry line in the arts, when friends can become clients, collaborators or commissioners – but being clear about processes, limits and expectations upfront with any new project or commission is essential. Better still, this can go a long way to protect friendships, too. For all artists, just like plumbers or lawyers, your time and your talent is money. Your friendships are your support networks. There is no shame in protecting either. To help navigate pitfalls in creative business, make a date with jewellery designer-maker Harriet Kelsall at the Fitzwilliam Museum, as part of keynote show Designers

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& Jewellery 1850 – 1940: Jewellery and Metalwork from the Fitzwilliam Museum, on 22 September. An award-winning creative businesswoman and author of The Creative’s Guide to Starting a Business, there’s fizz included with the talk and a chance to buy her book. Sounds like this will be very popular – check out fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk for info and to register. Make sure you see the exhibition while there, which showcases little-known treasures from the Fitzwilliam Museum’s outstanding permanent collection, this exhibition celebrates exquisitely-designed and often handcrafted jewellery and metalwork, dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It’s perfect inspiration for lovers of contemporary jewellery design. Cambridge is a fantastic place to base a creative business – including jewellery. “I’ve been helped in setting up my business by the support of galleries such as VK Gallery in St Ives who were the first to take my work,” says Ditanny Rose, a vibrant jewellery designer-maker who makes work in the city and sells at fairs and through her website. “Now I have my work in Cambridge Contemporary Crafts in Cambridge plus shops in Newmarket and Norwich. Local collectives of artists and craftspeople are invaluable – in Cambridge I’m a member of Cambridge Made, which has a strong online and ‘in real life’ presence. My proudest moment was last year when I got a prestigious slot as one of the featured jewellers in the foyer of the Hepworth Wakefield. “My buyers are people who like contemporary design, who want the quality of silver jewellery but also like colour and want something fresh and unique, who like the idea of “wearable artwork”. I aim for my work to be abstract but not austere, subtle and simple, yet detailed.” Find out more at dittanyrose.co.uk. Also watch out for Still Murmuring at the Junction on the 18th, which is also part of the Festival of Ideas. Forty years after NASA launched Voyager 1 and 2 with a public photo record of information reflective of the human race for extra-terrestrials, artist Anna Brownstead hosts the public vote on what should be included next. What would you include? Go along and have your say. For an extreme readathon of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, visit the Scott Polar Institute on Saturday 27th (10am – 5pm), or catch French Revolutions in Painting on the 20th (11am – noon), at Little Hall Sidgwick Site, where Claire White explores how radical conflict was turned into art; there’s plenty of picks to suit art and culture lovers. For the full festival programme, visit festivalofideas.cam.ac.uk. Finally, pop into Makers Gallery for Cheryl Warren’s new show Landscape – A Response, running 19 October until 2 November. It’s a chance to immerse yourself in her haunting, joyous abstracts – a must for fans of natural beauty. With autumn all around us at this time of year, that’s free for us all to enjoy. Have a fabulous month all. l

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Bright Ideas BRINGING MORE THAN 200 MIND-EXPANDING TALKS, DEBATES, PERFORMANCES AND HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES, THE FESTIVAL OF IDEAS RETURNS 15 TO 28 OCTOBER – HERE’S WHAT NOT TO MISS AFTER HOURS AT THE POLAR MUSEUM

Explore the treasures of the Polar Museum after dark on 27 October, when the doors will be open until 9pm and a host of special activities will be on offer. Tales of extreme survival from the world’s coldest corner await on this voyage into the windiest, highest and driest of places, plus you can see a selection of rarely seen objects from the museum collection, dress up in expedition gear and ask the team questions about polar exploration. There will also be a marathon reading of Frankenstein running all day. HOMERTON 250

2018 sees Homerton College (pictured right) celebrate its 250th anniversary, a milestone the institution is marking with special events throughout the year. The highlight, on 27 October, is the Homerton 250 Festival, which will feature a packed day of activities that includes the chance

to experience a sensory Quiet Room, take part in dance workshops, art sessions and messy chemistry, plus join in a masterclass with Dame Evelyn Glennie – the world’s premier solo percussionist and Honorary Fellow of Homerton College. Runs 10.30am to 5.30pm. EDUCATED WITH TARA WESTOVER

Raised in rural Idaho, Tara Westover escaped a brutal upbringing at the hands of her survivalist Mormon family to study at Cambridge University. Her remarkable journey of self-education and emancipation is chronicled in her bestselling memoir Educated, which Barack Obama listed on his summer reading list recently. Join her at the festival in conversation with Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman for a discussion of what it means to be independent. 20 October, Faculty of Law, 11am.

ANTISOCIAL MEDIA

As Cambridge Analytica, fake news and Facebook hit headlines, the impact of social media on democracy and society at large is increasingly under the spotlight. On 18 October, join a discussion on the topic in which a panel of experts will delve into the challenges facing us in the digital age. Frankopan Hall, Jesus College, 7.30pm. EXTREME PLANT HUNTING

Explore the perilous world of Victorian and Edwardian plant hunters at the Botanic Garden on 23 October. These intrepid adventurers risked life and limb to bring their exotic spoils home to English gardens, faced with death, disease and shipwreck as a matter of course. Twigs Way explores extraordinary expeditions and lives lived on the edge, followed by a talk by Angela Cano and Alex Summers from the Botanic Garden about a recent plant-hunting trip to the deserts of South Africa. 11am. HEARTS OF DARKNESS

If you’re fascinated by the extremes of human immorality – by monstrous acts which seem unfathomable to regular people – head along to this talk by Anglia Ruskin’s Michael Wilby on 27 October. He’ll be exploring what drives some people to cause suffering in others, considering their motives and characters and drawing on the thought of

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F E ST I VA L O F I D E AS

philosophers such as Kant, Nietzsche and Arendt. Anglia Ruskin University, 5pm. UP CLOSE TO MEDIEVAL CAMBRIDGE

Home of the famous Stourbridge Fair and a central trading point, Cambridge was a busy, important town during Medieval times. On 21 October, revisit this fascinating period in its history with a special interactive tour that begins at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and will take you around the city, where you’ll meet medieval characters, explore an exhibition at the Old Divinity School and discover how skeletons tell stories about the past. 12pm to 4pm. THE FUTURE OF WORK

What does the future of work look like? Will jobs become ever more precarious while robots take over, or can we regulate to make the gig economy and artificial intelligence work in our favour? Join what promises to be a fascinating, and possibly quite scary, discussion on 20 October with author James Bloodworth, Alex Wood, Hatice Gunes, and Ben Dellot from the Royal Society for the Arts. Faculty of Law, 1pm. TURBULENT TIMES

How do we comprehend extreme political changes? This talk explores a variety of shocking and revolutionary events, considering how contemporaries

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understood the changing political tides they were experiencing. A group of historians review case studies ranging from the English Civil War to the Warsaw Uprising, and link them to the contemporary Brexit controversy. 19 October, St John’s College Fisher Building, 6pm. BUILD A DAY OF THE DEAD ALTAR

Celebrated in Mexico, Día de Muertos – or Day of the Dead – is a public holiday

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during which people honour their deceased relatives in festivities filled with colour, costume and food. See what it’s all about from 26 to 28 October with the University of Cambridge Mexican Society and MAA, where you can help decorate the Day of the Dead altar. Drop in and join in the crafts and trails or just see the altar as it grows over the weekend. Runs 11am to 4pm Fri and Sat and 12pm to 4pm on Sunday. l festivalofideas.cam.ac.uk

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Sunday Papers Live GRAB YOUR SLIPPERS AND A BLOODY MARY AND ENJOY THE ULTIMATE SUNDAY WITH MY LITTLE FESTIVAL

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ho doesn’t love Sundays? Lazy brunches, newspaper browsing, hearty lunches and relaxation. If that sounds perfect to you, turn your feet to the Cambridge Wine Merchants Wine Bar in the University Centre for Sunday Papers Live on 21 October. Organised by My Little Festival in conjunction with the Festival of Ideas, the event pays homage to the shared joys of Sundays, promising Bloody Marys, roast potatoes and squishy sofas plus speakers, comedy and music. A series of talks will bring the broadsheets to life section by section, including science with Viren Swami, one of the world’s leading experts in the psychology of romantic attraction. He’ll be delving into how and why we form relationships, considering factors such as geography, appearance and similarity – as well as debunking commonly held myths. There’s politics, too, from Tim Whitmarsh, British classicist and Professor of Greek Culture at the University of Cambridge. In his talk, ‘A Tyrant in the White House’, he’ll consider Trump through the lens of the Ancient Greeks: a people with ample experience dealing with capricious rulers who courted the public to undermine existing elites; strong-man leaders who demanded loyalty, were prone to paranoia and narcissism, and vindictively punished those deemed to have betrayed them.

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Artist Anna Brownsted takes care of music and culture with a listening session and discussion on ‘The Top 5 Most Significant Songs of the Last 40 Years’, while travel author Sarah Woods will give a fascinating talk on her extreme globetrotting experiences. Dr Bianca Jupp, a neuroscientist at Cambridge University, tackles health, considering why we get addicted. Why are some of us able to control our use of substances like alcohol and some are not? Join her for a look at what substances do to our brains, and what aspects of our personality and physiology make us vulnerable to addiction. Tying it all together will be compere Ali Warwood, stand-up comedian and founder of the brilliant Commoners Comedy club. There’s also a range of more handson activities on offer, including guided walking tours of Cambridge, plus the bar will be well-stocked with Bloody Marys, wines, craft beers and spirits to help you really relax on the Day of Rest. Of course,

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no great Sunday would be complete without a slap-up feast, which will be laid on in the form of roast beef rolls, crispy Italian-style roast potatoes and other splendidly comforting fare. “We were delighted to collaborate with the Festival of Ideas after our successful pop-up at Cambridge Science Festival earlier in the year,’’ commented Alex Ruczaj, marketing director for My Little Festival. “We once again have access to an amazing array of speakers through the festival and our own network of great artists and performers. The theme of the festival, Extremes, gives us great scope for some fascinating talks and entertainment. What we love about the event is how diverse it is – only at the Sunday Papers Live could you have a professor of classics sharing the bill with a comedian, a travel writer and a leading psychology professor.’’ Tickets to the event are £20 per adult, £10 for children 12 to 18. l mylittlefestival.uk

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BOOK CLUB CAMBRIDGE EDITION

Book Club BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

TAKE NOTHING WITH YOU BY PATRICK GALE REVIEW BY CHARLOT TE GRIFFITHS

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ou don’t have to be a cellist to enjoy the latest novel from bestselling author Patrick Gale, but those au fait with the cello – and, for that matter, musicians of all disciplines – should make a beeline for this engaging and emotional coming-ofage drama. The novel follows Eustace, a 50-something lonely Londoner, who we meet at the point of two great realisations: that he is in love for the third time in his life, and that he might very well be dying. Eustace has fallen for a cake-making soldier, Theo, who is currently in the middle of a tour in Afghanistan, and who he communicates with via weekly Skype calls. Eustace has also been prescribed an intense course of radiotherapy following a recent diagnosis of thyroid cancer and, as a result, has to spend 24 hours in a lead-lined room while the effects of the treatment wear off – a room into which he is advised to “bring nothing with you that you don’t mind leaving behind”. As Eustace walks to the treatment, accompanied by long-time friend and fellow musician Naomi, she gifts him a tiny MP3 player filled with cello music which provides the starting point for Eustace’s reminiscings. The story unfolds further as room-bound Eustace remembers his unusual childhood in Weston-super-Mare, growing up through the 1970s in his unhappilymarried parents’ old people’s home, and charts his rocky route to maturity through prep-school bullying, confused adolescence and eventual discovery and mastery of the cello through the attention of legendary teacher Carla Gold. The bohemian Carla’s friendship (and the literature belonging to her gay housemates) lead the younger Eustace to acknowledge long-evident truths about his own sexuality – and his mother S E P T E M B E R 2 018

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to make some surprising realisations regarding her own. The novel is warm, funny but also dark, and filled with beautiful characterisations of even the most briefly-featured individuals, and is a clear demonstration of why Patrick Gale is one of Britain’s best-loved living novelists. The original idea for the novel came to Patrick while visiting the library at Weston-super-Mare: he was struck by what a “strange and melancholy place it would be to grow up in” – but the intended book quickly took a turn into a closer study of how learning music had shaped and influenced his childhood. Born on the Isle of Wight in 1962, life‑long cello player Patrick attended holiday courses at the International Cello Centre as a child and was taught by the late Jane Cowan, a much-loved and extremely successful cello instructor. Patrick says that playing the cello

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requires his “total physical and mental concentration – so can be a great escape route when I’m having trouble with a piece of work.” As you might expect, the music and pieces chosen play a huge part in the novel, and Gale does an astonishing job of rendering and describing music using the written word – but for those who’d like to hear the music mentioned for real, there’s a Spotify playlist available so you can recreate Eustace’s listening habits. Although Patrick clearly has insider knowledge of the healing power of music and, as mentioned, musicians will feel immediate kinship with the protagonist, the book never feels exclusive: the experiences of teenagerdom, of frustrating parents, of discovering your life’s passion, of meeting inspirational adults, are universal ones – and make this book a rewardingly empathetic and engaging read. l

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CATHY MOORE, DIRECTOR OF CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL, ON TAKE NOTHING WITH YOU There is something about Patrick Gale’s writing that gets under your skin. I first came across him when his first book Rough Music was published in 2000. It had me captivated from the start. As is the way with newcomers to Patrick Gale, I went on to read many more, several of which, as somebody who loves Cornwall, were made all the more pleasurable by their Cornish setting. And this is the thing with Patrick Gale: he writes from his own experiences – whether it be living in Cornwall, playing the cello or being gay – which lends an authenticity and depth to his writing. His characters are drawn with gentleness and kindness and are treated with a dignity that will leave you wondering about them long after the book has finished. His latest novel Take Nothing with You is a coming-of-age novel about a young boy’s journey to adulthood and the joy and pain of learning to play a musical instrument. Joyous, contemplative and life-affirming, Take Nothing With You is Patrick Gale at his best. Patrick Gale is appearing at Cambridge Literary Festival on Sunday 25 November at 1pm. For full details visit cambridgeliteraryfestival.com.

LOOK OUT FOR THE CAMBRIDGE EDITION BOOK CLUB STICKERS IN HEFFERS & GET MONEY OFF OUR MONTHLY PICK.

Heffers is located at 20 Trinity Street, Cambridge. blackwells.co.uk

UP NEXT MONTH

MIDDLE ENGL A ND BY JONATH A N COE From Jonathan Coe, author of What a Carve Up!, comes Middle England – a timely look at our country’s national identity through the eyes of a vividly imagined cast of characters. Among them are newlyweds Ian and Sophie, who disagree about the future of the country and, possibly, the future of their relationship; Doug, the political commentator who writes impassioned columns about austerity from his Chelsea townhouse; and his radical teenage daughter who will stop at nothing in her quest for social justice. There’s also Benjamin Trotter, who embarks on an apparently doomed new career in middle age, and his father Colin, whose last wish is to vote in the European referendum. The backdrop of all these lives is modern England: a place of nostalgia and delusion; of bewilderment and barely-suppressed rage. Read along with us and get in touch with your thoughts – Jonathan Coe will also be appearing at next month’s Cambridge Literary Festival on Saturday 24 November. MIDDLE ENGLAND IS AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE AT HEFFERS. READ ALONG AND TWEET US YOUR THOUGHTS @CAMBSEDITION, WITH THE HASHTAG #EDITIONBOOKCLUB FOR A CHANCE TO FEATURE IN THE NEXT ISSUE.

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CA M B R I D G E F I L M F E ST I VA L

Cambridge Film Festival CYRUS PUNDOLE EXPLORES HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CAMBRIDGE FILM FESTIVAL 2018

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t’s that wonderful time of year when fans of all film genres look forward to picking up perhaps the most important bit of reading there is: the new Cambridge Film Festival brochure. Whether you have wildly eclectic tastes or not, there’s always a feast of cinema goodies to be found. Early highlights have already been confirmed by festival organisers: Shoplifters, this year’s Palme d’Or winner at the Cannes Film Festival, will be screened, as will Robert Redford’s apparently-final film The Old Man & The Gun, Jean-Luc Goddard’s The Image Book and Lee Chang-dong’s thriller Burning. From Japanese auteur Hirokazu Koreeda, Shoplifters is a thrilling, lyrical tale of Tokyo’s down-and-outs, centring on a young girl who is taken in by a family of shoplifters. Also a hit on the international film festival scene this year, Burning is based on the short story Barn Burning by Haruki Marukami. Lee’s sensuously-scored mystery thriller focusses on Jong-su, who is introduced by former classmate Haemi to Ben, a man with a tendency to set things alight... Goddard’s The Image Book has been described as a film without actors, but with a storyteller. While it didn’t win the top prize at Cannes, it was awarded the first ‘Special Palme d’Or’. Eighty-two-year-old screen legend Robert Redford has indicated that The Old Man & The Gun will be his final role. Also starring Casey Affleck, Sissy Spacek, Danny Glover and Tom Waits, it’s a crime comedy that sounds unmissable. “It’s a chance to relive and enjoy past glories, but also to see what’s happening in film right now, and reveal new talents who will shape the future of cinema,” says festival director Tony Jones. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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“It’s a chance to see what’s happening in film right now” “A good example is a chap who had his student short selected for the programme here back in 1996, named Christopher Nolan. Apparently he’s done quite well since! Of course, it’s also a chance to see films from around the world, from other cultures, and it’s all brought to our doorstep. It brings the people who make the films here, too, so it’s a chance to put your questions to actors, writers and directors. The festival attracts big names, but is nonetheless intimate and approachable.” There will be more than 150 films in total, hailing from at least 30 countries, and other highlights announced so far include Margarethe von Trotta’s Searching for Ingmar Bergman, South American

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drug mafia epic Birds of Passage from director Ciro Guerra, and The Workshop from Laurent Cantent. There are also festivals within the festival: a Camera Catalonia strand, short films in the Short Fusion section, the Cambridge African Film Festival, Family Film Festival, Microcinema, Restorations & Rediscoveries, and Cambridge Connections. So, whether you buy all your tickets at once or pay as you go, grab your popcorn and get ready for a feast of cinema that can’t come soon enough... l Cambridge Film Festival runs 25 October - 1 November. The full programme will be available at cambridgefilmfestival.org.uk

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After Hours

NOW BOOKING

THE NIGHTLIFE EVENTS NOT TO MISS THIS MONTH

R A ZOR L IGH T 19 DEC, JUNCTION, £25

Johnny Borrell and co are back on the road – join them for both new tracks and a trip down memory lane with hits like America, Golden Touch and In the Morning.

VINYL OPENS

T H E BR A SS FUNKEYS

Slink into something sequined, bouffe that hair up and get down to Sidney Street to check out Vinyl – Cambridge’s new Studio 54-esque nightspot. The building, formerly home to Kuda, has undergone a £550,000 renovation which includes glittering disco balls and a light-up dancefloor: the perfect backdrop for dancing the night away to a soundtrack of retro pop classics and guilty pleasures. “We are confident Vinyl is going to be pick of the pops, with hits from the 80s, 90s and 00s and songs that everyone loves,” says general manager, Will Hodge. “We’ve got booths with inflatable guitars and dress-up items, as well as a new VIP area with its own dancefloor, to make every night a party night!” vinylclub.co.uk

25 JAN, JUNCTION, £11

Snap up your tickets now for the ultimate January blues-buster: a night with the irrepressible Brass Funkeys.

BI L LY O CE A N 4 MARCH, CORN EX, FROM £27.75

The icon of British soul and maker of hits including When the Going Gets Tough and Love Really Hurts Without You visits Cambridge in the spring of next year.

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NIGHTLIFE

Gig Guide JORDAN WORLAND FROM LOCAL MUSIC WEBSITE SLATE THE DISCO GIVES HIS TOP LIVE MUSIC PICKS FOR SEPTEMBER

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ctober is a tremendously busy one for live music in Cambridge. We have visitors from stateside, returning local heroes, an Ed Sheeran mentee and some of the biggest break-out acts of the last 18 months all gracing our city. Let’s get into it then. There’s three terrific shows at the Storey’s Field Centre this month. Firstly, we have one of the UK’s best-loved and breakthrough acts of 2017, Blaenavon (on the 4th). Their debut LP is a sumptuous, thrilling and brave collection of songs which are anthemic, introspective, and delightful. The same venue then hosts Wedding Present and their ‘Tommy Tour’ (3rd) and Laura Veirs on the 18th. Veirs creates churning, exquisite folk-pop songs; her latest album is a concept record that explores the fragility of precious things. Norfolk Street this month hosts the holistic sounds and intricate playing of Jim Ghedi and Toby Hay (Blue Moon, 9th) and Annie Dressner (CB2 Bistro, 26th). Our must sees at The Portland, meanwhile, include the fearless post-punk sounds of Goat Girl (22nd) and the utterly compelling BC Camplight, with his richly melodic and bold arrangements that singer-songwriter classicism, gnarly synth-pop and 50s rock’n’roll (29th). There’s a homecoming as Bloody Knees bring their thrashy, grungy indie back to venue on the 12th, while former local and ex-Broken Family Band-er Steven Adams brings his new outfit to the same venue on the 11th. Other Portland recommendations include We Are Scientists (24th), Her’s (25th) and Clap Your Hands Say Yeah (18th) who are celebrating the ten-year anniversary of landmark second record Some Loud Thunder. Finally, we have the compelling Kiran Leonard (23rd). Leonard is a singular, brilliant talent who creates immense orchestral-pop, post-rock and avantgarde music: he releases his third record this month. Cambridge Junction highlights this month include soulpop prodigy Mahalia (7th), Hunter and The Bear (9th), and Will Varley (11th). The brittle icy synth flourishes, quirky anthems and timeless pop sounds of Fickle Friends (20th) make our do-not-miss list, as does the eight-strong collective Superorganism (26th) who bring their infectious, kaleidoscopic wonky-pop fun to Cambridge for the first time. Finally, the excellent Tom Odell is at the Corn Exchange on the 22nd.

T HE SH A DOW CIRCUS The hottest Halloween ticket in town, Neon Moon returns to Cambridge Junction for its infamous annual ball on 27 October. Step into its glamorous and ghoulish world and be awed by electrifying burlesque and cabaret acts on the stage, while you sip cocktails and dance the night away to the vintage-meetsmodern-bass-music soundtrack. Get creative with your outfit (the crowd is always fabulously attired), and expect the unexpected… Runs 9pm to 3am and tickets are from £30. junction.co.uk

27 OCT

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NIGHTLIFE

2648 TRANSFORMS Exciting things are happening down at 2648, Trinity Street’s hip subterranean nightspot. Over the course of the last few months, the venue has been quietly metamorphosing into a Shoreditch-style cocktail and DJ bar, and is now ready to unveil a fresh cocktail list and plenty of new nights for your delectation, whether you fancy a hands-in-the-air night of dancing, a couple of drinks with a chilled out tunes, or a street food pop-up. There are house nights in the pipeline from Primitive Music, minimal house and techno with Found Sounds, plus appearances from local DJ Stuart Banks, founder of Wonky Disco. The team behind Wild Wood Disco are planning some ‘festival style’ party nights this autumn too, along with regular vinyl nights including Roustabout, geared towards lovers of Rockabilly and vintage tunes. Look out for the Wednesday night open mics too: a chance to see the next big thing in an intimate setting. Concealed behind a bookshelf is the new tequila den, where you can sip your way around Mexico’s finest inside a secret library. Owner Tunji Oyewobi commented, “Tequila is fast becoming the new gin, and our love of tequila and educating customers about its versatility has led to the development of our new tequila bar, which we will be launching very soon with a range of the best tequilas and tequila-based cocktails”. 2648cambridge.com

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JOAN ARMATRADING

Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Joan Armatrading visits Cambridge this month for a gig at the Corn Exchange on 2 October. A prolific artist, she has a musical career of almost five decades and 19 albums’ worth of material to draw upon, including loved tracks like Love And Affection, Willow, Drop The Pilot and Lovers Speak. Go see her for soulful folk, rhythmic guitars and captivating electric solos – tickets are £35.50 and the show starts at 7.30pm. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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W H AT ’ S O N

What’s On

A ROUND-UP OF EVENTS IN AND AROUND CAMBRIDGESHIRE THIS MONTH

1-6 OCTOBER

4 OCTOBER

8-13 OCTOBER

VULCAN 7

DYLAN MORAN: DR COSMOS

RAIN MAN

Nigel Planer and Adrian Edmondson join forces again to star in this new stage comedy. Written by the two former Young Ones stars, it follows actors Gary and Hugh, whose respective careers have taken drastically different paths since they studied together. 7.45pm, 2.30pm Thursdays and Saturdays Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £25 cambridgeartstheatre.com

The Oscar Wilde of comedy, Dylan Moran is touring his new show, Dr Cosmos – filled as ever with his famed deadpan, witty, crackpot style and promising an unmissable, clichéswerving journey through the modern world. 8pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange £28 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

Based on the Oscar-winning film that features two very different brothers, this Bill Kenwright presentation features Matthew Horne (Gavin & Stacey) as longlost brother, Raymond, and Ed Speleers (Downton Abbey) as self-centred Charlie. 7.45pm, 2.30pm Thursdays and Saturdays Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £23 cambridgeartstheatre.com

6 OCTOBER

GRACELAND BY LONDON AFRICAN GOSPEL CHOIR

2-6 OCTOBER

FOOTLIGHTS: PILLOW TALK The renowned sketch group return home after a world tour to present their International Tour Show on home turf. Expect free-flowing hilarity, top original writing and side-splitting character comedy. 11pm | ADC Theatre | from £6 | adctheatre.com

Three decades after its release, Paul Simon’s album Graceland is a classic, often credited with bringing ‘world music’ to the masses. It’s performed in all its glory, with rousing renditions of hits such as You Can Call Me Al, by the London African Gospel Choir. 7pm | Cambridge Junction £25 | junction.co.uk

11 OCTOBER

JASON MANFORD Stand-up hero who’s a regular on TV and has his own Absolute Radio show returns to our city with an extra date on his new tour, Muddle Class. 8pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange £30.25 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk 12 OCTOBER

OCEAN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR A new selection of the world’s most amazing films from the big blue. Brought to us by the team behind the Banff Film Festival tour, the festival is sure to wow you with marine life and the characters who film it. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange £16.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk 13 OCTOBER

CHAMPAGNE FAIR Cambridge Wine Merchants take you through the whole Champagne region, from Epernay to Chaumont. A walkaround, pay-as-you-taste event. 3pm | Cambridge University Centre | £7.50 | champagnefair.eventbrite.co.uk 17 OCTOBER

12 OCTOBER

PE T E F IR M A N: M A R V EL S One of the country’s most popular magicians, back on the road with an astonishing show. Expect pure comedy magic. 7.30pm | Cambridge Junction | £18 | junction.co.uk

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AUSTENTATIOUS – THE IMPROVISED JANE AUSTEN NOVEL

Starring a cast of the country’s quickest comic performers, every show the cast conjure up a new ‘lost’ Jane Austen novel, based on nothing more than a title suggested by the audience. 7pm | West Road Concert Hall £18.50 | junction.co.uk

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W H AT ’ S O N

5 OCTOBER

OU R F IN ES T HOU R 21 OCTOBER

CLARE TEAL AND HER BIG MINI BIG BAND The popular singer and Radio 2 presenter performs classics from the golden age of song, including Cry Me a River and It Don’t Mean a Thing if it Ain’t Got that Swing. 7.45pm | Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £20 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

Presented by Lewis star Kevin Whately, the BBC Big Band and singer Annie Gill capture the spirit of the 1940s, from Vera Lynn and Gracie Fields to Glenn Miller. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange | from £19.50 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

21 OCTOBER

23-27 OCTOBER

27 OCTOBER

NICK SHARRATT’S DRAWALONG

HORRIBLE HISTORIES

PUMPKIN DAY

Children’s writer and illustrator, whose work includes bringing Jacqueline Wilson’s characters to life on the page, presents a fun-filled drawalong for all ages. 11.30am, 2.30pm | Cambridge Junction £6 children, £10 adults | junction.co.uk

Expect informative thrills and laughs in these two Horrible Histories shows. Awful Egyptians uncovers foul facts and mean mummies, while Terrible Tudors reveals Henry VIII’s punch-up with the pope. Various times | Cambridge Arts Theatre from £19 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

As well as picking and carving your pumpkin, there’s plenty for kids, big and small, to do including tractor rides, cooking demos and face painting. 11am-4pm | Riverford, Sacrewell £4 | riverford.co.uk

23 OCTOBER

24 OCTOBER

KARINE POLWART

ONE-MAN STRANGER THINGS: A PARODY

27 OCTOBER

Five-time winner at the Radio 2 Folk Awards, her LP A Pocket of Wind Resistance won Late Junction’s album of the year for 2017 and provided the soundtrack to her debut work for theatre. Two sets with no support. 6.30pm | Cambridge Junction £22.50 | junction.co.uk

Canadian actor Charles Ross singlehandedly recreates both seasons of the hit Netflix sensation, Stranger Things, using just his voice and frenetic physicality. 8pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange £24 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

23/24 OCTOBER

26/27 OCTOBER

LITTLE BABY BUM

ENGLISH TOURING OPERA

Join Mia, Jacus, Twinkle and their nursery rhyme friends in a mixture of puppetry, live action and digital animation from the world’s largest educational YouTube channel. Various times | Cambridge Corn Exchange £14 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

A triple bill of 17th century music and opera on Friday 26th is followed by one of Handel’s most appreciated operas, Radamisto, on Saturday 27 October. 7.30pm | Saffron Hall | from £18 | saffronhall.com

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RIP IT UP Strictly stars Louis Smith, Harry Judd and Aston Merrygold danced to the hits of the 50s last year, and this year’s vintage sees them strut their stuff to, you guessed it, the 60s songbook. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange from £25.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk 29 OCTOBER

SUE PERKINS A rare date from one of the country’s top all-round stars, Perkins will deliver her usual dose of dubious puns in a show based on her new travel memoir, East of Croydon, with journeys from the Himalayas to Hong Kong. Tickets include a copy of the book. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange £29.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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FA M I LY DAYS O U T

TOP FAMILY DAYS OUT FAMILY-FRIENDLY THEATRE AT THE JUNCTION

From Stories in the dark, welcoming you back to the magical story tent filled with twinkling lights and whirling colours, to Elle Dubois: No Show, a dazzling display of arts and acrobatics, there’s plenty of family-friendly theatre to enjoy at the Junction this October. Muck in and join Nick Sharrat for a draw-along on the 21st, exploring the numerous characters from his bestselling books, including Jacqueline Wilson’s lovable rebel Tracy Beaker. Or, sit back and immerse yourself in The Missing Light, a multi-media production using puppetry, film, music and live animation on the 7th. Specialising in theatre experiences for those with profound and multiple learning difficulties, Frozen Light present The Isle of Brimsker on 9 and 10 October – a sensory experience about a lighthouse keeper who lives on a desolate outcrop surrounded by stormy seas. And finally, everyone will love the magical, musical extravaganza from time-travelling duo Morgan & West, whose Utterly Spiffing Spectacular Magic Show is set to get you giggling. Join them on 22 and 23 October.

H A L L OW EEN W I T H T H E K I DS PUMPKIN CARVING AT HOME FARM

On 20 October, join the team on the Home Farm at the Wimpole Estate for some Halloween fun. Pick a pumpkin and learn some tricks to make your jack o’ lantern look a treat! Pumpkins cost £4 each, visit the website to book a slot. nationaltrust.org.uk FENLAND SPOOKTACULAR

The team at Wicken Fen invite you to dust off your broomsticks and join them for an entire weekend of fun, with no need to book ahead. This Fenland fear fest promises crafts and games galore to get you and your little monsters into the spooky spirit. It’s £5.50 per child. nationaltrust.org.uk HALLOWEEN AT DENNY ABBEY

The Farmland Museum at Denny Abbey encourages you to come dressed to scare for an all-pumpkins-blazing kind of day, packed with Halloween activities. There is no extra admission fee for this popular family event, so mark your calendars for Sunday 28th. dennyfarmlandmuseum.org.uk HALLOWEEN WEEK AT SHEPRETH

Half term week promises to be full of creepy creatures at Shepreth Wildlife Park. Tackle your darkest fears in the bat cave and watch the park rangers feed the wolves, before a magical owl display tops off the mystical goings-on! sheprethwildlifepark.co.uk

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Food & Drink NEW OPENINGS • RECIPES •

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CO M P E T I T I O N

WIN A TWO-NIGHT STAY AT GUERNSEY’S ‘GIN HOTEL’, BELLA LUCE!

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his year’s hit film, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society, gave viewers a taste of why Guernsey is considered one of the most beautiful parts of the British Isles, with its miles of unspoilt beaches, historical sites to explore, unique hotels and wildlife in abundance. This month we’re giving you a chance to win a two-night stay in glorious Guernsey at the luxuriously understated Bella Luce hotel (bellalucehotel.com), an historic Norman manor house just minutes from Guernsey’s stunning coastline. The hotel is also home to Wheadon’s Gin, the only commercial distillery within a hotel in the British Isles. You will enjoy a once-in-a-lifetime ‘gin and dine’ experience where, in the Bella Luce Small Batch Distillery, you’ll taste your way around a variety of gins and develop an understanding of the role of different botanicals. This will be followed by a three-course dinner at the award-winning restaurant, which serves Modern European cuisine created by chef Patricio Filipe. Each room at the hotel has been individually designed to complement the character of the property and provides the perfect environment to retreat to for a restful night’s sleep, after which you’ll be treated to a hearty breakfast. Our winner will also receive a VIP voucher for a treatment at the Bella Spa & Boutique, where you can relax, unwind and enjoy a restorative treatment. Once revived, explore Guernsey’s beaches, wildlife, historical sites and artisan producers. l

WORTH OVER

£500!

T&Cs: Prize is a two-night stay for two adults sharing a classic luxury room. Prize includes breakfast, three-course dinner on one night with a bottle of wine/soft drinks and a gin tasting. Prize also includes a 55-minute spa treatment each. The closing date is 31 October 2018. Prize subject to availability, non-transferable and no cash alternatives available. Transport not included in prize.

R E A DER OF F ER !

Even if you’re not selected as our lucky winner you can take advantage of a special offer at the Bella Luce Hotel, Guernsey. For £439 per person, get two nights bed and breakfast for two, including a gin tasting and dinner. Quote CAMBS EDITION on booking to receive a complimentary bottle of prosecco in your room. Offer is for two adults sharing a classic room. Call 01481 238764 or visit bellalucehotel.com to book. Find the Hotel on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @BellaLuceHotel.

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Carpenters Arms R E S TAU R A N T R E V I E W

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WE ENJOY A FEAST OF COMFORT FOOD AND CRAFT BEER AT THIS RECENTLY REVAMPED VICTORIA ROAD EATERY

cookie-cutter clone of its sister gastro-boozer, the Salisbury Arms, the Carpenters Arms is different in a couple of ways: a slightly lower ceiling and a somewhat larger garden. Basically: if you like the Salisbury, then you’ll like the Carpenters – and as so many of us do seem to enjoy the group’s splendid pizzas, excellent beers and budget-friendly deals for eats, then another branch of the same in our city is definitely no bad thing. Powered by Bedford-based brewery Charles Wells, the Pizza, Pots & Pints concept has proven extremely popular and the concept has spread to six eateries between here and Oxford, with the group hoping to have twenty in the stable by 2020. Promising “freshly-made, wood-fired artisan pizzas, warming terracotta pots of comfort food and fresh Bedfordshire-brewed beer”, the group’s distinctively eclectic take on interior and exterior design has, of course, been fully implemented at the Carpenters, giving this long-standing pub a new lease of life as a food-focused hang-out. We sat near the bar and its array of Charles Wells beers, within sight of the wood-fired pizza oven at the heart of the eatery. You’d be hard-pushed to spot any differences between the menu at the

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Carpenters’ and the one at the Salisbury, which meant ordering was swift – both of us were familiar (perhaps a little too much!) with the menu down the hill, and knew the dishes we’d get excited about: the Armin pizza with goat’s cheese, sweet onion chutney and rocket, plus a macaroni cheese with extra bacon from the Pots side of the menu. The Carpenters’ team managed to tempt us into adding a second Pot to our order: dry-rubbed barbecue pork ribs, served with Boston beans and cornbread, all washed down with refreshing pints of Charlie Wells Dry Hopped Lager and Triple Hop IPA. The food arrived, and was – well – exactly as you’d hope: chewy-crusted pizza with tangy-yet-clean goat’s cheese and savoury-sweet chutney for balance; unctuously oozy macaroni cheese studded throughout with salty morsels of bacon; and deliciously meaty, spiced ribs that’d delight any committed carnivore. It’s not a place for small appetites – but then, as I keep reiterating, if you’ve been to the sister pubs, you’d already know to turn up with an empty tum. Despite all the similarities, the Carpenters was still able to surprise: “I didn’t actually know they did desserts,” admitted my dining companion, “which is probably a good thing, considering how often I’m at the Salisbury.” We

chose a brownie to share, which after a single mouthful we agreed was one of the finest we’d had in the city. Topped with a sphere of melting vanilla ice cream and drizzled with salted caramel, it was that perfect combination of chewy on the inside and crunchy on the outside which is once tried, never forgotten. Highly recommended – assuming you’ve not filled up on pots or pizzas already. We chatted with the staff throughout our meal and there was a real feeling of excitement in the air, as if their pace of life was about to accelerate at any moment. When we visited, the local student population was due back imminently, and from my own days living up the hill I know all too well that there’s a dearth of dining options in that particular suburb of our city. As the refurb was only completed in April this year, the majority of the uphill students only had a couple of months to discover this stellar eatery so close to home before disappearing for the summer: now they’re back, it surely won’t be long before it’s as packed as its sister pub. We’re lucky to have the Salisbury: we’re even luckier to have been graced with a second pub in the same stable – so make sure you go and back up Charles Wells’ belief that the people of Cambridge deserve two opportunities to tuck into delicious pizzas, pots and pints. l

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R E STAU RA N T R E V I E W

W H AT:

Perfect pizzas, pots of comfort food and top beer in a friendly setting

W H ER E:

184-186 Victoria Road, Cambridge

HOW MUCH:

Pizzas from £8.50 (2-for-1 on Mondays), and pots from £6.50

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FO O D & D R I N K

Nature’s Larder

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THE TEAM FROM THE GOG, OUR AWARD-WINNING LOCAL FARM SHOP, BUTCHERY, DELI AND CAFÉ, GIVE THE LOW-DOWN ON THE SEASONAL PRODUCE TO SEEK OUT THIS MONTH

utumn is most definitely upon us and as the nights draw in there’s nothing better than a tasty bowl of hearty soup. Possible combinations are endless, but we especially love the vast array of winter squashes which mirror the rich colours of the season. At the time of writing our expert grocers are predicting a shortage of pumpkins due to a very hot summer, but fear not, there are plenty of choices from the Gourd family of flowering plants. The formal name is cucurbitaceae, and it comprises around 700 species of annual or perennial herbs which include cucumbers, gourds, melons, squashes and pumpkins. Generally cucurbits have a low nutrient content, with the exception of winter squashes. We hand select the finest pumpkins and squashes from Lincoln and Kent which satisfy the demands of both foodies and artists for the all-important carving. Why not share your creation on social using #Gogpumpkin for a chance to win some great prizes this Halloween? The Gog was recently awarded another three Great Taste awards in the 2018 competition, and combining these prizewinning products in a platter will really hit the spot on a crisp autumn day. Charles Bradford, MD, who has been a Great Taste judge in the past and knows just how rigorous the judging process is, commented, “for The Gog to be recognised once again in this world-renowned competition is astonishing. This brings our tally of Great Taste awards, for own-produced food, to eighteen – alongside the accolade for the Best Farm Shop in the UK in 2017 – which is truly phenomenal!” The Gog picked up a whopping two-star award for The Gog cheese scone which uses Montgomery’s cheddar, one star for their Marmalade Ham and another for the limited edition ‘El Huevos Escoceses’ Chorizo Scotch Egg. Serve up any combination of these delicious products alongside a hearty bowl of winter squash soup and you’re onto a sure-fire winner! l The Gog, Heath Farm, Shelford Bottom, Cambridge CB22 3AD 01223 248352 | thegog.com

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HOW TO EAT IT WA R M ING SQUA SH SOU P SERVES 4-6 1 butternut squash (around 1kg), peeled and roughly diced 1 large onion, diced 1 carrot, roughly chopped 1 stick of celery, roughly chopped 4 cloves of garlic, sliced 3 sprigs of thyme, picked off the stem and diced 2tbsp olive oil 1tbsp butter OPTIONAL EXTRA

½ to 1 chilli deseeded for extra warmth 500ml-800ml vegetable stock TO SERVE:

Crispy fried sage leaves x3 (fry in olive oil until crispy) Chilli flakes A drizzle of crème fraiche (thinned out with olive oil) or a drizzle of cream

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Food News A MONTHLY ROUND-UP OF GASTRO GOINGS-ON AROUND CAMBRIDGESHIRE

A TALL STORY AT THIRSTY The team at Chesterton Road drinks shop Thirsty

will be collaborating with chefs Alex Rushmer and Lawrence Butler this month for A Tall Story, a kitchen takeover happening on 12 and 13 October. With a focus on seasonally-inspired small plates, the pop-up will reunite the two chefs previously found manning the stoves at the much-missed Hole in the Wall, Little Wilbraham, serving up a convivial, relaxed atmosphere and plenty of delicious food paired with great drinks. Runs 6pm to 10pm both nights. Contact the team at Thirsty to book. wearethirsty.co.uk

CAMBRIDGE VEGAN MARKET According to recent stats from the Vegan Society, the number of vegans in the UK has quadrupled between 2014 and 2018, a trend which shows no sign of slowing. If you’re local and among the ever-rising number of vegans and v-curious, or just keen to learn more about a plant-based diet and lifestyle, check out this month’s Cambridge Vegan Market, which takes place at the Guildhall on 7 October. With over fifty exhibiting traders showing their wares, you’ll be able to taste your way around cuisines from across the globe – all without an animal product in sight. There will be tasty vegan drinks, too, plus clothes and cosmetics, together with stalls offering information about nutrition and the environment. The event runs 10.30am till 4pm, tickets are £2 and free for kids under 12. Free coffee or tea for the first 100 people to arrive. vegfest.co.uk

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FO O D & D R I N K E V EN T S AT T H E DIST I L L ERY

The team at The Cambridge Distillery, those connoisseurs of all things gin, have been busy creating new taste sensations over the summer. Now that their latest creation, Elderflower Gin Liquer, has sold out, they are promising a new prototype on the third Thursday of every month. Keep an eye on their social media, as each month’s offering will only be available in small numbers. Meanwhile, on 13 October, the team celebrate Truffle Day, paying homage to this splendid ingredient with truffle dishes and truffle cocktails. Dogs are invited to join their owners at scent workshops, to see if they can become truffle hounds. Steak & Honour will be there, complete with mushroom burgers that have a truffle twist. Also up this month, the first Showroom Sundays on 14 and 28 October. The Grantchester showroom will open up at 11am, offering a perfect spot to while away a Sunday morning. Newspapers will be in, with a street food truck or two outside, plus delicious Red Snappers (a bloody Mary, but with gin). Kura Kura’s Sri Lankan delights will be outside on the 14th, with Mac Daddy confirmed on the 28th. cambridgedistillery.co.uk

A PPL E DAY AT BU RWA SH M A NOR Burwash Manor’s Apple Day returns on 13 October, kicking off at 10am. A fabulous foodie celebration of the countryside with apples at its core, it’s all in aid of the Sick Children’s Trust, a charity that helps to keep the families of seriously ill children together in their times of need. The fun will include cookery demonstrations, appley games, street food, stalls and crafts. You can also take a ride on a miniature steam train, listen to the Sawston Steel Band and watch displays of many traditional activities, from falconry to willow and coppice crafts. Little ones can enjoy face painting, pony rides, a fairground, an assault course and the ever-popular tractor and trailer rides around the farm. Bring your apples down to be identified by the EEAOP – and don’t forget a few extra to be pulped and juiced. Visit Cam Valley Orchards who will be selling and discussing their heritage apple varieties, then enjoy a drink or two at the juice, cider and craft beer bars. Entry is £4 per adult and free for under 12s. burwashmanor.com

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NATIONAL ACCLAIM FOR LOCAL PUB

The Good Pub Guide has announced its 2019 ‘Pub of the Year’ as The Cock, Hemingford Grey, praising its imaginative food, extensive wine list, interesting beers, bustling atmosphere and smart restaurant. It’s not the first time this popular local watering hole has received plaudits, having won Cambridgeshire Dining Pub of the Year a number of times for its first-rate modern British and European menu, fresh fish dishes, succulent steaks and famed homemade sausages, a much-loved signature dish. The pub is part of Cambscuisine, which also runs The Crown & Punchbowl at Horningsea, The Three Horseshoes in Madingley and The Tickell Arms in Whittlesford. cambscuisine.com

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FO O D & D R I N K

Ten years of

Bill’s Kitchen BILL SEWELL, BEST-SELLING FOOD WRITER AND OWNER OF CAMBRIDGE’S MICHAELHOUSE CAFE, SHARES SOME FAVOURITE RECIPES IN CELEBRATION OF TEN YEARS AT THE HELM

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opularised in the medieval murder mystery novels of Susanna Gregory and now a mainstay of Cambridge’s cultural scene, Michaelhouse Cafe on Trinity Street celebrates ten years of Bill’s Kitchen this autumn, marking a decade of tasty home cooked food from restaurateur and food writer Bill Sewell. The origins of Michaelhouse (or St Michael’s Church to give it its historical name) date back to 1324, as the second oldest residential college of the city’s famous university. Historical figures linked to the medieval church include Henry VIII, Mary Tudor and Elizabeth I, and following its infamous fire of 1849 the building underwent significant refurbishments by Sir George Gilbert Scott and his son. By 1908, Michaelhouse had been joined to a sister church, Great St Mary’s, with which it shares a special relationship to this day. A radical restoration of Michaelhouse took place in the next millennium, blending medieval architecture with modern British design, and introducing mezzanine seating, an art gallery and a modern cafe into the historic nave. Consulting on this new direction was seasoned cafe creator and former Trinity scholar Bill Sewell, whose earlier restaurant developments (The Place Below in the crypt of St Mary-le-Bow and Cafe @ All Saints in Hereford) met national acclaim. Bill’s reputation for no-nonsense cooking techniques and delicious, sustainable food has earned him features with BBC Good Food and Waitrose Food magazines, not to mention the completion of two much-celebrated vegetarian cookbooks (Food from The Place Below and Feasts from The Place Below), and his recently published Bill’s Kitchen, celebrating a life in food. “Following an exhausting restoration project, I found myself persuaded to take on the running of the new cafe in the beautiful setting we see today,” says Bill. “It is amazing to think that ten years have now passed, and we are celebrating a decade of links with some of the best food and drink producers across the county and beyond. Six days a week Michaelhouse Cafe continues to serve up award-winning breakfasts, delicious home-cooked lunches, luscious cakes and cream teas – all created with our fantastic, home-gown and locally sourced Cambridgeshire produce.” l To enjoy a changing programme of free art events and concerts, pop into Michaelhouse Centre between Monday and Saturday or visit online at michaelhousecafe.co.uk

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“Bill has a reputation for no-nonsense cooking techniques and delicious food” O C T O B E R 2 018

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FO O D & D R I N K

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SERVES

VENISON & MUSHROOM LASAGNE

DEVISED BY MICHAELHOUSE HEAD CHEF LOWNZ, THIS DELICIOUS DISH HAS PROVED A HUGE HIT. IF YOU CAN’T GET HOLD OF WILD VENISON, IT’S ALSO AN EXCELLENT RECIPE FOR A STANDARD BEEF LASAGNE MADE USING LOCAL BEEF FROM A FIRST-RATE, SMALL-SCALE LOCAL BUTCHER. FOR THE VENISON AND MUSHROOM FILLING

1 medium onion, diced 1cm 1 clove garlic, crushed 2 tbs olive oil 1 tsp salt 6 00g minced venison (or beef) 4 sprigs of thyme, leaves left on the stalks 3 00g field mushroom, diced 2cm 1 x 500g packet passata 2 5g dried ceps/porcini mushrooms 1 00ml hot water

75g breadcrumbs (whizz stale white bread in a food processor)

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FOR THE CHEESE SAUCE

650ml milk 1 clove 1 bay leaf, broken 7 5g butter 7 5g white flour 7 5g grated cheddar

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TO ASSEMBLE THE LASAGNE

300g lasagne sheets 5 0g parmesan, grated

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STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

l C  over the ceps in hot water and leave to soak

for 20 minutes or more.

l C  ook the onions and garlic in the olive oil

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with the salt for about 10 minutes until the onion is soft. Add the minced venison/beef and the thyme and cook on a low heat with the lid on for about half an hour. Discard thyme stalks. Add the mushrooms, cook for about 5 minutes until the mushrooms have softened a little, then add the passata. T  ake the ceps out of their soaking liquor, chop them finely then add to the pan together with their soaking liquor. Simmer for a further 30 to 60 minutes until the sauce has thickened a little. Check the seasoning.

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FOR THE ASSEMBLY

l P  re-heat the oven to 160°C (fan). In a large,

FOR THE CHEESE SAUCE

l H  eat the milk with clove and bay leaf until it

begins to boil.

l T  urn off the heat and leave for at least 10

minutes for the milk to take on the clove and bay leaf flavours. Remove these from the milk and bring it back to boiling point. Heat

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the butter in a large saucepan until it begins to foam, then tip in the flour and mix it well into the butter. When the mixture (the roux) begins to bubble and become paler in colour, begin adding the milk – to avoid lumps, add it a little at a time. After each addition of milk bring the sauce back to the boil, then simmer and stir vigorously with a balloon whisk until thick and lump-free. W  hen you have added all the milk, bring the sauce to the boil and then immediately take off the heat. Stir in the grated cheddar and season to taste.

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deep baking dish (eg. 28cm x 28cm x 5cm deep) add layers as follows: first a shallow layer of venison mix; lasagne sheets; cheese sauce. Then more lasagne sheets; venison; yet more lasagne sheets; and then cheese sauce. Finally, mix the breadcrumbs and parmesan and sprinkle over the top. B  ake for 40 minutes until the lasagne is tender and the top is beginning to brown. Allow to settle for five minutes or so before serving.

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12 MAKES

P IECES

XXXXXXXX ST ICK Y L EMON CAKE WITH BLUEBER R I ES A MENU STAPLE OF BILL’S FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS, THIS CAKE WAS RECENTLY GIVEN A TWIST WITH THE ADDITION OF FRESH BLUEBERRIES. THESE BRING A LUSH JUICINESS THAT PAIRS PERFECTLY WITH THE TARTNESS OF THE LEMON CAKE AND THE SWEET SYRUP INGREDIENTS

125g butter, softened 175g caster sugar 1 75g plain flour 2 tsp baking powder 2 eggs, lightly beaten together 1 lemon, juice and zest 7 5g fresh blueberries 1 lemon, juice and zest 9 0g icing sugar

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STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

l P  re-heat the oven to

140°C.

l G  rease and line a 20cm x

30cm x 5cm baking tray.

l U  sing a food processor,

l

l

cream together the softened butter and the caster sugar until it is fluffy and pale. Add the lightly beaten eggs, the flour and baking powder and mix well. Add the lemon zest and juice and mix again. P  our the mix into the lined tin and level off gently. Pour the blueberries evenly on top. Bake at 140C for 30 to 35 minutes or until risen and a skewer inserted comes out clean. W  hile the sponge is still warm, prick all over with a thin skewer or cocktail stick right down to the bottom. Mix together the lemon zest, juice and icing sugar, and pour over the sponge. Allow to cool before serving.

Bill’s Kitchen, a recipe book featuring 120 of Bill’s favourite dishes, can be purchased for £20 at michaelhousecafe.co.uk

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BEER REVOLUTION

Dizzy Brew Heights

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CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS MEETS THE MOVERS AND SHAKERS OF THE CRAFT BEER REVOLUTION BREWING IN CAMBRIDGE

n 1516, when Cambridge University was a mere 300 years old, Duke Wilhelm IV of Bavaria introduced the Reinheitsgebot – the beer purity laws – which insisted that every pint brewed in Germany should only use three ingredients: hops, barley and water. Yeast isn’t mentioned, because science hadn’t discovered it yet. You might tweak the type of hops, or tinker with timings, but whether you’re a multinational super brewer or fiddling with demijohns in your airing cupboard, the basic recipe for beer has been the

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same ever since. But in 21st century Cambridge, there seem to be two extra ingredients required: time and space. And in a bustling and competitivelypriced city like the one we call home, that’s what makes the difference between bland and brilliant. Jon Cockley and Tim Pheasant are the old friends who Cambridge’s Old Friends Brewery is named for: they met at school and have stayed in touch ever since before launching their garage-based brewery in 2016. Originally, the two brewers wanted to recreate the style of beers that they enjoyed themselves, strongly influenced by the US and the huge craft beer scene across the Atlantic. “It’s a fusion of North American hops, grains and Cambridge water to make a sort of hybrid local-slash-US influenced

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beer,” Jon explains. “A bit like the city – very internationally minded…” Old Friends now has a core set of beers, including a pale ale and session ale plus a new milk stout, and enjoys the ability to be responsive that small-scale brewing offers. “It’s great when you hit upon something people like and enjoy, but it’s not that much fun to brew the same beer time and time again – it’s nice to experiment and play,” Jon says. “It’s a question of trying styles that we like, or that we could put a twist on, and then having a go at making them. You start with the style of beer and ABV that you’re going for, and then you start to piece together the bare bones of a recipe. Tim’s really good at this, and does a lot of research – he makes sure we get the balance and the bitterness right. You get 80 to 90% of the structure and then u O C T O B E R 2 018

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and clearing up after our tap nights at the brewery!” LIT TLE POCKETS

“You’ve got to tinker with it, play with the recipe – kind of like a science lesson” through the process of making the beer – tweaking your hop additions, how much dry hopping you do, when you do the dry-hopping – those are the little nuances that refine the taste. You’ve got to tinker with it, play with the recipe – kind of like a science lesson except at the end, you have something to drink…” A LABOUR OF LOVE

“Part of the reason for starting Old Friends,” says Jon, “was having a reason to get off the sofa and hang out with a mate. In our increasingly digital world, where you’re in front of a screen all the time, it’s so refreshing to physically make something with your hands – and then three weeks later, to drink it and share it. To have a tangible end product is very rewarding.” Both Jon and Tim have other jobs aside from making beer: “Brewing is really laborious,” Jon says. “and there’s no getting away from the fact that it is a seven -or-eight-hour process where you have to be there – so we either start early, or brew in the evening and go right through. A lot of what we do is very manual – we hand bottle, we hand label, hand cap, hand stamp – it’s really time consuming. But it’s definitely a labour of love. This project

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very much falls between ‘is it a business, is it a hobby, is it a passion project?’ – it’s somewhere in the middle. I don’t really know where it’s going to take us, but we’re really enjoying it.” As so many independent businesses discover, you can’t often rely on pure passion and talent to get you through: being able to run a company and get a beer to market is essential if you want to survive. The trio behind Harston-based microbrewery BrewBoard are very big on defined roles: the three directors Stuart Chambers, Paul Archer and Oliver Pugh divide tasks between themselves based on their individual strengths. Paul explains: “We came together via a well-trodden love of beer but knew from the outset that if we were going to start and run a successful brewery we were going to have to complete the circle of great beer and great branding with hopefully some fairly solid and sensible business acumen. Stuart is a very talented brewer, Ollie is a very talented artist and graphic designer and I’m the sensible one with a background in finance who keeps this fiasco pointing in the right direction! That said, it’s a young business so we all have to muck in, humping kegs about, making deliveries, and serving

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Tap nights, or some way for the public to buy beer direct from source, are universally agreed upon as a good way forward for small-scale breweries. BrewBoard hold twice-monthly latenight open-house style sessions at their brewery on an industrial estate in Harston, where they throw the doors open, a food truck or two parks outside, and a band sets up in front of BrewBoard’s four fermenting vessels, each illuminated by coloured spotlights. “Initially it was local people coming by, but now we’re finding that as more and more people hear about us, we’ve got people from further afield getting on trains – we’ve had groups coming from London – and in that respect we’re delighted,” Ollie says. “But our local crew have been very good to us. Before we produce new beers at a production level, we’ll always test drive them on people who come to our tap nights, and we really respect what they have to say. And hopefully the reason they keep coming back is because they like our beers.” But it’s not just focus-grouping that tap nights help with. “One of the main problems we face as brewers is that beer is fairly expensive to make,” Jon at Old Friends explains. “We’re selling it at a trade price – and then the people buying it and selling it on are the ones making the mark-up. So if you can sell direct to the public, then you’re keeping 100% of the profit. It makes huge sense. That said, premises in Cambridge…” For Old Friends, access to space was the original catalyst for starting the brewery. “Tim bought a new house with a triple garage, which he wasn’t using – and we literally walked into it one day and said ‘What could we do in here?’” Jon says. “I think it’s a shame that Cambridge is so expensive and prohibitive – it makes it really hard for independent creative businesses to exist here. We were lucky. There are people who’ve found little pockets… I think that’s why Calverley’s has done so well: they’ve got that bit of land, they’ve got their tap room – having a tap room would be lovely.” Calverley’s started brewing back in 2014, and first opened its doors with regular tap nights about two years ago. Based in a cluster of old industrial workshops next to the railway lines, the brewery is tucked away down a side street just off Mill Road on a pocket of land which brewer Tom Calverley says they’re “blessed to have”. The garage on the site was built by a relative’s grandfather back in the 1930s, and the buildings have lived many lives since then. “The brewery was originally a stables for a fire engine,” Tom says, “and I think the last business that u CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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BEER REVOLUTION

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BEER REVOLUTION was in there was a typewriter repair shop – you get an idea of the history.” Calverley’s tap nights allow the public to try the huge range of beers brewed on site. “Our whole thing is that we give people tastes until they find something they enjoy,” Tom explains. “All we ask is an open mind. We brew a whole array of beer styles here: if you like white wine, we make a beer similar to that which is super dry and complex… We make a diversity of flavours, and let you taste until you find something that works for your palate.” Tom is passionate about the local brewing scene in Cambridge, and agrees that space being at a premium in the city is a limiting factor. “I’d like to see a return to localisation of all good food and drink production,” he says, “and that’s what I’d like to think we’re part of. You’ve got people like Jack’s Gelato, some bakeries doing some really interesting things… but they all require space, and that’s the problem.” Sam Owens, owner of Thirsty and the brains behind its seasonal Biergarten events, is well-placed to talk about the demand for beer in our city. “It is a bit sad that there’s not more around,” he says. “I would have thought that in somewhere as young, dynamic, well-off, as international as Cambridge, that there would be more craft brewing, a younger brewing scene, and more places selling decent beer. It probably is to do with the fact that it’s difficult to get premises. Whatever space there is available is expensive, so it’s out of the reach of small, interesting, enterprising independents, whether they’re brewers or retailers.” AN HONEST DRINK

When it comes to Cambridge’s own tastes, Sam paints a picture split between traditional craft-style ales and more experimental brews: “The pale ales – the hoppier, session ales – have become very popular in the last few years, but people still like lagers and pilsners, the goldenstyle beers,” Sam says. ”We’ve also seen people going for these real one-offs, like imperial stouts aged in whisky barrels – with cherries and stuff dropped into them, which come in at 8, 9, 10, 12%,

and you drink them like a wine. Also sour beers, a traditional style that’s been driven by the craft brewers and tends to be lower alcohol, highly refreshing, often flavoured with fruit to counter-balance the sourness – they can be pretty nifty. So I think it’s those two newer styles coming in alongside the more mainstream ones.” With many of the small craft breweries looking to BrewBoard’s example and seeking to expand into premises outside the challenges of the city centre, there’s

BEER ON INSTAGRAM With constantly-changing brews and test batches, the best way to keep up with Cambridge’s craft brewers is to follow them on social media – or drop by their regular tap nights to try their beers for yourself. CALVERLEY'S

@calverleysbrewery

BREWBOARD

@brewboarduk

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OLD FRIENDS

@oldfriendsbrew

THIRSTY

@thirstycamb

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a lot to look forward to – in part because of the good relationships and supportive community that exists between the local brewers. “It’s really friendly and welcoming,” Jon at Old Friends says. “When we first started out we went to have a chat with the guys at Calverley’s – they were really open with us – and there doesn’t seem to be any kind of mystique. I think it’s because most people are in this business for the love, not for the money, and as a result that hopefully whittles away people who are trying to make a quick buck – and you end up with people who just have a love for it.” Despite the cleaning involved, and the lack of space to experiment – at the end of the day, it’s clear that Cambridgeshire’s brewers are a passionate bunch, and adore what they do. “It’s exciting!” Jon sums up. “It’s very everyman – it’s not pretentious. Even though we’re getting increasingly into this world of craft beer, and expensive, exotic and different beers – I still think, essentially, that beer is accessible, it’s not elitist, it’s welcoming. It’s just an honest drink.” l

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H OW TO M A K E T H E B E S T

Ale soda bread ALEX RUSHMER SHARES A RECIPE FOR A BEERY BREAD THAT’S QUICK AND SIMPLE TO MAKE

Soda bread is a real favourite of mine. It’s not only super to eat fresh out of the oven, with plenty of cold butter, but it is also the fastestraised bread you can possibly make. Instead of relying on yeast – which can take hours to work – soda bread creates a rise in just a few minutes and doesn’t need proving. Traditionally, buttermilk provides all the necessary acid to react with the bicarbonate of soda, but here I’ve added ale and the results are even better, bringing a lovely yeasty flavour to the dish that is normally absent in soda bread. O C T O B E R 2 018

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INGREDIENTS

500g strong white bread flour 330ml ale 7 0ml kefir, yoghurt or buttermilk 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

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STEP-BY-STEP

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Mix together the dry ingredients and then add the wet ingredients. K  nead for 2-3 minutes and shape into a round ball. Dust with flour and place onto a baking tray. M  ake two deep cuts into the loaf in a cross shape, almost to the bottom of the loaf, and bake for 30 minutes. T  urn the loaf upside down, lower the oven temperature to 160 degrees and cook for a further 10-15 minutes. R  emove from the oven, place on a wire rack and leave to cool.

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FO O D X&X XDXRXIXNX KX

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FO O D & D R I N K C H E F ’S TA B L E

Country Pumpkin FORGET JACK-O'-LANTERNS. ALEX RUSHMER HAS DELICIOUS PLANS FOR THE ABUNDANCE OF PUMPKINS IN HIS VEGETABLE PATCH

W

e are fortunate enough to have a decentsized vegetable patch in the back garden. Over the summer it has offered up some pretty delicious morsels: fresh purple beans, marble-sized Charlotte potatoes, punchy rocket leaves and a great many squash blossoms. I should add, at this juncture, that the productivity of the garden has virtually nothing to do with me. I’ve tried to enjoy gardening, I really have and, at a push, I can get excited about the vaguely destructive side of it: digging down, heaving earth from one place to another, chopping down a tree or finding a creeping ivy’s taproot in order to prevent it slowly suffocating its prey. But planting, pruning, weeding and waiting – these require a level of patience that is beyond me. I want a more instant gratification. Thankfully, my wife has fingers that are considerably greener than my own and has transformed our small garden into a hive of productivity. This is even more true in relation to the pumpkin patch. It is usually courgettes that spread and sprawl inexorably over the garden, their trailing arms covering the lawn and bare earth until it becomes almost impossible to spy the shiny fruits, until it is too late and the unmistakable sheen of a giant marrow is visible under the low canopy of leaves. But this year, it is pumpkins that have taken over. Within days of the heavy August rains, the small green fruits, no bigger than a child’s fist, had swelled into pale beach balls. Even now, they continue to grow as they slowly ripen in the raised bed, on the lawn or wherever they have ended up. These aren’t Halloween pumpkins, overgrown, gnarly, watery and orange. They return a

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resonant hollow sound, like a woodblock, when tapped with a crooked knuckle. Their skin is pale green and gently mottled like unpolished jade. And there are many of them. Finding something to do with such a surfeit is always going to be a challenge. At this time of year the mind does wander to chutney and the potential for homemade Christmas gifts but a brief look through the cupboard reveals a veritable library of carefully labelled preserves, in a variety of scrawls, dating back several years. There really is only so much chutney one can eat in any given year. Pumpkins do have the benefit of being pretty battle-hardy. They can remain in an apparent stasis for several months during autumn and winter, if kept cool and dry, ready to be called upon in times of need. Those we have growing at the moment have developed a fairly tough armour, best tackled with a bread knife and then diced into fair-sized chunks before being cooked. The pumpkin spiced latte may well be a creation from the depths of

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the most depraved marketeers’ soul, but the inspiration is sound: a bowl or mug of gently spiced soup is wholesome and delicious, ideal for taking the chill off after an autumnal walk. But it is with more robust spicing when pumpkin really shines. I have fond memories of a wonderful – and very spicy – pumpkin curry eaten in Sri Lanka a few years ago. And although I haven’t been able to recreate the dish in its full glory, each attempt gets a little closer. In addition to the expected spices: cumin, coriander, turmeric, cinnamon and chilli – mustard seed and curry leaf lend an unmistakably Sri Lankan flavour to the dish which is simmered in a rich gravy made almost entirely from coconut milk, perfect as those evenings draw in. Maybe we will be able to use all those pumpkins after all. l O C T O B E R 2 018

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Drinks TROLLEY

I K NOW T HIS GR E AT L I T T L E PL ACE ...

d’Arry’s Liquor Loft Located upstairs at King Street’s d’Arry’s, the Liquor Loft has become a popular in-the-know haunt for discerning locals in search of delicious cocktails and food. Opened in the summer of 2016, the story of this addition to the restaurant in fact began some 10 years ago when a fire ripped through d’Arry’s, prompting a refurbishment which unearthed an intriguing space upstairs. Among the discoveries was brewing equipment from the George Scales Brewery, which inhabited the King Street spot as far back as 1866. Working around the unique original features, which include the mash tun and pot still, a stylish

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new 80-capacity bar area was created, complete with outdoor terrace area for drinking and dining. Pull up a stool at the ludicrously well-stocked bar, or cosy up in the fur blanket and colourful cushionlined nooks to enjoy unique barrel aged cocktails, boozy affogato, a vast range of gins and craft beers, and a top wine list. Peckish? There’s seriously tasty bites like shredded duck bon bons and Cajun calamari to enjoy, plus hearty mains like burgers and sticky ribs. The Liquor Loft also hosts regular gigs and open mic nights; keep an eye on the d’Arry’s website for more details. darrys.co.uk

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XDXRXIXNXKS XXX

THREE WINE MEN The UK’s best-loved wine experts, Oz Clarke, Tim Atkin MW and Olly Smith return to the city for this year’s wine extravaganza, Three Wine Men, at the Corn Exchange on 10 November. Oz, Tim and Olly will be on hand ready to point you in the direction of some top tipples, starting you on the road to vinous pleasure. You simply grab a glass and move from table to table to taste from hundreds of wines. There will be three masterclasses: cheese and wine; Champagne from France’s oldest producer, Champagne Gosset; and the best that Spain has to offer. Many of the exhibitors will have special offers on their wines, so you can treat yourself to your favourites, taking them home (and perhaps preparing for your Christmas supplies). Tastings and mingling with the three experts are included in the £35 ticket price, but a separate ticket is needed for the masterclasses. Fancy joining the fun for free? Head to our website at cambsedition.co.uk and click the Competitions tab where we’ll be giving away tickets! threewinemen.co.uk

FEELING THIRSTY?

A Natural Choice ELODIE CAMERON FROM DRINKS SHOP THIRSTY GIVES THE LOWDOWN ON WHAT NATURAL WINES ARE – AND WHY WE SHOULD CARE ● FIRST THINGS FIRST: IF WINE

IS MADE FROM GRAPES…. ISN’T IT ALL NATURAL?

Natural is one of those terms, like biodynamic and organic before it, that’s bandied about like we should instantly know what it means and nod our heads sagely. As is often the case when a term is first used, initially there may be limited agreement about its definition – however, slowly but surely the muddied water (or wine in this case) clears. Firstly, as strange as it may seem, not all wine is ‘natural’ so this is where a definition becomes essential. Natural wine is an approach or philosophy (if you prefer) to winemaking where minimal chemical and technological intervention occurs, not just in the growing of the grapes as seen with organic or biodynamic wine but also the process of turning them into wine. Sounds simple and indeed it is supposed to be, but in practice it becomes a little more complicated. There is no established certification that everyone adheres to, and indeed there is no legal status. There are instead many associations and individuals who are clear about their approach and so perhaps the best way to understand this philosophy is to understand what they generally have in common. Essentially the key is what many call ‘low intervention’, and key identifiers across most producers are that the wines are: generally organic, often biodynamic, naturally fermented (ie. the fermentation process is spontaneous, this means no yeasts are added), unfiltered, no additives, no sulphites (although a little on bottling seems acceptable to keep the wine fresh – this is where it gets more complicated). ● BUT WHY BOTHER?

Sadly, many wines are made to a recipe, they taste the same year in, year out and

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the flavours are often one dimensional. You may never have wondered why but think about it: for wine, a natural product that grows each year with differing weather conditions, to remain so homogenous takes some serious intervention. Additives, added yeasts, preservatives and perhaps acidity, sugar and even colour... the list goes on but I’m sure you get the point. Many smaller producers have a very different approach, believing wine should show the characteristics of the terroir from which it emanates and be a reflection of the season in which it grew. Seems obvious right? Others take it a few steps further: organic, biodynamic and perhaps even natural. ● WHAT TO EXPECT?

Lively wines with vibrant flavours and fantastic hues. Yes, they may be cloudy but to keep everything in many believe you shouldn’t take anything out, and that is exactly what filtering does. If wine is fermented grape juice then the idea is this is what we should be getting – wine as it should be, no pesticides, herbicides, sulphur dioxide or any other nasties. ● WHY AREN’T ALL WINES

MADE THIS WAY?

Well, attention to detail and quality take time and effort – and as a consequence there is a cost. Also, not everyone is a fan. Some feel that these wines are unstable and often taste oxidised (a sherried character), don’t keep and therefore are not trustworthy. But really? Like with everything there are those who do it well and those that don’t. So my best advice is: give it a go, and ask for advice – trust your wine shop. New range of natural wines available at Thirsty from late September.

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Weddings

WEDDINGS

A happy couple at South Farm, which boasts an abundance of unique venues and features

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Venues

WHETHER YOU WANT SMALL AND INTIMATE OR A FULL-ON MINI FESTIVAL, THERE’S A LOCAL VENUE THAT CAN FULFIL YOUR DREAMS

SOUTH FARM Found on the Cambridgeshire/ Hertfordshire border, South Farm boasts an abundance of unique features. Made up of stunning barn buildings, a picture-perfect country house, secluded gardens and a unique set of Romany caravans, not to mention various luxury accommodation options, there’s much to love about this family-run venue. We adore that their smallholding supplies the home-grown produce for wedding menus throughout the year, ingredients which are then transformed into seasonal feasts by the in-house chefs, and that you can arrive at your ceremony aboard a Thai-style tuk-tuk. You’re in safe hands with the dedicated and friendly front-of-house team, too, who offer meticulous planning, flexibility and great service, and will be there on the day to ensure everything goes swimmingly. south-farm.co.uk

SECR ET G A R DEN AT BURWA SH

At the heart of Burwash Manor, Barton, lies the sixteenth century moated Manor House. Nestled in its peaceful and secluded old walled garden is a spacious and pretty marquee – the ideal setting for a perfect country wedding. This 1600sq ft pine-floored, permanently situated marquee combines all of the charm of an English country garden marquee-style wedding with the ease and comfort of all the necessary facilities to hand – while the rural site which surrounds it makes a dreamy backdrop for those all-important big day photographs. At The Secret Garden, couples have the freedom and flexibility to create their own dream wedding while receiving the full support and advice of the experienced team at Burwash Manor. If you're looking for a relaxed venue which can be tailored to your requirements in a stunning countryside setting, this might be your dream spot. burwashweddings.com O C T O B E R 2 018

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Old Hall, Ely

A recently renovated Jacobean manor house, The Old Hall is set in an historic estate of 3000 acres that also boasts formal gardens, ornamental lakes and gorgeous views across farmland to Ely Cathedral. The venue team pride themselves on a welcoming atmosphere, a creative and personal approach to the weddings they host, and in making the planning as enjoyable and relaxed as possible. Civil ceremonies take place in the stunning oak Garden Pavilion within the picturesque setting of the lower lawn, or in the Grand Hall by a roaring fire. The all-important wedding breakfast takes place in a completely up-to-date marquee, which nonetheless epitomises the essence of a traditional, English country house wedding. Lined in mid-ivory with pea lights in the ceiling, two sides of the marquee are completely glass, and can be opened to offer beautiful views of the lake and Ely Cathedral. If you choose to marry at The Old Hall, you and your guests will enjoy private use of the house and grounds, complete with a complimentary four poster honeymoon suite and 13 additional bedrooms for guests. All the rooms have been individually designed and furnished with antiques and handmade furniture. theoldhallely.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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BEDFORD LODGE HOTEL & SPA If you’re looking for a luxurious, all-encompassing wedding venue, look no further than Bedford Lodge Hotel & Spa. Awarded Best Venue, East of England, at The Wedding Industry Awards 2018, the hotel has been recognised for always exceeding expectations – going above and beyond to make your big day truly special. The elegant 17th century building is nestled in a stunning rose garden and houses three banqueting suites, enabling it to host weddings of all sizes, from intimate parties of ten to extravagant occasions for up to 150. The hotel also houses romantic wedding suites, 80 luxury rooms and an award-winning spa for limitless wedding celebrations. To top it all off, Sean Melville, the venue’s award-winning executive head chef, is on hand to create your ultimate wedding dining experience, whether it’s a relaxed afternoon tea or a sumptuous three-course meal. bedfordlodgehotel.co.uk

UN I V ER SI T Y A R MS

Having reopened following a stunning £80 million refurbishment this summer, the University Arms has put itself firmly on the map for venueseeking betrothed couples in the area. Perched on the edge of Parker’s Piece, there’s no doubt the hotel would make a jaw-droppingly beautiful backdrop for big day celebrations, plus you know your catering would be in the safest of hands with celebrated in-house chef Tristian Welch masterminding the wedding breakfast. There’s an elegant, 200-capacity ballroom for larger gatherings, but if yours is a more intimate affair it can be scaled back with a solid oak partitioning wall that divides the space into separate rooms. Promising exceptional service, “from the personally crafted menu to the bespoke silverware on the tables”, the experienced team will be on hand to make sure your nuptials are everything you’ve dreamed of – and more. universityarms.com

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WEDDINGS

CHIPPENHAM PARK A charming Georgian country house, Chippenham Park is located on the Suffolk/Cambridgeshire border near Ely and Newmarket. It’s surrounded by 300 acres of pretty parkland and gardens, giving a secluded feel, and couples can walk down the aisle surrounded by trees and flowers before saying ‘I do’ at the edge of a lake in a beautiful summer house. Other ceremony venues on-site include an oak gazebo, the Old Ballroom (capacity 120), or the nearby St Margaret’s Church. Come the reception, you and your guests can enjoy drinks and canapés on the rose terrace before a wedding breakfast by one of the venue’s catering partners, be it a sit-down feast or a more relaxed hog roast. Then, party the night away on the star-lit dancefloor and lakeside decking area to a live band or DJ – you can bed down for the night at Chippenham Park, too, with a range of stunning en-suite rooms in the converted potting sheds across the courtyard. chippenhamparkevents.co.uk

Hotel Felix

With a stately Victorian villa at its centre, stylish interiors, award-winning food and luxurious suites, we’re pretty sure it’ll be love at first sight with Hotel Felix. Say ‘I do’ in the elegant first-floor rooms overlooking the gardens or, weather permitting, in the hotel’s romantic gazebo. Should you require a little more space they also offer a marquee option, with the Victorian mansion providing a stunning backdrop for those all-important wedding photos. After the formalities, sip champagne on the terrace, relax into the evening celebrations, dance the night away or perhaps enjoy a stroll in the garden as you celebrate the start of your life together. Whichever option you choose, you can rest assured that the hotel’s experienced team of wedding coordinators will work with you to make sure your special day is memorable for all of the right reasons. Email weddings@hotelfelix.co.uk hotelfelix.co.uk

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Happy Hens

WEDDINGS

GIVE TEAM BRIDE THE PRE-WEDDING TREAT THEY DESERVE, WHETHER IT’S A WEEKEND OF RELAXATION IN A BOUTIQUE SPA OR GETTING CREATIVE WITH HANDS ON ACTIVITIES

PAMPERING AT GRESHAM HOUSE WELLNESS For a spot of pampering for you and your girls (or guys!) in the heart of Cambridge, recently-opened Gresham House Wellness takes some beating. Unveiled in May this year, this beautiful retreat is nestled inside a Victorian villa within the walled garden of the Gonville Hotel. A sleek and contemporary spa inspired by the surrounding gardens, a botanical theme abounds inside, with stunning floral wallpapers and soft furnishings providing pops of rich colour. There are three serene treatment rooms where guests can unwind and take advantage of an extensive spa menu, created in partnership with prestigious skincare brand ESPA. Pampering enthusiasts will be spoiled for choice with the sumptuous selection of offerings, which include Optimal Skin Pro facials, Holistic Total Body Ritual massages with hot stones, Advanced Body Cocoons and Jessica Nail treatments. If you’re looking to really relax and indulge, there are also eight feature bedrooms for an overnight stay, each uniquely designed and boasting gorgeous features such as freestanding bathtubs and jewel-coloured velvet armchairs. gonvillehotel.co.uk

C A MBR I D GE F L OW ER SCHO OL PA RT Y WOR K SHOP S Creative brides-to-be will love the range of party workshops on offer at Cambridge Flower School in Newton. The ‘Bridal Party’ package – geared specifically towards hen groups – will see you and your gang creating a pretty, vintage-inspired table centrepiece with a rustic mixture of flowers and foliage. Other popular party options include ‘Four Seasons’, where groups learn to create gorgeous, hand-tied bouquets using pretty seasonal flowers, and the ‘Country Garden’ where you’ll create a natural arrangement in a wooden box using herbs and British-grown flowers. The sessions last two-and-a-half hours and are priced at £75 per head for groups of six to nine, or £65 per head for groups of ten to 12, which includes refreshments, homemade cake and all materials. The school can also bring the workshop to the venue of your choice for an additional charge – contact the team for more details. thecambridgeflowerschool.co.uk

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The Wedding Saviour

© IMAGES BY LINA & TOM WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY

VANESSA HARNESS, DIRECTOR OF AWARD-WINNING LOCAL WEDDING PLANNERS ROCKS & FROCKS, OFFERS HER TOP TIPS FOR BRIDES-TO-BE

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BUDGET Decide your budget at the beginning and stick to it. It’s all too easy to be distracted by Pinterest and Instagram, but only budget what you know you are comfortable with – remember that no matter how big or small the amount you have to spend is, you will be able to create a fabulous day.

GUEST NUMBERS The more guests you have, the less you’ll be able to spend per head. To get the most out of your budget, consider keeping your guest numbers low, inviting only the immediate family and friends who will be with you throughout your married life. This will allow you more budget to spend on your food, drink, decor, florals and so on.

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PRIORITIES Think about which parts of the wedding you would like to really impress your guests with, and then divide your budget according to what really matters to you – if you and your fiancé are ‘foodies’ and food is therefore really important to you, allocate more of your budget for food than, say, flowers – or vice versa.

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BRIDE TRIBE Choose your girls wisely – they will be the ones you ask for help and reassurance along the planning journey, at the set-up of the wedding, the day before and on the morning of the wedding, so make sure that these moments are drama- and stress-free!

WEDDINGS

The Finishing Touches

BORED, THIRSTY AND HUNGRY These are the three key things you must avoid your guests becoming on the day! You can spend lots of money on a jaw-droppingly beautiful venue but if your guests are thirsty, hungry or bored, this is what they will remember your wedding day for. Concentrate on timings, entertainment, food and drink.

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LASTING MEMORIES One area not to cut your budget is on your photographer. At the end of the day and in years to come, the images are the only lasting item from your day so make sure you choose wisely. Always have a consultation with them before booking to make sure that you like them and get on with them, as they will be with you all day. Never book a photographer based on price alone.

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SET UP Never underestimate how long it takes to set up your wedding if you are doing it yourself. Keep your helpers to a minimum, write a list of everything to be done and assign responsibilities to those you have chosen to help. If you intend to set up/decorate the day before, do not book beauty appointments or dinners for that evening unless you are 100% confident you can all work to strict deadlines – you may well still be decorating your venue late into the evening.

COCK TA I L S A N D M AC A RONS

Founded in 2016, Cocktails and Macarons is a Cambridge-based company that specialises in custom wedding favours, dazzling macaron towers and pre-prepared fresh and natural ready-to-drink-cocktails. All items can be customised for your special day, as all products are made from scratch and to order, so you can be sure that you and your guests will not be disappointed. Saphsa, the founder of Cocktails and Macarons, says, “I’m very conscious about unnecessary ingredients going into products and as a result no artificial flavours or additives are used, and the addition of refined sugar is kept to a minimum.” Macaron towers range from £55 upwards, with pre-prepared cocktails ranging from £75 upwards (33 portions). Cocktails and Macarons were a finalist in a University of East London Enterprise entrepreneurial competition earlier this year, beating the other entrants in a three-stage process from 256 to five. cocktailsandmacarons.co.uk

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DELEGATE For any wedding day, especially outdoor weddings, there are lots of tasks throughout the day that need to happen, from meeting suppliers as they arrive to table and glass clearing. Always ensure you know who is undertaking these tasks and managing the suppliers. If necessary make sure you book a planner to manage your day so that you and your family and friends can enjoy yourselves.

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MAKE IT YOURS Plan your wedding so that it is exactly how you want it to be – if you want to mix the speeches up and have them before dinner or between courses or none at all, that’s absolutely fine! If you don’t want to cut the cake, or have a first dance or do a big choreographed number with the bridal party then that’s ok – it’s your day, so do it your way.

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DON’T SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF Remember that your wedding day is all about celebrating you and your fiancé becoming husband and wife, do not stress the small stuff and remember that if someone says that nothing went wrong on their wedding day, they probably didn’t notice it! Relax and enjoy every moment, and if anything does go wrong, remember that your guests don’t know what your plans were – they will have absolutely no idea if something is not quite how you wanted it to be. randfweddings.co.uk

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A N NA’ S F L OW ER FA R M

Anna’s Flower Farm creates spectacular floral designs using flowers from Audley End for brides all over Cambridge, London and the South East. The process begins with a consultation at the studio, which is located on the plots where the flowers are planted so brides and grooms can see and smell their blooms growing in the weeks before their wedding. Anna offers a range of fixed-price packages from the Ready to Wed – which includes everything from the bride’s bouquet down to boutonnière for the groomsmen – to the Ready to Arrange, where you’ll receive buckets of flowers to arrange yourself. Sign up for her newsletter for details of year-round growing and arranging classes or visit for one of the monthly open events. Join the taster session for the year-long Grow Your Own Cutting Garden course on Thursday 11 October 2018. annasflowerfarm.com

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Capture your Big Day

WEDDINGS

PRO TIPS ON GETTING THE WEDDING SNAPS OF YOUR DREAMS FROM AWARDWINNING CAMBRIDGE PHOTOGRAPHER JEAN-LUC BENAZET

● HIRE A GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER

If possible, hire someone local who will know the area well. Check out their website testimonials and how many Google reviews they have, and ask for recommendations from friends. Always try and meet the chosen photographer beforehand either face-to-face or via Skype to get a feel for how they work and if you would be a good match, as they will ultimately be telling the story of your big day.

timeline for your whole wedding day. How long will the bridal preparations, ceremony, drinks reception, meal and evening entertainment last? That way you can give your photographer an idea of what to expect and when – especially during the crucial drinks reception right after the ceremony, as that section of the day is often the moment when he/she will capture group photos, pictures of you two as a married couple and the important candid and informal photos of your guests.

● CREATE A MOOD BOARD

In order for your photographer to understand what you want, it may be a good idea to create a mood board. It can be easily created using Pinterest, where you can save ideas and images you like. That way, you can easily communicate the style of photos you’d love for your big day in a truly visual manner. ● PLAN ENOUGH TIME FOR EACH SECTION OF THE DAY

It is important for you to create a rough

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● KEEP YOUR GROUP/FORMAL PHOTOS TO A MINIMUM

In order to have as much time as possible for socialising and chatting with your guests on your wedding day, and especially during your drinks reception, I recommend keeping the number of group and formal photos to a minimum. Firstly, choose someone who knows both your families well to help the photographer gather everyone. It is not the couple’s job on the day. All you have to do is

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relax and enjoy. Secondly, have a maximum of five group photos planned. Remember, it can take between one and five minutes to organise one group photo, so if you want your photographer to capture five photos it could take between five and 25 minutes depending on the organisation! As for the location of your group photos, a great photographer should be able to make almost any location work. Have trust in your photographer’s creative abilities. ● DON’T FORGET TO ENJOY YOUR WEDDING DAY

Tell yourself you will not be able to influence an unexpected something that may not fit in with what you had perfectly planned. The wedding day goes very quickly, so the important thing is to enjoy every minute of it – you will have your photographs to look back on to remind yourself how great it was! Jean-Luc Benazet Photography 3 Brookfield Way, Cambridge 07811 512422, jeanlucbenazet.com

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B E AU T Y

the

BEAUTY K

een (winged) eyes will have already noticed that Debenhams in Cambridge has a new offering for make-up fans: an addition that has got me next-level excited with Halloween on the horizon. Kat Von D Beauty, purveyor of the inkiest eyeliners around, has joined the beauty hall as the latest offering in highquality make-up from the store. I’ve been obsessed with the Tattoo Liner in Trooper (£14.45) for years and can confidently say, as a cat wing connoisseur, it’s my favourite ever. Easier to use than most thanks to its precision tip and fluid, non-dragging formula, and unlike many other felt-tip style pens on the market this one does not dry out after the first few uses. In fact, it keeps going and going for months – I promise! Halloween is one of my favourite dates in the calendar, and a great excuse for getting heavy-handed with the smoky eye. Kat Von D is known for her gothic vibes and pigmented palettes, and if you’re new to the range the Shade and Light Eye Contour Palette (£31.45), available in mattes or glimmers – is the perfect place to start. Rich, buttery colours housed in a luxurious gothic palette. For a sophisticated Halloween look, sweep a lighter shade into creases for a soft transfer and work darker shades outward corner in, taking the colour as far out as you dare. New to the range you’ll find the innovative Lash Liner (£14.45), a first-ofits-kind liquid product designed especially for the waterline, an area which is tricky for

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deep colour payoff. This new nifty product will stay put with no touch-ups needed all night. Now, just because it’s Halloween, doesn’t mean it’s all dark and stormy. There’s always a place for highlighter in my heart, but rather than go for a typical hue I’ll be opting for a perkier shade on the colour wheel this spooky season. The Kat Von D Metal Crush Extreme Highlighter Palette (£21.44) has three metallic shades for a hyperreflective glow. Spraying your brush with a little fixing spray (NYX Matte Finish, £7 at Boots, is great for this) before swirling in the product will give even richer payoff. This can be done with eyeshadows, too, for extra oomph. For an ethereal finish, I cannot get enough of the Stila Heavens Hue Highlighter in Transcendence (£28, beautybay.com) an iridescent purple just perfect for cheek bones, brow bones and cupid’s bow. For lips, you’ll want something longlasting and deep in colour. Kat Von D’s Everlasting Liquid Lipsticks (£14.45) are insanely good for any occasion; try Beloved for a pretty heather pink for every day, or vamp it up for Halloween with Outlaw – a deep, plummy red. And for a true pumpkin kiss, the Everlasting Glimmer Veil (£17) in the shade Rocker pops an acid orange punch. l

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WORDS BY DAISY DICKINSON

THE ONE THAT I WANT

When Stila brought out the Magnificent Metals range of liquid eyeshadows – things changed. Applying glitter used to be a mildly terrifying affair, leaving a hot mess of a trail, but thanks to these dinky pots of liquid formula and doe-foot applicators it’s now foolproof to apply shimmers and glitter with total ease. Try Vivid Garnet (£23, beautybay.com), a rich pomegranate shade patted over lids for a sultry stare, or go all out mer-mazing with the new Glitter and Glow Mermaid Collection of two-tone shades. My favourite is Into the Blue (£23, beautybay.com).

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CO M P E T I T I O N

Win a Specialized Alibi Sport Hybrid bike

H ere at Cambridge Edition we’ve teamed up with Rutland Cycling to give one lucky reader a Specialized Alibi Sport Step-Through Hybrid bike worth £449.99, perfect for cycling around the city in style. Every cyclist wants less maintenance and more riding – and that’s exactly what you get with the Specialized Alibi Sport StepThrough Hybrid. Airless tyres mean less pumping and no pesky flats, and the antirust chain removes the need for regular grimy upkeep. If those perks weren’t enough to convince you, the saddle and grips were designed using Body Geometry technology, meaning they’re super supportive, and Fitness Geometry informed the design of the frame, helping you go faster without the discomfort that comes from an aggressive ride position. The Step-Through frame design makes this bike easy to get on and off, plus the Alibi Sport has a wide range of gears, courtesy of Shimano, so you can ride up those hills with ease.

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WITH RUTLAND CYCLING WOR

£449.9 9!

Family business Rutland Cycling has five stores in Cambridge, open seven days a week, with branches at Cambridge Station, Grand Arcade, Barnwell Road, Histon and the Giant Store on Hills Road. Rutland offers a full range of bikes including road, hybrid, MTB, electric and children’s, plus parts, accessories and clothing for all, as well as servicing, repairs and friendly advice. Daily or longterm cycle hire is available at the Grand Arcade and Cambridge Station stores. To be in win with a chance of winning the Specialized Alibi Sport Step-Through Hybrid, visit cambsedition.co.uk and click on the Competition tab to enter. l Rutland Cycling | rutlandcycling.com | 0330 555 0080 T&CS

The winner must be able to collect the bike from one of Rutland Cycling’s Cambridge stores, either Grand Arcade, Cambridge Station, Histon, Barnwell Road or Giant Store on Hills Road.

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TH

LO N G -T E R M STUDENT BIKE HIRE FROM ONLY 90P PER DAY FOR STUDENTS!

Available from Rutland Cycling Grand Arcade and Cambridge Station stores. For more information pop into store or call. Rutland Cycling Grand Arcade, Corn Exchange Street, CB2 3QF 01223 307655 Rutland Cycling Cambridge Station, 156 Great Northern Road, CB1 2FX 01223 352728

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Autumn Essentials Bring a little colour and sparkle to your autumn wardrobe with a flash of sequins, a shimmer of metallic, a touch of animal print and a cosy, colourful faux fur coat

SILK SHIRT

£120, Jigsaw, Trinity Street

CLAUDINE DRESS

£169 Hobbs, Grand Arcade

FRANCISCO BROGUE

£99 Dune, Market Street CHECK TROUSERS

£40, River Island, Grand Arcade

MUSTARD FAUX FUR LONGLINE COAT

£39.99, New Look, Lion Yard

PRINCIPLES SKIRT

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FAS H I O N

Coat £149 Biba jumper £45 Maison de Nimes dress £105, Lollys Laundry at House of Fraser

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INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH

Loci Interiors SIOBHAN GODWOOD FINDS OUT MORE ABOUT THE COMPANY BRINGING GREAT ARCHITECTURE, STYLISH INTERIORS AND CREATIVE BRANDING TO THE STREETS OF CAMBRIDGE

N o one would argue with the fact that Cambridge is one of the most beautiful and historic cities in the world. But in decades past, there haven’t been many places where the ordinary residents of Cambridge could really enjoy and appreciate that beauty. Of course, you can admire the awesome architecture from the outside as you get on with your shopping, or you can take a tour of one of the colleges. But sitting on a rooftop, or in a bay window, sipping a coffee or a cocktail while you admire the skyline? Until recently, that hasn’t been so easy to do. Things have changed in the last few years, with more and more pubs, bars and restaurants around Cambridge focusing on architecture and design – as well as great food and drink – to make the most of the buildings and surroundings. So when you go out for food or drinks with friends, rather than walking into a bar that could be in

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any city, in any country in the world, you can have an experience that is quintessentially ‘Cambridge’. If you take a look around some of Cambridgeshire’s most exciting and innovative venues, you start to see a connection: many of them have been designed by the team at Loci Interiors, which was established by husband-andwife team Jonathan and Rivka Furbank in 2004. Loci covers architecture, interior design and branding, which is an unusual mix. “The thing that really sets us apart,” says Rivka, “is that we like to be handson from the very beginning, and work very closely with our clients to get to the core of what their business is or what they want it to be. Sometimes clients come to us without a clear direction; they know they want a restaurant, for example but don’t know the exact offer. Then it’s a question of brainstorming and analysis, to think about what will work in the area or specific location. So before we look at layouts, we’ll assess the name, signage and brand. We’ll look at the stories behind the business, where it’s come from and where it wants to go.” A look at Loci’s website is like reading a roll call of all the best places to hang out in Cambridgeshire: they’ve worked with Millworks, The Cambridge Chop House, Bread & Meat, Fitzbillies and many, many more. The pair’s design roots lie in quite a different city, however. “We started out in Brighton,” says Rivka, “and the restaurant and cafe scene there seemed really vibrant, always focused on the next big thing. When we came to Cambridge, it didn’t have that feel. We wanted to find that perfect place to sit in the sun and drink a coffee, and it made sense

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that Cambridge needed places for people of all different ages to be entertained and to have fun.” Of course it’s a huge thrill for the team at Loci when their projects achieve success – the Cock at Hemingford Grey has just won National Pub of the Year – but when they get the chance to see first-hand the difference their work has made, that’s even better. “We recently worked on the Griffin Bar at Homerton College,” explains Rivka. “That was really exciting, because it was all about looking at the history of Homerton and where it’s come from, and then trying to take that through to its future life with its newly

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INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH

awarded charter. The students, when they came to the bar for the first time, absolutely loved it and couldn’t believe it was for them!” Loci Interiors brings its magic to more than just restaurants and bars; they help transform work and study spaces in Cambridge, too. One of their first clients was the Leys School, and they have continued to work with them, transforming many of the school’s boarding houses. They’ve also had a hand in some of the new business spaces in and around the city. “The other side of things in this city, away from cafes and bars, is the importance of all of these amazing brains working away backstage, changing the globe,” says Rivka. “We’ve worked with BioStrata in Histon and with Bluestone at One Station Square; it’s been really interesting to see that office space can make a difference to people’s lives, too. It can act as a representation of what a company is and what it does, and can also be a dynamic place for people to be, and do the best work that they can.” Working in Cambridge offers unique

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challenges, of course. The buildings are often listed and protected by other conservation laws. The team at Loci Interiors don’t see this as an obstacle, however, rather something that makes their job even more exciting and worthwhile. “We want to ensure that everything we do is in keeping as much as possible with the history of the buildings and location,” explains Rivka. “We have such an important city and enhancing Cambridge is always our objective.” l Loci Interiors, 8a Kings Parade 01223 352222 | lociinteriors.co.uk

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Education

© F&F

N E WS , A DV I C E , E X P E RT O P I N I O N A N D LO CA L S C H O O L S P OT L I G H TS

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E D U CAT I O N

Open Season WITH SCHOOL OPEN DAYS IN FULL SWING, CHARLOTTE PHILIPS CONSIDERS HOW TO LOOK PAST THE BELLS AND WHISTLES AND FIND A SCHOOL THAT’S THE RIGHT FIT FOR YOUR CHILD

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t’s that time of year again. Parents are poring over education websites and prospectuses, trying to work out which schools to visit as open day season gets underway. Their challenge is identifying the Goldilocks school that’s just right for their child. It’s not too big or too small. It produces brilliant results on the sports pitch but doesn’t stint on stretching students in the classroom, either. All this while ensuring that pupils’ happiness and confidence levels also remain top of the agenda. On the plus side, open days leave you in no doubt as to the quality of schools in our region. But they can also be an overwhelming experience. Schools, looking and sounding their best and exuding excellence, can leave families feeling adrift in a rolling sea of superlatives. The starting point for parents should be getting themselves prepped for the experience, says Dave Watkin, assistant head at Culford School. Open days should be one element in the

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process of getting to know the school rather than the be all and end all. “Your open day is your first fly by the school. You’re going to go on two if not three different occasions. It’s not about ruling schools out but ruling schools in,” he says. His advice is to be clear not only about schools’ open day agendas but what matters to you. Take on board everything the school perceives as important but don’t lose sight of your own objectives so you can ensure that the school delivers on these as well. “Pick out three priorities and make it your business to find out about them,” he says. Schools can be hugely impressive, but he stresses that it’s important to reflect on the information you’re given. “Don’t blindly absorb things. Be aware of the process by which schools communicate and present themselves.” Getting the most out of open days is all about making your visit a multi-sensory experience. u

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E D U CAT I O N

Will Phelan, Principal of the Stamford Endowed Schools, Lincolnshire, is in no doubt that touch, taste, sight, sound and smell can all be useful tools for information gathering. “A good handshake from a confident pupil tour guide (touch) will tell you much about the pastoral care and the pupils’ social and personal development; the school lunch (taste) is an indicator of everything from how much pupils are valued by senior leadership to the financial health of the school.” And that’s just the start. If you observe welltended displays and facilities, it indicates a happy, motivated and successful school. Listen

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for the chatter of the pupils around you and the welcome from staff. “It indicates respect, confidence, personal development and all sorts of other good things,” Will points out. Smell meanwhile, can offer instant insights, from the cleanliness of the changing rooms to how often the lawns are mown – or neglected. And it’s a tell-tale pointer as to the quality of school meals. “It’s terrific way of knowing whether the lunch is appetising or like something out of the Bash Street Kids – one of the least fakeable clues to the life of any school,” he points out. As his comments suggest, getting to the heart of a school is often about much more than being

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E D U CAT I O N

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wowed by the big, exciting bits like 4G pitches, corridors of snazzy science labs or professionalquality concert halls. Instead, it can be the smaller details that can tell you where a school’s priorities really lie. Take the displays of work that are a feature of many a school corridor and classroom. Don’t just admire the neatness of the presentation but drill down into the nitty gritty, says Victoria Robeson at Cambridge International School. “How have spelling mistakes been handled? What are the children the same age as your child doing? Is it just the top students’ work on display or has everyone been given the opportunity to shine?” she says. Answering these questions will give you an insight into the teaching methods at the school and the curriculum offered. Watching current students can also shed light on the school environment. Happy pupils will show it in the way they talk to each other and interact with staff. Their uniform will be generally neat and tidy. Even their manners – pupils hold open the door, how do they interact with staff? All these points will tell you about the environment at the school, and if it is an environment that you would be happy for your child to join. And don’t overlook the school library. This, too, can give you plenty of clues about a school’s culture. If there are empty shelves, do they signal keen readers or a tiny budget for new books? Richard Settle, head at Sancton Wood School, suggests paying close attention to the displays to see how pupil-focused they are and how enticingly they present books and the whole process of reading. “Are there just pictures of books or children’s own book reviews, and is there a book of the month, or recommended reads?” he says. Libraries may be ultra-smart, but where’s the evidence they’re being actively promoted? “Are the librarians passionate about reading and do they light up when they talk about how the library is being used?” It’s all about finding out whether or not engaged pupils are enjoying every aspect of school life, and these little things can make all the difference. Taking in not only the sights but also the sounds of school life can be equally telling, say school insiders. While the level of formality will depend on the school, and is really a matter of choice for the parents in deciding on the approach they want, says Will Phelan, some things are a constant. “There must be a sense of mutual respect; there must be a clear sense that both pupils and staff are happy to be there and are positively engaged with the business of learning; and there must be a sense of a supportive, encouraging environment, where pupils can ask for help when they need it – from staff, and from each other.” And don’t discount what happens outside the classroom, says Victoria Robeson at CIS, so listen out for calm corridors, not a noisy rabble. If there’s a lesson in progress, what tone are teachers using. “Are they enthusiastic about the lesson they are teaching and engaging with the children?” she queries. If you seek out a specific teacher, think about how they respond to your query, says u

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E D U CAT I O N

“If you leave with a gnawing sense that it isn’t the right place for your child, even if there’s nothing you can put your finger on, don’t ignore it” Dave Watkin. “If my child is a high performing mathematician and you ask the head of maths how many children went to study mathematics from the school and where did they go to study – it’s very powerful if they say, ‘I don’t know but give me your email and I’ll drop you a line and let you know’.” And don’t neglect those other senses, from the smell of new-mown grass – which “indicates the grounds are looked after,” says Will Phelan – to touch. Basic cleanliness is a non-negotiable but it’s even worthwhile clocking the temperature as a way of assessing just how well schools manage the overall environment. “What are the classrooms like – freezing cold or warm and welcoming?” says Victoria Robeson. Ultimately, it’s about bringing all those impressions together to help you evaluate

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each school visit. And here, it’s worthwhile considering that elusive sixth sense – your gut instinct – that certainly shouldn’t be ignored. If you leave with a gnawing sense that it isn’t the right place for your child, even if there’s nothing you can put your finger on – don’t ignore it, says Richard Settle at Sancton Wood. “If there’s something nagging at you, my recommendation would be not to dismiss the school out of hand but go back on a day when the school is fully functional,” he says. “Walk round and see if you can spend a bit of time with the head teacher and have more one-to-one time.” Always trust your instinct, agrees Victoria Robeson. “I think it is a bit like buying a house,” she says. “You just know the right environment for your child.” l

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E D U CAT I O N E D U C AT I O N S P OT L I G H T

Technology in the Classroom

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RICHARD SETTLE, HEADTEACHER OF SANCTON WOOD SCHOOL, CONSIDERS WHY 'SCREEN TIME' MIGHT NOT BE ALL BAD NEWS

n this day and age – whether we like it or not – technology is part of our everyday lives. Whether it’s getting Alexa to switch on our coffee machine, using our GPS to find the quickest route to work or relaxing in front of Netflix; technology makes our lives easier, saves us time and enhances our day-to-day experiences. But recently, technology has seen a rather unexpected backlash – especially when it comes to its role in the lives of our future generations. It is estimated that the average young person (aged between five and 16) spends a staggering six and a half hours in front of a screen every day, with the number increasing amongst teenagers. Much of this is made up of watching TV, playing games consoles and using a smart device. So what impact is this having, both mentally and physically? And where does this leave the role of technology in the classroom? At Sancton Wood School, we believe that in order to develop well-rounded, multitalented and successful students, a combination of the two is fundamental. Striking a balance between technologybased learning and a more experiential approach is key in preparing pupils for both their wider educational journey and their life ahead. We believe they shouldn’t just ‘consume’ technology, but learn to understand how these devices work and how they can influence the modern world. Aside from the usual ‘physical’ development of ICT kit commonplace in schools (interactive whiteboards, iPads, laptops etc), we aim to keep a continued

focus on the development of the pupils’ experience of ICT in their lessons at the forefront of our thinking. At the heart of this is a curriculum that develops cognitive background knowledge of ICT; one in which pupils get ‘hands on’ and actually touch and understand the computer components and how they work. They literally build computer operating systems and networks to develop a clearer understanding of the internet of things. This modern curriculum provides a sharper focus on computer science, with lessons building on thinking skills, mathematical and digital technology concepts alongside industry standard applications that the student would expect to see in the IT workplace and the more practical programming tasks in Python. We use computer labs equipped with Raspberry Pi devices and Arduinos to support this focus, as pupils learn to problem solve with algorithms.

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Elsewhere, in the day-to-day curriculum, pupils use specific educational apps and therefore receive a much more detailed and visual learning experience – and also a greater sense of autonomy over their learning, as they are controlling the pace at which they move through the work. Having an array of smart devices means students can work in a range of different ways – whether individually and in smaller breakout groups, or collectively as a class. This ability to work flexibly in different forums not only keeps things interesting and engaging for students, but also enables teachers to move around the classroom more and adapt their lesson plans to suit the individual requirements of students. Technology moves quickly and, rather than simply attempting to keep up with the endless stream of devices and machines available, it is far better to focus students on the essential matter of what computers are made up of and what makes them work. A simple Raspberry Pi device is capable of way more than a student could at first imagine and it is from this simple starting point that an effective Computing curriculum is built. Schools have a responsibility to prepare students for the future and work to show them, and their parents perhaps, that technology is about way more than ‘screen time’, gaming and endless streaming. l O C T O B E R 2 018

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Home Edition © HOUSE OF FRASER

STO R E O F T H E M O N T H • B O L D B AT H RO O MS • E D I T I O N LO V E S

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The A/W 18 interiors trend report FROM MATT BLACK TO TERRAZZO FLOORING – WHAT ARE THE NEW INTERIORS TRENDS THAT YOU’LL ADOPT IN YOUR HOME? ANGELINA VILLA-CLARKE UNCOVERS THE LATEST DÉCOR COMING TO A HIGH STREET NEAR YOU

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ust like in the world of fashion, new homeware trends are often led by the colours of the season and this autumn is no exception. Inspired by the classic British countryside, moody variations of ochre, sage and grey are key colours, but above all it is black that is set to become a significant shade for the home. Farrow & Ball’s ‘Railings’ – a softer alternative to solid black – is a good choice if you want to introduce the hue into a scheme. “This deeply rich colour has a commanding presence in the room, creating a beautiful backdrop against more traditional or rustic furniture,” says Charlotte Cosby, head of creative at the brand. “Black paint is used to punctuate a scheme and to give it definition,” agrees David Mottershead, managing director of Little Greene. “It’s contemporary, confident and charismatic. It looks particularly on-trend when teamed with white and feminine pinks.” If black walls are a step too far, you can give a nod to the trend with black accessories – matt black crockery gives a sophisticated touch to dinner parties, while an occasional piece of furniture adds a sense of drama. Source black velvet chairs from Ella James, Frenchstyle chests of drawers from Argos and statement pendant lights from Umage. The Black Calico collection of china from Burleigh, meanwhile, is a subtle addition to any kitchen, and, says the company’s creative director, Steven Moore, “it will transform country casual u

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Clockwise from top Sophia chest, £249, Argos; wall painted in Farrow and Ball’s Railings, prices vary. Umage’s Conia light, from £39. Black Calico dinner plate, £17, from Burleigh

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INTERIORS

Previous page Burbridge Malmo kitchen in Anthracite Gloss and Matt, from £12,000. Above Little Greene’s Monroe Night Flower wallpaper, £88 per roll

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This Image Delcor’s Prezzo sofa in Swaffer Marble, £2,611 Bottom Kitchen by John Lewis of Hungerford, prices vary

into cosmopolitan chic. For me, black is the very essence of what Burleigh does – it’s 160 years of history distilled into a new drama.” For larger investments, a black sofa is a practical and stylish addition. Delcor’s The Duchess range, for instance, looks instantly ‘of the moment’ when chosen in ‘Nero Leather’ or ‘Ebony Wool’, while the Prezzo sofa in ‘Swaffer Marble’ is a subtle interpretation of the colour. Kitchens can also be updated with slick black cabinetry. Check out John Lewis of Hungerford, which offers handpainted units. A good option is to have a contrasting monochrome colour scheme, such as a black island matched with a neutral kitchen. Meanwhile at kitchen company Burbidge & Son, the company’s marketing manager, Joanne Emery, says that dark, dramatic kitchens are the latest trend. “Black is an intense shade that can help create an elegant and contemporary urban feel,” she states. “It’s bold and eye-catching, whilst being incredibly luxurious, but can easily be softened with accessories in warmer tones, metallics and light woods." Originally used in Italian palazzos, terrazzo is another big style of the season – and not necessarily confined to floors. u

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“Kitchens can be updated with slick black cabinetry”

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“Light wooden furniture with soft pops of colour can help create a serene atmosphere” STO CK IST S From lighting to tiling, the speckled pattern will be seen everywhere this autumn. Whether you want to make a bold statement with Graham & Brown’s pretty terrazzo-print wallpapers, available in different colourways, or reflect it with the odd accessory – the design will look fresh and modern. Made from different chips of marble, quartz and glass, true terrazzo is then bound in cement and polished to a smooth finish, and so it makes for a

practical option for kitchen surfaces. For a local source, go to Granite Transformations – its Cristallino range is the perfect reflection of the fashion. Meanwhile, known for his on-trend fabrics, James Hare’s new Hatton Collection for autumn/winter includes a sumptuous terrazzo decorative fabric. Saffron Hare, creative director, says: “Terrazzo is a major interiors trend at the moment in soft furnishings, fabrics and home accessories. Our version has

Amara 0800 587 7645 amara.com

Argos 0345 640 2020 argos.co.uk Bert & May 0203 744 0776 bertandmay.com Burbidge burbidge.co.uk Burleigh 01773 740740 burleigh.co.uk Delcor 0191 237 1303 delcor.co.uk Ella James 01572 759 190 ellajames.co.uk Farrow and Ball 01223 367771 farrow-ball.com Graham & Brown 0808 168 3795 grahambrown.com Granite Transformations 01223 853913 granitetransformations.co.uk James Hare james-hare.com John Lewis, Cambridge 01223 361292 johnlewis.com John Lewis of Hungerford 01223 305480 john-lewis.co.uk Little Greene 020 7935 8844 littlegreene.com Love Frankie 01803 866399 lovefrankie.com Paint and Paper Library 0845 880 5844 paintandpaperlibrary.com Ross & Brown 0345 600 3315 rossandbrownhome.co.uk THG Paris thg-paris.com/uk Umage umage.com Valspar Paint valsparpaint.co.uk Willis & Gambier 01733 318400 willisgambier.co.uk

This image Inspired by the terrazzo flooring in the Victorian arcades in and around Hatton Garden, the Terrazzo fabric from James Hare is priced at £80 per metre

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This image Boston sideboard, £1,379, from Willis & Gambier

been inspired by the terrazzo flooring in Victorian arcades in and around Hatton Garden.” For those after a more ‘touchy-feely’ sense of comfort in the home, the good news is that there is a move towards more textural, organic shapes and earthy colours in the quest to create a soothing, calm atmosphere. From natural wood furniture, like the tables and chairs at Willis & Gambier, to botanical textiles, such as those at Love Frankie – it’s all about incorporating colours and textures inspired by nature. Nicola Williams, brand manager at Willis & Gambier, agrees: “Light wooden furniture, with soft pops of colour and traditional accessories, can help to create a serene and calming atmosphere that will work beautifully within open spaces. Combine more textural furnishings with soft sheepskin rugs, natural palettes and organic materials to complete the overall look.” Paint and Paper Library’s Aloe Walk wallpaper, in the Tresco Collection in collaboration with Hugo Dalton, gives a hand-painted effect of plants and flowers with a mural-like finish. Valspar’s Deep Autumn, Rustic Wicker and Fire Within shades are wonderfully warming and inviting – and work perfectly against natural materials.

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Finally, it’s out with steel, chrome and silver fittings and a return to gold for a show-stopping look. With a range of goldfinished pieces, such as hexagonal tables and lanterns, online store Amara is a great source for the gilded fashion. Sam Hood, co-founder and creative director of the shop, says: “Metallic tones such as gold are perfect for brightening up a dark décor scheme. This metallic colour will attract attention to specific corners or areas of a room. Look towards using gold accessories in small doses, such as a bedside table, as this will help open up the space and create a strong focal point.” Also giving an update on kitchen and bathroom fixtures, gold taps and shower heads give a luxurious finish. Tristan de la Haye, managing director at THG Paris, agrees: “We have noticed that gold bathroom fixtures and fittings are gradually taking over the matt black and chrome finishes which were so popular in 2017, as people move away from minimalism to a more maximalist aesthetic. Rose gold, satin and matt gold are just some the finishes we now offer in our range of bathroom fittings, with some taps even available with precious stone inlays and Guilloché engraving.” It’s all about that subtle touch of opulence... l

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KEEP IT NATURAL LEE THORNLEY, FOUNDER OF BERT & MAY, GIVES THREE TIPS ON THE ORGANIC TREND

Use materials that are natural in both feel and look. Our encaustic tiles are poured using only natural materials: cement, sand and marble. The effect is a raw aesthetic. Bring the outside in. Create continuity by using the same tile leading from an outdoor space into the home. Collect curiosities and decorative items as you go. This will mean the look you create will be less contrived and fit with an organic feel.

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INTERIORS JAPANESE INSPIRED TOKYO FLORAL BOLSTER CUSHION

£30, lovefrankie.com

HEJA NATURAL WOOD MIRROR

£90, argos.co.uk

SLEEK PEWTER CONE

£69, industville.co.uk

EDI T ION

TERRAZZO CERAMIC BULBHOLDER

£25, johnlewis.com

MIDNIGHT PARTY SMALL STAR BOWL

LOVES

£4, sainsburys.co.uk

GROOVE VASE

£19, hoosglasgow.co.uk

WOVEN BASKETS

from £55, rossandbrownhome.co.uk

LORENA CANALS TERRAZZO RUG

£220, amara.com

HEXAGONAL TABLE CHARCOAL VELVET BEDROOM CHAIR

£120, amara.com

£345, ellajames.co.uk

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Cambridge Edition October 2018  

Cambridge Edition October issue.

Cambridge Edition October 2018  

Cambridge Edition October issue.