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LOCAL LIFE

Get inspired this

November TO P LO C A L C H R I S TM A S M A R K E T S • C A M B R I D G E L I T E R A RY F E S T I VA L H I G H L I G H T S • T H E U LT IM AT E W I N T E R D I N I N G G U I D E • W I N A LUX U RY M I N I B R E A K • B O N F I R E N I G H T F U N • T H I S MO N T H ' S T H E AT R E & G I G P I C KS • T H E B E S T P I Z Z A S I N TOW N

S I G N U P TO O U R W E E K LY D I G I TA L N E W S L E T T E R

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Cambridge

ED IT

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W E LC O M E

Welcome.

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chill in the air and the nights resolutely drawing in; this time of year always makes me crave a good feasting session. Apparently I’m not alone, and this is something many of us experience around this time – a fact some researchers attribute to an ancient, primitive impulse to stockpile calories for the cold winter ahead. Whether vestigial urge or straightforward craving for comfort food now that winter has set in, November invariably sees me on the prowl for a good, hearty bit of indulgence. My descent into feast-mode might well explain our preoccupation with Cambridge’s many and delicious culinary offerings this issue. ‘Season’s Eatings’ over on page 59 sees us perusing what’s on offer locally if you’re on the lookout for a great meal out with friends or colleagues as we near Christmas, while we’ve also been tasting our way around Cambridge’s finest pizzas over on page 51 – take a look to discover who came out on top (you’ll never resort to Dominos again, I promise). Alex, meanwhile, whose column you’ll find on page 47, is back from the Alps and hungrily eyeing up the brightest and best of the city’s food scene, plus we also sampled the slow cooked meaty joy being served up at the new SmokeWorks II on Station Road: see what we thought on page 48. How about a feast of words to add into the mix? Cambridge Literary Festival is back for its winter outing this month too, with a typically imaginatively curated programme of fiction heavyweights, comedians, politicians and plenty more. Whet your appetite on page 30. There’s also bonfire night fun, family days out, gigs, art, theatre and plenty more to get your teeth into – have a great November and see you next month!

Nicola Foley

E D I TO R I A L

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Senior sub editor Lisa Clatworthy Sub editors Siobhan Godwood, Fliss Evans

A DV E RT I S I N G

Senior sales executive Chris Jacobs 01223 499463 chrisjacobs@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Shannon Walford 01223 499457 shannonwalford@bright-publishing.com

C O N T R I B U TO R S

Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Charlotte Griffiths, Charlotte Phillips, Cyrus Pundole, Daisy Dickinson, Elodie Cameron, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Siobhan Godwood

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Editorial designer Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong 01223 499468 manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com

M A N AG I N G D I R E C TO R S

Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450

FIND US @ CAMBSEDITION

CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition. co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

This month’s cover illustration, created by Flo Thomas, depicts Cambridge University's Jerwood Library. See more of Flo’s illustrations on Etsy at HeydayDesignsUK.

Editor in chief

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

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Contents. 9 Reasons to be cheerful.

55 Drinks.

10 Cambridge Covetables.

59 Season’s Eatings.

13Arts & Culture.

71 Competition.

A round-up of arty, cultural events in the city, from exhibitions to theatre

Fulfil your cosy coastal minibreak daydreams with a free getaway to the Grove in Cromer

26 Christmas Craft Fairs.

72 Listings.

Get ahead on your pressie list and in the festive mood at these local fairs

Your at-a-glance guide to local events for November, grab your diary and get planning!

29 North Pole Cambridge.

74 Family.

Get your skates on at Cambridge’s winter wonderland on Parker’s Piece

Children’s theatre, outdoorsy fun and Bonfire Night happenings

30 Winter Literary Festival.

78 Indie of the Month.

Excellent things to enjoy in Cambridge this November

Find out what’s on our local most-wanted list this month

Novelists, poets, politicians and more stop by for the city’s seasonal literary jamboree

33 Music Blog.

Jordan Worland from Slate the Disco shares his top live music picks

34 Nightlife.

Gigs, comedy and more after-dark fun this month

39 Food News.

All the need-to-know nuggets from the local foodie scene

47 Chef’s Column.

Freshly back from the Alps, Alex waxes lyrical on the local food scene

48 Review.

We check out SmokeWorks II, Station Road’s new BBQ joint

51 Foodie 5 of the Best.

Which eatery serves Cambridge’s most bellissimo pizza? We find out!

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Level-up your cosy nights in with a little help from Elodie Cameron and her top picks for winter warming wines

Fantastic feasts and where to find them this festive season - we hope you're hungry!

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We learn more about indie gallery Byard Art

81 Beauty.

Goss from the local beauty scene plus hot tips from our beauty columnist

87 Sixth Form Special.

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A look at the impact of A level reforms, with advice for those about to take the next step in their education

99 Interiors.

All the advice and inspiration you need to create the stylish but functional kitchen of your dreams

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109 Edition Loves. Our top picks for stylish living and interiors

111 Home Store of the Month.

Founded in Saffron Walden in 1881, Angela Reed has just opened a new branch in Cambridge – we take a look around

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NEWS

Reasons to be cheerful. THE BIG SW I TC H O N .

NORTH POLE CAMBRIDGE. Can’t wait to get into the Christmas spirit? You’ll be pleased to hear that Parker’s Piece is welcoming back its winter wonderland this month, complete with ice rink, alpine bar, fairground and festive stalls. Set to run right the way through until early January, pop by to enjoy a fairy-lit ice skate, glass of mulled wine and a good dollop of Christmassy cheer. Find out more over on page 29.

Heralding the beginning of the countdown to Christmas, Cambridge’s hugely popular annual festive lights switch on takes place on Sunday 19 November, with events running in the Market Square, as well as at the Grand Arcade and Grafton Centre. There’s a fun-packed day in store to celebrate which includes loads of homegrown dance and music talent. Grab a warm drink and soak up the uplifting sounds of Souls Café Gospel Choir and Cambridge busker Tom Korni, plus Fitz Swing, Cambridge University’s 20-piece student big band, amongst lots more.

A LITERARY FEAST. There’s new fiction, poetry, political discussion, comedians, crime and cricket in store at the Cambridge Literary Festival, which is back for its winter instalment this month. Bookworms of all colours will find something to excite in the glittering line-up, which features appearances from Man Booker Prize winner Roddy Doyle, former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg, broadcasting legend Henry Blofeld and Peep Show’s Robert Webb, amongst many, many more. Turn to page 30 for the full story.

F I R E W O R KS N I G H T F U N . Wrap up warm and join the hordes at the biggest fireworks display in town, which takes place on 4 November at Midsummer Common. Presented by Cambridge City Council and organised by Cambridge Live, there will be a funfair, food stalls, a bonfire and, of course, a huge, dazzling firework show. For more info, head to our family section on page 77.

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TA M B U R L A I N E BONFIRE TEA.

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Think Bonfire Night and you probably think chilly nights, swarms of people and perhaps a toffee apple on Midsummer Common. Not so over at the Tamburlaine hotel, where they’ll be serving up a decadent Bonfire night tea created by head pastry chef Jérôme Viard. Served in the hotel’s gorgeous, colonial-inspired Garden Room, this delectable teatime menu features mini pumpkin pies, toffee crab apple pie with honey crémeux, cinnamon doughnut and blackberry and pear frozen parfait, topped off with fireworks and served with gunpowder tea. Priced at £21.50 and available until 30 November 2017.

FIREWORKS AT THE VARSITY.

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Cambridge’s Midsummer Common fireworks display will be lighting up the sky on 4 November this year, and you can get the best view in the house by heading up to the stunning roof terrace at the Varsity Hotel. While you’re watching the fireworks you’ll be able to enjoy a warming mulled wine, or opt for something a little stronger and sample a couple of the hotel’s expertly blended cocktails. Entry is priced at £15, which includes a glass of mulled wine. N O V E M B E R 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

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COCKTAILS AT THE GIN LAB.

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If you’re a fan of a glass or two of the old ‘Mother’s Ruin’, you’ve probably got wind of the newlyopened Cambridge Gin Laboratory on Green Street – but you may not have heard about the very cool tasting lounge upstairs. Pop upstairs in this gorgeous old building (formerly Catesby’s) and enjoy some of the best cocktails in the city, from basil smashes to espresso martinis. There are also speciality coffees and gin flights to be sampled. Find out more on page 44.

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CAMBRIDGE SATC H E L N E W R A N G E . Cambridge Satchel Company can always be relied upon to make us go a bit swoony with their beautiful bags, but the new season’s collection really is rather special. Taking inspiration from the glitz and glamour of the roaring 20s, there are art deco vibes, glittering metallics and opulent patterns aplenty. There’s even a bag with a monochrome graphic print based on the ceiling of King’s College Chapel. Just the thing for a Christmas present, we’d say…

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B OX BY L U C Y. We’re crossing our fingers that somebody likes us enough to order us one of these gorgeous gift boxes, created by new local company Box by Lucy. Bursting with treats from small, independent businesses and makers, you can choose between Nesting, Pamper or Little Bird Boxes, or make your own bespoke box. There’s luxurious natural skincare products, cute baby bits for new mums, beautiful clutch bags, artisan chocolates and cookies, scented candles, stylish stationary and loads more to choose between. Stay tuned to our next issue where we’ll be giving away a box as part of our Christmas hamper prize. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Arts & culture.

DRIVING MISS DAISY. Turned into an Oscar-winning film in the 1980s, Driving Miss Daisy is an unusual, winning take on civil unrest, and you can catch the stage version at the Arts Theatre from 6 to 11 November. Starring Dame Siân Phillips and Derek Griffiths, their characters meet after elderly widow Daisy Werthan crashes her car in 1948, leading her son to hire chauffeur African-American Hoke Colburn. After a rocky start, their conversations over a 25-year backdrop of prejudice and inequality turn into a profound, life-altering friendship in this acclaimed comedy-drama. Tickets start from £19. cambridgeartstheatre.com CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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CAMBRIDGE I N T E R N AT I O N A L JA Z Z F E S T I VA L 2017. Jazz fans are in for a huge treat this month as the city welcomes back its exuberant annual celebration of the genre. Running 11-26 November, Cambridge International Jazz Festival was founded in 2014 and brings together the local jazz community, showcasing both up-and-coming talent and established names and offering a huge showcase of jazz in all its diversity. Delivering more than 80 events in total, this year’s programme is busier than ever and features a galaxy of stars from the world of jazz, some of the UK’s finest female instrumentalists, emerging and boundarypushing talent, workshops, tributes and more. Opening this year’s festival is saxophonist Andy Shepherd, who’ll perform his new work Beyond the Dancing Sun at the beautiful Stapleford Granary. Other highlights of this year’s programme include Roy Ayers, a legend in the world of funk and soul and one of the most sampled artists in history. His calling card, the immortal Everybody Loves the Sunshine, is a floor-filler to this day, and continues to get reworked by artists from across the musical spectrum. Elsewhere at St Catherine’s College Chapel, Zoe Rahman, one of the brightest contemporary jazz stars, performs music from her album Dreamland. Internationally acclaimed percussion impresario Dame Evelyn Glennie will be giving a master class open to all, while guiding five young musicians through their musical journeys at Fitzwilliam College Auditorium. There’s also a gypsy jazz jamboree to look forward to, plus a visit from the sensational London Gay Big Band, who’ll be performing at the Emmanuel United Reformed Church. Get there early for a chance to learn how to swing dance with the Cambridge Lindy Hoppers. Another must-see gig is the Corn Exchange’s NewGenJazz: an all-day event featuring some of the most exciting young musicians in UK jazz. Eleven bands, including the MOBO award-winning sax and drum duo Binker & Moses, will perform across two stages during the day, closing with brilliantly energetic eight-piece The Brass Funkeys. The Museum of Zoology, meanwhile, will be opening late for a unique gig where guests will be treated to performances from Entropi and Phil Meadows Project, together with an interactive sound and light installation – in the company of a giant whale skeleton! For the full programme, with all the venues, artists and prices, visit the website. cambridgejazzfestival.info

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INTO FILM FESTIVAL. This free, UK-wide celebration of film and education for five- to 19-year-olds takes place from 8 to 24 November, with events at locations throughout Cambridgeshire. Part of an ongoing initiative to put film at the heart of young people’s learning and personal development, the Festival provides access to the big screen at its best; accessibility and inclusivity are key aims, with over half of the programme offered as audio-described, subtitled or autism-friendly. intofilm.org/festival

R OYA L PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA. A pianist described as “a born Chopin interpreter” by Arthur Rubinstein features in the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra’s Corn Exchange concert on 2 November. Janina Fialkowska – who recovered from cancer surgery that left her unable to lift her arm in 2002 – leads the orchestra through a programme featuring Chopin’s Piano Concerto No 2, which she describes as “a piece of total perfection, full of drama, full of technical wizardry and full of melodies to melt your heart”. The programme also features Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture, Elgar’s ‘Enigma’ Variations and Vaughan Williams’ The Wasps Overture. Tickets start from £12.50 for those under 26, or from £32. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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DEAR ESTHER. If watching a computer game being played sounds like a slightly odd way to spend an evening, be aware: Dear Esther is like no other computer game you’ve ever experienced. Described by The Telegraph as “oil painting, poetry, eulogy and video game all at once”, Dear Esther immerses the viewer in a haunting otherworld in which meaning and narrative shift and change over the course of the event, accompanied by sumptuous visuals and a stunning original score. Catch this extraordinary performance at the Corn Exchange on 30 November, with tickets from £12.50. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | N O V E M B E R 2 017

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FESTIVAL OF THE SPOKEN NERD.

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Geek songs, experiments and stand-up maths from Helen Arney, Steve Mould and Matt Parker respectively all go into the pot that is Festival of the Spoken Nerd… a chemical mix to make you giggle and be amazed all at once. Since their last tour they’ve created an “experimental” comedy for Radio 4 and played the Hammersmith Apollo with Professor Brian Cox. At Cambridge Junction on 17 and 18 November they promise to create a periodic table of new science, songs and spreadsheets to light your Bunsen burner. Tickets for Festival of the Spoken Nerd: You Can’t Polish Nerd are £19.50 (£15.50 concessions). junction.co.uk

A piece by local artist, Pam Winbolt, who recently showed her paintings at Float

F LOAT GA L L E RY.

The De Freville area of Cambridge has recently welcomed Float Gallery, a new exhibition space on Hawthorn Way for local artists to show their work. The name is inspired by the flotation therapy facilities already in residence at the address thanks to Art of Float, meaning visitors can enjoy a unique combination of relaxation experience in a state-of-the-art floatation pod together with exploring the pieces in the gallery. Each month the gallery will showcase a new artist and fresh batch of work, encapsulating all sorts of media from painting and photography to sculpture. For info on which artists will be exhibiting, check out the gallery’s website. floatgallery.co.uk

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THE ART INSIDER. RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CA MBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ART Y PICKS OF THE MONTH

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he air in paintings,’ Edgar Degas once said, ‘is not air we can breathe.’ But make you breathe, Degas: A Passion for Perfection, will. Now showing at the Fitzwilliam Museum until 14 January 2018 – marking the centenary of Degas’ death – this is a divine walkthrough of his life’s work. An utter treat for Cambridge, it offers a surprising glimpse into the depth of an artist most famous for being the ‘painter of dancers’. From wax and bronze sculptures, to his Impressionist paintings of Parisian women, to nude drawings full of energy – this is a fabulous show with a packed programme of talks and events, that will not disappoint. The show also reveals the far-reaching influence of Degas on other artists, too – from Lucian Freud, to Francis Bacon, Picasso and Henry Moore. Degas’ charm, vivacity and wit shines through, his restless creative drive, arresting. Maynard Keynes was instrumental in persuading the UK treasury to give the National Gallery £20,000 to buy several works from war-besieged Paris: a coup he described to friend, Vanessa Bell, as a ‘whirlwind affair’, later leading the way to making the Cambridge-based economist a vital influence, not just in cementing Impressionism to Cambridge, but to the UK, too. Famous more for his staunch advocacy for interventionist economics, it’s less well known that Keynes was a member of the Bloomsbury set and founded the Arts Council. A keen art collector, he snapped up Cezanne’s Still Life With Apples, for £500, which you can also see at the exhibition, now one of the top ten most viewed masterpieces today. With traditional portrayals of Degas as a bitter misanthropist, the show also shines a light on his witty, warm-hearted side. His final letters to Alexis Rouart make for poignant reading, as blindness took over: “I can’t see what I’m writing,” he lamented. Described as an ‘urban creature’ by curator Jane Munro, who drew inspiration from Parisian café culture, his iconic paintings such as At The Café are breathtaking to see in person. It’s been ‘nice to bring him alive’ comments Jane. Watch out for the chance to visit the museum for a late opening on 15 November. Cambridge Literary Festival brings an array of literary treats to the city this month. I’m looking forward to

Rebecca Solnit discussing her new work, The Mother of All Questions, on 2 November. A radical voice for hope, Solnit will not disappoint. You can also join the winner of the Goldsmiths Prize for fiction, announced this month, in conversation with culture editor of New Statesman, Tom Gatti on 26 November. Plus, there’s an appearance from Cambridge’s Ali Smith, too. Make a start on your Christmas shopping by visiting Eclectic Mix, a platform for local artists with an array of pop-up shops this season, showcasing a variety of makers, designers, jewellers and printmakers at some great Cambridge venues. On Friday 10 November and Saturday 11 November, Eclectic Mix are at St Andrew’s Street Baptist Church, then on 19 November, they will be south of the city at Stapleford Community Primary School, whose Christmas Gift Fair dates back 30 years. Then on 6 December, back in the city centre, Santander Bank on St Andrew’s Street are hosting Eclectic Mix. It’s the first time Santander have done anything like this – art in a bank, fabulous! “In the true spirit of Eclectic Mix, we have a really good mix of venues to showcase our wonderful makers,” says the founder of Eclectic Mix, Delia Naylor. “We have some fabulous artists on board, with a range of price points, so people can find little stocking fillers or more extravagant gifts for their loved ones. All our artists and makers we select work from home or in small studios, crafting work from scratch, often using sustainable materials. As one customer suggested, Cambridge needs a shop like Eclectic Mix. So we will keep popping up all over Cambridge!” Another fantastic addition to Cambridge’s pop-up art circuit is Gallery 9 on Norfolk Street (formerly Changing Spaces), founded by artist Paul Arsenault. Created in partnership with CB2 Bistro, the space has a rolling programme of shows, with several artists based there, too. Check out the website gallery-9.co.uk to see current shows and pop in to have a look. Finally, listen to Nick Mulvey’s new album, Wake Up Now – and put it on your Christmas list. Mountain To Move, the seventh track on the album, is a total joy, with the Cambridgeraised star inviting us to wake up, a warning against losing yourself in comparisons in a world dominated by selfie-culture and materialism – timely indeed. Have a fabulous November all! n

An utter treat for Cambridge, Degas: A Passion for Perfection offers a surprising glimpse into an artist most famous for being the ‘painter of dancers’

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VIEWS FROM THE ’BRIDGE. Cambridge Junction’s showcase of new work by local performers is back on 29 November. Extracts of new work by Hannah Walker and ThisEgg (Josie Dale-Jones) have been confirmed, with further slots to be announced. Views from The ’Bridge is part of Cambridge Junction’s artist development programme Troop. The pieces are chosen through written application and invitation. Tickets are £6. junction.co.uk

NEW CAMBRIDGE SINGERS. New Cambridge Singers get their 2017-18 season underway with In The Beginning on 11 and 18 November. Featuring Danielle Perrett on harp, the centrepieces are Kodaly’s expressive Missa Brevis and Copland’s scintillating setting of the opening of the book of Genesis. The concert will also feature two contrasting versions of the Lord’s Prayer, one by Janáček, for choir, organ and harp, and another by Russian conductorcomposer Nikolai Golovanov. The concert, on the 11th, takes place at The Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Harlton, at 7.30pm, and on the 18th at the Church of Our Lady & the English Martyrs, Cambridge, at 8pm. newcambridgesingers.org.uk

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A R O U N D T H E W O R L D I N 8 0 DAYS . The tale of Phileas Fogg is a timeless classic (inspiring Michael Palin’s travels and even packets of crisps) and Around the World in 80 Days sees him stop off in Cambridge for five days, 14 to 18 November. The mysterious and wealthy Fogg wagers his life’s fortune that he can go around the globe in just 80 days. With his loyal valet Passepartout in tow, they pass through misty alleys of Victorian London to the exotic subcontinent and the Wild West in a race against the clock. This thrilling adventure-comedy features a cast of eight playing the more than 125 characters in this imaginative, high-spirited escapade. Suitable for ages seven and up; tickets start from £20, children’s tickets are £18. cambridgeartstheatre.com

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ACADEMY OF ANCIENT MUSIC. WE FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE I N T E R N AT I O N A L LY- AC C L A I M E D LO C A L O R C H E S T R A R E I N V I G O R AT I N G ANCIENT MUSIC When Christopher Hogwood, a prominent exponent of early music, founded the Academy of Ancient Music (AAM) in the 1970s, his goal was to create an orchestra with a difference. Turning his back on the trend at the time for playing classical music in a modern style, his gaze was fixed firmly on the past, on rediscovering sounds unheard for hundreds of years and deep diving into the context and history of classical masterworks so that he might recreate them, with reverence and passion, in the truest possible fashion. It’s an ethos that the AAM, now an internationally acclaimed period instrument orchestra, has stayed true to in the intervening years. Looking beyond the sheet music and capturing the essence of works by great composers, they imbue ancient music with an exhilarating new lease of life. Through exploring the sound-worlds known to Bach, Handel, Haydn and Mozart and using authentic traditional instruments (strings made of animal gut not steel, wooden flutes, violins minus chin rests), they are able to resurrect and reinvigorate baroque and classical music, so that the audience can enjoy it in the style and spirit it was originally performed. Based here in Cambridge, the AAM present a rich programme of concerts throughout the year, offering a chance to see some rarer classical delights. For example, next April, immerse yourself in the music world of 18th century London – and get acquainted with its resident bad boy, Jan Ladislav Dussek. Putting the ‘lad’ into Ladislav, this notorious seducer of princesses and rumoured revolutionary was responsible for the fashion of solo pianists sitting sideways on to the audience. The reason? So that the assembled crowd might admire his handsome face… This December meanwhile, the oft-overlooked genius of Telemann will be in the spotlight. History may favour his contemporary Bach, but things weren’t always that way – in fact, three centuries ago it was Telemann who was the flavour of the hour, being offered positions in preference to Bach. Fast-forward to 2017, can Telemann’s work still stand up to Bach’s celebrated Brandenburg Concertos? Find out in Telemann & Bach – Reversed Fortunes on 12 December at West Road Concert Hall. Tickets are available from cambridgelivetrust.co.uk. aam.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Images Guest soloists Carolyn Sampson and Tim Mead, who will appear in AAM concerts in November and February respectively

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THE JOYS AND SORROWS OF SOUTHERN ALBANIAN SONG. Immerse yourself in the mesmerising music of Albanian Saze this month, when The Saze Project pitches up at Cambridge Junction for an evening of thrilling harmonies, joyful dances and soulful laments. Saz’iso are masters of Saze, an ancient iso-polyphonic style of singing hailing from Southern Albania, which weaves intricate vocal and instrumental lines. This hand-picked ensemble, brought together by legendary producer Joe Boyd (Pink Floyd, Toumani Diabaté, Nick Drake) and co-producers Andrea Goertler and Edit Pula, comprises some of the finest contemporary performers of Saze, opening a window into Albania’s fascinating musical traditions. The group performing includes three singers along with violin virtuosos, clarinet, llautë (lute) and dajre (frame drum). Enjoy their spellbinding sounds on 6 November; tickets are £11. junction.co.uk

CAMBRIDGE MUSIC FESTIVAL.

GA L L E RY-9 O P E N S .

Gallery-9, an exciting new art space geared towards showcasing new and emerging artists, has recently opened its doors on Norfolk Street. Founded by artist Paul Arsenault and created in partnership with CB2 Bistro, the space will host a rolling programme of shows, including Epilogue at the start of this month, which shows the work of 20 graduating Masters artists from Cambridge School of Arts. Following that, local abstract painter Peter Hawksby’s solo show will be on until 30 November. “Our mission statement is very simple,” says Paul. “We aim to be the commercial, contemporary art gallery that Cambridge doesn’t have. When you come to the gallery you’ll see less tourist driven work and hopefully more conceptual and thought-provoking pieces.” gallery-9.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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This eclectic and exciting festival returns with a superb line-up of guest players and recitals, including a performance of Mozart’s Gran Partita led by world-renowned clarinetist Michael Collins, and an appearance by Chineke! Orchestra, Europe’s only professional orchestra of black and minority ethnic players, founded by double bassist Chi-chi Nwanoku OBE. The festival takes place between 14 and 22 November at venues throughout the city, with tickets priced from £15 (some events are free) and multi-buy offers available. cambridgemusicfestival.co.uk

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Festive B U RY ST EDMUNDS C H R I S T M A S FAY R E .

M I L L R OA D W I N T E R FA I R .

Surely Cambridge’s favourite winter event, the Mill Road Winter Fair is a joyful celebration of both the buzzy Mill Road neighbourhood and the whole Cambridge community. Eat, drink, shop, dance and make merry with thousands of others on Saturday 2 December, when the whole of Mill Road comes alive with live music, scrumptious food from all corners of the globe and stalls selling everything from crafts and gifts to books and clothing. Grab a mulled wine and enjoy the party!

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Bury St Edmunds, around 45 minutes away from Cambridge, will be welcoming back its huge annual Christmas Fayre this month, serving up stalls, entertainment and festive cheer from 23 to 26 November. Extending from the historic Angel Hill and adjoining Abbey Gardens to The Arc and throughout the town centre, this huge event sees the whole of Bury getting well and truly into the Christmas spirit. Pick up gifts from hundreds of traders, selling everything from traditional toys to handmade soaps and beautiful arts and crafts, enjoy lively entertainment across three stages, meet real life reindeer and say hello to Santa in the grotto. Over in the food marquee, meanwhile, chomp your way around stalls selling treats including fudge, bacon jam, roasted nuts, artisan pork pies and lots more. We’d suggest hopping on the train from Cambridge to eliminate the stress of parking and busy roads.

H I S TO N HANDMADE CHRISTMAS.

Pop along to Histon Handmade on 25 November and browse a plethora of stalls from 23 artists and designers all under one roof. Exhibitors include Emma Bennett, a professional collage artist based in Cambridge who’s well known locally for her bright, eye-catching depictions of the city’s sights and landmarks made using only recycled papers. She’ll be selling home giftware, textiles, prints and more. Elsewhere, peruse unique jewellery by Abi Cochran, adorable children’s books by Nicola Killen, ceramics from Katharina Klug, quirky millinery by Sally Wilding and metal clocks by Rebecca Stark. There will also be tasty treats and drinks on offer from Cambridge Street Bakes.

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Fairs

CHRISTMAS

E LY C AT H E D R A L CHRISTMAS GIFT & F O O D FA I R .

Ely Cathedral will once again host its gift and food fair this November, an event which affords Christmas shoppers the chance to browse stalls and pick up gifts in a unique and beautiful setting. Taking place 17 to 18 November, the fair is now in its sixth year, and is often praised as being one of East Anglia’s best festive shopping experiences. Stalls will be selling gifts, distinctive homewares and accessories, seasonal produce and more, plus there will be a range of inspiring demonstrations including festive cake decorating and floral arranging. On Saturday there will attractions for families including a traditional carousel and some rather special Christmas guests, plus the heated Café Marquee will serve as the perfect spot to relax and enjoy some delicious festive fare.

B L AC KT H O R P E BARN .

Located just outside Bury St Edmunds, Blackthorpe Barn is a lovely place to visit at any time of year, but come winter it’s transformed into a festive wonderland. From now until 22 December, the medieval barn will be brimming with Christmassy treasures and treats. Pick up handmade gifts and decorations at the Country Christmas Shop, indulge in mulled wines and tasty homemade food at the Little House of Cooking pop-up café, and get crafty in a range of workshops. For kids, there’s the chance to meet the big beardy one himself at Santa’s Grotto, plus Blackthorpe Barn will be showcasing a line-up of British crafts which changes weekly and will feature glasswork, ceramics, jewellery and more.

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N O RT H P O L E

North Pole Cambridge is back! E N J OY A W I N T E R F E S T I VA L V I B E O N PA R K E R ’S P I E C E A S T H E P O P U L A R F E S T I V E AT T R AC T I O N R E T U R N S

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ow in its sixth year, North Pole Cambridge has become a comforting festive fixture on Parker’s Piece, heralding the arrival of the Christmas season and twinkling invitingly right the way through to the new year. Launching on 17 November and running until 8 January, this year's event will be delivering the usual dose of Christmassy magic, complete with ice skating, stalls, rides and food and drink. As ever, at the heart of the attraction will be a huge open-air rink, offering 600 metres of gleaming ice to glide around on. If you’ve got children with you, pop along during the ‘mamas and papas’ sessions during the day, where families with younger kids get the rink to themselves and have the opportunity to pick up new skate skills. Warm up after at the Alpine Cabin Bar, a cosy undercover wooden lodge serving hot chocolates, mulled wine, festive cocktails and seasonal drinks which you can enjoy while you watch the skaters taking to the ice. If you’re feeling peckish, there will be all sorts of traditional food treats to enjoy, including German bratwurst from the swing grill, gourmet burgers, fish and chips and churros. Elsewhere, have a go on bungee trampolines, Santa’s slay rides, penguin bumper cars, ski slope and a multitude of games. There are also fairground rides including the 32-metre high big wheel, which offers spectacular views out across the city, plus there’s a chance to get a special souvenir of your day to capture your festive fun. “This year we are working very hard to offer visitors a different type of festive experience and the festival will be focused around celebrating winter and our traditions”, said Richard Elmer from The North Pole team. “There are lots of Christmas markets in the UK and this year we want to bring a new look and feel, and draw on the popular festival vibe. We are hoping to attract more visitors during the period and are delighted to be working with local businesses to make this an event for all of the city to enjoy.” Adult ice skating tickets are priced at £11.50 and £9.50 for children under 12 years. A family skate ticket (for four) is available for £36. n thenorthpolecambridge.co.uk

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Cambridge T H E W I N T E R E D I T I O N O F O U R C I T Y’S V I B R A N T, VA R I E D C E L E B R AT I O N O F WO R D S A N D WO R D S M I T H S R E T U R N S WORDS NICOLA FOLEY

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iterature, laughter, poetry, prose and politics are in store at this month’s Cambridge Literature Festival, which returns for its largest event yet from 24 to 26 November. A vibrant celebration of the written word, the festival has been running since 2003 and will once again bring a sparkling line-up of speakers to the city. Launching the event is former Lib Dem party leader Nick Clegg, one of the UK’s most prominent ‘Remainers’, who will be discussing his book How To Stop Brexit. A practical guide to resisting the UK’s departure from the European Union, the book argues that the simplest, easiest, most pragmatic and certainly cheapest option for Britain would simply be to stop. Can the country be reunited? And most importantly is Brexit inevitable? Join the debate on 24 November. Jess Phillips, Steve Richards and Johnny Mercer will also be considering where Britain might be headed in the aftermath of the EU referendum, along with other burning political issues of the day, when the Union Chamber will become the New Statesman Politics Briefing Room on 26 November. Also talking current affairs are Evan Davis and Matthew d’Ancona, who will be offering some navigation through the turbid waters of the ‘post truth era’. Head along on the 26th and equip yourself in the fight against fake news, conspiracy theories and alternative facts. The fiction cohort at this year’s festival is especially exciting, featuring Man Booker Prize winner Roddy Doyle on the 26th, debut novelist Fiona Mozley on the 25th and the peerless Ali Smith, also on the 26th. Discussing Winter, the second book in her dazzling seasonal quartet, Cambridge-based Smith brings warmth, laughter and love to the coldest season. Another local author, Sophie Hannah, will be joined by fellow crime fiction doyennes Nicola Upson and Alison Bruce

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W I N T E R L I T E R A RY F E S T I VA L

on the 26th, as part of a discussion about just what makes their genre so utterly addictive. If you’re prone to forgoing sleep in favour of hungrily finishing the latest suspense-filled murder mystery novel, this one’s definitely for you. A little light relief will be on offer courtesy of stand-up comedian Sarah Millican on the 25th. Join her for a chat about her debut book, How to be Champion, which sees her cogitating on divorce, IBS and many other of life’s little blips. Dubbed the ‘hard man of satire’ by The Telegraph, Armando Iannucci is best known for razor-sharp political comedies such as The Thick of It, but he’ll be discussing his less-publicised passion at the festival: classical music. Another comic star showing a different side of himself will be Robert Webb of Peep Show fame, who will be talking about his recent book, How Not to Be a Boy, which considers masculinity, manhood, fatherhood – and the crushing weight of

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If you’re prone to forgoing sleep in favour of hungrily finishing the latest suspense-filled murder mystery novel, this one’s definitely for you

expectation that arises from each. Both will appear on the 25th. Whetting our appetites with a look at his new book Modern Kitchen is Tim Hayward, the food writer responsible for turning around the fortunes of Cambridge’s beloved Fitzbillies. Join him on the 25th for an appetising exchange with the Guardian’s excellent food columnist Felicity Cloake. From food to feminism, with the refreshing and radical Rebecca Solnit, who visits the festival for a preview event on 2 November. The woman responsible for coining the term ‘mansplaining’, her oeuvre contains more than 20 books about art, feminism and politics, including The Mother of All Questions: Further Feminisms, which was released in August this year. Join her for a hopeful discussion on what feminism means today and how everyone can be included in the discussion. Ending the festival on the 26th with a poetic flourish will be Scotland’s poet laureate Jackie Kay and the Man Booker Prize-winning Ben Okri. In conversation with literary critic Ángel Gurría-Quintana, Okri will reflect on his life and luminous literary career, from his seminal, muchcelebrated book The Famished Road to his recent, mystical and meditative offering The Magic Lamp: Dreams of Our Age. n cambridgeliteraryfestival.com

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GIG GUIDE

Music blog. J O R DA N WO R L A N D F RO M L O C A L M U S I C W E B S I T E S L AT E T H E D I S C O S E L E C T S H I S M U S T-S E E G I GS I N CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH

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ovember for Cambridge’s live music scene is a month brimming with excellence. We start down Norfolk Street on the 1st when avant-garde country guitarist Dr Eugene Chadbourne plays downstairs at CB2. Eugene Chadbourne is an eclectic and unconventional improvisor/guitarist/banjo player who draws on a range of forms – including free jazz, country and bluegrass and all-out noise. His idiosyncratic and uncompromising approach to music has made him a living legend Staying on Norfolk Street, there is a host of gems at The Blue Moon. Firstly there is the stellar Moonstrips, Jungfrau and Newts triple billing on Sunday 12 November. We’re particularly looking forward to Jungfrau – a Brighton five-piece who use intuitive beats and hypnotic basslines to weave a rich texture of sonic guitar licks. Then we have the Goldblume, War Waves and Pale Girls triple header on the 17th, and finally, the Sweet Revenge all-dayer of Indie Pop on the 18th. The event is back for a second year and will host eight quality bands with our picks being The Tuts, with their pop-infused punk songs, and the whip-smart songwriting slacker sounds of Peaness. There’s an excellent bill of Grieving, Culture CT and Modest playing the Corner House on the 10th. Whilst Grieving and Culture CT are local, Modest are bringing their post-punk gloomy sounds over from Denmark for just three UK shows. There’s a busy month at The Portland, with our top pick being Weaves, who bring their distinct brand of wonky, guitar-driven pop back to Cambridge on the 13th. Last month saw Weaves release their sophomore album, a sonic treat filled with idiosyncratic songs that play with genre and form while vocalist Jasmyn Burke’s precisely calibrated alto is truly on point. The Portland also sees Jared & The Mill bring their south-western indie rock to Cambridge on the 14th, whilst Dundee quartet Model Aeroplanes showcase sun-drenched pop on the 20th. Finally, at The Portland on the 29th, Hunter and The Bear bring their thunderous live show to the venue. There’s a huge month shaping up at Cambridge Junction, but the standout highlight for us is Ghostpoet’s show on the 2nd. Ghostpoet’s take on hip-hop is filled with brooding post-punk guitar lines that provide the menacing landscape for his provocative lyrics, all of which take on an extra layer of doom noir in a live setting. Hugh Cornwell plays the same venue on the 2nd. Another big treat there is Spoon’s visit on the 9th. Back in March the CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Images from top Hunter and the Bear; Ghostpoet; Lucy Rose

band released the captivating Hot Thoughts record, which sees the band creating a musical universe all of their own and rivalling some of their best ever work. It’s also ten years since the release of their finest album, Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga so we might get a few visits to that record on the 9th also. Lucy Rose, the British folk artist who released her acclaimed third album Something’s Changing in July, returns to Cambridge this month, playing the J2 on the 23rd. Like all folkloric stories, the making of this record had a certain degree of serendipity. Rose organised and booked her own tour of Latin America in response to fan requests from that region, and the experience resulted in the evocative intimacy and widescreen sweep of the new album. Charlie Cunningham brings his lyrical depth and singular musical ability to the support slot – providing an excellent reason to arrive early for this gig. Get ready for those big brass numbers because London’s much-loved Hackney Colliery Band are back for a big show on the 4th. Also paying a visit to the Junction is Billy Bragg, who has been a fearless recording artist, tireless live performer and outspoken political campaigner for over 30 years. He plays on the 8th as part of his Bridges Not Walls solo tour. Following on from their fourth studio album hitting their highest ever chart position in January, Deaf Havana bring the record to the Junction on the 12th with the excellent Black Foxxes in tow. Finally at the Junction we have the ever popular Newton Faulkner on the 16th and the legendary Roy Ayers on the 25th. n

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November nightlife. CHECK OUT LOCAL EVENTS ONLINE AT C A M B S E D I T I O N .C O.U K

NEWTON FAULKNER. Following the release of Hit the Ground Running, his sixth album, singer-songwriter Newton Faulkner brings his mellow, rootsy grooves to Cambridge this month. We’re now just over a decade since his breakthrough debut Hand Built By Robots, the album which introduced us to his sunny charms and unique guitar style, storming straight to the top of the charts and earning him a Brit Award nomination. His latest offering sees him firing on all cylinders and pushing his voice to the limit with a collection of tracks chosen for their live appeal. See him in action on 16 November, tickets are £24.50. junction.co.uk

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Hackney Colliery Band.

A lively, modern take on the traditional brass band, Hackney Colliery Band are back in Cambridge this month for a gig at the Junction’s J2 on 4 November. Featuring trumpets, trombones, saxes, sousaphone and marching percussion, their set lists are a mad miscellany of genres, romping through covers of tunes by the Prodigy, Nirvana and Toto, to name a few. Whatever they choose to play, they always get the party started. Join in the fun for £17 a ticket. junction.co.uk

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Star of TV shows including Gavin & Stacey, The Trip and Marion and Geoff, Rob Brydon is in Cambridge this month to perform his new stand-up show, I Am Standing Up. He might be a bit out of practice (his last live show was back in 2009), but there’s no doubt that he’s a seasoned crowd pleaser, keeping the laughs going with his vast repertoire of impressions, improvised audience interaction, singing and generally hilarious observations on life and aging. Giggle along on 22 November at the Corn Exchange – and here’s to hoping he cracks out ‘small man trapped in a box’… Tickets are £27.75. cornex.co.uk

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NIGHTLIFE

NOW BOOKING. TR ANSATL ANTIC SESSIONS 7 FEB, CORN EX, F R O M £24

A musical melting pot which draws on the best of Nashville, Ireland and Scotland for a folky feast in Feb.

HAPPY MONDAYS. Manchester’s finest, Happy Mondays, play the Corn Exchange this month as part of their Twenty Four Hour Party People – Greatest Hits tour, which swings our way on the 25th. Mashing together acid house and indie rock, Sean Ryder, Bez and co were poster boys of the ‘Madchester’ scene of the 80s and early 90s, embodying the sound, style and excess of the movement like no others. At the heart of it all was the near-mythical Haçienda: a warehouse-turned-nightclub which became the epicentre of acid house and rave culture in the UK for a few heady years. The band became national celebrities and released four hit albums before eventually imploding in a haze of class As in 1992. Fast-forward to the present and it’s all changed: Bez has sworn off the hedonistic lifestyle in favour of gardening and politics, and Shaun is on the straight and narrow, too, happily married with kids. “I am really looking forward to the ‘Mondays’ shows leading up to Christmas 2017,” he said of the upcoming tour. “We’re performing better than ever and I love getting together with the band, blasting out all our great tunes we’ve made together over the decades. It’s gonna be great.” Pull on your baggy jeans and bucket hat, and party like it’s 1990 – tickets are £32.25. cornex.co.uk

JA S O N MANFORD

8 MARCH, CORN EX, £30. 25

Funnyman Jason Manford brings his brand-new show to Cambridge, which sees him contemplating class and his confusion on the matter.

NINA CONTI.

SLEAFORD MODS. Iggy Pop reckons they’re “undoubtedly, absolutely, definitely the world’s greatest rock ‘n’ roll band”, and this month they’re here in Cambridge. Sleaford Mods, aka Nottingham-based duo Jason Williamson and Andrew Fearn, are touring in support of their latest album English Tapas, which was released via Rough Trade Records in the spring of this year. True to form, it sees the pair serving up another helping of caustic commentary on the shape of modern Britain. Catch them on 7 November at the Corn Exchange. Tickets are £21.25. cornex.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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BAFTA nominated and British Comedy Award-winning ventriloquist Nina Conti brings her new show In Your Face to the Corn Exchange this month for a dose of her astonishing, voice-throwing, mask-wearing shtick on 17 November. With plenty of improv and audience interaction, no two shows are the same when Conti – whom The Telegraph describe as “gut-bustingly funny” – is in the driving seat. Expect two things: the unexpected, and to laugh your head off. Tickets are £22.75. cornex.co.uk

THE STRANGLERS

30 M A R C H , C O R N E X , F R O M £3 0 . 2 5

English rockers The Stranglers are back in town in March next year, offering a definitive retrospective on their back catalogue, which includes tracks such as Golden Brown and Peaches.

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Food & drink.

G E T T H E I N S I D E T R AC K O N C A M B R I D G E ’S F O O D I E S C E N E W I T H E D I T I O N ’S M O N T H LY SUPPLEMENT

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C A M B R I D G E ’S BEST PIZZAS.

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FOOD & DRINK

Food news.

NEW MENU AT JAMAICA BLUE. Found in the Lion Yard, Jamaica Blue offers shoppers a chilled-out haven to relax in mid-retail therapy, complete with good, punchy coffee and plenty of tasty eats. Their recently launched winter menu features a range of dishes guaranteed to warm you up and energise you for more shopping – we especially love the look of the baked eggs with kale and dukkah for a brunch bite. Come lunchtime, you can tuck into a Reuben sandwich on sourdough, a jerk spiced chicken baguette with avocado and mozzarella, or if you need a little more sustenance, a steaming bowl of pesto pasta with bacon. jamaicablue.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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ADNAMS OPEN P O P - U P S H O P.

Lovers of gin and beer and those in search of Christmas presents, listen up! Adnams, the award-winning Southwold-based brewery and distillery, has opened up a rather cute pop-up shop on Market Street. Inside the store, which will be open throughout the run-up to Christmas, you’ll find a huge range of Adnams beers and spirits. Pick up a mini-keg of favourite ales such as Ghost Ship, Ease Up IPA and Dry Hopped, plus bottles of handcrafted spirits including the very quaffable Copper House Gin, which was voted the World’s Best Gin at the International Wine & Spirits Competition 2013. There are also Adnams prosecco, liqueurs and whiskies on offer, as well as loads of extras such as bottle openers, tin cups and gift sets – plus there will be ample opportunity to have a taste of products before you buy (that’s got to make the Chrimbo shopping more enjoyable...). “We are excited to open our new pop-up Adnams store in the centre of Cambridge in the run-up to Christmas,” says Adnams Retail general manager Neil Griffin. “Our customers are always asking us when we are coming to Cambridge so we’re delighted to have the chance to meet them all… The store is focused on Adnams’ own award-wining range, and selected seasonal products from trusted partners that fit with our ethos of sustainability and fun.” adnams.co.uk

S T E M + G LO RY O P E N 2ND BRANCH. It was a sad day indeed when the owner of Afternoon Tease announced last month that, after a hugely successful four-year run, she’d be closing the doors to her much-loved cafe. There’s no doubt that Cambridge will miss AT’s fantastic cakes and brunches, but we’re heartened to hear that another local indie will be popping up at 13 King Street in its place. It’s now the turn of Stem + Glory, the CamYoga-run vegan eatery which is building on the success of its first branch in Chesterton. They’re preserving the relaxed feel of the cafe, plus Afternoon Tease’s tradition of top brunches, crumpets, banana bread and – crucially – will continue to serve coffee from London’s Caravan roastery. There will be lots more plant-based deliciousness on offer, too, from nutritious Buddha bowls to pulled jackfruit burgers, to warming vegan curries and other hot dishes, all available to eat in or take away. Stem + Glory 2 will be open 8am to 6pm. stemandglory.uk

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GRUB CLUB. Grub Club will host their final dinner of the year this month at Robinson College, offering a chance for local food professionals to chat, network and spark up ideas while enjoying some great food. Manning the stoves will be Masterchef finalist Giovanna Ryan, who’ll be cooking up a fabulous three-course menu featuring beef cheek with olive oil mash and roast fennel, plus caramelised quince, pears and apples with sable biscuits and crème fraiche sorbet for dessert. You don’t need to be a Grub Club member to join the fun, and tickets are £53. grubclubcambridge.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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F O OXDX & X XDXRXI N XX K

WAGA M A M A L AU N C H E S V E GA N M E N U . With a focus on proving that ‘meat free shouldn’t mean taste-free’, Wagamama has unveiled a tasty-looking new vegetarian and vegan menu, which you can sample in Cambridge at the St Andrew’s Street branch. The chain, which specialises in Japanese-inspired cuisine with a communal dining vibe, has been a huge hit since arriving in the UK, proliferating at a rate of knots around the country. New offerings from the plant-based menu include kare burosu, a vegan ramen, plus yasai samla, a fragrant coconut and lemongrass curry with tofu. There’s also a selection of vegan sweet treats which includes pink guava and passionfruit sorbet. They haven’t stopped at the food, either, adding drinks to complement the flavours on the new menu, from fresh juices to wines, beers and Jinzu Fever – a new Japanese serve gin with Fever-Tree tonic. With the popularity of veganism clearly exploding in Cambridge – as evidenced by events such as Ely’s vegan market and the runaway success of vegan cafe Stem + Glory – we’re sure the city’s vegans and v-curious will be swarming over in no time. wagamama.com

SALT PIG OPENS. Green Street has welcomed a new opening in the last few weeks in the shape of Salt Pig, a cafe and restaurant from the team behind burger joint Butch Annie’s. With a sophisticated, continental feel, Salt Pig serves up great coffee (from Hot Numbers), specialist teas, croissants, pastries, breads and light lunches in the day, transforming into an elegant, bistro-style restaurant at night. They welcome the laptop-wielding freelancer brigade, offering Wi-Fi and USB ports – and we have to say, with its classy, slightly opulent décor and comfy banquettes, we could definitely think of worse spots to put in a few hours work. The menu is peppered with crowd-pleasers, from eggs Benedict for brunch to Reuben sandwiches at lunch to seafood linguine in the evening, and as with Butch Annie’s, the commitment to sourcing the tastiest possible ingredients shines through. There are too many highlights to pick from the dinner menu, but at a push we’d say we’re most looking forward to sampling the grilled octopus with paprika mash or the Iberico pork shoulder, which comes served with an indulgent Café de Paris butter. There are also classic cocktails for a few afterdinner tipples, plus a cheese trolley loaded with delectable artisan fromage to taste your way through.

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© NICOLA FOLEY

FOOD & DRINK

N O R F O L K S T B A K E RY I I O P E N S .

© NICOLA FOLEY

Famed for their pastéis de nata – the best you’ll get outside of Lisbon, never mind in Cambridge – Norfolk Street Bakery has had a cult following in the city for many years. Despite a location tucked away on a quiet residential street, it’s gained many fans since its opening in 2012, with foodies all over town raving about their beautiful freshly-baked breads, cakes and biscuits. There’s good news this month for local fans or those keen to sample Adília’s and her team’s bakes, as they’ve just opened a new branch at 7 Station Road. As well as a counter laden with homemade sweet treats, from prune and port brownies to rye and chocolate cookies, you’ll be able to pick up a range of artisan loaves. There’s also a colourfully painted seating area where you can enjoy your spoils with a coffee, plus you can enjoy light bites such as toasties, sandwiches and panini. Make sure you pick up a custard tart for the road, too.

THIRSTY SERVICE. Drinks shop Thirsty is continuing its quest for world domination with the launch of yet another irresistible event. Featuring the usual winning combo of street food, entertainment and great booze, Thirsty Service sees the gang popping up in a rather unlikely new location: a church! Throughout October they were doing their thing at St Philip’s on Mill Road, and now you can catch them at St Paul’s Church on Hills Road on 3, 10 and 17 November, plus 1 December. You can get well and truly in the holy spirit with a range of cracking gins, plus craft beers and wines on tap (amen to that!), and there will be tasty eats on offer from favourite food trucks. If the weather’s not up to much, don’t worry, there will be ample indoor biergarten-style seating, heating and cosy fairy lights and candles. wearethirsty.co.uk

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GIN L A B O R ATO RY OPENS ON G R E E N S T R E E T. Gin lovers of the city should already be au fait with Cambridge Gin Distillery – the innovative, much celebrated local gin-makers known for their unique methods and flavourings (including a little number infused with red ants…). You may have sampled their wares – their gin is served at various bars around the city, or you may have even popped down to their erstwhile home on Trinity Street for a tasting – but now they’ve unveiled their most exciting endeavor yet: a brand new, three story gin ‘laboratory’, complete with tasting lounge, shop and classroom, right in the heart of the city centre. Located at number 10 Green Street, at the site formerly home to Catesby’s, the new premises will offer ginthusiasts the chance to create their own gin, tasting their way through a variety of gins and distillates, tweaking their blend until they find their perfect recipe. If you want to learn more about the fascinating history and mysteries of ‘mother’s ruin’, from how the spirit almost destroyed 18th century London to how it’s produced, book in for a tutored tasting session. Informative, funny and, naturally, filled with swigs of gin, the classes make for an ideal night out with friends, hen do or corporate activity. Upstairs, there are flights of gin to try, plus a range of cocktails and speciality coffees, whilst you can also purchase any of Cambridge Gin Distillery’s products downstairs. Visit the Cambridge Gin Distillery website for more information. cambridgedistillery.co.uk

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THE ARCHITECT RE-OPENS UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT. The Architect on Castle Hill has reopened its doors under new management in recent weeks, promising a unique new foodie offering plus craft beers, guest ales and an impressive new gin menu. Helming the pub are Luke Edwards and Stuart Tuck, who bring a wealth of experience in the trade, including running Hardwick’s popular Blue Lion. The menu focuses on two pub grub classics: pie and mash and fish and chips, but there’s a twist! Just like the architect of the pub’s name, diners can design and build their own dishes, selecting their fish, batter style, sides and sauces so it’s exactly to their taste. Equally, you can create your dream pie, selecting fillings such as beef shin and mushroom in red wine, adding buttery or mustard mash and choosing a sauce – we’d go traditional and opt for the parsley liquor ourselves… If you don’t fancy either of those, you can concoct a mix-and-match sharing board with treats such as scotch eggs, deep-fried brie and pork scratchings: what better way to make sure everybody’s happy? thearchitectcambridge.co.uk

C R AC K I N G C H R I S T M A S WINES WITH THE THREE WINE MEN .

Get your festive season off to an early, suitably boozy start at the Corn Exchange this month, when the venue welcomes Cracking Christmas Wines with the Three Wine Men on the 18th. You’ll be in good company as Oz Clarke, Tim Atkin MW and Olly Smith, three of the UK’s leading wine experts, steward you through top tipples and start you on your road to vinous pleasure. There will be hundreds of excellent wines on offer, with exhibitors offering samples and serving up special offers if you find a bottle just too good not to buy. “It doesn't matter if you’re an expert, enthusiast or just enjoy the occasional slurp,” says Oz Clarke. “There is something for all those with a curious palate. As well as the walk around tasting there is a learning zone for those new to wine tastings and masterclasses for more in-depth knowledge. Just grab a glass and join in!” There are sessions at midday and 4pm, and tickets are priced at £29.50 per session (or £56 for both, if you really want to get stuck in). cornex.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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There’s no taste like home. A L E X RU S H M E R R E T U R N S F RO M T H E A L P S , H U N G RY TO S I N K H I S T E E T H B AC K I N TO T H E C A M B R I D G E F O O D S C E N E

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left the Alps just two days ago, just as Verbier was beginning to smell of wood smoke and fresh pine. Although the temperature was still in double figures, the tops of the mountains, where I had picnicked just six weeks previously and been too hot in short-sleeves, were freshly cloaked in snow every morning. Some days the clouds came in low and lent the town a brief, supernatural feeling. I began to see how mountain cuisine had developed and it seemed more suitable, and relevant, than it had before under the scorching August sun. An invitation to stay for the season was considered, agonised over and, ultimately, politely rejected. I had enjoyed myself but in all honesty, I really missed my house, my family and my home town. Of course, there were the obvious things I longed for: a thick hot chocolate from Savino’s, a slice of pizza and a cannoli from Aromi, a vegetarian meze box from The Wandering Yak, a bowl of soup dumplings from Zhonghua, a plate of sushi from Japas and an unbeatable burger from Steak & Honour (this list could go on…). But there was something else that I realised I had missed whilst I was away, something less tangible and harder to explain than a simple rundown of foods that I yearned for. Cambridge has finally tipped over into being a serious food destination and with that comes an undercurrent of energy, excitement, enthusiasm and pride. It was only through a degree of geographical separation, as well as stepping away from the hobs and ovens myself at the end of June, that I’ve been able to realise this. The quality and variety of cuisines now available to us is both dizzying and brilliant, and a series of recent and upcoming openings looks set to invigorate the city’s food scene even further. Chief among these is the long-awaited relaunch of the Parker’s Tavern restaurant at the extensively refurbished University Arms. I’ve been fortunate enough to taste head chef Tristan Welch’s food before, whilst he was based at Launceston Place in Kensington, and if that is anything to go by, we are all in for a real treat. Having spent the last six years in the kitchen – attempting to contribute in my own small way to the burgeoning Cambridge food scene – followed by two months out of the country, I’m very much looking forward to a period of time on the other side, as a consumer. Whenever I travel, I do so with fresh and hungry eyes fixed on where to eat. Itineraries tend to be based around restaurants, cafés and food shops rather than sights of interest, museums and galleries. I feel very lucky to be in a position now where I can conduct the same exercise in the place where I live. Received wisdom might suggest that travel broadens the mind, but I’m rapidly coming to realise that returning home can be equally as enlightening. n CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Images The interior of Parker’s Tavern, a new restaurant on the cusp of opening at the University Arms hotel with Tristan Welch as head chef; dumplings from Zhonghua Traditional Snacks (photograph by Charlotte Griffiths); pizza from Aromi, and a look at the exterior of the newly-refurbished University Arms hotel

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SmokeWorks II. W E PAY A V I S I T T O S TAT I O N ROA D ’S N E W STEAMPUNK BARBECUE JOINT AND BAR

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lynchpin of Cambridge’s thriving food scene, the Cambscuisine group’s collection of well-loved local eateries includes the Chop Houses, MillWorks, the Crown and Punchbowl and SmokeWorks, and their march toward Cambridge domination shows zero signs of slowing. The latest addition to the family is SmokeWorks II, a sister restaurant to the Free School Lane outpost which has been delighting taste buds in the city centre since the summer of 2014. So, what’s new? The new location on Station Road (the building previously home to the Great Northern pub) is bigger, for starters, and they’ve amped up the steampunk-meets-Americana theme and got themselves some snazzy new neon accessories (just wait and see what happens when you twist the buzzer for service…), plus you can now book a table in advance unlike over at Free School Lane. Also new is the cocktail bar – which occupies more than half the floor space and features a nifty stepped seating arrangement and moveable cubby holes stocked with Marvel comics to peruse while sipping on craft beers and cocktails. We can recommend the excellent espresso martinis for giving you a post-barbecue binge lift, or check out the Double Barrel, a SmokeWorks take on the classic Sazerac served on the rocks and billowing with smoke. Swing by for happy hour (Mon-Fri 3-7pm and Sat and Sun 12-7pm) and enjoy bargains including £5 cocktails and £6 for two glasses of fizz. The food continues very much in the mould of the original SmokeWorks mission of bringing the people of Cambridge ‘Slow Cooked. Fast’ classic barbecue treats, teamed with great craft beers, bourbon or milkshakes. They take their barbecuing seriously here, rubbing, brining and smoking meat in their

own smokery in Cambridge for up to 14 hours to achieve maximum flavour and melt-in-the-mouth tenderness. It’s a winning formula which the foodies of Cambridge have enthusiastically embraced, evidenced by the restaurant’s constant throng of diners. It’s also received plaudits on a national level, with The Telegraph naming it as one of the top ten BBQ restaurants in the whole of the UK. On our early evening visit, we start with the croquettes: mouth-wateringly moreish cylinders of crisp fried breadcrumb stuffed with smoky pulled pork shoulder and served with a swoosh of tart apple sauce. Curiosity got the better of us and we also shared a ‘bone marrow luge’, which arrived with shot of buffalo trace bourbon on the side – down it through the bone luge, get a photo and you too can be immortalised on the ‘bone yard’ board of fame in the bar. The roast bone marrow, buttery and rich, was paired with a decadent helping of tender pulled beef brisket, sweet red onion and toast. Feeling gluttonous, we went for the Beefed Up Works for our mains. If you want a whistlestop tour of SmokeWorks’ best bits (final destination: food coma), then this platter of barbecued deliciousness is absolutely the menu choice for you. Groaning under the weight of meltingly tender beef ribs, chunky house-spiced sausage, lip-smacking marinated chicken wings and a squidgy brioche bun loaded with luscious pulled meat, plus fries and pickles, it’s meaty feast which really does takes some beating. The tangy pickles cut through all the smokiness nicely but I could have done with a little more freshness or greenery in the mix – next time I’ll add in a house salad or bowl of SmokeWorks’ homemade cabbage slaw. The Works also comes with a portion of the meaty beans I raved about in my review of the original SmokeWorks a couple of years back. They’re made using haricot, black turtle

I never thought I'd get excited about a dish of baked beans, but SmokeWorks manage to elevate them to show-stealing status

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and black-eyed beans (which are soaked overnight and mixed with smoking juices, barbecue sauce and beef dripping butter), before lavish layers of low and slow cooked meat are added. I never thought I’d get excited about a dish of baked beans – but SmokeWorks manages to elevate them to showstealing status. Order the Works and you’re turning your greed into a good deed, too, since they donate 25p from every Works to local homelessness charity Wintercomfort. We couldn’t manage one on this occasion – blame The Works! – but SmokeWorks’ old school shakes are the stuff of legend. Order the salted caramel and make it ‘hard’ with a shot of bourbon for max indulgence. We did make space for a creamy baked cheesecake though, especially enjoying the contrast provided by the juicy pineapple salsa with a hint of chilli. There’s never been more choice for diners in Cambridge, so a restaurant needs to have something special to get people through the doors and keep them coming back for more, but with its buzzy atmosphere, cool design, handy location and truly next-level barbecue food – I can see SmokeWorks II becoming a bona fide stalwart. It’s worth remembering too, that if you’ve got a hankering for some slow cooked meaty joy but can’t tear yourself away from Netflix, you can now order via Deliveroo… n smokeworks.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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F O OXDX & X XDXRXI N XX K

PIZZAS. W O R D S & I M AG E S C H A R LOT T E G R I F F I T H S

C A M B R I D G E ’S P I Z Z A O F F E R I N GS H AV E C O M E A N I N C R E D I B LY L O N G WAY I N T H E L A S T F E W Y E A R S : G O N E A R E T H E DAYS O F STRUGGLING TO CHOOSE BET WEEN THE HUT OR THE EXPRESS. W H I T T L I N G D OW N T H I S L I S T T O J U S T F I V E E AT E R I E S P ROV E D T O B E A H A R D (B U T D E L I C I O U S) CHALLENGE – WE’VE SELECTED S O M E S TA N D - O U T I N D E P E N D E N T S T O H I G H L I G H T I N T H E S E PAG E S , B U T I F W E ’ V E M I S S E D O U T YO U R FAVO U R I T E P I Z Z A P U RV E YO R , T WEET US @CAMBSEDITION AND T E L L U S W H Y…

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1 C H A R L I E ’S COFFEE CO.

Push past the families (or add your own brood to the play area) and get your order in pronto for some of the lightest, most flavour-packed pizza in the city. Family-run Charlie’s wafer-thin dough is liberally strewn with some seriously fresh and flavourful ingredients and then fired in a G-branded Gosney oven, before being rushed to your table. Heads up: their pizzas are large, so come hungry or ready to share – but if you don’t manage it all in one sitting, their branded takeaway boxes are really rather stylish. A new-ish daytime slice bar next door allows you to sample their creations for as little as £1.50 per piece: bargain.

Still thinking about Charlie’s Friarelli with sausage white pizza: Neapolitan broccoli rabe, Italian sausage, mozzarella and Grana Padano

@kiukiuli says “I second @CharliesCambs – anywhere with a chocolate menu is a winner”

GATTUSO’S. Head to The Junction and cross over Hills Road for this family-friendly trattoria which serves up thin, flavourful, mozzarella-strewn Neapolitan-style pizzas alongside a lengthy menu of Sicilian-inspired dishes. There’s an extensive list of topping options to choose from, including white pizzas and calzones, and a specials board which changes daily. Perfect for pre- or post-cinema eats or an after college snack – and you can even take away, if you’re homeward bound. @irishgrldm says “Definitely Gattuso’s on Hills Road – loads of toppings, super tasty!”

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Thin, crispy and laden with pools of melted buffalo mozzarella: check the specials board to take advantage of Gattuso’s off-menu pizzas

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T H E SA L I S B U RY A R M S .

No list of fine pizzerias in Cambridge is complete without the Salisbury Arms. It’s been a few years since this station stop-off underwent its dramatic reimagining, but it’s still a truly splendid food-powered local which puts pizza at the heart of a small but perfectly formed menu. Their wood-fired Gosney oven sends out consistently light, crisp, finger-lickingly good pizza that’s beautifully seasoned and slathered with just the right amount of cheese – and if you drop by on Mondays, it’s two-for-one. Pair your feast with a pint from their Bedfordshire-based brewery and slather on the home-made “goil” (that’s garlic oil to you and me), and you won’t be disappointed. @TimHayward says “Salisbury on Tenison Road. Just don’t tell anyone else, huh?”

Try the Salisbury’s Lardo for a pub classic in pizza form: prosciutto ham, egg and spinach

SIGNORELLI’S.

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Burleigh Street’s newest residents have arrived in style: this Italian eatery-slash-deli-slash-wine bar-slash-pasticceria serves up a little slice of Rome in the heart of our city. Open all day until 10 on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, Signorelli’s delivers whatever time you visit: some superbly tempting lunch deals give way to late-night cocktails and aperitivo. Their Roman-style pizza is, in a word, superb: piled high with toppings and created fresh every day in their in-house bakery just backstage. As owner Alex says, the food miles you’ll accrue here will total about six steps – but that first bite of Bergamasca, laden with Italian sausage and Taleggio, is guaranteed to immediately transport you to the Tuscan hills.

Two ‘quarters’ of pizza from Signorelli’s on Burleigh Street make a splendid lunch for two

@deepamstry says “Going back to Signorelli’s tonight – was good the first time I tried it!”

TRADIZIONE. C ATC H T H E M I F YO U C A N …

This much-loved Mill Road eatery started out life as a takeaway, but rapidly expanded to meet clamouring demand for their square slices. Hunker down on one of the chic white tables, admire the local art which decorates the walls, and wait for your pizza feast to arrive. Super-fresh toppings are laden onto a satisfyingly chewy, uniformly thick Roman-style base, which – if you can’t manage it all in one sitting – is just as delicious for breakfast the next day. Tradizione still delivers all over Cambridge (call them to check for your postcode) but better still, grab a bottle of Chianti from Cambridge Wine Merchants up the road and sit in to take advantage of their absolute bargain £1 BYOB. @MillRoadCambridge says “Tradizione on Mill Road – best I’ve ever eaten. I’m not vegan, but I even like their vegan pizzas!” CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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If you’re in need of vegetables, try Tradizione’s Ortolan: tomato, mozzarella, aubergine, broccoli and courgette

Cambridge’s lively street food scene naturally includes pizzas, served hot and fresh out of mobile kitchens: if you’re able to track them down at events or pop-ups, we wholeheartedly recommend both Fired UP and Pizza Mondo for delicious slices on the go. Keep your eyes on their social media pages for their next appearances. @FiredUPizza @PizzaMondoPizza

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Bring some warmth to cooler nights. E M B R AC E T H E C O L D E R W E AT H E R A N D C O S Y U P W I T H O N E O F T H E S E T O P T I P P L E S , S AYS E L O D I E C A M E RO N F RO M D R I N K S S H O P T H I R S T Y

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e can no longer deny it, the nights are closing in and the central heating is back on. We drank up those summer wines with the same sort of ritual we indulge in when we pack away our shorts, T-shirts and flip-flops for next summer. There is a comfort in digging out jumpers, scarves and coats as we look out at the darkening evenings. Yes, summer has come to an end, as is inevitable in this country, and autumn is in full swing. In the same way that we rediscover our winter wardrobes, we move on our wine tastes too. Now is the time to revisit and rediscover wines of greater complexity and depth that accompany the soulsatisfying foods we like to eat at this time of year. Cooking up a shepherd’s pie, lasagne or sausage and mash is the kind of comforting pleasure we deserve during cold weather. An evening trick or treating, or watching fireworks is perfect finished with one of the above and a hearty glass of wine. Curl up and enjoy.

2 014 V I R É C L E S S É , C E C I L E G O N D A R D (£15.93)

Viré and Clessé are two villages in Burgundy that gained their own appellation in 1998, a definite step up from the generic Macon villages. The limestone soil and gentle climate gives a wine with honeysuckle and hints of lemon. This wine is round and soft yet fresh – now with a little age we are finding notes of quince and pine are beginning to appear. An ideal transitional season wine, this is perfect with a béchamel-based chicken pasta bake.

2 015 L E S C H A R M E U S E S , C R OZ E S H E R M I TAG E B L A N C , D O M A I N E M U C Y N (£17.19)

Velvety and round on the palate, this white wine from the cooler Northern Rhône is a blend of Marsanne and Roussanne, the two white grapes of this area. The light golden colour alerts us to the gentle richness that follows – apricot, preserved fruit and pepper with surprising elements of honey and mandarin. Serve with fish or scallops in a butter or cream sauce served with rice.

2 012 D E N T E L L E , D O M A I N E R O U G E B L E U (£11.4 3)

Nestled between Gigondas and Châteauneufdu-Pape, these winemakers are inspired by biodynamics working in line with nature to produce wines with soul. This ruby red number CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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sings with wild berries, spice and cassis with a sprinkling of nutmeg. What’s great about this wine is it matches well with summer and winter dishes so you can enjoy it with salad and charcuterie on a mild day or with pizza or pasta ragu when you need a winter warmer.

Revisit and rediscover wines of greater complexity and depth

2011 D E C E N I O R E S E RVA , L A S O R C A S R I O JA (£14 . 76)

I love this kind of wine when the weather gets cooler. Autumnal fruits abound, in particular dark cherries and plums. This is cloaked in soft vanilla and hints of tobacco and herbs adding just the right warmth and complexity. Classic Rioja with style, match this with shepherd’s pie or Lancashire hotpot as it’s perfect for lamb. n

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Season’s Eatings.

DINING GUIDE

T H E U LT I M AT E G U I D E T O D I N I N G O U T A RO U N D C A M B R I D G E S H I R E T H I S W I N T E R . W H E T H E R YO U ’R E LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT VENUE FOR A MEAL OUT WITH F R I E N D S , A C H R I S TM A S PA R T Y W I T H C O L L E AG U E S , O R E V E N C H R I S TM A S L U N C H I T S E L F – W E ’ V E G O T YO U C OV E R E D !

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P I N T S H O P. One of the most consistently excellent eateries in the city, Pint Shop never disappoints with its deliciously inventive menu. The Christmas offering is looking typically tempting this year, beginning with homemade cheese straws and sharing starters which include the Pint Shop’s famous Scotch eggs, plus croquettes loaded with Lancashire cheese, parsnips and hazelnuts. Mains options are hearty and indulgent, yielding treats like overnight pork belly and cider brined turkey with roasted apples and shallots and bacon, while desserts include chocolate and stout figgy pudding and clementine jellies with whisky cream and sherbet. Three courses cost £27.50 and the menu will be served from Thursday 23 November to Sunday 24 December. pintshop.co.uk

FOODIE HEAVEN. O L D B I C YC L E S H O P.

Another reliably delicious choice is the Old Bicycle Shop, where you can be sure of wholesome, tasty dishes with plenty of veggie options in a cool setting, together with a great choice of drinks. Their festive menu is mouthwatering, featuring treats like twice-baked goats cheese soufflé with beetroot gel, and juniper roasted venison rump. Traditionalists will love the roasted English Rose turkey with all the trimmings option, while if you’ve got vegans in the party, they’re well catered for with a braised lentil and jackfruit cobbler. Sate your sweet tooth with decadent desserts including sticky fig Eton mess and Christmas pud with brandy butter. The menu is priced at £22.50 for two courses and £27 for three. oldbicycleshop.com

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HOTEL DU VIN. There’s a whole host of options at Hotel du Vin for feasting this festive season, whether you want a sumptuous seasonal afternoon tea, a party menu or the all-important Christmas day dinner itself. A handsome townhouse on Trumpington Street, the hotel offers an atmospheric bistro, unique private dining rooms and a subterranean cocktail lounge – plus of course plenty of bedrooms if you want to make a night of it. The Christmas celebrations menu (priced at £31.95 for lunch and £34.95 for dinner), boasts indulgent French inspired classics such as beef bourguignon and duck liver parfait, plus sweet treats like eggnog panna cotta and chocolate and chestnut pavlova. The hotel will also be offering a Christmas Day feast, plus a Boxing Day lunch, and also a special afternoon tea with a Christmassy twist. hotelduvin.com CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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DINING GUIDE

SMOKEWORKS. Eschew dry turkey and watery gravy this Christmas and head to SmokeWorks for a slow-cooked barbecue festive feast instead. Running 27 November to 24 December, the ‘Naughty List’ menu features platters of barbecue delights including pulled turkey sliders with cranberry ketchup, pork ribs, Christmas slaw, crispy chicken wings and spiced sausage. There’s a veggie option with a halloumi bun too, and you get party hats and humbugs with all. The Christmas party menu is available from £15 per person at lunchtime and £20 per person for the evening (£17 for veggies). smokeworks.co.uk

THE RIVER BAR STEAKHOUSE & GRILL. A truly hidden gem, The River Bar is tucked away on Quayside’s boardwalk with a stunning location overlooking the Cam and Magdalene College. The building, actually an 18th century warehouse, sings with sophistication, with a glamorous cocktail bar and old-school bistro feel. As the name suggests, steak is their speciality, and we can vouch for the fact that they serve fabulously full-flavoured cuts of 28-day dry aged beef, not to mention delectable homemade puddings. The Christmas 2017 menu, priced at £29.50 for lunch and £38 for dinner, features simple, crowd-pleasing starters such as Somerset brie with Parma ham and winter salad, or chicken paté with roasted figs and sourdough. For mains, meanwhile, you can tuck into roasted noisettes of turkey with duck fat fondant potato and all the trimmings, or roasted pork loin with chorizo and cannellini beans and Yorkshire puds. The indulgence doesn’t stop there, either, with heavenly desserts like steamed Christmas pudding with proper brandy sauce to round off your feast. riverbarsteakhouse.com CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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DINING GUIDE

©WILLIAM BALL

H O L I DAY INN .

Novi.

Novi’s stunning roof terrace will be transformed into a winter wonderland this festive season, festooned with lighting, blankets and heaters, making it ideal for a festive tipple, and they’ll also be laying on Christmas buffet menus available for large groups at £30 per person. There’s the option to hire one or both of Novi’s upstairs function rooms, and guests will be treated to fizz on arrival with bread, dips and olives, before enjoying a sophisticated buffet – you can even bring your own music if you want to have a boogie. novicambridge.co.uk

BEST FOR BIG GROUPS.

Set in spacious grounds just outside Cambridge, Holiday Inn, Impington is going all out with a huge range of options. Christmas Party Nights, on Thursdays to Saturdays from 24 November, offer an all-inclusive package of three-course meal, drinks and disco. Work off your traditional Christmas (or fishy or vegetarian) feast on the dance floor till past midnight, then sleep it off at the hotel. Overnight rates start at £75; party only is from £34.95. If it’s simply a feast you’re after, a two- or three-course festive lunch or dinner might fit the bill. Choose a date in November or December; with prices from £15.95. The hotel will be open on Christmas Day too, serving a relaxed buffet style lunch with all-inclusive drinks for £69.50. hicambridgehotel.co.uk

MADINGLEY HALL.

An elegant country house built in the 16th century and surrounded by spectacular gardens and grounds, Madingley Hall offers a truly memorable setting for your festive feast. Ideal for private Christmas lunches or dinners for groups of up to 100, the venue will also be laying on its popular Christmas Party Nights once again. There are currently spaces available on 16 and 19 December, and for £42 per person you’ll be treated to a beautiful three-course meal and a disco. madingleyhall.co.uk

REVOLUTION BAR. Raise a glass to Christmas at Revolution this year, where they’re running all sorts of festive specials, from made-to-order Christmas cocktails to tasty festive treats. There are options for buffets from £14.95 per head and a sit-down three-course meal from a very affordable £17.95 per head, plus an events team to make sure your shindig goes off without a hitch. With a super central location, club room, Cuban-inspired bar and – most excitingly – a heated, fairy-lit roof terrace to hang out on, you’re guaranteed a good night out. revolution-bars.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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OUT OF TOWN TREATS.

THE ROYAL OAK, BARRINGTON. An ancient inn on the edge of a village green in the ludicrously picturesque Barrington, The Royal Oak is just the ticket for a cosy chow-down this winter. The Christmas menu, available until 24 December, is priced at £28.95 for three courses, while they’re also open on Christmas Day itself and serving up a super indulgent three-course feast complete with Prosecco, canapés, roast turkey and Christmas pudding (£75 per person). Come New Year’s Eve, you can party into 2018 with a disco and hot and cold buffet at the pub, which will be open 6pm until late. Tickets to the NYE party are priced at £30 per person. royaloakbarrington.co.uk

T H E E LT I S L E Y, E LT I S L E Y.

CROWN & PUNCHBOWL, HORNINGSEA. Set in the chocolate box village of Horningsea, this Cambscuisine-run country pub and restaurant has long held a fantastic reputation for its food offering. The building, which dates back to the 17th century, boasts cosy fireplaces, a luxurious private dining room and a bright conservatory area, while the menu offers a range of indulgent British dishes which always impress. The Christmas menu is priced at £25 for two courses or £30 for three and features C&P menu favourites alongside seasonal specialities like roast turkey with roast potatoes and Christmas pudding with brandy butter and winter fruit compote. If you fancy raising a few toasts to the season and don’t want to drive, there are five delightful bedrooms upstairs for overnight guests. cambscuisine.com

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With a gorgeous shabby chic interior and a winning menu of local, seasonal and flavour-packed modern British cuisine, The Eltisley opened earlier this year under management Feast & Frolic, the group behind quirky gastro hotspots The Willow Tree in Bourn and No.77 in Caxton. There’s cosy candlelight, woodburners and a lovely bar for after dinner drinks, making it a splendid spot for a Christmas feast. The festive menu looks all kinds of tasty, including soul-pleasing celeriac soup with Gruyère and garlic puff, and venison goulash with rosemary mashed potato and roasted swede – plus a toasted marshmallow and fruit hook with melty chocolate sauce and ice cream for dessert. It’s available 1 to 24 December, priced at £22 for two courses and £27 for three. There’s also a Boxing Day festival for when that Christmas cabin fever sets in – pop down for a hog roast, live music and beers on 26 December. feastandfrolic.co.uk

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DINING GUIDE

THREE HORSESHOES, MADINGLEY. A pretty thatched inn out in Madingley, the Three Horseshoes has been one of the area’s most celebrated fine dining spots for years, and serves up a menu brimming with bright, seasonal and flavour-packed dishes. They’re laying on a host of festive treats over the festive period, from the Christmas party menu at £35 per person, to a New Year’s Day lunch. We love the look of the indulgent Christmas Day menu, which begins with cranberry Bellinis, includes a roast turkey with all the trimmings and ends with divine desserts and then cheese and biscuits – sounds like heaven to us! There’s also a New Year’s Eve dinner, which offers a sophisticated option for anyone looking to celebrate with good food and wine, but without a big, noisy party. threehorseshoesmadingley.co.uk

THE SHED, LODE.

T H E W I L LOW TREE, BOURN .

A gorgeous gastro pub in Bourn, The Willow Tree offers quirky decor and beautiful food. Their festive menu is available from 1 to 24 December, priced at £25 for two courses and £30 for three, and features a selection of dishes endowed with the flair this eaterie – which is mentioned in The Michelin Guide – is known for. Feast on a trio of pork terrine with apple ketchup, grilled baby leeks and pork crackling before tucking into hake fillet served with crushed new potatoes, kale and a shrimp and chive velouté. There’s also a splendid looking traditional roast turkey, complete with rosemary and garlic roasties, sprouts, braised red cabbage, chestnut and sage stuffing plus lashings of gravy. For an extra special private dining experience, you can hire the outdoor tipi – which seats 10-20 around a large fire pit and is available all year round. A Festive Pow Wow (private dining in the tipi) can be yours for £50 per person, which includes three courses from the festive dining menu and a glass of fizz or mulled wine on arrival, plus you get a dedicated server. feastandfrolic.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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You’re guaranteed to have a Christmas cracker of a feast at The Shed, which is located in the pretty village of lode on the outskirts of Cambridge. Grab your friends and family and head over to enjoy their Christmas Party Menu, priced at a £25 for three courses or £20 for two, featuring hearty fare like roasted vegetable soup with goats’ cheese and braised beef with horseradish creamed potatoes. There’s also a traditional turkey with all the trimmings, or a tempting sounding vegetable Gorgonzola Wellington for veggies. If you fancy letting someone else do the cooking and washing up on Christmas Day itself, they have a menu for that too, £75 for adults and £37.50 for children. the-shed-pub.co.uk

T H E G R OV E , CROMER.

Whether you fancy a romantic winter minibreak, a big group party or an intimate dinner, the family-run Grove hotel on the Norfolk Coast in Cromer has it all. The in-house restaurant is a fine-dining hotspot, with two Rosettes and a menu bursting with top-quality local produce and seasonally inspired dishes. The Christmas Party Menu, available from 28 November to 23 December, is priced at £24.95 for three courses or £19.95 for two, and ranges from a classic roast turkey with winter veggies to rolled haunch of venison with goose fat fondant potato and blackberry jus. The Grove can cater for larger groups of up to 39 guests – and there’s also the option to reserve the entire place and have the dining room, lounge, study and orangery bar all to yourselves, as well as full use of the gorgeous grounds and indoor swimming pool. For 2017, they are offering exclusive hire from £7000 for two nights, which includes dinner, bed and breakfast for up to 39 people. thegrovecromer.co.uk

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DINING GUIDE

INTERNATIONAL INSPIRATION. N O .77.

ZARA INDIAN CUISINE.

Spice things up this winter with a trip to one of team Edition’s favourite curry houses – Zara Indian Cuisine. Located in Great Shelford, this top-notch restaurant is housed within a converted railway building and serves up a huge range of beautifully put together, creative Indian dishes. Going way beyond your bogstandard offerings, Zara offers regional recipes and speciality dishes aplenty, all freshly made using the finest ingredients. A perfect winter warmer! zarashelford.com

© DAISY DICKINSON

Hop continents for a Thai feast at Caxton’s No.77, where they’re laying on a festive feast from 1 to 31 December. Recently selected for inclusion in The Michelin Guide for a third consecutive year, the traditional exterior of this gorgeous restaurant belies its delightfully quirky interior, with its copper bar, chandeliers and sumptuous velvet furnishings. The festive menu features Thai sharing platters of favourite dishes including duck rolls, chicken Thai curry, king prawn pad thai and panang curry, and costs £25 per person. feastandfrolic.co.uk

DE LUCA.

© DAISY DICKINSON

A stalwart of the Cambridge food scene for over a decade, De Luca Cucina on Regent Street can be relied upon for delicious, hearty Italian fare, top wines and cocktails, plus a great atmosphere. It’s a long-standing city centre favourite for good reason. As ever, they’re getting into the seasonal spirit with a special set menu this winter, featuring three courses for £32. Begin with chorizo and fontina arancini or deep-fried squid with sweet chilli and ginger relish, then move on to ‘Secondi’ including baked turkey escalope stuffed with sausage meat and dates, served with roast potatoes. Desserts include De Luca’s boozy, creamy tiramisu, and you shouldn’t leave without popping upstairs to the cocktail lounge and enjoying a tipple or two. delucacucina.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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THE WOW FACTOR. SIX CAMBRIDGE. Located on the sixth floor of the Varsity Hotel & Spa, Six drips with style, from the glittering bar to the cool monochrome floor tiling and the dazzling views out across the city’s skyline. As settings for a winter feast or Christmas party go, it’s hard to beat. The three-course Christmas menu boasts woodstone roasted salmon with Welsh Rarebit potato and creamed spinach, slow roast pork belly and oven baked aubergines with grilled halloumi, not to mention desserts including ‘mince pie mess’ with vanilla ice cream. It’s priced at £29.50 per head for lunchtime and £38 for dinner, and they’ll even throw in Christmas crackers for your group. sixcambridge.co.uk

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DINING GUIDE

MEET CAMBRIDGE.

A venue finding service for the city and surrounding area, Meet Cambridge has a vast portfolio of venues for your seasonal shindig, whether you’re looking for historical grandeur or cool and contemporary; an intimate lunch or a formal dinner party for 300+ guests. Highlights with wow factor include King’s College, boasting a variety of spectacular dining spaces from the Saltmarsh Rooms to the magnificent Hall, where you can dine while soaking up the stunning architecture of one of Cambridge’s most treasured landmarks. There’s also the impressive Millennium Grandstand at Newmarket Racecourses, which will be transformed into a ‘White Christmas’ setting. Enjoy a welcome drink followed by a three-course festive dinner before taking to the dance floor. The Dining Hall at Westminster College, meanwhile, provides the perfect Christmas party setting: it offers a range of packages, from lunches to private dining. meet-cambridge.com

THE REINDEER.

THIRSTY FESTIVE. Over the last couple of years, Thirsty has gone from small drinks shop with big dreams to major player in the Cambridge nightlife scene, hosting festivals, a summer biergarten and pop-ups all over the city. It’s back at the Museum of Technology this winter, this time transforming the garden into an après-ski style, all-weather Wintergarten, complete with giant tipis, funky lights, firepits and plenty of seating. As ever, the Thirsty bar will be serving up a huge variety of craft beers on tap, along with wines, gins and Glühwein, and a variety of food trucks will be popping up in the cobbled yard at the back. Thirsty also has a range of tempting party packages available if you’re looking for something more bespoke, booking you in at the Wintergarten itself (which can accommodate up to 250), the ‘bunker’ at their Chesterton Road shop (up to 50 people), or even bringing the fun to you with the help of their Thirstybus mobile bar, which can provide drinks for events of up to 1000 people. For all of these, there’s the option to include top street food from local traders. wearethirsty.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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The My Little Festival team will be bringing a serving of their glittery good-time vibes to the city this Christmas with an extra pop-up event at the Cambridge Union. The Reindeer festival will see the historic debating chamber transformed into the ‘Winter Chamber’, a snowy, twinkling winter wonderland filled with surprises where guests will enjoy a four-course banquet made by Guerrilla Kitchen’s Jay Scrimshaw. The fun doesn’t stop there; guests will also be able to enjoy flowing cocktails, a kitsch disco, quirky interactive cabaret, live music, DJs, and a photo booth – plus a Santa’s Grotto with a difference. The event takes place on 20 December and costs £65 per head, which includes dinner, half a bottle of wine and a glass of fizz on arrival. mylittlefestival.uk

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WIN A STAY AT THE GROVE, CROMER!

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f you find yourself daydreaming about slipping away to the coast for a luxurious minibreak, we just might have the perfect competition for you this month. Cambridge Edition has teamed up with The Grove hotel in Cromer to give away an indulgent overnight stay, complete with hearty breakfast, and they’re even throwing in a bottle of prosecco. A Georgian house set in four acres of glorious Norfolk countryside, The Grove has it all, from the award-winning restaurant to the heated indoor pool to the beautiful gardens – they even have a direct woodland path to Cromer’s beaches and cliffs. Our lucky winners will be able to explore the beautiful north Norfolk coast or nearby town of Cromer before bedding down for the night in a Superior bedroom, which boasts views out across the gardens and a large, cosy bed to sink into for a heavenly night’s sleep. You might want to take advantage of the hotel’s double AA Rosettewinning restaurant while you’re there, too, enjoying some of its celebrated fine dining fare before you hit the hay. Come morning, you’ll be treated to a delicious breakfast made using local produce before you set off home, refreshed and revitalised. Sound good? Head to the Cambridge Edition website at cambsedition.co.uk to find out how to win! n The Grove, 95 Overstrand Road, Cromer, Norfolk | 01263 512412 | Email: enquiries@thegrovecromer.co.uk | thegrovecromer.co.uk

Ts & Cs Prize includes bed and breakfast, plus bottle of prosecco. Excludes summer holidays and Saturdays. Must be claimed within one year. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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What’s on.

A RO U N D - U P O F E V E N T S I N A N D A RO U N D CAMBRIDGESHIRE THIS MONTH

2 N OV E M B E R GHOSTPOET

Of hip hop artist Ghostpoet’s three critically-acclaimed albums so far, two have been nominated for the Mercury Music Prize. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £17 | junction.co.uk

2 & 24-26 N OV E M B E R CAMBRIDGE L I T E R A RY F E S T I VA L

Rebecca Solnit, one of today’s leading global thinkers, is in conversation on the 2nd to discuss The Mother of All Questions, before three packed days later in the month featuring Roddy Doyle, Sarah Millican and many more.

Check site for times | Various venues and prices | cambridgeliteraryfestival.com

3 N OV E M B E R O M D

The eighties synth-pop masters return with their new album The Punishment of Luxury almost 40 years after they formed. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £37.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

4 N OV E M B E R J O H N M AYA L L

Legendary British bluesman, whose Bluesbreakers band featured Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie among many others. Sixty-four albums and still going strong.

7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £25.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

5 N OV E M B E R U G LY D U C K L I N G

A menagerie of mean farmyard animals depicted through inventive physicality, with live music that quacks and trills, this version of the classic tale is suitable for ages three and up. 11.30am, 2.30pm | Cambridge Junction | £10 adult, £6 child | junction.co.uk

7 N OV E M B E R SLEAFORD MODS

Nottingham duo return after the release of their third album English Tapas, produced at former

Pulp member Steve Mackey’s studio in London. Iggy Pop has hailed them as ‘the world’s greatest rock ‘n’ roll band’. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £21.25 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

7 - 11 N OV E M B E R T H E R E S I S TA B L E R I S E O F A RT U R O UI

Chicago, a city of jazz, gangsters, prohibition and poverty has room for small-time crook Arturo Ui to make a name for himself… but Bertolt Brecht’s play descends into something much more dangerous. 7.45pm | ADC Theatre | from £7 | adctheatre.com

9 N OV E M B E R T H E B OTA N I C GA R D E N IN WINTER

Head of Horticulture Sally Petitt leads a tour of the garden, explaining the horticultural work that takes place at this time of year and detailing ongoing works and projects. 10.30am | Cambridge University Botanic Garden | £10 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

9 N OV E M B E R M A RT I N S I M P S O N

In the atmospheric setting of St Phillip’s Church on Mill Road, enjoy an evening of music from the award-winning Martin Simpson, one of the finest acoustic, fingerstyle guitarists in the world. 7.30pm | St Phillip's Church | £18 | wegottickets.com

11 N OV E M B E R ALAN TURING AND THE ENIGMA M AC H I N E

25 November Happy Mondays.

80s and 90s Madchester icons known for hedonism back in the day return for a greatest hits tour on the eve of the 30th anniversary of their first album. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £32.25 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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Mathematician Dr James Grime talks about one of the UK’s great thinkers, the father of computer science, Alan Turing. As well as his code-breaking machine, he discovered why leopards have spots and zebras have stripes. 2.15pm | West Road Concert Hall | £7, £5 concs | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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W X XHXAT XX ' SXO XN X 15 - 18 N OV E M B E R T H E G R U F FA LO ’S CHILD

Just how brave is the Gruffalo’s child? She ignores her father’s warning and tiptoes out into the snow on a wild and windy night. After all, the big bad mouse doesn’t really exist… does he? 10.30am Thursday to Saturday, 1.30pm Wednesday & Friday | Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £15.50 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

16 N OV E M B E R BBC NEW G E N E R AT I O N A RT I S TS

A rare pairing of clarinet (Annelien van Wauwe), viola (Eivind Holtsmark Ringstad) and piano (Pavel Kolesnikov) combine to play works by Mozart, Brahms and Schumann. 6pm | St John’s College Divinity School | £16.88 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

17 N OV E M B E R B L U E L A B B E ATS + THE ELECTRIO

Blue Lab Beats comprises NK-OK and Mr DM, and the pair have remixed for Jodie Abacus, Dua Lipa and Rag ‘n’ Bone Man. Part of Cambridge Jazz Festival. 9pm | La Raza | £13.20 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

15/16 November Simon Amstell.

18 N OV E M B E R C R AC K I N G CHRISTMAS WINES WITH THE THREE WINE MEN A wine-tasting to remember, Oz Clarke, Tim Atkin and Olly Smith are three of the country’s most high-profile wine experts. Grab a glass and go with the vino flow. 12pm, 4pm | Corn Exchange | from £29.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

19 N OV E M B E R D A M E E V E LY N G L E N N I E : W H AT ’S YO U R V O I C E

A masterclass from the percussionist extraordinaire for five local musicians. Includes an audience Q&A, part of Cambridge Jazz Festival. 2.30pm | Fitzwilliam College Auditorium | £16.50, £13.20 students/U18s | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

21 - 2 5 N OV E M B E R P E O P L E , P L AC E S AND THINGS

Intoxicating play about surviving in the modern world. Emma’s in rehab, her first step is to admit she CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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The former Never Mind the Buzzcocks host and two-time British Comedy Awardwinner embarks on his fifth UK tour. 8pm | Cambridge Junction | £25 | junction.co.uk

has a problem. But the problem isn’t with her, but everything else. On tour following a sold-out season at The National. 7.45pm, 2.30pm Thursday & Saturday | Arts Theatre | from £24 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

22 N OV E M B E R – 2 DECEMBER CUADC/ F O OT L I G H TS PA N TO : T H E H U N C H B AC K O F N OT R E D A M E

A revolution is brewing on the streets of Paris, and so, apparently, is the beer. Expect lonely bell ringers with silly names, moving gargoyles and pantomime dames dancing goats and drunken clowns. 7.45pm, 2.30pm selected dates | ADC Theatre | from £9 | adctheatre.com

2 3 - 2 5 N OV E M B E R S H E R LO C K B U N GA LOW A N D THE DIABOLICAL TREASURE

A fast-paced gag-filled absurd parody of the Holmes and Watson tales. When the Queen is murdered, Bungalow and Watson must solve their most fiendish case yet. 11pm | ADC Theatre | from £6 | adctheatre.com

2 4 N OV E M B E R JOEL DOMMET T

Arriving on the comedy circuit in 2007, Dommett has appeared on Russell Howard’s Good News, Impractical Jokers, acted in Skins and featured in last year’s I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here. 8pm | Corn Exchange | £21.25 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

2 4 N OV E M B E R PIZZA AND PROSECCO F E S T I VA L

A festival based around the ultimate food and drink duo. Get a slice of the action from an array of pizza pop-ups and prosecco bars. 6pm | Cambridge Junction | from £10.99 | junction.co.uk

3 0 N OV E M B E R – 7 J A N U A RY J AC K A N D T H E B E A N S TA L K

Matt Crosby returns as the Arts Theatre’s panto dame in this timeless tale of magic beans with slapstick fun, songs, boos and look-behind-yous. Various times | Arts Theatre | from £17 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

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T H E G R U F FA LO ’S CHILD. Created by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler, the story of the Gruffalo has become a modern classic, adored by kids and grown-ups the world over. In this, a stage adaptation of the sequel to the book, Tall Stories Theatre Company tells the story of the night the Gruffalo’s child ignores her dad’s warnings and ventures out into the snow. After all, the Big Bad Mouse doesn’t really exist… does he? There’s singing, funny bits and scary fun aplenty in this family-friendly show, which runs 15 to 18 November at Cambridge Arts Theatre. Tickets are £15.50, show times vary. cambridgeartstheatre.com

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THE BUILDYUPPY DANCE SHOW.

This month at Cambridge Junction, Anatomical presents The Buildy-uppy Dance Show, a magical, fantastical hour of building, music and dancing. This fully interactive show sees hundreds of boxes stacked, squashed and rebuilt into whatever imaginations can summon, from enticing caves to castles fit for a king. It’s performed by award-winning duo Anna Williams and Tom Roden, who create an enchanting, ever-changing playground constructed and inhabited by its audience. Join the fun on 25 and 26 November, tickets are £6 per child and £10 per adult. junction.co.uk

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FA M I LY

T I DY U P. Your little ones might be more used to making mess than tidying up, but this colourful show from Peut-Être Theatre shows kids that tidiness can be fun and exciting! Using dance, theatre and a big dollop of imagination, Tidy Up is an uplifting journey that’s full of surprises, showing that chaos and order can live side by side. Join in the confetti-filled party on 12 November at Cambridge Junction; there are shows at 11.30am and 2.30pm. Tickets are £6 per child and £10 per adult. There will also be a free arts and crafts session before each show led by a professional visual artist to tie in with the show. junction.co.uk

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OUTDOOR CRAFT & STORYTELLING FOR CHILDREN.

Kids can get out and about in the great outdoors and get creative this month at Wandlebury Country Park’s monthly craft and storytelling workshop. Running on 15 November (10.30am-11.30am), the session will be led by Vital Spark Theatre, a Cambridgeshire-based company specialising in working with young people in a creative way through drama, dance, music and arts. It’s aimed at pre-schoolers, children up to the age of six and young home-schooled children and costs £8 per family (up to three children and £3 per additional child). cambridgeppf.org CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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B O N F I R E N I G H T.

Cambridge’s oldest and largest Bonfire Night celebration returns to Midsummer Common on 4 November (remember, remember – not the 5th!) for an evening of booms, bangs, sparkles, oohs and ahhs. Presented by Cambridge City Council and organised by Cambridge Live, this annual event sees thousands flock to the historic common each year for a huge fireworks display, bonfire and fairground. It’s free to attend (donations welcome), with the bonfire being lit, the fairground opening and food stalls serving from 6 to 10pm. “Cambridge is gearing up for another amazing fireworks display,” says Chris Pearce, from multi-award winning company Jubilee Fireworks, which is designing the display. “We are planning a show that will thrill and entertain like never before, with the introduction of a new range of impressive effects from Italy and Slovenia, in addition to the more traditional fireworks that appeal to everyone. The all-aerial display has been designed to have maximum visual impact with fireworks bursting up to a height of 200 metres. The display will feature sequences of shells and roman candles of every colour and hue imaginable, some novel noise effects, and a spectacular finale that is sure to take everyone’s breath away!” As always, it’s likely to be a very popular event (the organisers expect to see around 20,000 attendees), so allow lots of time for your journey and cycle or walk wherever possible. Donations of at least £3 are encouraged, which can be made by texting the word BANG to 70500. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E JA Z Z F E S T I VA L F O R FA M I L I E S . There’s a whole host of family-friendly events taking place as part of this month’s Cambridge International Jazz Festival, running 11 to 26 November. On Sunday the 19th, head to Hotel Felix for an hour of storytelling and live music dedicated to the First Lady of Jazz, Ella Fitzgerald. You can also book in for an afternoon tea at the show, which is based around a new children’s book by bestselling author and illustrator Helen Hancocks that looks at the life of the iconic singer. Enjoy a selection of Ella’s most famous songs, plus live illustration and a short reading of the book, Ella: Queen of Jazz. On the same day, join the supremely talented Cambridge Lindy Hoppers for a swing dancing workshop at St Andrew’s Baptist Church. Suitable for all ages, the classes will introduce swing dancing – the umbrella name for dances including the Charleston and the Jitterbug – and take you through some easy steps. With a Big Band Bonanza and Gypsy Jazz Jamboree also taking place on the same day, there’ll be plenty of opportunities to show off your new moves! On 18 November at Hot Numbers café, join six-piece modern jazz band The Alley Cats, who’ll be treating you to arrangements of much-loved Disney songs and tunes from other childhood movie classics old and new. Elsewhere, open the lid of the Magical Musical StoryBox with Sara Mitra and see what’s inside. This event, running on 26 November at the Unitarian Church, promises to transport children on a jazz-filled journey of make-believe, with song, percussion and movement. cambridgejazzfestival.info

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Byard Art.

T H I S S T U N N I N G GA L L E RY H A S B E C O M E A M U S T-V I S I T F O R BOTH LOCALS AND VISITORS TO CA MBRIDGE

WORDS SIOBHAN GODWOOD

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yard Art is a real Cambridge institution, familiar to so many of us for its beautiful, striking window displays and prominent King’s Parade location. So it might come as a surprise to learn that it started life in a different city entirely. “The gallery is named for Byard Lane in Nottingham, where it started life as a commercial gallery in 1993,” explains Jessie White at Byard Art. The name remained when the gallery relocated to St Mary’s Passage in Cambridge in 1998, and finally in 2009 to its current location. “We feel really fortunate to be in such a wonderful location, because King’s Parade is one of the most important streets in Cambridge,” continues Jessie. “So many tourists come along here to see King’s College, and of course Cambridge locals know we’re here too; it’s really the heart of the city.” That mix of tourists and locals is a big part of the huge success of Byard Art. “We have a core of regular, local customers who come back to us frequently,” explains Jessie. “Art is such a personal thing, and because we know our subject really well, we can offer a lovely service to our customers, recognising them and suggesting things that we think they might like, or new work from artists that we know they’ve bought before.” As well as being good for business, these relationships makes the gallery a really fantastic place to work. “It’s lovely when a customer that we know comes in, it’s like seeing an old friend. And because everyone who works here is an art lover in one way or the other, either as a working artist or a background in art history, we have a real shared interest with our customers. We all feel really lucky to be able to combine our passion with our job, and it’s great to be able to help people find what they’re looking for; we’re a very friendly, personable gallery.” Of course, with the huge numbers of tourists that Cambridge attracts, Byard Art also gets visitors from all around the world; but it’s not just passers by, en route to King’s College, that comprise the gallery’s international clientele. Several times a year, Byard Art takes its show on the road and visits international art fairs. They visit four exhibitions in London, as well as cities as diverse as Stockholm, Seattle, Amsterdam and New York. “These fairs raise the profile of the gallery,” says Jessie, “but they also give our artists a chance to exhibit in other cities, which is really important for their profiles, too.” The team choose work from eight to ten artists for each fair, and sell the work there and then, although visitors to their stands at fairs often get in touch afterwards to buy other work which can then be shipped to wherever they are in the world, and customers who have seen the gallery at fairs often come back to see them when they visit Cambridge. Of course, international visitors often don’t want to carry large paintings home

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The gallery is really magical at Christmas, and we offer a chance to browse beautiful art, crafts and jewellery while ticking friends off your present list

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with them when they travel, so their purchases can be shipped to them, too. Although they are building up their international collection of artists, Byard Art’s main collection of artists is based in the UK, including a number of artists from Cambridge and the surrounding East Anglia area. They do a special exhibition every year called Up Your Street, which focuses on these local artists. “We feel it’s nice for visitors to Cambridge who want to see something that celebrates our beautiful city and countryside, as well as local customers who like to see their home town represented,” says Jessie. Each year the gallery hosts between eight and ten exhibitions, from mixed theme shows to solo shows, mostly in the upstairs gallery. Then downstairs they exhibit their regular gallery artists, whose work they show all year round. “It’s good to have some artists on display all the time,” explains Jessie. “We find that often people will see a piece that they love, then go away and think about it for a few weeks or months, and come back and ask if we still have it. Then quite often, even if we don’t have that same exact piece, we can tell them that we have that artist on display downstairs so they can perhaps find something else that they love just as much.” Byard Art also has three floor to ceiling cabinets, filled with unique, handmade jewellery that you can’t

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find anywhere else in Cambridge. “A lot of people might feel intimidated about walking into a gallery, believing that there won’t be anything on display that they could afford,” Jessie says, “but our jewellery covers a huge range of prices, and we also display ceramics, crafts and sculptures: so there really is something for everyone.” The gallery even does a gift list service, so that if you’re planning a wedding or have a special birthday or anniversary coming up, you can ask your friends and family to contribute towards a special piece of art or even a personal commission from one of Byard Art’s exhibiting artists. As we approach the festive season, keep your eyes open for Byard Art’s Christmas Cracker Exhibition, which starts with an opening on 18 November with mulled wine and mince pies. All the artists that exhibit with the gallery throughout the year will be represented, so it’s a real treasure trove of lovely things to suit all budgets. “The gallery is really magical at Christmas,” says Jessie, “and we offer a chance to browse beautiful art, crafts and jewellery while ticking friends and relatives off your present list!” So next time you’re on King’s Parade admiring Byard Art’s fabulous windows, why not step inside? You never know, you might discover your new favourite artist, or find the perfect gift for yourself or someone special. n Byard Art, 14 King’s Parade, Cambridge, CB2 1SJ | 01223 464646 | byardart.co.uk C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | N O V E M B E R 2 017

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LAUNDRAPP LAUNDRY APP LAUNCHES IN CAMBRIDGE

LAUNDRAPP, THE laundry and dry cleaning app allowing customers to outsource their laundry, with free collection and delivery, has launched its services in Cambridge. The app, which is one of the UK’s fastest growing companies, will offer outsourced laundry and dry cleaning services across Cambridgeshire, with a fleet of vehicles and drivers ready to collect, clean and deliver. Laundrapp partners with local laundry and dry cleaning partners across Cambridge, providing a boost to local businesses. The award-winning, easy-to-use app has already proved extremely successful in over 100 UK towns and cities. Since its launch in January 2015, Laundrapp has been downloaded over 250,000 times, cleaning an item of clothes every 10 seconds. That’s a total of over 1.5 million items that have been collected, laundered and delivered back to time-poor Brits. This is all made achievable by combining Laundrapp’s clever technology with dozens of laundry and dry cleaning partners, and more than 200 local drivers across the country. Edward Relf, Laundrapp co-founder and CEO comments: “We are on a mission to change the way we Brits do our laundry, by bringing convenience to the lives of our users and saving people valuable time. Laundrapp saves people both time and money, and removes a much disliked household chore from the weekly schedule.” Laundrapp – at the heart of an emerging mobile, on-demand eco-system – offers free collection and delivery across the UK via the app or online at www.laundrapp.com. Washing machines in the home may soon be a thing of the past! n

FAQ S

Laundrapp aims to collect your clothes, clean them to a professional standard and get them back to you, all within 48 hours. Prices start from as little as £2.50, with bundle deals available.

GET £20 OFF YO U R F I R S T L AU N D R A P P ORDER E XC L U S I V E ! ENDS SOON . Exclusive to Cambridge Edition readers, Laundrapp is offering a £20 discount for residents with the following postcodes: CB1, CB2, CB3, CB4, CB5 and CB24. To use, simply download the app, register, select items that need cleaning and use code LAUNDRAPPCBED at checkout.

Laundrapp clean not only clothes, but accessories, bedding and home items, too. Collection and delivery times are available from 7am to 11pm, seven days a week.

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Beauty News. SPACEMASKS AT FINN JORDAN. If you’re in need of a little pampering, pop into Finn Jordan Beauty Hair Salon in the city centre and pick up a Spacemask. Promising out of this world results, these much-hyped, jasmine-scented facemasks encourage deep relaxation and help to relieve tired, swollen eyes, while creating a lovely warming sensation on the skin. Exclusive to Finn Jordan in Cambridge, you can pick up a pack of five for £15, plus the team will be working them into their other range of treatments as a bonus treat, too. finnjordan.co.uk

H A LO L AU N C H E S W I G S E RV I C E S .

Halo Hair, which has been running for over six years, has recently added another string to its bow with the launch of a wig service at its Sawston salon. Aimed primarily at those who have lost their hair through illness or treatment, the team wanted to use their specialist knowledge in the fitting and styling of wigs to create a safe, friendly and private space where clients could choose a quality wig to make them feel more like themselves. Offering wigs made entirely from human hair, plus synthetic and part-synthetic wigs, all clients are given a free one-hour consultation to talk through their preferences with a fully-qualified wig fitter and stylist. After this, wigs are individually styled and cut to the clients’ requirements, and fully tailored to face shape, skin tone and eye colour to ensure that they are as flattering and natural looking as possible. Find out more on Halo’s website. halo-hair-salon.co.uk

Boho Blow Dry Bar opens.

Get that ‘just stepped out of the salon’ look at King Street’s latest addition: a dedicated blow dry bar. The first of its kind in the city, Boho’s offerings include a classic wash and blow dry, Olaplex treatments to repair damaged hair and keratin treatments to leave your hair feeling silky smooth. They also do creative updos and wedding hair, as well as having make-up artists on hand if you want to really pamper yourself ahead of a big night out or special occasion. bohoblowdry.com

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Beauty Blog.

DA I S Y D I C K I N S O N G I V E S U S T H E LOW D OW N O N T H E B E S T B U YS A N D TO P T R E N DS I N T H E B E AU T Y WO R L D

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love it when a wearable beauty trend comes around that I can really get on board with. Not to say I couldn’t be tempted with a little catwalk extreme every now again, but everyday trends generally mean supply and demand for brands, and more choice for us real folk! Most well known as a pop star, Rihanna recently caused a huge stir in the beauty industry by launching her own make-up collection, Fenty Beauty. Regardless of the expected attention this bestselling artist was bound to command, the fact that she launched with a whopping 40 shades of foundation has got people, frankly, freaking out (and justifiably so, I say!). I was lucky enough to be in New York just after her launch at the Times Square Sephora store and picked up a couple of items. When a celebrity launches a make-up range I’m often sceptical. It’s an easy way for brands to cash in on the established fame, and can sometimes mean that the product quality suffers, but when Rihanna launched Fenty Beauty, I couldn’t help but notice how much it oozed sophistication – plus it’s totally cruelty free. The packaging is delightfully simple, and the range offers a genuine versatility and access to a multitude of skin tones, which is unfortunately still so rare to see. While Fenty isn’t yet available in Cambridge, you don’t have to cross the pond, as Harvey Nichols stocks the full collection and it can be ordered online. If you only go for two items (because who can pick just one?!) the Pro Filt’r Soft Matte Longwear Foundation (£26) offers a beautifully natural formula, and the highlighters are blinding. I opted for

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the Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter Duo (£26) in Lightning Dust and Fire Crystal, which gives a beautiful glow. Rihanna’s aim was to launch a make-up line so that women everywhere would be included, focusing on a wide range of traditionally hard-to-match skin tones, creating formulas that work for all skin types. She wanted to ultimately make skin look like skin, an ethos that I’ve seen also carried by viral brand Glossier, another range I was happy to visit on my NYC trip. Founded back in 2014, Glossier’s focus was to create skincare and beauty products that women actually reach for and want to use. Combining the extensive experience of the editorial team from beauty website Into The Gloss, the brand is also cruelty free; and the good news for us Brits is that Glossier just this October updated their site to offer delivery to the UK. Credit cards at the ready, I promise it will be worth it. From body products to face masks, super serums and SPF, all products are designed to work naturally with your skin’s own PH, and the make-up line is stunning. My first choice was the Boy Brow (£14), a kind of grown-up brow mascara which makes bolder, more defined brows a doddle. I also highly recommend The Balm Dotcom (£10), a multipurpose skin and lip salve available in six delicious flavours, packed with antioxidants that goes on reassuringly thick, but melts into skin. Finally, Cloud Paint (£15) is a seamlessly sheer flush of colour, easy to finger paint over cheeks. n

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Sixth Form Special. C H A R L O T T E P H I L L I P S TA K E S A L O O K AT T H E I M PAC T O F A L E V E L R E F O R M S L O C A L LY A N D O F F E R S A DV I C E F O R T H O S E TA K I N G T H E N E X T S T E P S F RO M G C S E S

f life weren’t already confusing enough for teenagers, reforms to sixth form qualifications have made planning for life after GCSEs just that bit more complicated. Module by module assessment is out, ‘once and for all’ exams held at the end of pupils’ two sixth form years are in. Art and design, biology, English (language and literature) and physics were among the initial subjects to get a makeover, with first results out this summer. The next batch (including geography and modern foreign languages) will follow with the first results in 2018, with law and maths among others to be added for 2019, and the remainder (Greek and modern Hebrew among them) in 2020. So how’s it all going so far? While the new courses are generally considered to be more taxing than the ones they replaced, pupils haven’t suffered as a result. Some might even argue that in some cases they’ve benefited – boys in particular. While both sexes did equally well when it came to top grades, girls had previously outperformed boys, a trend that has been reversed with the latest set of A level results. The reason, some educationalists are suggesting, is that the design of the new A levels is a better fit with the way boys work. While there are, of course, exceptions, the old system tended to favour girls’ tendency to work consistently over a long

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period. Boys, in contrast, prefer a shorter, more concentrated burst of revision. Of the changes, one of the biggest is working out what to do if your results aren’t quite up to scratch first time round. In the old days, students could retake individual units in every A level subject. While that’s still true of legacy A levels it’s no longer an option with reformed subjects, where it’s now a case of repeating the whole year or deciding to cut your losses and switch to a completely different subject, explains David Shah, director of studies at MPW Cambridge, where increasing numbers of potential students are experiencing just this dilemma. “Around 80% of those revisiting their A levels are taking one year courses simply because of the effects of the reforms, though the overall number of students has remained the same.” That said, schools in our area are going great guns when it comes to exam performance. Not that there was any question that 2017 was going to be another good year, but there’s no doubting that the odd sigh of relief was breathed when the results came in.

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With 76% of A level pass rates at grades A* to B and 92% at A* to C, this year, Hills Road Sixth Form College and its pupils certainly won't be found complaining. Jo Trump, Hills Road principal, is delighted that students at the college have coped so well both with the new, challenging, linear A level specifications and so-called ‘legacy’ A level qualifications (which are yet to change). “We are really pleased, not only with the very high percentage of top grades, but also with the consistency of performance across subjects,” she says. Students and teachers at MPW Cambridge, where 36% of A level exams were awarded top grades, are also celebrating. “We’re extremely pleased and proud of our students and tutors for having made the transition thus far, though it still has two years to run,” says David Shah. And as he points out, the results themselves are only part of the equation. It’s what they lead on to in the way of university places that matters. Here, too, MPW students also achieved their goals. “I’d say a very high proportion achieved their first choices,” says David Shah. “An absolute majority have got their first or insurance choice.” At CCSS, meanwhile, where over 80% of students in year 13 achieved A*-C grades, principal Stuart Nicholson says the new system is serving his pupils well. A hard-working bunch, they got the results that they deserved. While sixth formers are – finally – leaving school behind, 15- and 16-year-olds yet to

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embark on life after GCSEs are often trying to work out the basics, such as what to study and where it might lead them. So what are the need-toknow essentials that will help them make the right decision? The starting point, says Stuart Nicholson, is knowing yourself. Being clear about how much support you need and how independent you are can help you work out where you’re most likely to thrive. “If students aren’t terribly well organised then they need to look for a school that will perhaps continue to give them a more rigid framework,” he points out. He also stresses that in the space between the start of year 11 and taking GCSEs the following summer, a lot of growing up can take place. “Quite a lot of students stop feeling like a schoolboy or a schoolgirl anymore. Instead, they feel they want an environment that gives them support when they need it but allows them to be a bit more independent.” And that’s just one of the conundrums that need working through when it comes to considering where to go for A levels. It can seem as though young people today are being required to look into the future. There’s constant pressure to work out what they might want to do next – not an easy task when you’re aged just 15 or 16 and are finding it hard to think beyond GCSEs, let alone what you might do with the rest of your life. So what issues do you really need to have clear in your mind – and what can wait, at least for now?

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It can seem as though young people today are being required to look into the future. There’s constant pressure to work out what they might want to do next – no easy task when you’re aged just 15 or 16 With many more A level subjects than there are GCSEs, time spent investigating new areas such as psychology and economics can be a worthwhile investment, says David Shah. MPW can help potential students by sitting down with them and working out ‘best fit’ subjects, he says. “If a student wants to do psychology, not having done it before, we’d look at how they have coped with biology and social sciences so we can see if they can manage, or if there are any warning signs.” The fundamental questions you should have in mind are the types of course, types of subjects and type of institution to aim for, says Jo Trump. It’s sound advice – particularly as A levels aren’t the only route into higher education or employment. At Parkside Sixth, the IB (International Baccalaureate) is on offer to sixth form students. It comes with its fair share of misconceptions. Take the widely held belief that it’s suitable only for the fantastically well organised or brilliantly clever. It’s the same entry requirement as A levels – five GCSEs at 4s or above, though with a 6 or 7 in maths and science. “The IB isn’t just for the super clever, it’s for everyone, and in our small environment we can make that happen,” stresses Jess Pearce. And the results speak for themselves. This summer, the average score was 31, close to Parkside’s best ever result. Universities were

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certainly impressed, with the numbers off to Russell Group destinations above average. At Cambridge Regional College (CRC), which doubled its campuses after merging with Huntingdonshire Regional College, the focus is on technical and professional education. Most students join after their GCSEs to take Level 3 qualifications – equivalent to A levels – and the college is also a leading provider of apprenticeships, which offer a real alternative to college and university. It’s all about practical, hands-on learning, says Marcus Doyle, CRC deputy principal. “We have around 3,000 full-time students and we’re a big part of the community in Cambridgeshire and beyond. We offer practical, hands-on learning, which suits a lot of students far more than A levels. 95% go on to higher education, apprenticeships or employment.”

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E D U C AT I O N

The opportun i socially with ty to mix o going to have ther students is a on their stud beneficial effect ies It’s also importa environment as nt to look at the learning there’s never go a whole. Spec ing to be a shor ialist colleges aimed solely tage of things at older stud to do. What m ents have th at ters is that stud advantage of be e a level an ents choose ing focused com d type of activ pletely on their needs. ity that’s right them. “It’s an for ything that mak At Hills Road, es the student happy to be st what this means ud yi systems, proc is ng dedicated If where they’re edures and fa extracurricular studying. cilities set up specifically to components an give them the op d activities enhance the portunity to m experience, says sixth form ix socially with other students, Jo Trump. “Unl then clearly that ike a school, all our attentio ’s going to have a beneficial eff n is on creatin ect on their st g the perfect environment fo udies – as long r just two year as they don’t groups: year 12 encroach too and year 13.” heavily on thei studies.” r The combinatio The bottom lin n of experienc e is that howeve whose total focu ed teachers r difficult the post-GCSE de s is on supportin cision making g transfer for st process, there’s udents from GC the smooth almost unlimite d SE – university or th e world of work through to to find a way th and expert – support on tap rough it. And th creates a real buzz, she says e advice from . “With so m everyone is to ac any like-minde cess it by visitin young people d g as many open in one place, evenings and ev ents as possible with a sixth form college, , and talking to you get a trem current students endous energy about their expe and enthusiasm riences. .” “Moving on to college, whethe It’s something r it’s a further education colle that isn’t just ge or sixth form the classroom. confined to , is a big step,” says Marcus Do Some establish ments offer a yle of CRC. “T plentiful range he best advice of extras, from is to do your research sport, music an drama to the ex – make d sure you tended project vi sit qu alification. open days, And as Stuart or just drop in Nicholson poin and talk to everything fro m the Institute ts out, with lecturers, ca reers advisers of to the Judge Bu siness School on Astronomy and other st udents, and the doorstep, ask lots of ques tions.” b

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INTERIORS: K I TC H E N S SPECIAL. EDITION LOV E S . S TO R E O F THE MONTH: ANGEL A REED.

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MIXING UP THE PERFECT BLEND.

INTERIORS

T H E K I TC H E N I S T H E P L AC E W H E R E W E C O O K U P A S TO R M , E AT TO G E T H E R , SOCIALISE AND S P E N D T H E M OS T FA M I LY T I M E . R E A D O N TO D I S C OV E R H OW TO T R A N S F O R M I T F RO M A P R AC T I C A L S PAC E I N TO A ST YLISH HEART OF THE HOME.

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WORDS ANGELINA VILL A-CL ARKE

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uted shades – cream, grey and taupe – have long been the go-to palette of choice for our kitchens. While these certainly give longevity and are unlikely to go out of fashion any time soon, especially when it comes to cabinetry, the latest trends are showing a bolder look with splashes of colour on walls, accent areas and furniture. Judy Smith, Crown Paint’s colour consultant, agrees: “A neutral base layered with colour is a good approach for a kitchen décor that will stand the test of time. Select calm tones of grey, white and cream for cabinets and dominant walls as this will provide a versatile backdrop. Then make your mark with vibrant pops of colour such as vivid red or zesty lemon to add character.” In its autumn/winter trend forecast, colour specialist Farrow & Ball has also indicated a growing interest for more dramatic, vivid hues within the home. It has picked out the understated, subtle tones of deep red – such as Radicchio – and the dark, rich green of Studio Green as two dramatic shades that work seamlessly with neutrals, such as dove grey, cream and charcoal darks to create a harmonious effect. Perfectly complementing accents of copper and brass is Fired Earth’s recently redesigned Vermont kitchen, handcrafted from oak and available in several finishes. Painted in Top Hat (a crushed velvet black) it is in keeping with the trend for dark palettes – which not only look super stylish but are also a practical choice in a kitchen. If taste is more towards brighter colours, then why not opt for a brightly-hued splashback or work surface? With an outlet in Cambridge, Granite Transformations’ surfaces are available in a wide choice of finishes, including scarlet red, sapphire blue and emerald green. Due to their dramatic appearance, these colours are best used as ‘hot spots’ – such as on an island – so they work as a focal point in an otherwise neutral kitchen. Melissa Klink, head of design at Harvey Jones, a brand renowned for its bespoke, luxury kitchens, adds: “By adding a coloured splashback, or painting your cabinetry in a dark shade, you can change the whole look of a kitchen and create a cosy and contemporary scheme. In addition, you can also easily inject some interesting, colourful shades into a neutral space using warming accessories and worktops, which can then be changed as trends develop.” ➥

HOT HUES. DAV I D M OT T E R S H E A D , M A N AG I N G D I R E C TO R O F L I T T L E GREENE, GIVES HIS T I P S O N C O LO U R Paint cabinets and kitchen walls the same colour – it gives a luxurious look. Pick colours that are unexpected. A warm pink, for instance, works wonders in the kitchen and adds a sense of playfulness to this hardworking room. Contrast it with our Lamp Black to keep it contemporary. Adding colour to the kitchen doesn’t have to mean using outlandish colours. Keep it neutral and add wallpaper above shelving for a soft, feminine look.

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A neutral base layered with colour is a good approach for a kitchen décor that will stand the test of time. Select calm tones of grey, white and cream for cabinets and dominant walls as this will provide a versatile backdrop

Left from top Farrow & Ball’s Charlotte’s Locks (bright orange) and All White, from £43.50 for 2.5 litres, give dramatic impact. Harvey Jones’s Linear Edge kitchen, from £18,000. Crown Paints’ kitchen colours include Lemon Squash and the muted shades of Splash of Pepper and Soft Shadow, from £20 for 2.5 litres Above Fired Earth’s Vermont kitchen, from £15,000, painted in Top Hat, a crushed velvet black, also seen on the walls, from £39.50 for 2.5 litres

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Above: Caple’s Metz Graphite high gloss kitchen, from £8,200 Right Tomas Kitchen Living’s naturalSHEER range of units, POA

C R U C I A L C A B I N E T RY. From handle-less units to industrial style minimalism – the choice of cabinets has never been wider, and these days it is all about mixing it up according to your personal choice. A kitchen is, of course, one of the biggest investments a homeowner makes so it’s sensible to invest in a style that you love and which will stand the test of time. Tom Hinton, founder and head designer at Cambridge-based Tomas Kitchen Living, reveals his insider view: “Anyone who is in the process of buying a kitchen won’t need to be told that it’s a ‘big ticket’ item,” he says. “A good kitchen will be designed for long-term use. Start with quality – it never goes out of style, so buy the best you can afford. Think ‘timeless’ – avoid contrived forms that confuse the eye and could become an irritation over time. One leading trend at the moment is fusing the old with the new and creating a really interesting and eclectic vibe. Anything goes, so throw away the rule book! Choose pieces that you love, re-introduce a family heirloom or a picture that tells a story.” From handmade kitchens made to order at Knights Country Kitchens (which is based in Suffolk) to the top-end contemporary styles available at Caple – whatever style you choose, it is vital to make sure you have enough storage to maintain a clutter-free look. From larders to special solutions to hide away everything from paper towels to toasters – a clear worktop can give the illusion of a larger kitchen space, so it is worth investigating all the latest options. ➥ CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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HOT KITCHENS. CAMBRIDGE-BASED INTERIOR DESIGNER E V E WA L D R O N R E V E A L S H E R TO P THREE TRENDS Grey stained oak for cabinetry is the perfect blend using natural materials in a sophisticated way. It looks sleek and of-the-moment. Combine darker woods below the worktop and white cabinets above the counter to add warmth but retain a sense of space and light. Poured concrete floors look seamless and thoroughly modern – you can achieve a similar effect with large-format grey concrete style tiles.

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C O N T E M P O R A RY C H A R AC T E R I S T I C S . Once you have the structure of your kitchen in place, with your chosen units, cupboards and appliances, the best – and easiest - way to add personality is with all the added extras. Kirsti Sturgess-Dawson, director of Profile Designs, a local company which makes bespoke furniture, says: “People want their homes to reflect their personalities and this can be achieved by making designs that meet their briefs. Everything we produce is made to order, so if you need a piece of furniture to fit into a particular area – such as a dining table – or are passionate about a particular colour, we can help you to achieve your dream design.” A touch of flair can be easily introduced by simply choosing a statement radiator, for instance, or picking out unusual tiles, like the reclaimed brick and wood-effect tiles at Tile Trader. Lighting is another way to introduce an element of drama to a space. Søren Ravn Christensen, chief creative developer at VITA Copenhagen, shares his tips on how to create a cosy atmosphere in the kitchen. “All kitchens need to feel inviting and inspiring. Our VITA Acorn pendants give practical and focused task-lighting, while at the same time creating the ambience you want for making the whole room more cosy.” ➥

Above/top Kitchen and walls painted in Little Greene’s Hicks’ Blue Above VITA Copenhagen acorn black polished light fittings, £64 from John Lewis of Hungerford Right White brick effect tiles, 91p per tile, by Tile Trader Opposite page, top right Loop mirror, POA, by Profile Designs Overleaf The sleek lines of Harvey Jones’s brand new Linear Edge kitchen, from £18,000

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3 1 HOW TO STYLE A KITCHEN.

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L AU R E N T C AT E L A S , C O M M E R C I A L D I R E C TO R AT T H G PA R I S A N D E X P E RT I N K I TC H E N F I T T I N G S , G I V E S H I S TO P T R E N D S

Timeless & traditional.

Our Bastide range of traditional kitchen taps has a timeless elegance which never seems to go out of fashion.

Mixed materials.

Create impact by pairing textural and natural materials with sleek and glossier finishes.

Minimalist x maximalist design.

Combine minimalist kitchen accessories with maximalist patterns and textures.

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Š HARVEY JONES

INTERIORS

S TO C K I S TS . Caple 0117 938 1900, caple.co.uk Crown Paints crownpaints.co.uk Eve Waldron 01223 470370, evewaldron.com

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Granite Transformations 01223 853913, granitetransformations.co.uk Harvey Jones 0800 389 6938, harveyjones.com

Farrow & Ball 01223 367771, farrow-ball.com

Knights Country Kitchens 01787 277914, knightscountrykitchens.co.uk

Fired Earth 01223 300941, firedearth.com

Little Greene 020 7935 8844, littlegreene.com

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Profile Designs profiledesigns.co.uk Tile Trader 0800 783 3183, tiletrader.co.uk THG Paris thg-paris.com/uk/en Tomas Kitchen Living 0800 023 6471, tomas-kitchen-living.co.uk Vita Copenhagen vitacopenhagen.com

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INTERIORS DEVOTION BLACK AND GOLD LEAF SPIRAL DOME PENDANT

£340, alexanderandpearl.co.uk

MARBLE AND MANGO WOOD SERVING BOARD

£28.95, decoratorsnotebook.co.uk ORLA KIELY MULTI STEM TEA TOWEL

£15, wildandwolf.com VINTAGE COPPER CHAIR

£105, pib-home.co.uk

Edition loves.

WOODEN SPICE GRINDER

£50, isak.co.uk

MARIMEKKO VELJEKSET PLATE

£19.50, abodeliving.co.uk TYPHOON VINTAGE COPPER COOKIE JAR

£25, kaleidoscope.co.uk

12-PIECE BLACK CUTLERY SET

£38, next.co.uk

OCHRE GLASS VASE

£20, Debenhams.com

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NORDIC CIRCULAR ROSE GOLD BASKET

£10, sainsburys.co.uk

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Angela Reed.

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WORDS ANGELINA VILL A-CL ARKE

t may have opened back in 1881, but that’s not to say the family-owned home store Angela Reed hasn’t got its eyes on the future. With the original store found in Saffron Walden, the company, which is run by four members from the fifth generation of the family, has just expanded, opening a second shop in Cambridge. Echoing its characterful property in Saffron Walden, the new Angela Reed shop – which opened in September – is found on Peas Hill, right in the heart of the city centre, and specialises in a wide range of gifts, home accessories and furniture. “The new property was originally two shops, but it was knocked into one space long ago,” says David Reed, MD. “The property has been empty for many years and so we’ve been able to come in and put our stamp on it. It’s a lovely space – light and bright – with big glass windows at the front and one section has a lower ceiling, so we’ve dressed it accordingly with a lovely Chesterfield sofa and desk.” While the first store in Saffron Walden is spread over 13 rooms and includes a café and bakery, the new opening is a smaller venture, but has the same focus on the brand’s unique finds. From the English-made Ludlow wooden bedroom furniture to Parker Knoll sofas, customers can find

Our lovely home office furniture has also been a success. It’s made from reclaimed and recycled wood, which gives each piece a unique character

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many classic and timeless pieces to add to their home across the two stores. They are also a treasure trove for home gifts and accessories, including a range of printed cushions by Voyage, which says David, “have found a spot in my own home”. “Whether you are looking for a gift or to revamp a room, we have something for you,” he says. “Our range of wooden ducks have been a surprise hit and our tub chairs, such as the Marle that comes in lots of fabrics, are also really popular. Our lovely home office furniture has also been a success. It’s made from reclaimed and recycled wood, which gives each piece a unique character.” Taking a leaf out of founder Thomas Reed’s entrepreneurial spirit, the company cites its excellent customer service as its USP. “Although we sell a lot of things that you won’t see elsewhere, what stands us apart is our staff who are well informed and willing to help, no matter whether customers buy now or come back later,” says David. He continues: “Moving to another location has certainly been challenging, but it’s very exciting too. We’re looking forward to a bright future in Cambridge. We are relishing settling in and welcoming customers new and old to our new shop. It’s going to be an exciting year!” n Angela Reed, 4-5 Peas Hill, Cambridge CB2 3PP | 01223 510301 | Clifford House, 5-7 Market Hill, Saffron Walden CB10 1HQ | 01799 520056 | angelareed.co.uk

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CAMBRIDGE HOME & GARDEN SHOW CELEBRATES SUCCESSFUL DEBUT!

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eptember saw the inaugural Cambridge Home & Garden Show, for which Cambridge Edition was a proud media partner. The first ever event of its kind to take place in the city, it brought together a varied line-up of quality homes and interior companies, showcasing both local and national brands. Taking place at the historic Guildhall in the city centre, the show welcomed more than 30 exhibitors, from kitchen specialists to florists, who showed

CAMBRIDGE GA R D E N STUDIOS. We found that the Cambridge Home & Garden Show was a fantastic opportunity to meet the Cambridgeshire public and we can’t wait for the next one. We have over 25 years’ experience and build over 50 garden rooms a year. We offer a fully bespoke service: You dream and we will build it – any size, any shape, any design, whether it be a garden studio, a commercial studio or Airbnb/holiday let. Our sales manager will happily come to your property to view your plot, measure up, show you samples, share our extensive experience and draw you plans and 3D drawings, all free of charge. If you prefer, you can make an appointment to come to our sales office and show studio at Scotsdales in Great Shelford. 01954 488306 | enquiries@ cambridgegardenstudios.co.uk cambridgegardenstudios.co.uk

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FiMi. FiMi was born with the idea of creating luxurious, scented, soya wax candles in contemporary, antique and vintage containers. We have scoured the country to create a bespoke range of unique pieces bringing sophistication, individuality, warmth and relaxation to your home. Our Cambridge friends may find two aspects of our business particularly appealing. Firstly, one of our ranges is a selection of 200-year-old coffee cans that were once part of the Collection of Christopher Hogwood, the famous musicologist who lived in Cambridge. These cans are delightful and make a special present for anyone with a musical connection. Secondly, we offer a filling and refilling service to encourage you to burn your candle rather than saving it for that special occasion. 07767 794196 | 07710 096005 enquiries@fimi.co fimi.co

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their wares to an impressive crowd of interiors enthusiasts. Additionally, the event welcomed a line-up of industry professionals who gave talks and demos on topics including styling your home and ‘inclusive design’, plus plenty of guests took advantage of the gorgeous pop-up café from Novi. All in all, a thoroughly successful debut – we can’t wait to see what’s next from the organisers, who are keen to grow and expand upon the event for 2018. Now though let’s hear from some of the exhibitors…

THE CAMBRIDGE SHUT TER C O M PA N Y. The Cambridge Shutter Company is a local family run business established by Rebecca Mason, an interior designer. As specialists in plantation shutters, we can offer a bespoke solution to suit your individual requirements with a variety of ranges available for use in every room, including kitchens, bathroom and conservatories. We can also offer beautiful solutions for those more unusual shapes, which can traditionally be very difficult to dress, such as arched, triangular and circular windows. Our reputation means everything to us, so we strive to deliver the best design solutions, quality installations and customer service possible. 07774 744400 info@thecambridgeshuttercompany.co.uk thecambridgeshuttercompany.co.uk

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DAVID HALL KITCHEN & FURNITURE MAKERS. David Hall trained at Chelsea School of Art in interior design, and has been designing and making contemporary bespoke furniture for over 30 years. We have a workshop and showroom in Melbourn, where we design and manufacture elegant bespoke kitchens, bedrooms, interior fitted cabinetry and free-standing furniture to the most exacting standards of British craftsmanship. Every project is unique and designed in 3D around each individual client’s requirements.

One client wrote to us recently: “I am emailing, because I was thinking of you two a lot during Christmas. You can probably guess why… “I was in the kitchen four days straight, nonstop from rise to bed and I loved it. The kitchen works so well. I am so pleased with the bar, tambour unit, drawers and the two proper ovens. And it looks amazing. Thanks again for everything.” Call Frances Hall on 01763 261010, email info@ davidhallfurniture.co.uk or visit davidhallfurniture.co.uk

DEVLIN A R C H I T E C TS LT D . We are passionate about design and architecture, and about creating spaces for our clients to enjoy. Our focus is on you and your needs. Your requirements are paramount to ensuring that every aspect of the design fulfils your vision. The ideas will be driven by this and influenced by your site, its environment and your budget. Every project has a story and we would like to add another chapter to yours. Our approach is to understand the character, composition and historical facts relating to the site, to then form the new narrative. We analyse the orientation, the views around and within the site and the movement of people to the vegetation and topography. All this information forms layers of influence that starts to assist us in generating a design for you and your project. 01480 276646 | info@devlinarchitects.com devlinarchitects.com

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VISTA LAUNCHES AT TRUMPINGTON MEADOWS.

BARRATT HOMES is delighted to announce the release of Trumpington Vista, an exciting new phase at the soughtafter Trumpington Meadows development on the southern fringe of the city. This new phase comprises a collection of 65 contemporary two- and three-bed apartments and eight premium villas in a prime location offering breathtaking views over the 148-acre country park. Located just minutes from Cambridge city centre but on the edge of one of the area’s most beautiful country parks, Trumpington Meadows is ideal for those looking for the convenience of city living, but with the benefits of country life. A fantastic array of amenities including Waitrose, Cambridge Lakes Golf Course, Cambridge Science Park and Addenbrooke’s Hospital are located nearby, whilst the proximity to Cambridge train station, with its fast track links to London, will appeal to commuters. Residents will also be ideally placed to use the Trumpington Park & Ride for getting into the centre of Cambridge without the hassles of parking and traffic to contend with. The Vista homes feature open-plan spacious living, with many properties benefitting from terraces, balconies and large windows making the most of the stunning views. Prices start at £464,995. n

For more information, or to arrange a booking, contact Barratt Homes on 0844 811 4888 or visit barratthomes.co.uk

TERMS & CONDITIONS APPLY See website for details, subject to contract and status. Prices correct at time of going to press if mentioned. Street scene is indicative only. Images depict typical Barratt interiors and include optional upgrades at additional cost. Calls to our 0844 numbers cost 7 pence per minute plus your phone company’s access charge.

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Cambridge Edition November  

Cambridge Edition November issue