Page 1

Cambridge EDITION A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

YOUR MONTHLY FIX OF

M A Y 2 017

LOCAL LIFE

WIN A HYBRID BIKE WORTH £650! LATEST FOOD NEWS & EVENTS WATCH OUT FESTIVAL MUSEUMS AT NIGHT TOP MUSIC FESTIVALS

CITY 1

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_001 (COVER FINAL2) cb.indd 1

S I G N U P TO O U R W E E K LY D I G I TA L N E W S L E T T E R

© PHOTO CREDIT

N I R G P S

Cambridge

ED IT

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 3:17 PM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 2

24/04/2017 14:26


W E LC O M E

Welcome.

A

E D I TO R I A L

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Senior sub editor Lisa Clatworthy Sub editors Catherine Brodie & Siobhan Godwood

A DV E RT I S I N G

s soon as May rolls around and the weather starts to warm up, my mind turns to the planning of summer fun, including which music festivals I’ve got my eye on. I’ve rounded up the best of the bunch in our general vicinity over on page 35 – and whether you fancy a woodland rave, a weekend of blissfully chilled-out SIGN UP folk tunes, outdoor classical concerts or Blues and W E E K LY TO O U R D Americana in the heart of the Suffolk countryside, N E W S L E I G I TA L TTER there’ll be something in the mix to take your fancy. Also this month, you can get up close and personal with ancient artefacts, glass of wine in hand, at Museums at Night (page 27), enjoy cocktails and classic albums from a luxury listening lounge (page 9), or experience a thrillingly unpredictable day of ‘dangerous theatre’ at Cambridge Junction’s Watch Out festival (page 33). Speaking of thrilling and unpredictable, our arts writer Ruthie has dug up tales from Cambridge’s punk past – from its 80s heyday to the present – over on page 30. You might think quaint old Cambridge is about as edgy as a Bakewell Tart, but there’s an underbelly of riot, rebellion and punk rock which thrives to this day. There’s a bumper food and drink section this month too, a result of the sudden boom of new openings and events we’re enjoying. My picks have to be the new café from Jack’s Gelato (a man who’s been scooping lust-worthy ice cream around Cambridge for over five years now), plus the excellent new brunch offerings at the Chop House. Perhaps most exciting of all though, is the launch of Thirsty Riverside: a brand new al fresco drinking and eating spot on the banks of the Cam which will be running right the way through until September. The brainchild of the team at Thirsty, this new venture will feature food trucks, craft beer and wines, open air cinema events, gigs, farmers’ markets and plenty more besides – I reckon it’s going to give the Mill Pond a run for its money on the place to be this summer in Cambridge. See what you think over on page 48. That’s not all: foodPark has announced its summer season of Night Markets, which kick off this month, so if an evening of feasting, cocktails, fizz and music sounds good to you, I recommend checking out page 52 where we’ve got all the info. Have a fantastic May!

Nicola Foley Editor in chief

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_003 (WELCOME)sg.indd 3

Cambridge

EDIT

Account director Natasha Blatcher 01223 499457 natashablatcher@bright-publishing.com Senior sales executive James Player 01223 492240 jamesplayer@bright-publishing.com Senior sales executive Mary Underwood 01223 499458 maryunderwood@bright-publishing.com

C O N T R I B U TO R S

Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Siobhan Godwood, Daisy Dickinson, Elodie Cameron, Sam Cooke, Michelle Alston, Cyrus Pundole

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Designer Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Ad production Lucy Woolcomb 01223 499468 lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com

M A N AG I N G D I R E C TO R S

Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450

FIND US @ CAMBSEDITION

CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area

C OV E R I M AG E .

This month's cover artwork was designed by Flo Thomas.

AUTHOR ILLUSTRATIONS BY LOUISA TAYLOR louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

3 4/24/17 3:32 PM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 4

24/04/2017 14:27


Contents. 7 Reasons to be cheerful.

Excellent things to enjoy in Cambridge this May

9 Nightlife.

After-dark fun, from live music and club nights to comedy

15 Music blog.

Jordan from Slate the Disco gives his top gig picks for the month

17 Arts & culture.

A round-up of arty, cultural happenings in the city, from exhibitions to theatre

27 Museums at Night.

Explore the city’s museums after hours with a drink in hand

28 Art insider.

Ruthie Collins gives the low-down on arty happenings this month

30 Cambridge calling.

Think Cambridge is the least punk place on earth? Think again

33 Watch Out Festival.

Cambridge Junction welcomes back its festival of ‘dangerous theatre’

35 Music festivals. Your guide to the best music fests in the area – whatever your tastes

40 Dragon Boat Festival.

The city’s most exuberant boating event is back and we’ve got all the details

45 Competition.

We’ve teamed up with Rutland Cycling to give away a top-of-the-range bike

48 Food news.

C O N T E N TS

17

63 Food column

Chef Alex Rushmer’s monthly musings

65 Recipes

A selection of vibrant vegetarian dishes from local food blogger Michelle Alston

73 Drinks.

Elodie from Chesterton Road drinks shop Thirsty on the tastiest craft beers

93

74 Listings.

Our at-a-glance guide to some of the best events in town this month

76 Family.

Our top ten ideas for family fun this month, featuring outdoorsy activities and shows

83 Education.

An insight into the A Level shake-up and its potential impact

84 Independent of the month.

35

In the spotlight this month, Cambridge University Bookshop

87 Fashion.

Top style picks from your local fashion boutiques

88 Beauty.

Daisy Dickinson shows you how to make the best of your tresses with a haircare special

93 Interiors.

Scandi style is everywhere – here’s how to add a little lagom to your life

105 Home store of the month.

65

We explore what local furniture maker Langtry has to offer

108 Property news The latest news and commentary from the local property market

All the hot gossip on Cambridge’s foodie circuit

59 Review.

Editor Nicola pays a visit to a Cambridge Cookery School’s Saturday night bistro

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_005 (CONTENTS) cb.indd 1

28

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | A P R I L 2 017

1 4/24/17 12:45 PM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 6

24/04/2017 14:27


Reasons to be cheerful. EPIC ALE.

Heralding the start of summer, the Cambridge Beer Festival will pitch up in its usual spot on Jesus Green from 22 to 27 May. Founded back in 1974, the event is organised by CAMRA and is one of the largest regional beer festivals held in the country. Pop by to sample hundreds of top beers and ales of all styles, as well as ciders, meads, perry and wine. Then grab some sustenance from the famed CAMRA Cheese Counter, which stocks plenty of pork pies, hams and locally made bread, as well as plenty of fantastic fromage. cambridgebeerfestival.com

© PHOTO CREDIT

Something for the weekend. Two long weekends in one month? Yes, please! You just need to figure out how to spend them. Keep it wholesome and head to Wandlebury bright and early on 1 May for their traditional bacon sarnies and Morris dancing as the sun comes up (5am). Equally traditional, the Reach fair returns for its annual May bank holiday outing. Founded in 1201, it runs from midday until 5pm on 1 May and features fairground rides, food and drink, entertainment and craft stalls. You can also enjoy Ely’s Food & Drink festival, 28 April to 1 May, and aerial adventures at the IWM Duxford Air Festival, 27 and 28 May. Fingers crossed for sunshine!

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_007 (REASONS)sg cb.indd 7

NEWS

Pool days. Few things say summer in Cambridge quite like blissful days splashing about and sunbathing at the Jesus Green Lido, which reopens for its summer season on 13 May. At 91m, it’s one of the longest lidos in Europe, with a long and narrow shape which was designed to mimic the nearby river. Come sunny days, this peaceful, tree-lined corner of Cambridge feels like a summertime paradise you’ll never want to leave. Follow @JesusGreenLido on Twitter for essential updates including pool temperature and what’s on the food menu.

FOOD G LO R I O U S F O O D ( PA R K ). Offering fabulous street food, booze, music and generally brill vibes, the foodPark Night Markets have become a well-loved fixture of the summer in Cambridge. Taking place at Gravel Hill Farm on Madingley Road, there are three events across the summer, each running from 5pm to 10pm and featuring Cambridge’s top food trucks, serving everything from delicate choux pastry delights to enormous, dripping burgers. There’s also local live music gems, bars serving cocktails, craft beer and fizz, plus plenty of cosy seating to relax in. Turn to page 52 for all the info. foodparkcam.com

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

7 4/24/17 12:46 PM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 8

24/04/2017 14:27


NIGHTLIFE

May nightlife.

CHEC O U T L O CK E V E N T SA L ONLINE CA M BS ED IT IO N .C O .U

K

CLASSIC ALBUM S U N DAYS . When was the last time you sat, uninterrupted, and listened to an album from start to finish? If you’re anything like the rest of us, it may have been a long while ago – possibly too long ago to remember. In our digital age of downloads, streaming and shuffle, the way we consume what we listen to has been utterly transformed from this time 20 years ago. While there’s obvious benefits to unlimited, speedy access to all the music in the world – there’s also a sense of having lost something in the process. And that rewarding, ‘slow listening’ experience is exactly what Classic Album Sundays, a new monthly event in Cambridge, is trying to recapture. Creating a luxury listening lounge kitted out with comfy chairs and top-of-the-range sound equipment, the events take place at Hidden Rooms on Jesus Lane. At the heart of the idea is a reverence for the music, encouraging you to grab a drink, pull up a chair and take the time to hear a truly great album as it was intended to be heard. As well as listening to iconic albums in full, the music will be introduced by a specially selected presenter, who’ll offer an overview of the album, its influence and what it means to them. Last month they delved into the pioneering, socially-conscious masterpiece that is The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, while this month, on 7 May, they’ll be listening to Radiohead’s OK Computer – an album which sounds every bit as creepily mesmerising now as it did 20 years ago when it was first released. On the cards for 4 June meanwhile is The Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street, which celebrates its 45th anniversary this year. Doors open at 2.30pm (presentations start at 3pm)and tickets are £8-£10 via Skiddle. Search Classic Album Sundays Cambridge on Facebook for more information. classicalbumsundays.com

M AY

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_009-012 (NIGHTLIFE) cb.indd 9

DJ F O R M AT & A B D O M I N A L .

Hip hop veteran DJ Format and his rapping sidekick Abdominal are swinging our way on 23 May for a gig at Cambridge Junction. Hailing from the UK’s south coast, Format is known for his sample-heavy, funky style which borrows heavily from early-days hip hop of the late 80s and 90s. While he’d been on the scene for a lot longer, he really made a name for himself in the early noughties with the release of his debut album, Music for the Mature B-Boy. Since then, he’s become known as a pioneer of the genre and established himself as one of the country’s top hip hop producers, collaborating frequently with Canadian MC Abdominal. The pair are on tour together once again in support of Still Hungry, their first full joint album. Doors are at 7pm and tickets are £14. junction.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

9 4/24/17 1:03 PM


NIGHTLIFE

RUSSELL BRAND: R E : B I RT H . “How do we make sense of the madness of our lives once we become parents?” asks Russell Brand in his new show, Re:Birth. Grappling with topics like responsibility, conformity and the dizzying transmutations wrought by first-time fatherhood, this new tour offers a taste of a more grown-up, even mature Russell Brand. He’s come a long way from his days gobbing off on Big Brother’s Big Mouth, known more now as an outspoken political campaigner and activist than the cavorting, controversy-courting comedian of old. His showdown with Jeremy Paxman on Newsnight in 2014, following which he was briefly painted as some kind of political prophet in the UK, seemed to usher in a new phase, prompting a book on political revolution, various documentaries and his regular YouTube series The Trews: True News with Russell Brand. If you’re worried he might have gone a bit too serious, don’t – his sharp-as-a-tack wit remains firmly in place, along with this impressive verbal dexterity and general charisma, all of which make for blisteringly good stand-up fodder. See him in action at the Corn Exchange on 24 May, tickets are £30.25. cornex.co.uk

Reginald D Hunter. Funny man Reginald D Hunter brings his latest show to Cambridge this month, promising to deliver an evening of laughs at the Corn Exchange on 28 May. Some People v Reginald D Hunter sees the Georgiaborn comic delivering a dose of searingly honest new material inspired by the people and places he’s seen. Tickets are £25.75. cornex.co.uk

M AY

W H E AT U S . Six albums since they exploded into the spotlight with their fiendishly earwormy single Teenage Dirtbag, American rockers Wheatus are still going strong – and they’ll be in Cambridge for your listening pleasure on 29 May. While they never quite managed to match the commercial success of this and their follow-up – a rocky cover of Erasure’s A Little Respect – they’re known for their infectious energy and enthusiastic live gigs. Sure to be a bit of fun. Doors are at 7pm and tickets are £19.50 adv. junction.co.uk

10

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_009-012 (NIGHTLIFE) cb.indd 10

4/24/17 10:31 AM


NIGHTLIFE

Neon Moon cabaret dining. Fancy a deliciously different dining event? Then make your way to the latest teaming up of the fabulously eccentric Neon Moon Burlesque and Cabaret Club and fab food, drink and ready-made atmosphere at La Raza, on Rose Crescent. On 11 May treat yourself to their eclectic cabaret, featuring cocktails, sumptuous sharing platters and a variety of dazzling entertainment including live music, circus and comedy. Neon Moon guests are invited to let their imaginations fly with their outfits and be sure to don your dancing shoes. Priced at £35 per person, which includes four courses and a glass of bubbly on arrival, expect plenty of surprises. It starts at 7.30pm and is for 18s and over. theneonmoonclub.com

Newmarket Nights announce line-up. A favourite fixture of the summer calendar locally, the Newmarket Nights series kicks off its 2017 run next month with a visit from Little Mix. Taking place at Newmarket Racecourse throughout the summer months, the events offer a chance to see big-name acts in a unique setting – plus enjoy a little flutter on the horses. It’s a return visit for girl group Little Mix, who put on a sizzling show last summer at the racecourse – catch them performing hits like Shout Out To My Ex and Black Magic on 23 June. They’re followed on 30 June by none other than The Jacksons, who’re celebrating a seriously impressive 50 years of hit-making together. Join them on a

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_009-012 (NIGHTLIFE) cb.indd 11

journey to Motown’s heart, boogying away through stonecold classics like ABC, I Want You Back and I’ll Be There. And then for something completely different, join festival regulars Chase & Status on 11 August for a DJ set, or swing by on the 18th for Olly Murs. Jess Glynne, vocalist on the Grammy Award winning Clean Bandit track Rather Be, and singer of chart toppers including My Love, Don’t Be So Hard on Yourself and Hold My Hand, stops by on 26 August for Summer Saturday Live. Keep an eye on the Jockey Club website for announcements of more acts to play this summer. newmarket.thejockeyclub.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

11 4/24/17 10:31 AM


NIGHTLIFE

Now booking. CAMBRIDGE C O M E DY F E S T I VA L . 19-23 J U LY, J E S U S G R E E N , F R O M £6

M AY

Skinny Lister.

Billing themselves as The Pogues’ rum-fuelled English cousin, Skinny Lister always get the party started with their boozy, shanty-singing antics. Expect dancing with the crowd, shots, and a riotous, unholy marriage between punk and folk. They play Cambridge Junction on 4 May and tickets are £13.50. junction.co.uk

The festival returns with over 40 shows from some of the world’s top comedy performers. With three marquees hosting Edinburgh previews, plus a double-decker bus offering Fringe Shows, there’s bound to be something to tickle your funny bone. cambridgecomedyfestival.com

CAMBRIDGE C O C K TA I L WEEKEND.

25- 27 AU G , C O R N E XC H A N G E , F R O M £5

A festival full of cocktails featuring loads of top bars and drinks brands, plus masterclasses, live music, DJs and more. cambridgecocktailweekend.co.uk

TEXAS.

12 S E P, C O R N E XC H A N G E , F R O M £31. 25

Having just released their first album since 2013, Scottish pop-rockers Texas are on the road again. Catch them at the Corn Exchange in September. cornex.co.uk

MAXIMO PA R K . Tyneside’s alt-rock maestros Maximo Park hit Cambridge Junction this month as part of a tour in support of their new album Risk to Exist. Released at the end of last month, some three years after their last offering (2014’s Too Much Information), it sees the band raging against the current state of world affairs in their off-kilter, hook-heavy style. You can expect a taster of this, plus highlights from their back catalogue like Apply Some Pressure and Our Velocity, at the gig on 15 May. Tickets are £22.50. junction.co.uk

12

SOUL LEGENDS. Shimmy and sparkle into the golden era of soul music this month as the Corn Exchange welcomes Soul Legends on 5 May. Presented by EasyTheatres, the show features favourite tunes from the 60s and through the 70s and 80s, performed by cast of talented singers and musicians. Expect a non-stop jukebox of solid gold hits from the likes of Earth, Wind & Fire, Aretha Franklin, James Brown, Kool and the Gang, Chaka Khan and more, plus dazzling costumes and impressive choreography. The show starts at 7.30pm and tickets are £25.75-£27.75. cornex.co.uk

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_009-012 (NIGHTLIFE) cb.indd 12

HAPPY M O N D AYS .

25 N OV, C O R N E XC H A N G E , £32. 25

Transport yourself back to the heyday of the Hacienda when Madchester’s finest come to Cambridge as part of their Twenty Four Hour Party People – Greatest Hits Tour. cornex.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:31 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 13

24/04/2017 14:27


CE ADS_MAY.indd 14

24/04/2017 14:28


MUSIC

Music blog. J O R DA N WO R L A N D F RO M L O C A L M U S I C W E B S I T E S L AT E T H E D I S C O S E L E C T S H I S M U S T- S E E G I GS I N CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH

M

ay on the Cambridge live music scene includes some of the best emerging indie and big-name folk outfits as well as some teenage dirtbags. Our May guide starts over on Emmanuel Road where the picturesque Unitarian Church hosts two stellar events. First up on the 5th we have Cambridge native Sivu, who mixes stately piano, haunting vocals and ethereal electronics to create an emotive and powerful sound, fitting for this grand venue. With a new album due later this year, this one is not to be missed. The same venue hosts Chris T-t on the 19th, when he brings his Best of performance, celebrating 20 years in music, to Cambridge. Chris T-t has always walked his own path, with visionary psych pop, startling humour and unflinching, sometimes discomfiting radicalism. We have a trio of highly recommended shows at the Blue Moon this month. First up on the 2nd, an evening of country blues songs of travel with solo-finger-pickingguitarists Daniel Bachman and Jake Xerxes Fussell. Second, we recommend American Primitive guitar exemplar Don Bikoff on the 11th, and completing the hat trick we have Gold Class on the 15th. There are few voices of meaningful dissent left in rock music – and even fewer play with the savagery, subtlety and melody of these Melbourne-based newcomers, making them well worth a watch. There’s a heaving line-up at The Portland too this month. Our first tip is the epic math-rock purveyors Tall Ships (3rd). Almost five years in the making, the Brighton quartet recently released their second record, delivering an ambitious and anthemic collection of tracks. The Magic Gang (8th) have cruised their way into being one of Britain’s most effortlessly exciting new bands. With a debut album in the works, they bring their charming indie-pop as a headline act for this first time this month. Support on the night comes from Abattoir Blues, a band who take their name from a Nick Cave album but really sound much louder, with lush slabs of psych rock. Gnod make beats that thrill and fray placing huge, ugly, bouldering beats over spoken word or letting distantly cascading percussive marches roll rhythmically into place. They’re at the Portland on the 18th. Billy Bibby & The Wry Smiles (17th) is the superb new musical endeavor of Billy Bibby, former and founding lead guitarist of Catfish and the Bottlemen and is worth checking out. As is local SpanishCeltic folk quartet Mad Mary (20th) and Dan Wilde (22nd) who has a bold and richly observant take on folk. Post War Glamour Girls (16th) are a four-piece who showcase an innate knack for creating intricately layered and intelligent compositions with an almost theatrical Arcade Fire-like build-up. They’re definitely worth your time, as are Twin Wild (29th) and Natives (10th) all at The Portland Arms.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_015 (GIG GUIDE) cbsg.indd 15

Visionary psych pop, startling humour and unflinching, sometimes discomfiting radicalism A busy month at the Cambridge Junction includes an acoustic outing from The Rifles (9th) and 2016’s biggest British rock success, Twin Atlantic (24th). The hotly tipped young Brit Declan McKenna plays the J2 on the 16th, bringing his smart, lyrical, fizzing alt-pop songs back to Cambridge after opening for Blossoms here earlier in the year. Jon Boden is best known as the lead singer of the progressive folk juggernaut Bellowhead. This year he’ll act as guest curator at the Folk Festival, but before then he brings his debut solo record to the J2 on the 9th. Other folk acts at the Cambridge Junction this month that are well worth your time include local outfit The Willows (17th) and Ward Thomas on the 30th, whilst Skinny Lister return with their traditional shanty-inspired folk with attitude on the 4th. Maximo Park bring their irresistible pop songs to the J1 on the 15th, or for further noughties nostalgia there is The Kooks at the Corn Exchange on the 9th and Wheatus at the J1 on the 29th. n

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

15 4/24/17 10:15 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 16

24/04/2017 14:28


A RTS & C U LT U R E

Arts & culture.

W E E X P L O R E T H E A R T S A N D C U LT U R E S C E N E I N C A M B R I D G E , S H OWC A S I N G S O M E O F T H E M A N Y E XC I T I N G E X H I B I T I O N S A N D S H OWS TA K I N G P L AC E A RO U N D T H E C I T Y

Rosalind. In Shakespeare’s As You Like It, Rosalind has to take on the persona of a young man, Ganymede, in order to live a fulfilling, independent life and be able to use her intellect and talents. Over 400 years on from when the play was written, this production from James Cousins Company asks whether women still have to take on a stereotypical masculinity to find equality in the modern world. Rosalind has been commissioned by Arts Council England as part of the Shakespeare Lives, which was a global celebration of the Bard on the 400th anniversary of his death. Rosalind is choreographed by James Cousins in collaboration with Korean dancers and artists, and premiered in Seoul in October last year before embarking on an international tour. It arrives at Cambridge Junction on Wednesday 3 May at 7.30pm, and tickets are £12.50. junction.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_017-024 (ARTS) cb.indd 17

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

17 4/24/17 10:18 AM


T H E M AG I C O F O P E R A . Enjoy an evening of fine dining and music by candlelight at the stunningly beautiful Woburn Abbey Sculpture Gallery when it plays host to The Magic of Opera on 19 May. This black-tie event, which begins at 7pm, will feature dramatic performances from some leading lights of the world of opera, in addition to a sumptuous three-course dinner and drinks reception.

Entertaining guests will be a 21-piece orchestra, conducted by the internationally renowned BjÖrn Dobbelaere, whilst Bridget Costello and Marcus Liljedahl will perform a selection of the well-loved arias and duets between courses at dinner. “We are honoured to welcome artists of Björn, Bridget and Marcus’ calibre to bring a touch of operatic drama to Woburn,” says

operations manager at The Sculpture Gallery, Ian Turland. “We look forward to bringing our guests another great evening of exceptional musical talent and superb food set against the backdrop of The Sculpture Gallery.” Tickets are priced at £70 per person and include a welcome drink and canapés, dinner and the performance. woburnabbey.co.uk

D E AT H O F A SA L E S M A N . Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman is widely considered to be one of the greatest plays of the 20th century. It tells the story of Willy Loman, a once successful travelling salesman, who is forced to come to terms with his own mortality and fading strengths. Willy’s story is told through action from his current life and flashbacks from his past. The play premiered in 1949 and won the Pulitzer prize for drama in that year, as well as a Tony for best play. Death of a Salesman has been interpreted throughout its life as a parable of the American Dream, as each character struggles in their own way to make sense of their lives and achievements. Willy has worked hard all his life to bring financial security to his family, but by the end of the play has concluded that he is worth more to them dead than alive, through his life insurance policy. His sons, Biff and Happy, have had to deal with their father’s unrealistic ambitions for them and their own expectations of life versus its often harsh reality. Willy is critical of what they’ve achieved, but throughout the play relives memories of past events that help him to become aware that his sons’ lives have been affected by his own behavior, and that Biff in particular has had his life shaped by his growing knowledge of his father’s failings. This major touring revival of Death of a Salesman stars Nicolas Woodeson as Willy, and is directed by Abigail Graham. It’s at Cambridge Arts Theatre from 4 to 6 May, with tickets from £18 to £38. cambridgeartstheatre.com

18

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_017-024 (ARTS) cb.indd 18

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:18 AM


IMAGES © JACK FRAME

© LEE MADGWICK

A RTS & C U LT U R E

Garden Delights. Byard Art, the contemporary gallery right in the centre of Cambridge, always surprises and delights with its exciting programme of exhibitions throughout the year. To get you in the mood for the beauty and vitality of spring, they are exhibiting a range of artworks inspired by the great outdoors in Garden Delights, from 5 to 30 May. Featuring a range of media, from ceramic and metalwork to print, painting and sculpture, it

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_017-024 (ARTS) cb.indd 19

will showcase the work of a broad selection of artists. Fletcher Prentice’s paintings are a celebration of the beauty of the natural world and of paint itself, and his work for this exhibition, including Robin on Flowers and Summer Garden with Kingfisher, are gorgeously evocative of English springtime at its luscious best. Maria Rivans’ work could not be more of a contrast, with her striking

collages formed from a melange of vintage photography and other ephemera, while Amanda Cobbett’s printed textiles, featuring fungi, are a reminder of the more earthy delights of the season. And if you – like me – wish that the trees could be covered in ravishing blossom throughout the entire year, you’ll love Jack Frame’s evocations of blossom trees, rendered with oil paints on silver. byardart.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

19 4/24/17 10:18 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 20

24/04/2017 14:28


A RTS & C U LT U R E

Moscow Philharmonic.

LIVE ON MARS. Lifelong fan Alex Thomas stars in this tribute to the life and work of David Bowie at the Corn Exchange on Friday 26 May. The show is influenced by David Bowie’s unforgettable live performances and is a true celebration of the music, artistry, style and showmanship of this matchless legend of pop. Incorporating mime, dance, animation and stunning big-screen visuals, the evening covers a huge range of songs from the Bowie back catalogue, from Space Oddity to Let’s Dance and everything in between. Tickets cost £27.25. cornex.co.uk

As part of the Corn Exchange’s Cambridge Classical Concert Series 16/17, on Thursday 11 May the Moscow Philharmonic will perform Shostakovich’s Festive Overture, Rachmaninov’s Concerto No.2 and Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Former artist in residence Freddy Kemp makes a welcome return, and the performance is conducted by Yuri Botnari. The concert starts at 7.30pm with tickets costing £17 to £40. There’s also a preconcert talk at 6pm at Cambridge University Press Bookshop which is free to ticket holders. cornex.co.uk

Showstopper! The Improvised Musical. Straight from a successful run in the West End, this spontaneous musical comedy is making a triumphant return to Cambridge following its last visit in 2016. Of course, it’s not quite true to say that it’s exactly the same show as we enjoyed a year ago; every night sees a brand-new musical extravaganza created from scratch, as audience suggestions are transformed on the spot into a dazzling, all-singing, all-dancing show. Showstopper! The Improvised Musical runs from Wednesday 31 May to Saturday 3 June and tickets are £19 to £29. Whether you’re new to the whole concept, or are a long-time fan, you can never see it too many times! cambridgeartstheatre.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_017-024 (ARTS) cb.indd 21

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

21 4/24/17 10:18 AM


WIMPOLE H I S TO RY F E S T I VA L .

V I N TAG E F I L M N I G H TS . Classic films have become a bit of an institution at St Giles’ Church over the last few months, with a different classic British or Hollywood movie showing each Saturday night in the church’s splendid gothic surroundings. The organisers aren’t allowed to publish the names of upcoming films, but film fans won’t have too much trouble identifying what’s on offer from the following cryptic clues: 13 May sees Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn undertaking a river adventure while on 10 June, you can watch Audrey Hepburn star in the iconic romantic comedy that launched her career. Drinks and snacks will be on sale or you can BYO. Suggested donation of £5. fosgc.org

22

festivals each year, it makes a great trio and a year-round offer.” Historian and founding patron David Reynolds added: “It’s been great fun to help prepare this feast of history for all the family in such beautiful surroundings.” The festival is run in a unique partnership between the Literary Festival team and the National Trust. Former National Trust director general Fiona Reynolds explains that people are enthralled and challenged by history, saying, “there couldn’t be a better time or place to explore its meaning and relevance to us all today.” The programme includes the show Austentatious, which riffs on audience suggestions to create brand new Jane Austen novels (previous examples include Jurassic Mansfield Park and Sixth Sense & Sensibility), while Andrew Marr reflects on what Brexit means for Britishness. The vast programme also includes children’s author Francesca Simon, sword school and, of course, Game of Thrones. The festival runs from 7 to 9 July. wimpolehistoryfestival.com

F R AC K E D !

VIEWS FROM THE ’BRIDGE.

Fracked! is a provocative new comedy by Alistair Beaton, well known for political satire including Spitting Image and his Bafta-nominated TV play, The Trial of Tony Blair. Running at the Arts Theatre from 22-27 May, the production sees retired academic Elizabeth, played by Last Tango in Halifax’s Anne Reid, and her bad-tempered husband Jack take on an energy company as they seek permission to start fracking in the couple’s idyllic English village. As the campaign goes viral, Elizabeth finds herself a big hit on social media, while Jack longs for the quiet life… A real play for our times, contrasting the priorities of rural retirees with the more global issues of the future of planetary energy, Fracked! has lots of laughs with a tough core of political relevance. cambridgeartstheatre.com

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_017-024 (ARTS) cb.indd 22

Whether it’s Vikings or The Last Kingdom, historical fiction has never been so popular. Non-fiction looking back at the past is always high in the bestseller lists, too, not to mention the period dramas on our small screens, often adapted from the classic novels of Austen and co. This perhaps makes it inevitable that while walking through the beautiful Wimpole Hall estate one summer evening, Cathy Moore, director of Cambridge Literary Festival, had an idea. What better setting to stage a celebration of history than the backdrop of a country mansion, rolling parkland and a library of more than 10,000 books? Two years later and the result is Wimpole History Festival, all set for three days in July. Featuring Andrew Marr, Lucy Worsley and Stephen Poliakoff among many more, history is guaranteed to come to life. “Hosting a history festival right now makes wonderful sense,” says Cathy. “In volatile times, there is comfort to be drawn from an understanding of history which allows us better to understand the world we live in. Added to our two literary

Each season, Cambridge Junction puts a call out for new, up-and-coming writers and performance makers to submit their work for a showcase of fresh talent. Previous success stories include Rowan James and Rachel Mariner, who both debuted shows at Views from the ’Bridge and went on to great success at Edinburgh Fringe. Wednesday 10 May sees the spring 2017 showcase, which will feature an eclectic mix of extracts and in-progress shows of between five and 20 minutes each. It’s a fantastic opportunity for artists to get feedback and for audience members to spot the next emerging local artist or company. Tickets are £6, and the show kicks off at 7.30pm. junction.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:18 AM


IMAGES © ANDY DAKIN

A RTS & C U LT U R E

Andy Dakin at Novi. Popular local artist Andy Dakin – three-time winner of Visitors’ Favourite at the Cambridge Drawing Society biennial – has an exhibition of atmospheric, figurative works at Novi on Regent Street during May. Andy has used Novi itself as inspiration for a raft of new work, reflecting a slice of modern Cambridge life. The exhibition opens with a party on Sunday 30 April, and continues until Friday 26 May. Andy will continue to work at Novi as artist in residence during the exhibition from the Tuesday to the Friday, 9am to 3pm, if you fancy seeing him in action. novicambridge.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_017-024 (ARTS) cb.indd 23

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

23 4/24/17 10:18 AM


A RTS & C U LT U R E

S C I E N C E O N S U N DAYS AT T H E B OTA N I C GA R D E N . Science is something that Cambridge, more than any other city, does brilliantly, and while not all of us are lucky enough to be up there with the world’s best brains, one of the benefits of living here is that, from time to time, we get to share some of the knowledge! On Sundays throughout this spring and summer, Cambridge University scientists will be hosting a series of informal, drop-in talks at Botanic Gardens, filling us in on some of the latest discoveries in plant science. On 21 May, Andrew Tanentzap from the Department of Plant Sciences will be asking: Are ghosts haunting the flora of New Zealand? The talks are designed to bring plant science to a wider audience and provoke thought and discussion around some of the very real issues facing our planet. Talks take place at 11am and again at 2pm, in the Gardens’ classroom. They’re free, although normal garden admission charges apply. There’s no need to book, just drop in. botanic.cam.ac.uk

Faces of Cambridge. It’s 75 years since the Friendly Invasion, when the first US troops arrived in Britain and Winston Churchill coined the phrase ‘special relationship’ to describe how the two nations would stand together in the Second World War. Some 3.5 million Americans passed through the UK from 1942 to early 1946 and many never made it home. Faces of Cambridge takes place on 27 and 28 May as part of Memorial Day weekend at the Cambridge American Cemetery, Madingley Road, near Coton. Over 3000 of the headstones and names carved on the Wall of the Missing will then

24

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_017-024 (ARTS) cb.indd 24

have a photograph of the individual that’s commemorated there. Like ghosts from the past, their faces appear. Meet the brave, forever young Americans of the war, with the cemetery also dressed in flags. Cambridge was one of three sites in the country used to temporarily bury US servicemen and women, on land donated by Cambridge University. Many of their families chose, at the end of the war, to have their remains stay in the UK and in 1956 the Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial officially opened. Entry is free and group tours are available at abmc.gov.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:18 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 25

24/04/2017 14:29


CE ADS_MAY.indd 26

24/04/2017 14:29


Museums at Night.

MUSEUMS

G O O N A N A F T E R - H O U R S A DV E N T U R E AT T H E C A M B R I D G E U N I V E R S I T Y MUSEUMS THIS MONTH

M

useums at Night is a national evening of events that aims to inspire; Cambridge will be hosting two contrasting special sessions on 17 May. Madonnas and Miracles has already proved a big draw at The Fitzwilliam Museum and from 6pm till 9pm that evening there’s a free sensory viewing, giving you the chance to immerse your senses and be transported to the holy home in Renaissance Italy. With added sights, smells, sounds and handling objects to touch, make sure you don’t miss a ten-minute introduction to your experience at 6pm, 7pm and 8pm from Dr Irene Galandra Cooper. As part of the event, Sarah Dunant, the renowned writer of historical fiction, broadcaster and critic, will be giving an illustrated talk about how she uses art and objects to conjure up the past, at 7pm. Other areas of the museum will be open late and there will be a bar serving drinks and Mediterranean nibbles until 8.30pm.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_027 (MUSEUMS) cbsg.indd 27

WORDS CYRUS PUNDOLE

There is a £7 charge for the talk and entrance to the museum from 6pm to 9pm will be via the courtyard entrance. Tickets for Sarah Dunant’s talk can be pre-booked online at cambridgelivetickets.co.uk. Lost is a very different offering at the Museum of Classical Archaeology, providing a poignant opportunity for reflection on one of the tragedies in the news over recent times. Syrian-born artist Issam Kourbaj has collected items of clothing belonging to refugees who were lost at sea attempting to make the perilous journey to Lesbos. Within the museum’s permanent display are 450 casts of plaster-dipped items, creating a thoughtprovoking and moving exhibition that provides a different take on the destruction of his homeland. “Lost becomes a statement of absence,” says Kourbaj. “The rigid surface of each item of clothing holds the ghost of its past, and acts as evidence of, and a gravestone for, its recent past carrier; the person who never made it to the end of their journey and was drowned and lost in dark water.” Lost, an evening with Issam Kourbaj and poet Ruth Padel, runs from 6.30pm to 8pm on the 17th. You can hear the stories behind the exhibition and hear Padel read her new poem Lesbos 2015. The event is free, but online booking is essential, at lost-event.eventbrite.co.uk. n

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

27 4/24/17 10:15 AM


The Art Insider. RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDE R OF C A MBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ART Y PICKS OF THE MONTH

aking art that’s visibly influenced by the political and global climate can’t really be called a trend. It’s more an attempt at negotiating this posttruth world of ours – shaped by war, fake news and crises. Anglia Ruskin’s Sustainability Art Prize went to third year Fine Art student Imogen Dungate for her piece Gravity, which “gives the planet a jewel-like quality, emphasising its fragility in the black void of space,” according to head of fine art, Chris Owen. Hannah Moshtael meanwhile, who received an additional prize sponsored by local vegan café Stem + Glory, created A home from home. This installation recreated an asylum seeker’s home and invited the public in to have mint tea, touching on what many of our hearts are bursting for right now, a global culture of sustainable collaboration. As curator Marina Velez, says, “contemporary art practices can offer ways for working with and through the ambivalences of loss attached to environmental issues because they can provide understanding and promote reparation in these complex human experiences…” We need more of this. Those wanting to help abate the apparently worsening refugee crisis can buy tickets for a catwalk fashion show on 10 June in aid of Syrian refugees, taking place at Hot Numbers on Trumpington Street. Artist Deanna Tyson has teamed up with the charity behind children’s art show, From Syria with Love, to showcase her startling, provocative kimonos and other customised recycled streetwear pieces from artists such as Jadryk Brown. Deanna’s textile works are punchy, political comments on current affairs – not dissimilar to the likes of Anthea Hamilton’s pieces currently making waves in contemporary art. Deanna’s work plays a vital role, like the pioneering female artists before her in the 60s and 70s, in destroying “the barrier that marginalised women and kept their productions out of ‘high’ art” (Katherine Grey). From Syria with Love/To Syria with Art itself is an incredibly moving show, which we hosted at the Art Salon last summer – you can find out more about the exhibition at fromsyriawithlove.com. Contact

28

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_028-029 (RUTHIE)cbsg.indd 28

© THOMAS ENDLEIN

M

Above Hollie McNish Top right Francesca Beard in How to Avoid a Post-Truth Apocalypse Right Hannah Moshtael’s instalation A home from home Below Anglia Ruskin’s Sustainability Art Prize winner Imogen Dungate

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:30 AM


A RTS & C U LT U R E

Deanna Tyson for tickets for the catwalk show on: deanna@deanna-tyson.com. How to Avoid a Post-Truth Apocalypse from Francesca Beard, featured as part of Cambridge Junction’s Watch Out Festival on 27 May, is another to look out for. As part of the project, Francesca, who was one of the originators of the current spoken word scene, is creating an archive of lies – which you can submit to online at www. posttruthapocalypse.com. This performance at the Watch Out Festival, known for its ‘dangerous theatre’, is a chance to catch a taste of the show before it goes on its full-length tour later this year. Head to the show for the chance to play Whose Lie is it Anyway, because as Albert Camus said, “fiction is the lie through which we tell the truth...” Also worth celebrating this month is the glorious revival of surrealist artist, Leonora Carrington, whose centenary was this year. New feminist publisher Silver Press have released The Debutante and Other Stories; a collection of short stories by this enigmatic surrealist artist, who became famous for her mesmerising depictions of female autonomy, sorcery and sexuality. Lover of Max Ernst, she ran away to Paris, alone, at the age of 19, swapping the narrow confines of her rich and privileged life for a trailblazing life of artistic freedom. You can also find a fascinating account of her work, Leonora Carrington: Surrealism, Alchemy and Art by Susan L Aberth, in Cambridge

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_028-029 (RUTHIE)cbsg.indd 29

Waterstones, plus see one of her paintings here in Cambridge as part of the Murray Edwards New Hall art collection. Finally, huge congratulations to Cambridge poets this month. Fay Roberts’ show The Selkie – A Song of Many Waters, at the time of writing this, has been nominated for a Saboteur Award. The Selkie’s award nomination is 100% deserved, few others have so tirelessly worked to make the performance poetry scene so vibrant, not least in Cambridge. Plus, Hollie McNish, also up for a Saboteur Award, has been awarded the prestigious Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry, for her poetic memoir, Nobody Told Me. Hollie is not only phenomenally gifted, she’s also a down-to-earth, genuine artist whose generous spirit reaches out to readers and audiences from all backgrounds. I’ll leave you with the advice that she gave her younger self (probably relevant to many adults, too) for our feminist art programme, Women of Influence, working with young women supported by charity Romsey Mill. “You are very small and the world is huge, millions of stars and other planets. The things you think are really important – the bad things I mean – the fallouts with friends, the outfits, the boyfriends, the bullies, those issues will soon be gone. You will grow older, and with age comes more freedom, more confidence, more excitement and less bother! So try to have fun.” Have a fantastic May, all. n

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

29 4/24/17 10:30 AM


Cambridge calling.

W

RUTHIE COLLINS LIFTS THE LID ON THE PUNK SCENE I N T H E C I T Y, F RO M I T S E A R LY 8 0 S H E Y DAY T H RO U G H T O T O DAY

30

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_030-031 (CAMBRIDGE CALLING) cbsg.indd 30

hat you’ve got to remember about punk is that it isn’t about art or music; it’s a state of mind,” says Jonny Loathsome, artist and performance poet, of its spirit. Punk might be famous for its standout style, but punk as a movement is not just about fashion or provocative shock tactics. “It’s about embracing who you are as an individual – don’t be forced to live a lie by conforming to social pressure,” says Shane, a punk fan and Cambridge artist. “We counted about 500 punks in the city. We were fighting for equality – a lot of gay rights, women’s rights, which punk fought for and won. It was a licence to be outwardly angry and not have it any more,” remembers Kretin, a punk in Cambridge in the early 80s, when Captain Sensible’s backing singers, post-punk band Dolly Mixture, still lived on De Freville Avenue. Back then, Cambridge had more squats, grotty pubs and makeshift spaces where you could watch gigs – like the Sea Cadets’ premises next to the Museum of Technology – than official venues. Talking to punks who remember the city then digs up stories of riots, rebellion and a fight back against all kinds of oppression: from an anti-school protest led by school children, to Cambridge’s infamous ‘disco night’ at Thakes Cycle Shop on East Road. The stuff of local legend, the Thakes ‘riot’, which was contained by 13 police vans, was part of a broader venting of frustration at the need for more music venues in the city and one that eventually campaigned for what’s now Cambridge Junction, a leading performing arts venue. “There was a pub, Lord Byron, at Cambridge train station where we’d meet in the 80s. A lot of the punks out in the villages might have been the only ones, so with Cambridge being the nearest city, they’d all leap on the train to meet other punks – and that was a great place to hang out,” describes Jonny Loathsome. “Pubs like the Cambridge Arms [now d’Arrys] on King Street were very punk in attitude. The music gave us confidence, kindred spirits. It’s the same today: if you have a certain type of spirit, it doesn’t matter where you come from, you’ll have that bond,” enthuses Louis, who was dual vocalist in band Death on the Streets. Look around for it and modern-day punk in Cambridge is alive and kicking, with a clutch of bands such as ska-punk Dirty Stop-Outs, fronted by activist and alt-model Anna Knight. “We’re hoping this year we’ll be playing more gigs out of town and at festivals and bringing the community together through music,” says Anna. You can see them at Last Gang in Town’s next gig this month, on 27 May, at the Portland Arms, headlined by Rebelation. “We are 100% not for profit, anti-fascist promoters,” says Laura Freestone, of Last Gang in Town, that she runs with husband Alec. “Inspired by the late Joe Strummer (The Clash),

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:30 AM


A RTS & C U LT U R E

It’s about doing everything you can do yourself: create your own band, create your own scene our first gig was a Strummerville benefit in 2003. It was supposed to be a one-off, but the rest is history…” Last Gang in Town also hosts and programmes the Devils Kicks Dancehall and Last Stand stages at Boomtown Fair festival. “We put on punk (the anarcho/crust/dub/street-punk, folk-punk and ska-punk side of punk!), ska, reggae, psychobilly and rockabilly bands.” “The scene is much more organised now. Last Gang in Town has a huge following and is bringing national names to Cambridge, regularly. We didn’t have that back then,’” remembers Louis. “It does feel like there’s more cohesion in the scene, with Last Gang in Town and venues like the Corner House”, agrees Jonny Loathsome. “The pressures we were under back then are coming back now – today. Protest, the need to fight for equality, though, under Trump, it’s all coming back, too,” he adds. Tim Neate, who runs the Scarecrow Corner at Strawberry Fair, describes how the DIY spirit there has never really gone away, continuing to grow ‘roots and community’. Those looking

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_030-031 (CAMBRIDGE CALLING) cbsg.indd 31

for punk, or the tools to make things happen for themselves, wanting to create change, can find a real sense of home at the festival, where you can find a tree circle, community and campaign stalls and a solar-powered stage. Captain Ruin, a punk artist from Australia, noticed it when he came. “There’s whole generations grown out of the scene here. But that’s what it’s about – it’s about family.” “We’ve got it all here,” Tim laughs. Cambridge artist and punk fan Shane describes the DIY principle behind punk. “It’s about doing everything you can do yourself: create your own band, create your own scene, create your own indie label, customise/make your clothes to express your individuality, make your own art, make the things you need and grow things you eat.” For anyone looking for punk in the city, embracing this DIY culture yourself, getting active and involved, seems like one of the best way to find it. n Last Gang in Town’s next gig, with Rebelation, Smoke Like a Fish and the Dirty Stop-Outs, is at the Portland Arms on 27 May.

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

31 4/24/17 10:30 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 32

24/04/2017 14:30


I

WATC H O U T F E S T I VA L

f you like your art and theatre edgy, the chances are that you already know about Cambridge Junction’s Watch Out festival, a one-day mix of shows and experiences that returns on 27 May. If you’re more of a conventional type, then the wide range of options is bound to inspire and invigorate, as some of the country’s leading artists explore new and dangerous ideas in theatre, dance and installation pieces. This year’s works encourage audiences to explore, see and engage with their local surroundings in new ways, whether it be the city itself, the community, family, strangers or the wider world. There are world premieres, a UK premiere, previews and more new work. Highlights include 24 Hour Radio Local, a new interactive radio project by performance duo Hunt and Darton. The day-long exploration of what it means to be local will be performed and edited outdoors, live from Cambridge Leisure Park, and broadcast live on Cambridge 105. Performance artist Jamal Harewood presents Word, which gives you the option to become a contestant or host an audience-led game show, with words to the fore. Watch Out producer Daniel Pitt said: “I’m proud that over the past three years (four if you include its predecessor, the 24-hour Night Watch) the festival has been an opportunity to support and present a really wide range of innovative new performance projects happening in all kinds of spaces around Cambridge Junction and the city. “The year-round theatre and dance programme is always contemporary and unusual, so Watch Out is a chance to take things that bit further, whether that’s in theme, format, style or duration.” Other performances and experiences include Play Cambridge Now or Never!, a geolocation app created by Cambridge and Ely artists Idit Nathan and Helen Stratford which invites users to interact with city sites in new ways, and Mothers, a new dance piece which closes the festival in a messy, sticky and ferocious way, courtesy of London-based choreographer Frauke Requardt. There are three free drop-in projects and seven paid-for shows throughout the day, with a super-handy festival pass available at just £20 or £15 for concessions. n

Watch Out.

GET SET FOR THE RETURN OF CAMBRIDGE J U N C T I O N ’S F E S T I VA L O F ‘ DA N G E RO U S’ T H E AT R E WORDS CYRUS PUNDOLE

W H AT ’S O N A N D W H E N . Free drop-in projects 24 HOUR RADIO LO C A L

Starting at 12pm, Cambridge Leisure Square: What is local about this place? Over 24 hours, performance duo Hunt and Darton will get to the heart of it, in a takeover of Cambridge 105’s airways.

P L AY C A M B R I D G E N OW OR NEVER!

All day: A site-specific geolocation app that prompts you when to play.

WA R N I N G S I G N S

All day, around the J2 building: A series of posters and signs by Hester Chillingworth which playfully use the phrase ‘watch out’.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_033 (WATCHOUT FEST) cbsg.indd 33

Seven shows for £20 (£15 con)

Hutson and her dad Addrian; they play their family tensions for laughs, with sincerity.

F LO O D S

SPLIT TER

15-minute slots from 12pm to 8pm, The Hub: An experience for two strangers created by Anna Brownsted. Splitter is the next track on the album of your life.

H OW TO S U RV I V E A P O S T - T R U T H A P O C A LY P S E

4pm, J3: Urban Foxes Collective’s funny, inventive piece about fear and the future.

WORD

5.30pm, J2: Is “it’s not what you say, but how you say it” really true?

T H E VO I C E O F N AT U R E

1pm, J3: Join Francesca Beard, your shamshaman, through a wonderland of lies, fiction and Wikipedia ‘facts’. Explore make-believe in its many forms.

7pm, J1: The stage becomes an arena for playing in Tim Spooner’s large-scale ‘performed sculpture’.

BI-CURIOUS GEORGE A N D OT H E R S I D E K I C KS

8.45pm, J2: A relentless, ferocious, yet tender dance that addresses all things ‘mother’, from Frauke Requardt.

2.30pm, J2: A collaboration between Lucy

M OT H E R S

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

33 4/24/17 10:15 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 34

24/04/2017 14:30


Staying out for the summer. W I T H F E S T I VA L S E A S O N A L M O S T U P O N U S, N I C O L A F O L E Y RO U N D S U P T H E B E S T M U S I C F E S T I VA L S I N T H E AREA . TIME TO GET PL ANNING!

Hedonism.

S E C R E T GA R D E N PA RT Y // 20-23 J U LY An eccentric, fun-loving fiesta in a stunningly beautiful setting, Cambridgeshire’s own Secret Garden Party (SGP) has set the creative benchmark for festivals around the world during its colourful 15-year tenure. A shimmering lake takes centre stage, surrounded by rolling meadows and woodland that are filled with art installations, silly games, raves, hot tubs, floating dance floors, paint fights, dance-offs

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_037-041 (FESTIVALS) cbsg.indd 35

and anything else your imagination can conjure. All good things must sadly come to an end though, and after a glorious run, the organisers have announced that this year’s festival, taking place in July, will be the last. So if you’ve ever fancied going along, this is truly your last chance. It’s going to come as heartbreaking news to the many local fans this festival has, but loyal ‘gardeners’ are likely to be encouraged by founder Freddie

Fellowes’ teaser of a ‘phoenix’ which will be raised from the ashes of SGP. One thing’s for sure, the organisers will be pulling out all the stops to make sure that this is the ultimate party – make sure you’re there! Headliners include Wild Beasts, Peaches and Crystal Fighters. Adult weekend tickets are currently available for £197. secretgardenparty.com Abbots Ripton35 mins from Cambridge

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

35 4/24/17 10:29 AM


ELECTRONIC.

Farr Festival // 13-16 July With the vibe of an excellent party your mate threw in his garden but a dance music line-up to rival any of the big festivals, Farr is an in-theknow gem just a short hop from Cambridge. Woodland illuminated by fairy lights deep in the Hertfordshire countryside provides a perfect backdrop for late-night partying, while also lending itself to relaxing daytime pursuits including yoga and film screenings. This year’s bill includes live performances from legendary producers Booka Shade and Todd Terje, plus sets from Submotion Orchestra, Red Axes and Nao. Tickets are limited to about 5000, making this an ultra-boutique affair in the scheme of things, and it’s pretty squarely aimed at those with a taste for the shadier corners of the house and techno scene. Expect intimate canopied stages, impressive sound systems and a lot of high-calibre electronic music. Day tickets cost from £40. farrfestival.co.uk Bygrave Woods, Hertfordshire45 mins from Cambridge

FUNK, DISCO, SOUL, HOUSE.

The Wild Wood Disco // 1 July

A brand-new one for summer 2017, The Wild Wood Disco is promising a night of glittery abandon under a canopy of trees deep in the woods near Linton this July. The musical line-up covers soul, funk, disco and house, featuring sets from Soul II Soul legend Jazzie B, Bristol outfit Funk From The Trunk and a dreamy, uplifting house set from The Head Gardener, aka Secret Garden Party founder Freddie Fellowes. Running from 4pm until 2am, guests can expect music, magical lasers, colourful lanterns, art installations, Prosecco bars, cocktails and top street food from foodPark. Early bird tickets £20, standard £25. Limited camping is available for £5 per person. Search Wild Wood Disco on Facebook. Horseheath Racecourse, Linton, Cambs35 mins from Cambridge

36

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_037-041 (FESTIVALS) cbsg.indd 36

Artsy.

P O LY P H O N I C // 2 S E P T E M B E R

Taking place in the sleepy village of Bourn, there’s every chance you’ve not heard of this innovative festival; but to those in the know, it’s one of the hottest tickets in town. Selected as one of Vogue magazine’s top independent festivals, this annual shindig at Wysing Arts Centre brings together boundary-pushing musicians for a genre-spanning frolic into the outer edges of the musical spectrum. Expect captivating innovation in a lush rural setting. wysingartscentre.org Wysing Arts Centre, Bourn30 mins from Cambridge

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:29 AM


M U S I C F E S T I VA L S

FOLK.

Cambridge Folk Festival // 27-30 July

Probably our city’s most famous musical happening, Cambridge Folk Festival has been pitching up at Cherry Hinton Hall for over 50 years. The festival’s come a long way since its debut event, when a few hundred gathered around one small stage (even if they were entertained by Paul Simon). It’s earned a reputation for serving up a fabulously eclectic mix of folky talent, and this years’ offering will be no exception. Having made his first appearance at the festival’s smallest stage, The Den, back in 2012, Jake Bugg is back to headline on the Sunday night with an acoustic set. He’s joined on the bill by British folk icon Shirley Collins, American duo Indigo Girls and singer and actress Olivia Newton-John (a Cambridge native!), who’ll be performing a unique collaboration with Beth Nielsen Chapman and Amy Sky. Elsewhere, get stuck into madcap Hillbilly covers of AC/DC from Hayseed Dixie, dance the hours away at a silent ceilidh, enjoy music workshops and more. For ticket prices and availability see the website. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/folk-festival Cherry Hinton Hall, CambridgeOn your doorstep

Rhythm & Blues. RED ROOSTER // 1-3 J U N E

Describing itself as “A whisky sippin’, guitar strummin’, banjo pickin’, rib suckin’, weekend of Southern blues”, Red Rooster takes place in the heart of the Suffolk Countryside. The music and vibe may be Americana but the pretty lawns, flower beds and wholesome games of rounders are indisputably, charmingly English. This year’s line-up features JD McPherson, The Savages and the legendary Nick Lowe, singer of classics like Cruel to be Kind and I Love the Sound of Breaking Glass. Expect a blissfully laid-back weekend spent hearing great music, eating seriously good food (think bourbon ribs and gourmet hot dogs), singalongs around the campfire and a family-friendly vibe. And lots of hay bales. Day tickets are available from £38.50 and weekend tickets (including camping), are available from £60.50. redrooster.org.uk Euston Hall, Suffolk50 mins from Cambridge

A BIT OF E V E RY T H I N G .

Standon Calling // 27-30 July A fun-filled three-day extravaganza in the Hertfordshire countryside, this colourful festival started life as a humble garden party in the pretty grounds of Standon Lordship. Since then it’s snowballed into one of the country’s top boutique music festivals, known for its friendly vibe and showcasing great up-and-coming acts. Described by Time Out magazine as having “more charm than you can imagine”, the event combines a glorious rural setting (complete with open-air swimming pool) with top music, family activities, tasty food, lots of fancy dress and general silliness. On the line-up this year are Orbital, Clean Bandit, British Sea Power and Gary Numan, while DJs include Joe Goddard of Hot Chip, DJ Yoda and Faithless. And then there’s the food, oh, the food! Standon Calling levels up festival fare with some of the best foodie outfits around – this year you’ll be able to feast on sumptuous brunches from Breakfast Club and Grade A burgers from Patty & Bun, amongst other delicious treats. Day tickets are available for £57 and weekend tickets are £137. standon-calling.com Standon, Hertfordshire50 mins from Cambridge

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_037-041 (FESTIVALS) cbsg.indd 37

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

37 4/24/17 2:43 PM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 38

24/04/2017 14:30


M U S I C F E S T I VA L S

Classical.

CAMBRIDGE SUMMER M U S I C F E S T I VA L // 13-29 J U LY

If romping about in a muddy field isn’t for you and you fancy a more refined experience, take a look at Cambridge Summer Music Festival (CSM). Presenting a series of performances from world-class musicians in beautiful venues around the city, the programme ranges from baroque to Beethoven, classical to jazz and ancient sacred music to traditional folk, with an impressive list of venues including the chapels of King’s and Trinity Colleges. CSM also includes the lovely Sounds Green series, in which the Botanic Gardens become the picturesque setting for outdoor concerts – what better way is there to spend a balmy summer’s evening? cambridgesummermusic.co.uk Venues across CambridgeOn your doorstep

R O C K/I N D I E .

Subterranean Festival // 23 September

Urban/Grime/Garage.

S T R AW B E R R I E S & C R E E M // 17 J U N E

Rising up out of the sleepy Cambridgeshire countryside, Strawberries and Creem is becoming more of a force to be reckoned with each stonking event that it hosts. The 2017 headline slot goes to Shaggy, and they’ve once again rallied a line-up of big hitters from the UK’s urban music scene, including legendary garage acts Artful Dodger and So Solid Crew, plus Wiley and The Streets’ Mike Skinner. Tickets are £40. strawberriesandcreem.com Haggis Farm, Cambridge 15 mins from Cambridge

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_037-041 (FESTIVALS) cbsg.indd 39

From the makers of the Cambridge Folk Festival comes Subterranean, a brand-new, one-day festival. The event will present a great line-up of indie and rock across three small stages – The Inferno Stage, The Labyrinth Stage and The Underworld Stage – inside the Corn Exchange’s main auditorium. Local talent meets national bands on the line-up, which features appearances from The Amorettes, Pins, and Stone Broken. The upstairs bar, meanwhile, will play host to The Lair, serving up the best in acoustic rock and indie, and there will be food and a shopping area. Advance tickets are available for £15. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk Corn Exchange, CambridgeOn your doorstep

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

39 4/24/17 10:29 AM


PROUD MEDIA PA RT N E R

SEP T

Dragon Boat Festival.

T

eams across the region are already starting to sign up to become part of the county’s most exuberant boating event, the Cambridge Dragon Boat Festival, which returns for its annual instalment on 9 September. Now in its 13th year, this river extravaganza sees teams from all around battle it out along a 200m stretch of the River Cam out in Fen Ditton. Crews are made up of companies, organisations, clubs and groups of friends, all competing in a nail-biting river race to see who will take home the crown. You don’t need to have any experience to get involved; it’s tons of fun and it’s not all about brute strength, so the race is open to anyone – all you need is lots of enthusiasm and a good bit of team spirit!

40

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_038-039 (DRAGONBOAT FEST) cb copysg.indd 40

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:28 AM


D R AG O N B OAT F E S T I VA L

The dragon boats, qualified helms and all racing equipment are provided, and each crew is guaranteed a minimum of three races. Best of all, it’s all in aid of a fantastic local cause: Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust (ACT), which is the only charity dedicated to making a difference for patients at Addenbrooke’s and the Rosie hospitals. Emily Willdigg, ACT’s Events Fundraiser is looking forward to building on the success of the event last year, saying: “We hope that businesses will support our much-loved hospitals by getting a team together. With the help of many generous supporters, we can provide funds so that our local hospitals can offer the very best care day after day, year after year.” The top fundraising crew for ACT will receive the coveted Charity trophy and a luxurious, traditional afternoon tea at the stylish Six Panoramic Bar and Restaurant in Cambridge. One of the early entrants is Sitec Infrastructure Services from Waterbeach, which provides specialist services across the UK telecommunication and fixed line industries. Crew manager Taryn Caleno is looking forward to strengthening internal company relationships through their participation and the company has also set a target of raising £1000 in sponsorship for ACT. “We thought it would be a great opportunity for team building. We are always so busy as a company with a number of different teams working for separate clients

and types of work. We find it difficult to fit traditional team building away days into our schedule so this looked a great opportunity to link in our social side with an element of team building too!” Other early Festival entrants include Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust, Taylor Wimpey East Anglia, TWI, Prometic Bioseparations, Inca Digital, Encore Estate Management Ltd and Ely-based Stormport Professional Services who have even entered a Gold crew. Gold and Silver entries include a significant donation to the festival charity ACT as well as marketing benefits such as the company name and logo on the side of a dragon boat. Stormport’s crew manager, Clair Godfrey is very excited about their debut at this year’s Dragon Boat Festival, “Our team will be made up of representatives from across the company and we felt this would be a great opportunity for team building, fundraising and having fun!” As well as all the action taking place on the river, there’s plenty to enjoy on the banks, including Chinese-themed entertainment, children’s rides, inflatable activities and plenty of food and drink for all the family on the bankside. If you fancy getting involved, visit the Gable Events website for more information and fill out an entry form. n dragonboatfestivals.co.uk/cambridge

A great opportunity for team building, fundraising and fun

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_038-039 (DRAGONBOAT FEST) cb copysg.indd 41

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

41 4/24/17 10:28 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 42

24/04/2017 14:31


CE ADS_MAY.indd 43

24/04/2017 14:31


CE ADS_MAY.indd 44

24/04/2017 14:33


A DV E RT I S E M CEONMTPFEETAT I T IUORN E

CAM

BSE

D

N ITIO

.CO

.UK

WIN A WHYTE STRAWBERRY HILL 2017 HYBRID BIKE FROM RUTLAND CYCLING!

C

ambridge Edition has teamed up with Rutland Cycling and Whyte to give away a top of the range Whyte Strawberry Hill 2017 Hybrid bike worth £649.99. Perfect for cycling around the city in style, this smart bicycle combines the elegance of a vintage machine with a 27-speed drivetrain. With its remarkably lightweight frame, Whyte has made it even easier to get up the hills, or just to carry up the stairs when you get home. Comfort has been given top priority with the Strawberry Hill; the Whyte saddle is highly cushioned but also lightweight. The grips are specifically designed to fit your palm on a swept handlebar and even the brake levers have a Kraton insert to add a tactile and comfortable feel. Full mudguards, a chainset cover, kickstand and internal cable routing keep all the moving parts away from the rider. Family business Rutland Cycling has five stores in the city, with branches at Cambridge Station, Grand Arcade, Barnwell Road, Histon and the Giant Store on Hills Road. Rutland offers a full range of bikes, including electric bikes, and accessories for all ages and abilities, plus servicing, repairs and friendly advice. Daily or long-term cycle hire is available at Grand Arcade and Cambridge Station stores. n

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_045 (COMPETITION)sgljc.indd 45

Electric bike demo day. On 14 May at Rutland Cycling’s Barnwell Road branch (10am4pm), you can test the best bikes in the industry and experience the amazing feeling of riding an electric bike. Rutland’s e-bike experts will be on hand to answer any questions and there will be unlimited demo rides on the day (subject to availability). To book your free place and for more information, visit rutlandcycling.com/events (£10 deposit refundable on the day).

T&CS

To enter, visit cambsedition.co.uk. The winner must be able to collect the bike from one of Rutland Cycling’s Cambridge stores, either Grand Arcade, Cambridge Station, Histon, Barnwell Road or the Giant Store on Hills Road.

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

45 4/24/17 10:15 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 46

24/04/2017 14:34


A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

Food & drink.

G E T T H E I N S I D E T R AC K O N C A M B R I D G E ’S F O O D I E S C E N E W I T H E D I T I O N ’S M O N T H LY SUPPLEMENT

48 59

FOOD NEWS. REVIEW: CAMBRIDGE C O O K E RY SCHOOL CAFE.

65

VIBRANT VEGGIE RECIPES.

73

TO P C R A F T B E E R S W I T H T H I R S T Y.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_047 (FOOD OPENER) cbsg.indd 47

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

47 4/24/17 10:15 AM


Food news.

A M O N T H LY RO U N D - U P O F GA S T RO N O M I C G O I N GS – O N I N C A M B R I D G E A N D T H E S U R RO U N D I N G A R E A

V E GA N & V I N TAG E FA I R .

THIRST Y RIVERSIDE. Drinks shop Thirsty, whose permanent base is on Chesterton Road, has been on a determined mission to shake up Cambridge’s food and boozing scene over the last couple of years. Following on from the roaring success of ThirstyFest’s latest instalment in March, they’ve now upped their game again with their latest venture: Thirsty Riverside. Having launched at the end of April, this German Biergarten-style event will be taking place each and every weekend throughout the summer, offering great food, great drinks and a whole host of special events. Thirsty Riverside will be located by the Cambridge Museum of Technology, which you can find opposite the Chesterton foot and cycle bridge. It’s going to be open each Friday lunchtime to Sunday evening right the way through until September, when you’ll be able to swing by and enjoy bites and tipples from local food trucks in the fairy light-festooned cobbled yard, as well as loads of tasty wines and craft beers from Thirsty. It’s not all about the booze though. There will also be great coffee, teas and plenty of soft drinks, plus homemade cakes and ice creams for pud. There’s also going to be special events at the site throughout the summer,

48

including drinks festivals, outdoor cinema screenings, music nights, monthly farmers’ markets and pop-up dining events. “The Museum owns one of the most amazing sites and buildings in Cambridge – a rare example of Victorian industrial architecture in our city, with lots of sheltered outside space, handily situated right on the river, just past Midsummer Common,” says Sam Owens of Thirsty. “There is so much potential to run amazing things there, whether one-off events or more permanent fixtures. This place is perfect for Thirsty and we are chuffed to bits to launch something totally different for Cambridge this summer. “As our customers know, we love all things German at Thirsty, and a real German Biergarten is something special,” he continues. “Our Thirsty version will feature German beer styles from our favourite UK brewers imports from our brilliant young German craft brewers (von Freude of Hamburg and Berliner Berg of Berlin) and a range of lovely German and Austrian wines. We also want the space to be family friendly, so there will be plenty on offer for younger customers, too. We think Cambridge is going to love it.” Stay tuned to @ThirstyCamb on Twitter for announcements.

Ely Markets will host a fair dedicated to all things vegan and vintage over the early May Bank Holiday weekend. This familyfriendly event, which is free to attend, will run from 10am to 4pm on both days and feature scrumptious plant-based foodie treats, vintage clothing and homewares, vinyl, street food and a fully stocked bar – as well as entertainment to keep kids entertained. Dolphin Lane will be transformed into ‘Vegan Alley’, playing host to a selection of much-loved vegan stalls including Kura Kura, the local Sri Lankan and South Indian street food outfit which serves up fragrant curries, kothu roti and bhajis. Food by Lizzi, famed for her vegan Scotch eggs, will also be there, along with Miss Molly, whilst in the marketplace you’ll be able to browse a variety of vintage trader stalls. “Ely Markets is pleased to host a fantastic event for the May Day weekend,” says Julia Davis from the Ely Markets team. “Whether you’re a foodie or just love vintage, come along to Ely marketplace on Sunday and Monday to check out new tastes and browse the great choice on offer.”

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 48

4/24/17 10:27 AM


FOOD & DRINK

New Look & 25% off at Browns. There’s no denying that Browns is a bit of a local institution. The setting for many a birthday celebration, graduation day meal and evening of cocktails with friends, it occupies a special place in the heart of lots of Cambridge dwellers. As such, it comes as welcome news that this Trumpington Street favourite has recently undergone a refurbishment and launched a brand-new menu bursting with luxurious dishes – and they’re celebrating with 25% off food throughout May. The interior of the impressive building, itself a converted Addenbrooke’s wing, is now sporting a fresh new look. Monochrome floor tiling meets tarnished gold and rich blue, abundant foliage, velvet booths, mirrors, dark wood and a stunning vintage-style bar. In short, it’s gorgeous – fully maximising the potential of this historic and light-flooded building. Edition can vouch for the calibre of the updated food offering too, which sings with seasonal flavours and indulgent British classics. Highlights include an expertly-cooked roast

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 49

lamb rump with rich red wine jus, accompanied by creamy potato gratin and crushed minted peas. There’s also a sumptuous lobster risotto, panfried sea bass on a succulent seafood stew, and slow-cooked pork belly with savoury apple pie, crackling and buttery mash. The salted caramel profiteroles are an oozy, indulgent delight too, and worth the trip alone. They’ve upped their brunch game too, with a new range of luxurious dishes including the Brown’s Lobster Benedict, as well as adding a ‘Most unusual afternoon tea’, with three tiers of brioche roll sandwiches, home-made scones and dainty miniature desserts. Another new addition is the private dining area (an excellent option for a larger group or special occasion), while the new seasonal cocktail list – which brims with beautiful concoctions like the Rhubarb and Cucumber Collins – also looks to be well worth working your way through. Throughout May, Browns will be offering a 25% discount on food – visit the website for more details. browns-restaurants.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

49 4/24/17 10:27 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 54

24/04/2017 14:36


FOOD & DRINK

MAKING THE MOST OF ENGLISH A S PA R AG U S . C H R I S G R E E N S TO C K , H E A D C H E F AT T H E T H R E E H O R S E S H O E S AT M A D I N G L E Y, S H OW S YO U H OW TO M A K E T H E M O S T O F A S PA R AG U S S E A S O N English asparagus is only in season for around six weeks, and that’s why it’s important to make the most of it. You can eat it simply steamed, raw or chargrilled – hot or cold – with butter or olive oil and parmesan. Or it works wonderfully well with other ingredients too such as parma ham or any fresh soft cheese. In terms of partnering with wine, asparagus is a problem! Like watercress and celery, there is an element that really doesn’t work with many wines. The answer is to stick to light, fresh whites and avoid all reds and heavier whites. Dry Riesling is perfect. Here is one of my favourite ways to enjoy this wonderful locally-grown crop.

Tagliatelle with asparagus, crème fraiche, lemon and pea-shoots.

4 SER

Ingredients • • • • • • • • •

400g tagliatelle pasta 24 asparagus spears 120g good quality crème fraiche 1 lemon 40g grated Parmesan Handful of fresh marjoram Handful of pea-shoots 3tbsp olive oil (or butter) Salt and pepper

VES

Step-by-step guide 1. Zest the lemon and cut in half, juicing just one half. 2. Chop marjoram. 3. Gently mix the zest, juice and marjoram with the crème fraiche. 4. Chop each asparagus spear into three pieces 5. Cook the tagliatelle in a pan of boiling water, with a pinch of salt, according to the instructions on the packet. 6. For the last two minutes (max) of pasta cooking time put the asparagus in boiling water. Drain in a colander. 7. In the same pan (or a fresh one if you prefer) heat the olive oil or butter over a medium heat. Add the crème fraiche, salt and pepper and tagliatelle and combine gently. 8. Serve with a generous sprinkling of Parmesan and then the pea shoots. Add salad on the side if you wish.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 51

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

51 4/24/17 2:44 PM


F O O D PA R K ANNOUNCE SUMMER NIGHT M A R K E TS .

Cambridge’s street food scene continues to go from strength to strength, and there’s no better chance to taste your way around it than at the foodPark Night Markets. Offering a selection of around ten different food trucks, plus bars, music and plenty of space to relax and cosy up – the events take place over the course of the summer and have become a well-loved fixture in the city. Saturday 27 May, Saturday 22 July and Saturday 30 September are the dates for your diary, when the markets will take place 5-10pm at Gravel Hill Farm on Madingley Road. Expect scrumptious curries from Sri Lankan eaterie Kura Kura, Steak & Honour burgers, wings from Buffalo Joe’s, steamed bao from Guerrilla Kitchen and treats from Churros Bar and Chouxstopper. There’s also cocktails, fizz, craft beer and more to enjoy from the pop-up bars, plus live music and a DJ. Tickets are £4 for adults and free for children, and advance booking is strongly recommended. foodparkcam.com

Walk with a Fork at Abbots Ripton. Back for its fifth year, Walk with a Fork returns for another foodie extravaganza on 7 May. Taking place at Abbots Ripton Hall, the event consists of an eightmile ramble around the picturesque estate, with treats from local food and drink producers along the way. On offer will be delicious bites and tipples from great suppliers including Aspall, The Village Deli, Allotment Café, The Abbot’s Elm, Johnsons of Old Hurst and many more. Walk with a Fork is the flagship event from Ormiston Families, the leading family charity in the East of England, which provides services to support children and young people who face the dangers of social exclusion. “We are delighted with the success Walk with a Fork has had over the years and are pleased to be bringing the event back to Cambridgeshire this year,” says Gavin Lamb, relationship and events manager for the charity. “We always look forward to enjoying the great local food and drink from East Anglia and the beautiful scenery of the countryside, while raising vital funds which allow us to continue our work with children, young people and families throughout the region.” Tickets are £23 per person, children under 5 go free, dogs welcome. Book online at ormiston-families.eventbrite.com

Jack’s Gelato shop opens. © NICOLA FOLEY

Jack van Praag picked up bags of experience cheffing in top-end kitchens around the world before setting up his well-loved ice cream business here in Cambridge. Under the Jack’s Gelato moniker, transported by his distinctive custom tricycle, he’s been delighting the taste buds of Cambridge for around five years, earning a huge army of fans for his exquisite iced treats. As well as scooping all over town, he’s been a regular at foodPark and has collaborated with countless other local foodie enterprises – and now he’s started the next, rather exciting OPENIN chapter, by opening his very own city centre ice cream parlour. G Located in the building formerly home to Six Ice Cream on Bene’t Street, it’s a great city centre spot with a beautiful fit-out inside. The ever-changing menu showcases exactly the kind of deliciously intriguing flavour combinations he’s become Cambridge-famous for. Sample gelatos like salted treacle, malted milk or cardamom and rose, or opt for sorbets such as Alphonso mango with chili and salt, or Earl Grey and plum. All his creations are handmade using top quality ingredients, often including herbs from his own allotment, and there’s always something new to try. The shop is open from noon until 9pm daily. Follow @jacks_gelato for news and updates.

52

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 52

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:27 AM


FOOD & DRINK

OPENIN

S TAT I O N TAV E R N . There’s been an awful lot going on at CB1 lately – including a rather exciting new opening in the shape of Cambridge’s newest pub, Station Tavern. Boasting beautiful interiors, a great menu packed with seasonal British fare and plenty of top beers to sample, it’s sure to become a regular haunt. The pub, which is located directly in front of the station, a stone’s throw from the platforms, is the first Cambridge outpost from Young’s Brewery, which has pubs across

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 53

London and the south of England. There’s outdoor seating for sunny days, and squishy leather chairs to sink into inside, as well as The Sidings, which offers an intimate private dining area. It’s open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch, dinner and everything in between, serving up a menu which includes quality pub classics such as beer-battered fish and triple-cooked chips, and sirloin steak with bone marrow. Other menu highlights include

G

roasted cauliflower steak with ricotta and butternut squash, and treacle and stout pork collar with fried duck egg. Drinks-wise, there’s plenty to tempt, with a huge range of craft beers from across the country, including Young’s cask ales and local speciality beers. There’s also a range of seasonal cocktails, which make perfect partners for the selection of sharing platters on offer. thestationtavern.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

53 4/24/17 10:27 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 50

24/04/2017 14:34


FOOD & DRINK

New Menu at Marco Pierre White Steakhouse. The Doubletree’s Marco Pierre White Steakhouse has unveiled a tasty looking new menu created by MPW himself and featuring some of the TV chef’s favourite childhood dinners alongside contemporary dishes. Bursting with locally-sourced ingredients, the menu features starters, mains and desserts, including a new range of vegetarian-friendly sharing boards and dishes. At the heart of the menu though, is steak – and oh boy, have they got some tempting offerings for any cardcarrying carnivores out there. The most decadent of all is the whopping 32oz T-bone sharing steak, which you can swaddle in peppercorn or brandy sauce. Alternatively enjoy a retro chicken kiev, an indulgent burger with cheese and bacon, or sticky babyback ribs in deluxe BBQ sauce served with French fries and American coleslaw. “My restaurants are not stuffy and pretentious,” says Marco Pierre White. “Instead they are about enjoying your evening, with excellent food and drink in luxurious, relaxed surroundings and quite simply having a good time. “That’s the kind of experience that our guests in Cambridge can look forward to, with something to suit every taste and budget. I call it affordable glamour and we hope it’s an experience our guests will want to return to again and again.” mpwrestaurants.co.uk

A S PA R AG U S F E A S T & S I Z Z L I N G S U N D AY AT B U RWA S H .

© PHOTO CREDIT

E V E N TS AT T H E TAC K R O O M .

There are two brilliant events to get your teeth into this month at Burwash Manor out in Barton, both of which provide a lovely familyfriendly day out. Up first, on 13 May, Burwash’s annual celebration of asparagus returns for a huge celebration of this beloved spring vegetable. Offering tasters, cooking demos and plenty of samples, it’s a perfect way of making the most of the fleeting British asparagus season, and sample some spears straight from the farm. Running 10am-4pm, there’s also street food vans, a bar and entertainment to enjoy. Then, on the 28th, the hugely popular Sizzling Sunday pitches up for a lazy afternoon of feasting and relaxing. Expect pulled pork and more barbecued deliciousness featuring Burwash’s own rare breed pigs, alongside food from Wandering Yak and Gourmet Brownie Company. Both events are free and there’s plenty of free parking on site. Search Burwash Manor on Facebook for more info.

Located at Palace House in Newmarket, The Tack Room restaurant serves up great-quality, seasonal and locally-sourced food in an elegant setting, complete with wine and cocktail bar. This month, pay a visit to their Italian Wine Tasting on the 2nd: an evening of beautiful wines and delicious food led by Italian wine producers, who’ll be on hand to impart wisdom and talk you through the tastings. Then, from 8 to 14 May, it’s Real Bread Week in the The King’s Yard, when you can enjoy daily demos from The Tack Room’s artisan bread maker, plus take home recipes and enjoy special sandwiches and other treats. palacehousenewmarket.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 55

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

55 4/24/17 10:27 AM


Trinity opens.

OPENIN

G

Located on Trinity Street, the sister restaurant for the popular Varsity opened its doors in April, and rather swish it’s looking too. Inside, there are elegant leather banquettes, atmospheric lighting and artworks depicting Cambridge scenes on the wall; we adore the illuminated signage on the wall too – very cool. It’s the menu which really does the talking though, bursting with sophisticated delicacies like oysters on ice with Tabasco, which you can enjoy with a glass of Black Velvet (that’s champagne and stout – the perfect palate-pal for oysters, in case you were wondering). For mains, enjoy artfully presented culinary masterpieces such as seared scallops with black pudding soil, pea purée, crispy pork belly and mint foam. With a stylish setting and exciting, but very reasonably priced menu, we reckon it’s only a matter of time before Trinity is the talk of the town. trinitycambridge.co.uk

G

©DAISY DICKINSON

OPENIN

56

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 56

S T I R B A K E RY OPENS.

Stir café was welcomed with open arms by the community in CB4 when it opened its doors around a year and a half ago, and it’s continued to go from strength to strength, recently expanding into the building next door to open its very own bakery. The Stir Bakery, which opened on Good Friday, will take all the baking for the café in-house, as well as offering its own delicious range of artisan breads, cakes and other treats. Everything will be handmade on-site, led by Stir’s new artisan head baker, Mahala Le May, who’ll be supported by a specialist team to create freshly-baked breads, bagels, croissants, plus sweet tarts and savoury pastries – all available fresh six days a week. The bread range, consisting of sourdoughs and other slow fermented breads, will be made with organic milled flour from Shipton Mill, while those with a sweet tooth can indulge in treats like crème brûlée tarts, almond blondies and fruit scones. “Our philosophy from day one was for Stir to be at the heart of the local community, making CB4 a better place to live,” explains Stir owner Judith Harrison. “We have focused on providing fresh, high-quality, ethicallysourced food and drink in the coffee shop and we’re delighted people have responded so positively. Opening a bakery feels like a natural extension to the business and we hope it will make CB4 even more special. “We want Stir Bakery to be famous for some signature menu items but also to be a place to discover new products and tastes. Our head baker will regularly be creating her own new recipes for our customers to try. The quality of the ingredients used and the incredible care and time that goes into each individual item will ensure that everything we make has a unique taste and character – we can’t wait to share these products with everyone!” stircambridge.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:27 AM


FOOD & DRINK

C H O P H O U S E L AU N C H E S B R U N C H M E N U . Looking right at home in one of Cambridge’s most picture-perfect corners, the Chop House on King’s Parade doesn’t rely on location alone to pull in the punters. As with every Cambscuisine venue, from Smokeworks to The Crown & Punchbowl, they’ve a reputation for consistently excellent grub. Which is why we are so delighted to report that they’ve recently

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_050-057 (FOOD NEWS) copysg ljc copy.indd 57

extended their offering to include fabulously indulgent brunches. The exemplary full English comes with sourdough toast, fried button mushrooms, baked beans, black pudding, tomato, eggs, thick and flavoursome bacon and a rather decadent three sausages. There’s a veggie variant too, as well a creamy porridge with fruit

compote, or smoked kipper on toast, but our tried-and-tested menu must-eat is hands down the Bacon Chop. The chunky bacon, smoky and succulent, is joined by a rich hollandaise sauce and sweet potato and red onion hash – it’s our new fave brunch dish in Cambridge. Breakfast is served daily 9-11.30am. cambscuisine.com

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

57 4/24/17 10:28 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 58

24/04/2017 14:36


E AT I N G O U T

Cambridge Cookery School Café.

T

W O R D S N I C O L A F O L E Y I M AG E S DA I SY D I C K I N S O N

he phrase ‘hidden gem’ is bandied around a lot, but you really do have to know where you’re going if you’ve any hope at all of finding Cambridge Cookery School’s Café. Tucked away anonymously in a quiet corner of central Cambridge, just off Hills Road between university buildings and new residential developments, it’s not a place you’re likely to stumble across by accident – but you’ll be glad for seeking it out. We stopped by on a warm evening in April, immediately greeted with friendly chat, a couple of zingy grapefruit cocktails and a bowl of warm almonds, gloriously drizzled in sticky honey with chilli and rosemary. The vibe of the café, which serves up brunches, lunches and home-made cakes during the day, is minimalist Scandi-cool; all bright whites, natural woods and modern, simple furnishings. Having built up a reputation first as an award-winning cookery school, and then as a favourite daytime haunt, the café is now introducing its latest incarnation, that of neighbourhood bistro and wine bar. Saturday nights now see the venue laying on a range of sumptuous sharing boards, lovingly crafted cocktails and a small but perfectly formed range of wines. As with everything Cambridge Cookery School does, a passion for excellent quality produce shines through on the menu, which offers a global culinary adventure by way of a handful of internationally inspired platters. Though tempted by the pickled herring and Swedish västerbotten

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_059 (REVIEW)_FE cb.indd 59

on the Scandinavian board, not to mention the decadent camembert and onion soufflé of the French offering, I couldn’t resist the Italian option – which had my mouth watering with its promises of cured meats, pungent cheeses and garlicky home-made pesto. As I’d hoped, this generously sized smorgasbord didn’t disappoint – a luscious feast of flavours, the marinated charred vegetables, soft hunks of buffalo mozzarella, truffle-infused honey and fragrant focaccia were particular highlights. A sturdy little lasagne, rich, meaty, creamy and just right, provided another welcome addition. Over on the other side of the table, my dining partner had hopped continents for a Middle Eastern jaunt with her colourful mezze platter. Smoky baba ganoush and unctuous hummus were joined by baked feta with lemon, plus a handful of juicy olives and a light, crunchy fattoush salad. A steaming bowl of sweet potato and lentil stew with tzatziki made for a hearty centrepiece. By this point barely able to move but determined not to miss out on anything coming from this kitchen, I also enjoyed a gorgeously delicate, light brownie with natural yoghurt for pudding. It may have meant I was good for little more than a food coma for the rest of the evening but I wouldn’t have missed it – a simple but resoundingly successful dessert. There may be shortcomings – those in search of a lively atmosphere on a Saturday night may be left wanting, for example – but there are lots of excellent reasons to visit. Lovingly prepared dishes offering huge flavours; beautiful wines and a friendly, relaxed setting – I’d say it’s pretty much everything that you could hope for from a neighbourhood restaurant. Dinner is served on Saturday nights from 6.30pm onwards. n cambridgecookeryschool.com

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

59 4/24/17 10:15 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 60

24/04/2017 14:39


CE ADS_MAY.indd 61

24/04/2017 14:39


CE ADS_MAY.indd 62

24/04/2017 14:40


Food with bite.

E AT I N G O U T

F RO M R AV I O L I T O R I S O T T O, NET TLES ARE A DELICIOUS A D D I T I O N T O M A N Y A FAVO U R I T E RECIPE, FINDS ALEX RUSHMER

N

WORDS ALEX RUSHMER

ext to where I live is a large plot of land. It used to be the home of an overgrown orchard, the branches of the trees bending under the weight of the sour apples that would fruit in the late summer. All that has gone and soon it will be houses. For now, nature remains defiant and dominant. Once we are beyond high summer, a thick fog of brambles will yield plump blackberries that would have been a fitting partner to the apples that used to grow there, but it is a cosy blanket of nettles that offer the most immediate sustenance. At this time of year the nettles are tender, young and fresh. They still require careful handling, but their verdant tops are a welcome addition to the springtime menu. They are an abundant, free and versatile ingredient that adds a delicious talking point to the dinner table. The easiest way to approach cooking with nettles is to think of them as an alternative to spinach. They have a similar grassy flavour but with an added the zip and pizzazz, the sort of freshness that you’d expect from a wild ingredient, especially one that is at its best when all the warmest days of summer are still ahead of us. When picking them, be sure to don a pair of rubber gloves and choose only the top shoots where the youngest leaves are. Those further down the plant can be too coarsely textured and give the resulting dishes an unpleasant graininess. Wash them well and then plunge into rapidly boiling salted water for 30 seconds before refreshing immediately in cold water. The cooking process should stop almost immediately to retain the vivid green colour. Once the nettles have been picked and blanched they are ready to use as you see fit. Blended with hazelnuts, rapeseed oil and some grated Cornish yarg cheese, they make a wonderfully English version of pesto, ideal for scooping up with a few breadsticks. As an addition to soup, too, nettles work brilliantly. Use onions and celery for flavour, potato for texture and plenty of nettles alongside some locally grown watercress for a truly local Fenland lunch. As an ingredient in Italian dishes, nettles really shine. They provide a gentle bitterness, beloved in Italy, but also the necessary vivacity of other famed ingredients. In the past I’ve made nettle risotto, a depth of flavour coming from a mellow mushroom stock and the whole thing finished with a generous

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_063 (FOOD COLUMN) cb.indd 63

Nettles are an abundant, free and versatile ingredient grating of hard cheese, a sauté of wild mushrooms and a drizzle of truffle oil. My most recent experiment though, proved to be a firm favourite: generously filled ravioli where the nettles replaced the spinach in a classic combination alongside ricotta, nutmeg and black pepper. These wonderful little dumplings were finished with a sauce made from nothing more than a little butter, a spoonful of the cooking water from the pasta pot and some salty Pecorino that melted through the whole dish. Suddenly a few little stings seemed like a small price to pay. n

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

63 4/24/17 10:15 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 64

24/04/2017 14:40


RECIPES

Avibrant veggie feast. W O R D S & I M AG E S M I C H E L L E A L S TO N

M I C H E L L E A L S T O N , AU T H O R O F T H E L A S T F O O D B L O G, S H A R E S A S E L E C T I O N O F H E R FAVO U R I T E M E AT- F R E E R E C I P E S I N H O N O U R O F N AT I O N A L V E G E TA R I A N W E E K , 15 -21 M AY

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

CE05_065-069 (RECIPES) cbsg copy.indd 65

65 4/24/17 10:26 AM


4

SERVE

S

Baked miso-glazed tofu with stir-fried veggies and noodles. A veggie-packed delight, this delightful crispy baked tofu with its rich red miso glaze will make a convert out of anyone P R E P T I M E : 45 M I N S C O O K T I M E : 3 0 M I N S

Ingredients

FOR THE BAKED M I S O - G L A Z E D TO F U

• 1 block (250g) firm tofu, drained and cut into even cubes • 3tbsp grapeseed oil • 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped • 1tbsp ginger, finely chopped • 1tbsp red miso paste • 1tbsp toasted sesame oil • 1tbsp honey • ½tbsp lemon juice

F O R T H E S T I R F RY VEGGIES AND NOODLES

• 150g buckwheat noodles (I used organic buckwheat noodles with quinoa) • ½tbsp grapeseed oil • 125g shiitake mushrooms, wiped clean and sliced • 50g pioppini mushrooms, wiped clean and left whole • 3 large spring onions, sliced diagonally • 100g kale, chopped with any woody stems removed • 150g purple sprouting broccoli • ½ a red chilli, finely sliced, seeds removed • 1tbsp sesame seeds, toasted (optional)

Step-by-step guide

1. Start by preparing the tofu. Lay a double layer of kitchen paper on a baking tray, spread the cubed tofu evenly on the baking tray, cover with another double layer of kitchen paper and then place a slightly smaller baking tray on top.

66

Place two 400g cans of beans or a heavy saucepan on top of the top tray and leave it to drain for 30 minutes. 2. Make the marinade by adding the oils, miso paste, honey, garlic, ginger and lemon juice to a large mixing bowl, big enough to contain the tofu (I used a pie dish). Whisk all the ingredients together. 3. Preheat the oven to 180°C; I use a fan assisted, electric oven, so please adjust according to your own oven. 4. Remove the tofu from the trays then add to the miso mixture to marinate for 15 minutes, turning the tofu halfway through. Prep your veg while the tofu is marinating. 5. Line a baking tray with parchment paper and place the tofu on the baking tray (keep the leftover marinade). Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, turning the cubes over half way through cooking and turning the tray around to ensure even cooking. The tofu is done when the edges are crispy and the cubes are a rich, golden colour. 6. While the tofu is baking, cook the noodles according to the packet. 7. Heat ½tbsp of oil in a large wok, add the spring onions, and cook for a minute, then add the mushrooms, cook for three minutes. Now add the chilli, cook for one minute then add the kale and sprouting broccoli and 2tbsp of the remaining marinade. Cook for three minutes. 8. Serve the tofu on a bed of noodles and stir-fry veggies, topped with some toasted sesame seeds and a drizzle of the remaining marinade.

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_065-069 (RECIPES) cbsg copy.indd 66

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 2:46 PM


RECIPES

STUFFED SQUASH WITH WILD RICE AND MUSHROOMS. With sweet and slightly caramelised squash, a lovely earthy taste from the rice and wild mushrooms and a nice crunch from the nuts and seeds, this is a budget-friendly, satisfying vegetarian meal P R E P T I M E : 15 M I N S C O O K T I M E : 5 0 M I N S

Ingredients

• 2 harlequin squash, cut in half lengthways • 100g wild & red rice (raw weight) • 1tsp vegetable bouillon • 2tbsp olive oil • ½ a red onion (80g), finely chopped • 100g wild mushrooms, or chestnut mushrooms, cleaned and chopped • 2 cloves of garlic, minced • 40g chopped walnuts • 60g feta

• 1tsp pumpkin seeds, chopped • A small bunch of thyme, leaves removed

Step-by-step guide

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (I use a fanassisted, electric oven, please adjust according to your oven) 2. Brush 1tbsp of olive oil on the inside of the halved squash, place them skin side down on a baking tray and bake for 35 minutes or until the flesh is soft. 3. While the squash is roasting make the filling. Cook the rice according to the packet instructions (I added a level teaspoon of vegetable boullion to the rice

when cooking for extra flavour, but you can leave it out if you wish). 4. While the rice is cooking, heat 1 tbsp of olive oil in a frying pan, add the onion and cook until soft, for about ten minutes. Then add the mushrooms, garlic and thyme and cook for five minutes. Set aside until the rice is cooked. 5. Once the rice is cooked add it to a large mixing bowl along with the onion and mushroom mixture, add in the walnuts and mix well. 6. Spoon the filling mixture into the squash, pat it down with the back of the spoon and then add some more. It’s OK for the filling to be heaped on here. 7. Crumble the feta over the mixture and bake in the oven for ten minutes. Sprinkle the pumpkin seeds over the squash and serve immediately.

4

SER

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_065-069 (RECIPES) cbsg copy.indd 67

VE

S

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

67 4/24/17 10:26 AM


68

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_068-069 (RECIPES NEW SPREAD) cbljc.indd 68

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:25 AM


RECIPES

F E TA A N D S U N - D R I E D TO M ATO SW I R L S W I T H W I L D GA R L I C P E S TO .

6

MA

KES

Super easy and full of bold flavours, these little swirls are perfect for picnics and entertaining PREP TIME: 50 MINS COOK TIME: 20 MINS

Ingredients

F O R T H E P E S TO

• • • • • • •

60g wild garlic, washed 20g curly leaf parsley, washed 50g vegetarian Parmesan cheese, finely grated 50g hazelnuts, skinned, lightly toasted then chopped 4tbsp extra virgin olive oil ¼tsp each of sea salt and cracked black pepper A small splash of lemon juice

F O R T H E F E TA A N D S U N-D R I E D TO M ATO SW I R L S

• • • • • •

375g sheet of ready rolled all-butter puff pastry 3tbsp wild garlic pesto (above) 100g feta, crumbled 50g sun-dried tomatoes, sliced lengthways 1 egg, whisked A little plain flour for dusting

Step-by-step guide

1. Add the wild garlic, parsley and hazelnuts to a mortar and pound with the pestle to break down the leaves and nuts, until you have a paste (this took me about 30 minutes). Add the cheese and use the pestle to mash it into the herbs. 2. Then stir in the lemon juice, sea salt and black

pepper. Add the extra virgin olive oil 1tbsp at a time until you have a smooth, slightly loose sauce. Transfer to a sealable glass jar.

F O R T H E F E TA A N D S U N-D R I E D TO M ATO SW I R L S

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C, I use a fan assisted, electric oven, so please adjust according to your own oven. 2. Dust a working surface with some flour and roll out the pastry. 3. Spread 3tbsp of the wild garlic pesto onto the pastry leaving a little room around the edges. 4. Sprinkle the feta on to the pesto and then add the sun-dried tomatoes. 5. Roll the pastry tightly from the long side and cut off the uneven edges at both ends with a bread knife. 6. Cut the rolled pastry into slices, about 2cm thick; you should have 16 slices. Place the slices flat side up on two baking trays lined with parchment paper. Brush with the egg then bake in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown. 7. When cooked leave them to cool on the baking trays for a few minutes then place them on a wire tray to cool further. 8. Serve warm or cold.

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

CE05_068-069 (RECIPES NEW SPREAD) cbljc.indd 69

69 4/24/17 10:26 AM


4

SERVE

S

Mediterranean Baked Sweet Potatoes. These flavour-packed baked sweet potatoes with za’atar chickpeas, goat’s cheese and a thyme and garlic yogurt sauce make a delicious and healthy meal P R E P T I M E : 30 M I N S C O O K T I M E : 50 M I N S

Ingredients

FOR THE BAKED SW E E T P OTATO E S

• A small pinch each of cracked black pepper and sea salt

TO S E RV E

• 4 large sweet potatoes, skin on, washed and dried • ½tbsp olive oil

• Watercress, lemon wedges, cracked black pepper and sea salt

FOR THE FILLING

Step-by-step guide

• 400g can of chickpeas, rinsed and dried • ½tbsp za’atar • ½tbsp olive oil • 80g vegetarian goat’s cheese • 3 spring onions, sliced

F O R T H E L E M O N, T H YM E A N D GA R L I C SAU C E

• 1tbsp thyme leaves • ½tsp olive oil • 1 clove of garlic, minced • 150g plain natural yogurt, full fat • zest of half a lemon

70

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (I use a fanassisted, electric oven, please adjust according to your own oven). 2. Wash and dry the sweet potatoes, pierce a couple of times with a fork, rub the oil onto the potatoes and place on baking tray. Bake for about 45-50 minutes or until cooked through. Test with a sharp knife and the knife should come out clean. 3. While the potatoes are cooking make the yogurt sauce. Add the thyme leaves and ½tsp of olive oil to a mortar and using the pestle bruise the leaves. In another small

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_065-069 (RECIPES) cbsg copy.indd 70

serving bowl add the yogurt, garlic, thyme, lemon zest, salt and pepper, mix well and leave in the fridge until ready to serve. 4. To make the za’atar chickpeas, place the dry chickpeas in a bowl with ½tbsp of olive oil and the za’atar, mix well and then transfer to a baking tray. Bake in the oven for ten minutes (I do this towards the end of cooking the sweet potatoes). 5. When the sweet potatoes are done, remove them from the oven. Using a sharp knife cut the potatoes open and fluff up the flesh of the potatoes with a fork. 6. Add the chickpeas and crumble in the goat’s cheese. Return the sweet potatoes to the oven for another seven to eight minutes until the cheese melts. 7. Serve the baked potatoes with the chopped spring onions, some watercress, lemon wedges and a good dollop of the thyme and lemon yogurt.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:26 AM


RECIPES

6

SER

VES

M E AT - F R E E C OT TAG E P I E . A rich and comforting meatless Cottage Pie, this is perfect comfort food for a cosy night in P R E P T I M E : 50 M I N S C O O K T I M E : 5 0 M I N S

Ingredients

• 1tbsp olive oil • 1 large onion (140g), chopped • 2 sticks of celery, chopped • 3 large carrots (240g), peeled and chopped • 2 medium parsnips, (200g), peeled and chopped • 150g chestnut mushrooms, wiped clean and cut into ¼ or 1/8 if large • 250g puy lentils, pre-cooked, I used a store bought pack. • 2 cloves of garlic, minced • 1tbsp plain flour • 1tbsp tomato puree • 750ml vegetable stock • 75ml red wine (optional, but recommended) • 2tbsp low-sodium soy sauce • 1tbsp Worcestershire sauce (optional) • 1tbsp redcurrant jelly • 1 large fresh bay leaf • 5 or 6 sprigs of thyme • ¼tsp ground black pepper • 850g floury potatoes (I used Maris Piper) • 40g butter • A good splash of milk • Black pepper and sea salt to season • 80g good cheddar cheese, grated

Step-by-step guide

1. Heat the oil in a heavy based large pan, add the onion and cook for gently

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_065-069 (RECIPES) cbsg copy.indd 71

until soft, then add the celery. Cook for a further five minutes. 2. Add the carrots, parsnips, mushrooms and garlic and cook for five minutes. 3. Now stir in the flour and tomato puree, mix well and cook for a minute or two. 4. Pour in the stock, and the wine and cook for about five minutes, then add the puy lentils, soy sauce, the Worcestershire sauce and drop in the redcurrant jelly. Mix this well. 5. Add the bay leaf, thyme and black pepper then simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the bottom. 6. While the veg is simmering boil the potatoes. When they are done mash them well, try to get them nice and smooth. Add the butter, milk, salt and pepper, then using a wooden spoon quickly stir the potatoes until you have a light and fluffy mash. 7. Once the veg mix has reduced to a thickish consistency add it to a large casserole dish, remove the thyme stalks and the bay leaves, then top with the mash, using a fork to spread it evenly over the veg mixture. 8. Top the mash with the cheese and cook in a preheated oven, at 180°C, for about 20 minutes or until the mash and cheese is golden and the pie is bubbling. 9. Remove from the oven and let it stand for a few minutes before serving. 10. Serve with greens or on its own.

Ely-based Michelle Alston has been running The Last Food Blog for around two years, having launched it as a place to share the recipes she was creating. It’s a treasure trove of foodie inspiration with gorgeous photography, featuring a huge array of easyto-make, health conscious but indulgent recipes. She’s a big fan of shopping local and loves picking up ingredients and making discoveries at the bustling Ely Market, as well as the Larder at Burwash Manor out in Barton. “I think food should be easy and uncomplicated,” says Michelle when asked about her food philosophy. “I use seasonal produce as much as possible and buy British and Irish products as much as possible (I’m Irish). Good quality ingredients are important to the end result. Good food doesn’t need to be expensive and if you buy in season it’s usually cheaper. I’m cooking more and more vegetarian dishes – we often have meat-free months, though we’re not vegetarian.” In honour of National Vegetarian Week, which is 15-21 May, we’ve decided to feature some of Michelle’s most delicious meat-free recipes, including the Cottage Pie which is her all-time favourite. “I’ve made that so many times now and I never miss the meat. It’s a firm family favourite. I also love eggs any time of the day, and they are the number one reason I will never be a vegan! Shakshuka with spinach and feta is my comfort food; typically served for breakfast, I like this for supper with some good crusty bread.” Check out the blog at thelastfoodblog.com.

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

71 4/24/17 10:26 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 72

24/04/2017 14:40


FOOD & DRINK

Brexit Beer.

E L O D I E C A M E RO N F RO M C H E S T E R T O N ROA D ’S THIRST Y CONSIDERS THE I M PAC T O F B R E X I T O N O U R B E L OV E D B R E WS

N

W O R D S E LO D I E C A M E R O N

igel Farage celebrated ‘Brexit Day’ with a beer on the 29 March. Can we really read anything into this – perhaps a support of the burgeoning UK beer market, which now has over 1,700 breweries across the UK? Or was it just a traditional celebratory tipple? Whatever the reason, here in Britain we love a beer – and more and more of us are opting for a lovingly created craft beer full of passion and flavour. In this new era of Brexit, surely the only way forward when you reach for a drink is to support British when you drink beer (even for us Remoaners). The craft beer scene in the country is huge – with small, passionate breweries across the UK offering us more than 11,000 beers to choose from! And what could be more British that a pint of beer? Thanks to this tradition we’ve seen a record number of microbreweries opening across the country, creating countless jobs and opportunities. Let’s just hope that the Brexit vote will not be too much of a hindrance, given that most grain and equipment used is imported. It seems we are happy to pay a premium for quality, but if the exchange rates bite it will be survival of the fittest for these smaller breweries. This could be easily countered: Roger Protz of CAMRA states “it’s absurd to import grain when it's widely acknowledged that maritime barley – as grown in Norfolk and Suffolk – delivers the finest flavour and sugars for fermentation.” With this in mind perhaps we can support British and buy local. This is very much the philosophy at Redwell Brewery in Norwich, where they combine local ingredients with a top-notch brewer and are now reinvigorating the rich brewing traditions of Norwich. Whichever way you look at it and whatever your views on Brexit, one thing is for sure: in Britain we love beer and there is no sign that this bubble is about to burst quite yet. n

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_071 (DRINKS)sgljc.indd 73

Best of British?

O L D F R I E N D S PA L E A L E (5.5%) £3.10

This local Cambridge beer is an American-inspired brew made using imported grain to create a generous hoppy pale ale – a light beer that’s full of flavour.

A N S PAC H & H O B DAY T H E C R E A M A L E (5.2%) £3.4 0

Stylish London crew Anspach & Hobday, although known for their heavier porter style brews, are the only brewery in London to brew a cream ale – a cross between a pale and a lager. Japanese hops allow the aromatics of the hop to complement the smoothness created by the addition of a little corn. You will also find hints of lemon and vanilla on the nose.

R E D W E L L B R E W E RY KO F R A S TO U T (5.9%) £3.4 0

The name comes from collaboration with a local Norwich coffee shop ‘Kofra’ and the beer is brewed using a specially blended coffee from Guatemala and Costa Rica. Just to top it all not only does this taste great, this beer is also gluten free through a magical enzyme process that breaks down the gluten molecules without affecting the flavour.

H E AV Y I N D U S T R I E S H E I S S E S C H E I S S E W E I S S E (5%) £3.4 0

This is an exciting, clearly ‘pro EU’ collaboration between Heavy Industry in North Wales and German craft brewers Von Freude, lovingly brought together by Thirsty to create this unique wheat stout with smokey chipotle chilli. We’ll leave you to work out what the name means!

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

73 4/24/17 12:47 PM


What’s on. A RO U N D - U P O F E V E N T S I N A N D A RO U N D C A M B R I D G E S H I R E T H I S M AY

1 M AY R E AC H V I L L AG E FA I R

The village fair returns for a day of fun with fair rides, Morris dancing, craft stalls, music, food and drink and plenty more besides. Make a day of it by joining in with the popular Reach Ride. 12pm-5pm | Reach Village Green | reachfair.org.uk

2 M AY G I N C L U B

Cambridge Wine Merchants host their monthly (G)investigation into what’s new and what’s hot in the world of gin at their Cherry Hinton Road branch. Expect plenty of gin, ice, tonic, wit, wisdom and some nibbles. 7pm | Cambridge Wine Merchants | £15 | cambridgewine.com

3 M AY E D D I READER

Having toured with the Eurythmics, been a member of punk outfit Gang of Four and, most famously, been part of Fairground Attraction, Scottish singer Eddi Reader brings a dose of her own gorgeous, romantic folk to Cambridge. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £24.50 | junction.co.uk

4 M AY A L A B A M A 3 Still going strong after 20 years making music together, the Brixton-based Alabama 3 are on the road with their raucous mash-up of rock, electronic, blues, country, gospel and spoken word. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £22.50 | junction.co.uk

4 M AY S K I N N Y LISTER

Rum-swilling, shanty-singing, punky-folk purveying Skinny Lister will be raising the roof in the J2 this month – expect a wonderfully wild night. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £13.50 | junction.co.uk

5 M AY S O U L LEGENDS

Hop aboard the soul train for an evening of unforgettable music performed by an all-star cast. Expect tunes from Tina Turner, Earth, Wind & Fire, Chaka Khan, Aretha Franklin and more in this show, which is presented by EasyTheatres. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £25.75-£27.75 | cornex.co.uk

DON MISS ’T THIN A G

CAM

BSED

IT IO N

.C O .U

K

5 M AY JESTERLARF C O M E DY C L U B M AY

The Junction’s J2 plays host to an evening of top comic talent, including appearances from Geoff Norcott, Jen Brister and Mike Gunn. Justin Panks will compère. 7.45pm | Cambridge Junction | £13.50 | junction.co.uk

12- 13 M AY M U S E U M S AT NIGHT

The Cambridge University Museums open their doors afterhours for special activities, escape games and music performances. Grab a glass of wine and enjoy an evening of culture with a twist. Times, locations and prices vary museums.cam.ac.uk

13 M AY B U RWA S H A S PA R AG U S FEAST

A huge celebration of the sensational spears of spring at Burwash Manor, featuring cookery demonstrations, samples and tastings, plus street food vans and a bar. Make the most of the short-lived asparagus season while it lasts. 10am-4pm | Burwash Manor | Free entry | burwashmanor.com

15 M AY M A X I M O PA R K

Alt pop maestros Maximo Park bring their hook-laden, highenergy flavour to Cambridge as part of a tour in support of the release of their latest album Risk to Exist. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £22.50 | junction.co.uk

6 May Imelda May. The acclaimed singer-songwriter and producer brings her unique sound to the Corn Exchange, following the release of her latest album, Life, Love, Flesh, Blood, which was released last month. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £27.75-£37.75 | cornex.co.uk

74

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_072-073 (LISTINGS) cb_FE.indd 74

19 M AY-18 J U N E E LY C AT H E D R A L S C I E N C E F E S T I VA L A month of interactive fun and discovery exploring science and the natural world through art, music and exhibitions. Times & Prices Vary | Ely Cathedral | elycathedral.org

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:25 AM


W WHHAT AT' S' SOONN

27 M AY C I T Y OF CAMBRIDGE SYM P H O N Y ORCHESTRA

Pianist Nicholas McCarthy offers a rare chance to see Liadov’s The Enchanted Lake, Britten’s Diversions on a Theme and Rachmaninov’s Symphony No. 3. 7.30pm | West Road | Concert Hall | £18 | westroad.org

15-20 May Not Dead Enough. Based on Peter James’ thrilling novel, Not Dead Enough tells the story of Brian Bishop, who claims he was 60 miles away, asleep, when his wife was murdered. As the detective delves deeper into the case, it becomes clear that love can be a very dangerous thing indeed… Times vary | Cambridge Arts Theatre | £23-£42 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

27 M AY WATC H O U T F E S T I VA L

A day-long festival geared towards showcasing edgy, contemporary performance makers. Expect the unexpected! 12pm-12am | Cambridge Junction | Festival Pass £20 | junction.co.uk

2 8 M AY S I Z Z L I N G S U N D AY

Spend a deliciously lazy Sunday at Burwash Manor, where they’re celebrating the rare breed pigs from their farm. Expect tasty pulled pork, a lavish barbecue, live music and a bar, plus local street food traders. 10am-4pm | The Larder at Burwash Manor | Free entry | burwashmanor.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_072-073 (LISTINGS) cb_FE.indd 75

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

75 4/24/17 10:25 AM


Top

10

FA M I LY DAYS O U T.

H A P P I LY E V E R A F T E R .

Inspired by the Dutch children’s book King and King by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland, Happily Ever After tells the story of a prince in search of his perfect partner. Presented by Action Transport Theatre, this warm-hearted and diversitychampioning fairy tale was created in partnership with The Proud Trust, and offers a visual treat of wordless storytelling and comedy clowning. The queen, starting to grow impatient, wants her lazy son to grow up and start acting like a king – but first he needs to get married. Ladies from across the land – tall ones, dancing ones and some with extraordinary hair – come to meet him in the hope of winning his affections, but he’s not impressed by any of them. It’s not until a princess arrives one day with her brother in tow that the love story begins… A not-to-be-missed fairy tale with a twist, this funny and poignant show runs at Cambridge Junction on 7 May. Tickets are £10 per adult and £6 per child. junction.co.uk

U P S TA I R S , D OW N S TA I R S .

Find out about life above and below the stairs at Audley End this month when the historic stately home is transported back to its Victorian heyday with the help of a cast of colourful characters. Meet Mrs Crocombe in the kitchen while she prepares a meal, chat to stable hands as they groom the horses and meet the housekeeper Mrs Warwick and other members of staff as they organise the house for the day. Life Above and Below the Stairs takes place on 6 and 7 May from 11am to 4pm, and tickets are £17.50 for adults and £10.50 for kids aged five to 15 years. english-heritage.org.uk

3 Leaf crowns.

Become a king or queen of the beautiful Botanic Gardens this month at a free, leaf crown crafting session. Kids can learn about leaves and have fun getting creative on 6 May between 11am and 3pm – drop in whenever you fancy (normal admission price for adults). botanic.cam.ac.uk

76

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_074-076 (FAMILY) cbsg.indd 76

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:24 AM


FA M I LY P E P PA P I G M U D DY WA L K .

If you’ve got kids or nieces and nephews of a certain age, you’re probably familiar with Peppa Pig – the series which has captured the hearts of a million preschoolers. This month, Peppa and her posse are doing their bit to help kids all over the world as they team up with Save the Children to launch a unique fundraising campaign. From 8 to 14 May, nurseries, early years’ groups, families and children up and down the country are being encouraged to take part in a Peppa Pig’s Muddy Puddle Walk. Splosh about in puddles, enjoy the great outdoors and have fun with pals, all while raising money for a great cause. There are loads of ways you can fundraise on your walk, from getting sponsored to asking for donations to take part, or you could even bake and sell some Muddy Puddle cupcakes! Save the Children works to support children around the world and give them a chance to learn, play and grow up healthy and happy – no matter where they’re born. Sign up to get a free Muddy Puddle Fundraising Pack, full of fundraising ideas and tips for great walks and activities indoors and out, as well as Peppa stickers and balloons. muddypuddlewalk.org

Duxford Air Festival.

THIS MONTH AT S H E P R E T H W I L D L I F E PA R K .

There’s aerial thrills and spills aplenty in store this month, when IWM Duxford welcomes back its hugely popular Duxford Air Festival on the weekend of 27 and 28 May. A much-loved fixture of the local calendar, this action-packed event will give visitors a chance to see all kinds of aircraft flying over the skies of Duxford’s airbase, showcasing the amazing skills of the pilots. See edge-of-your-seat aerobatics and thrilling ingenuity from a range of powerful aircraft, as well as live entertainment that includes music, family activities and talks. There will be a variety of festival food on offer for when you get peckish, as well as the award-winning museum to explore, which features various interactive exhibitions. Tickets start at £29.50 for adults; children aged 15 and under go free when purchasing a full price adult ticket. iwm.org.uk

FA N TA S T I C M R F OX .

Shepreth Wildlife Park has a couple of tempting delights this month, with their annual Bio-Blitz first up on 1 May. Children can explore beyond the usual wild and wonderful animals at the park to discover what else lives there. They can be part of a real scientific expedition to document the wildlife living in ponds and native species gardens around the grounds too. Activities include pond dipping, minibeast searching, birdwatching and bat detecting. Then during half-term, on 29 May (10am-4pm), there will be workshop sessions, face painting, a chance to feed animals and learn about zoos and conservation on Love Your Zoo day. It’s a campaign that’s run by the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums to encourage people to find out what goes on behind the scenes and why zoos are important. Normal admission applies for both events. sheprethwildlifepark.co.uk

Roald Dahl’s much-loved tale of a clever fox outwitting a trio of horrid farmers gets a musical reworking for the stage this month at the Arts Theatre. Featuring singing, dancing and spectacular sets, the show came about as part of the Roald Dahl centenary celebrations last year and runs from 9-13 May. Mr Fox is smart, quick and generally fantastic – but he’s got some horrible, smelly adversaries who go by the names of Boggis, Bunce and Bean. They’re out to get him and his family and friends, but can he hatch a plan to save the day – and can they outrun the diggers and outsmart the farmers? Fizzing with fun and colour this show has received rave reviews for its brilliantly Dahl-ish gruesomeness and silliness. All in all, a wondercrump treat for the whole family! Suitable for ages five years and up. Show times vary, tickets are £25 for adults and £18 for children. cambridgeartstheatre.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_074-076 (FAMILY) cbsg.indd 77

7

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

77 4/24/17 10:25 AM


8

FA M I LY

T H E E M P E R O R ’S N E W C LOT H E S .

After sell-out performances of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Stuff and Nonsense return to The Junction with The Emperor’s New Clothes on 21 May. Inspired by The Muppets, Danny Kaye and vintage family movies, there’s a problem for an Emperor who loves clothes more than anything. Despite a wardrobe the size of Paris, he’s run out of outfits and it’s his birthday tomorrow... he hasn’t got a stitch to wear! When two designers come to town with a promise to create him an outfit that’s “never been seen before”, the Emperor doesn’t quite realise what he’s let himself in for. Populated with puppets, music and song, this inventive and energetic production is told in true Stuff and Nonsense style, with boundless enthusiasm and great storytelling. Catch the show on 21 May at 11.30am and 2.30pm. Tickets are £6 for children and £10 for adults. junction.co.uk

Asparagus Feast. There’s lots of family fun to be had at the annual Burwash Manor Asparagus Feast on 13 May. Find out more about these scrumptious spears, take tractor rides out on the farm – and of course, enjoy yummy food all day long. burwashmanor.com

78

10

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_074-076 (FAMILY) cbsg.indd 78

R A S TA M O U S E MICE WITH SKILLS.

Exclusively for preschoolers and their parents or carers, the Toddler Time screenings at Cambridge Arts Picturehouse are free for grown-ups to attend and just £3 per child. On 3 and 4 May, catch Rastamouse Mice with Skills at 10am, a colourful musical romp with everybody’s favourite reggae-loving rodent and his pals. picturehouses.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:25 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 79

24/04/2017 14:41


CE ADS_MAY.indd 80

24/04/2017 14:41


CE ADS_MAY.indd 81

24/04/2017 14:41


CE ADS_MAY.indd 82

24/04/2017 14:42


E D U C AT I O N

Navigating the A level reforms. M A N D E R P O R TM A N WO O DWA R D C O L L E G E A DV I S E S O N T H E A L E V E L S H A K E - U P A N D I T S I M PAC T

T

he planning of a prospective sixth form student’s A levels has always required careful consideration. Building on successful GCSEs – the results of which are not even known when the ‘What A levels to choose?’ conversation usually starts – and projecting towards potential university or vocational goals are important parts of this process. If truth be told, it can be a stressful time for students and parents alike. The last thing those concerned need is the added complication of the ongoing A level reform. However, this has already been a reality in the sixth form landscape for the past two years and it will reach its culmination in 2017/2018. Indeed, whether you are a student who is just about to embark on two-year A levels, one who is looking to change your educational setting between Years 12 and 13, or one who is looking to improve on already achieved A level grades as an alternative to UCAS Clearing, seeking expert advice is no longer a luxury. Dr David Shah, director of studies at Mander Portman Woodward (MPW) fifth and sixth-form college in Cambridge explains: “Many of the young people and parents who approach us for A level guidance come remarkably well-informed. They often know which subjects are required for a particular university course; and they could also ask about which exam board we teach a given A level subject on. For example, knowing the difference between OCR A and OCR B (Salters) chemistry is vital in planning an end of Year 12 transfer which includes this subject. The A level reforms, however, have added a whole new dimension to this already complex exercise.” Beyond the government’s guiding principles in setting down the reform, one of the main changes has been the decoupling of AS and A levels. Where

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_083 (EDUCATION) cb_FE.indd 83

previously AS level exams taken at the end of the lower-sixth year would count for half of the A level, they now form a self-contained qualification; a full A level’s marks are now only available in the final upper-sixth exams. Adding to the complexity, the transition from the older (or ‘legacy’) to the new (‘reformed’) A levels has been introduced in three distinct ‘waves’, between September 2015 and September 2017. David Shah again illustrates: “Of the young people approaching MPW over the coming months, we could have a Year 13 student who – even before their summer exams – is less than confident about achieving their target grades or has reassessed their university goals, or even both. In other words, they need a ‘Plan B’. “If this student is, for instance, looking to revisit A levels in a year in economics, geography and mathematics, the first would have to be undertaken in its entirety as a ‘reformed’ subject, the last would still be examined in ‘legacy’ units in summer 2018, while the geography could be either. How this is then framed in a university application also requires a knowledgeable educator’s insight.” As a leading, independent A level provider, which is rated ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted (November 2016), MPW offers prospective students and their parents the expert advice needed to navigate their way through the changing A level landscape and beyond. To gain an even better insight into the college and to discuss your A level plans, why not book a place on the upcoming MPW Open Morning on Saturday 6 June (appointments are available between 9.30am and 1pm)? n MPW, 01223 350158, cambridge@mpw.ac.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

83 4/24/17 10:15 AM


F RO M O N E O F T H E M O S T H I S T O R I C S I T E S F O R P U B L I S H I N G I N T H E WO R L D, T H E C U P B O O K S H O P S P R E A D S T H E AC A D E M I C P ROW E S S O F C A M B R I D G E A L L A RO U N D T H E WO R L D WORDS SIOBHAN GODWOOD

84

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_082-083 (INDIE)sg cb.indd 84

© PHOTO CREDIT

Cambridge University Press Bookshop.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:24 AM


C

INDIE OF THE MONTH

ambridge University Press Bookshop (CUP) has the great privilege of inhabiting one of the oldest and most historic buildings in the city. And when the city in question is Cambridge, one with a world-renowned heritage, that’s really saying something. The shop, at number one Trinity Street, in the heart of the city centre – is one of the most historic sites in bookselling, and is believed to be the oldest bookshop in the whole of the UK. “The history of our building is linked to the history of English printing,” explains Alice Tranah of CUP Bookshop. “At the end of the 16th century there were small, individual printing shops on what is now Senate House lawn. They used to sell pamphlets and other things that they printed through a shop on Trinity Street; the very same site where the CUP bookshop is now.” It’s known that books have been sold from the shop since at least 1581, and possibly as early as 1505. “In the early days the printers were connected to the university,” continues Alice, “but the shop has been through many incarnations between then and becoming the CUP Bookshop.” Cambridge University Press is itself the oldest printing and publishing house in the world, and the oldest university press. It originated from Letters Patent – like a Royal Charter – granted to the university by Henry VIII in 1534. London printers had a monopoly on the English trade at that time, so printing didn’t actually begin in Cambridge for another 50 years, when a University printer, Thomas Thomas, was appointed and began printing and selling works from the Trinity Street bookshop. Groundbreaking works produced by the Press include John Milton’s Lycidas in 1638 and a second edition of Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica in 1713 that saved the book from obscurity and improved significantly on the original – the Cambridge University library has a copy of the first edition with with corrections in Newton’s own hand. From 1845 onwards the bookshop was run by Alexander and Daniel Macmillan, who became so successful on the publishing side that they gave up running the shop to concentrate on the now worldfamous publishing house. Relatives of the Macmillans then ran the shop as Bowes & Bowes, and it bore this name from 1907, despite being taken over by W H Smith, until 1986, when it became Sherratt & Hughes. The bookshop even has its own ghostly legend: it’s said that it’s haunted by the ghost of a Victorian gentleman, as well as that of a young girl with long, fair hair, who is accompanied by the smell of violets! Cambridge University Press took over the bookshop in 1992, and since then has been exclusively selling CUP books. As well as customers from in and around Cambridge, the shop sends books out to customers globally, via mail order and online. “We sell books all over the world, and have an Amazon selling point as well,” says Alice. “We offer a service that is very specialised and can get hold of books that other providers can’t necessarily.

“We supply to libraries, we supply a lot of books to the individual college and department libraries in Cambridge itself, and can get hold of books very quickly if their students have made special requests,” she continues. “We can even arrange to have books printed and manufactured at short notice, so it’s a unique and very thorough service.” Many bookshops bemoan the advent of Amazon and other online book retailers, but Alice feels that their relationship with the Internet giant has been a positive one for both sides. “We’re able to reach people that can’t just come in off the street, people all over the world,” she explains. “It gives us a reach to customers who may have no idea our shop exists: they can still find out about what the Press does and can buy our books through Amazon, which is beneficial for us and our customers.” The building next door to the CUP bookshop is their associated Schools and English Language Learning shop, which opened in 2008. “It specialises in English as a second language and education materials for primary schools through to GCSE and A level,” says Alice. “The people that work in there are specialists in helping with the education side of things. The CUP publishes world-leading materials and titles in this area and it’s a hugely important part of what the Press does.” CUP bookshop also runs events throughout the year, some of them linked with the colleges, as well as book launches and themed educational events, including ones for English as a second language learners. May 2017 is a really important time for the bookshop, as it’s its 25th anniversary, and the team have lots of competitions and promotions planned to celebrate. “We will be putting details of all our planned events on our Facebook page, and also on Twitter and Instagram. “Cambridge is a city with a wonderful literary history,” says Alice, “and we are proud to be a part of that, so we want to celebrate our past achievements and look to the future of the CUP bookshop.” n CUP Bookshop, 1 Trinity Street, Cambridge CB2 1SZ | 01223 333333 | Facebook: Cambridge University Press Bookshop | Twitter: @CUPBookshop

Cambridge University Press is the oldest publishing house in the world

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

CE05_082-083 (INDIE)sg cb.indd 85

85 4/24/17 10:24 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 86

24/04/2017 14:42


FA S H I O N DRIFTING CARNATION DRESS

£189, Brora, Trinity Street

LINEN & COTTON CARDIGAN

£85, Brora, Trinity Street

DUNGAREES

£72, Ark, Peas Hill

The style list.

ROXIE SKIRT BY DARLING

£59, Lilac Rose, Bridge Street

T O P P I C K S F RO M L O C A L FA S H I O N B O U T I Q U E S

TABLE FOR TEA DRESS BY TROLLIED DOLLY

£52, Lilac Rose, Bridge Street

MAISON SCOTCH BOMBER

£125, Anna, High Street, Saffron Walden

STATEMENT PIECE NECKLACE

HIGH BY CLAIRE CAMPBELL AT LENGTH DRESS

£234.95, Cuckoo Clothing, St Mary’s Passage & Burwash Manor

YELLOW STRIPED RAINCOAT

£265, Ark, Peas Hill

£424, Della Kaur, Magdalene Street

ESSKA ROSE GOLD NASH SANDAL

£100, Cuckoo Clothing, St Mary’s Passage & Burwash Manor

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_085 (FASHION)sg cb.indd 85

4/24/17 12:47 PM


Level up your locks. S H A K E U P YO U R H A I RC A R E R E G I M E A N D T RY S O M E T H I N G N E W F O R YO U R T R E S S E S W I T H DA I S Y D I C K I N S O N ’S G U I D E TO W H AT’S H O T

W O R D S D A I SY D I C K I N S O N

R E C OV E R A N D R E N E W

Lacklustre, dry hair or split ends threatening to ruin your do? NEAL’S YARD NURTURING ROSE SHAMPOO AND CONDITIONER 1 (FROM £11.50 EACH) enhances vibrancy for dry and

damaged hair, harnessing vitamin-rich rose hip and passion flower oils to cleanse. Don’t be concerned about the shampoo’s low lathering foam, its natural composition means it’s super gentle, without stripping natural oils. If your tresses are really stressed, head to FINN JORDAN on Sussex Street and ask about the REDKEN HEATCURE 2 , just £20, which is a luxurious in-salon intensive treatment ideal for brittle, heat-styled hair. Finn Jordan also have plenty of products to try at home, and I’m loving the REDKEN EXTREME MEGA MASK 3 (£12.90)

which combines two formulas for maximum results. Stylist Katelyn Peters tells me that to make the mask application even more effective and pampering, simply apply the product generously, then wrap hair in a heated towel. The warmth causes the cuticles of the hair to open and allows the mask to penetrate more deeply into the follicles.

C O LO U R C H A R AC T E R I S T I C S

Changing your hair colour is a bold option for trying out a new look, but enhancing what you’ve already got can work wonders, too, without committing to anything permanent. COLOUR VIBE 4 (£2.99, BOOTS) is a wash-in, semi-permanent colour carried in a shampoo! Lasting up to three weeks and available in 13 colours, it’s great for enriching your tresses, or trying out something new. Coloured hair can suffer dryness, but using an oil will keep your locks hydrated, combating any associated dullness. BUMBLE AND BUMBLE’S DRY OIL FINISHING SPRAY 5 (£25, BOOTS) makes

application easy – and mess free – adding a beautiful gloss and a silky finish to tresses. If all else fails and you need some professional help, pop in and see the guys at Stilo Nuovo on St Johns Street for a pampering treatment. Stylist Heather Thornton advises me that KÉRASTASE FUSIO DOSE 6 (£15 EACH) is like a shot of goodness for the hair. Five varieties

88

can be mixed and matched depending on your needs, and worked through hair in place of conditioner, or left as a mask. Combine the Radiance and Nutrition injections for the ultimate glossy glow for coloured hair.

S U N, S E A A N D SA S S

With summer peeping just around the corner, beachy, tousled hair is in, and you don’t have to cruise the coast to achieve it. LEE STAFFORD ’S SEA SALT RANGE will have you sorted, and the ST YLING MIST 7 (£9.99, BOOTS) does an amazing job at adding texture. Spray into ends and scrunch with fingers to style – it smells amazing, too! For any water babies out there, PHILIP KINGSLEY’S SWIMCAP 8 (£15, PHILIPKINGSLEY.CO.UK) was originally

created for the US Olympic synchronised swimming team and guards against chlorine, sea water and UV damage, as well as protecting colour, so no more blonde-green hair! Simply apply to wet hair before diving in.

G L A M O R O U S G LO S S

No matter what the time of year, glossy hair is always on-trend. An easy way to get that mirror shine is with straightening. Not a fan of irons? Try the new DAFNI GO STRAIGHTENING BRUSH 9 (£79.95, JOHN LEWIS), a totally innovative brush

which straightens in just five minutes of brushing, with a detachable cord for lightweight and convenient travelling. Start your shine from the shower with KHADI AML A SHAMPOO FOR VOLUME AND SHINE 10 (£11.90, KHADIHAIR. CO.UK). This clever shampoo

promotes hair growth, feeding the hair with good fats and nutrients for instantly noticeable shine thanks to shikakai, ylang ylang, almond and amla (which is a type of gooseberry full of vitamin C). A natural way to add shine, and a favourite product of mine, is coconut oil. Nourishing inside and out, NEAL’S YARD

ORGANIC VIRGIN COCONUT OIL 11 (£9, NEAL’S YARD) can be run through

hair ends for moisturising gleam, as well as used in cooking, for removing make-up and adding highlight to cheekbones!

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_086-087 (BEAUTY)_FEljc.indd 88

4

6

4/24/17 10:23 AM


B E AU T Y

2

7 1 1

8

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_086-087 (BEAUTY)_FEljc.indd 89

0 1

1 5

39 C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

89 4/24/17 10:24 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 102

24/04/2017 14:45


© HOUSE OF FRASER

A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

Property edition. 93

INTERIORS: SCANDI ST YLE.

103

EDITION LOV E S .

105 108

S P OT L I G H T : L A N G T RY FIT TED FURNITURE.

© PHOTO CREDIT

P R O P E RT Y NEWS.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_089 (PROPERTY OPENER) cbsg.indd 91

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

91 4/24/17 10:53 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 90

24/04/2017 14:43


INTERIORS

The

new

Nordic. M A R RY I N G U N D E R S TAT E D E L E GA N C E W I T H A N A P P E A L I N G F U N C T I O N A L I T Y, S C A N D I N AV I A N D E S I G N G I V E S A H O M E A S E N S E O F S O U L F U L S I M P L I C I T Y. H E R E ’S H OW T O A D D A T O U C H O F S C A N D I S T Y L E T O YO U R I N T E R I O R S

© PHOTO CREDIT © BE AND LIV

WORDS ANGELINA VILL A-CL ARKE

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 93

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

93 4/24/17 10:22 AM


LIVING.

Top Carpetright’s Triangle Scandi Rug, from £69, brings the right level of cosiness Above Wharfside’s Open Retro Cabinet in walnut, £3750, gives a sleek design ethos

94

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 94

Last year, we all went mad for hygge – a Danish concept which roughly translates as ‘the art of cosiness and little pleasures’ (think scented candles, warm throws and roaring fires). This year, a cooler sensibility is set to nudge hygge off its pinnacle. Lagom, a Swedish term, meaning ‘not too little, not too much, just right’, is all about balance, and is the perfect philosophy for creating a beautiful home. Bright, light and airy are the cornerstones of Scandinavian design. When it comes to a colour palette, it’s all about playing it cool with white, black and blue dominating the look. “Muted mid-tones, grey, caramel or soft blue, are restful, yet stimulating and help to create a clean and balanced design,” says Kasia Wiktorowicz at Valspar Paint, available at B&Q. “Chalky whites also blend quietly with these colours so you are left with a calming interior that will rejuvenate your mind after a busy day.” Flooring is a good route for adding some warmth to a room with a cool colour scheme. Carpetright’s Carousel Twist carpet in Aqua sets the tone perfectly, as does the brand’s Triangle Scandi Rug – cosy on scrubbed floorboards. When it comes to furniture – look for clean lines and classic design. Wharfside’s Danish Retro coffee tables and sideboards add an instant ➥

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:23 AM


INTERIORS

Top Jo Alexander’s Tuscan Teak dining table and six chairs, from £2315. Above middle Design Project chaise with table, £699, one arm sofa, £650, armchair, £325, stone coffee table, £200, all from John Lewis. Above Teak Longstock round dining table and six chairs, £1399, from John Lewis. Left Egg Chair, £399, from Wyevale Garden Centres. Right Valencia Teak daybed, £1995, at Jo Alexander.

Above Long Brass Swing Lamp, £169.95, by House Doctor DK at Ovo Home adds a clean, cool aesthetic to a room

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 95

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

95 4/24/17 10:23 AM


INTERIORS

TOP TIPS.

style statement. Meanwhile, Neptune’s stand-alone cabinets and dressers in shades of white or grey are perfect for kitchens. The clean lines of the Scandy Kitchen at Cambridge-based David Hall Furniture give a simple, elegant symmetry. Of course, nothing says Nordic as much as an open fire does and Morsø’s log burners are definitely an atmospheric addition to a living room. Alicia Zimnickas, interior designer and owner of Cambridge-based AZ Interiors, gives her advice: “Clean lines, natural materials and lots of light are key. Remember: ‘less is more, but not too little’ is the primary ethos of Scandi cool.” ➥

ELIZA MILLER, INTERIOR DESIGNER AT A R C A D I A H O M E I N T E R I O R S , G I V E S T H R E E T I P S F O R AC H I E V I N G A S C A N D I LO O K

Light.

Whitewashed floors and painted furniture keep interiors bright, which is essential in long, dark Nordic winters.

Textures.

Add interest to a simple scheme with textural sheepskin rugs, faux fur cushions and pendant lighting in stainless steel or glass.

Fire.

Gather around a flame – inside or out – to bring to life the Scandi concept of ‘your home is your sanctuary’.

Top Scandiinspired interiors designed by Alicia Zimnickas Far left Neptune’s Henley Cabinets in Snow, prices vary Left Valspar Paint’s neutral Whisper Softly, from £15/l

96

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 96

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:23 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 97

24/04/2017 14:44


SLEEPING. Keep bedrooms soft and inviting. Go for neutral colour schemes – soft greys, chalky pinks and cool blues. Add textures and layers into your design by using candles, cosy bedspreads and pillows. Casual contrasting in tonal colours works well – look to Vanessa Arbuthnott’s Swedish Collection range of textiles – inspired by Nordic colours and motifs – for a subtle clashing effect. Darren Marcangelo, co-founder of mattress experts, Herdysleep, says: “Adopt a soft palette of tonal whites, creams and warm greys to generate a soothing environment in the bedroom. Consider layering some chunky knitted throws and cushions with sophisticated linens. Lastly, team this with a hand-finished and traditionally tufted Herdysleep mattress to get a peaceful night’s sleep.” Lighting is key to creating atmosphere. VITA Copenhagen’s small Acorn pendants are perfect for hanging either side of a bed. A fuss-free look is essential, so do away with ornate curtains and go for a crisp look with shutters. Shutterly Fabulous offers an affordable range of colours and styles as does The Shutter Store. Go for an all-white look or opt for a pop of colour to make the windows into the room’s focal point. Claire Hornby, creative stylist for Barker and Stonehouse which offers a range of furniture and home accessories that fit the Scandi theme, gives her take on the trend: “Characterised by clean lines, minimalistic styling and natural textures, a Scandi approach to decorating has taken the interiors world by storm in recent years. White backdrops will help you to maximise natural light and will come to life when they’re styled with cosy sheepskin throws, geometric prints and organic materials.”

SLEEP T I G H T.

T H R E E WAYS TO AC H I E V E A NORDIC SLEEP BY SA N D I E WA L L M A N , FOUNDER OF NORDIC HOUSE

Above Grey shutters, POA, from Shutterly Fabulous Below Invest in a mattress from Herdysleep, prices vary Bottom Vanessa Arbuthnott’s Swedish Collection of textiles, from £46/m

1 2 Don’t share!

Scandinavians each have their own king-size, individual duvet so you can choose the right one for your individual needs.

Thoughtful.

Bedrooms should be a sanctuary so remember the ‘just the right amount’ ethos of lagom when you decorate a room.

3 Layering.

Scandinavians use lots of texture in the home and especially in the bedroom – use cushions, throws and rugs.

98

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 98

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 2:47 PM


INTERIORS

E AT I N G .

From cosy winter feasts over laden tables to relaxed, al fresco dining once summer arrives, the Scandinavian approach to eating is all about focusing on those special moments with family and friends. Start with a timeless table. French furniture company PIB’s eclectic range features Scandinavian retro, vintage and industrial-style tables. “Scandinavian vintage furniture is iconic and timeless,” says the company’s co-owner Thomas d’Estienne d’Orves. “It never goes out of fashion as it’s so simple and elegant.” Then, invest in some nostalgic Swedish enamel and porcelain tableware, courtesy of Isak. Its Midnattssol (Midnight Sun) range of eco-friendly home accessories is inspired by Nordic heritage. Sandra Isaksson, Isak’s Swedish founder and designer, says: “Enamel and wood are perfect materials for al fresco dining because they are durable and practical. The Midnattssol collection is a reflection of how I live with my family. We are very connected to nature and often cook on the beach or in the forest; we grow our own vegetables and we like to forage, pickle and preserve.” n

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 99

Top Neptune’s Henley Kitchen, from £14,000 Above The Midnattssol range of kitchenware, from £8, by Isak Left Marmori Triangular Side Table, £139, from PIB

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

99 4/24/17 10:23 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 100

24/04/2017 14:44


INTERIORS

Stockists. ARCADIA HOME INTERIORS 01328 807063 arcadiahomeinteriors.co.uk AZ INTERIORS 07963 175508 az-interiors.co.uk BARKER AND STONEHOUSE 0330 311 6179 barkerandstonehouse.co.uk B&Q 01223 323432 diy.com BE AND LIV beandliv.com CARPETRIGHT carpetright.co.uk DAVID HALL FURNITURE 01763 261010 davidhallfurniture.co.uk HERDYSLEEP 0800 294 8666 herdysleep.com ISAK isak.co.uk Above VITA Copenhagen’s Acorn lights in polished steel, £64 each Left Cone Shaped Pendant with Gold Inner, £69, from Barker and Stonehouse Below left Nevada Walnut Chest of Drawers, £1105, from Barker and Stonehouse Below Riva 1920 Armchair, £1365, from Barker and Stonehouse

MORSØ 01788 55 44 10 morsoe.com NEPTUNE 01793 427300 neptune.com NORDIC HOUSE 01872 223220 nordichouse.co.uk OVO HOME 01244 329643 ovohome.com PIB 020 3445 5150 pib-home.co.uk SHUTTERLY FABULOUS 0808 278 1589 shutterlyfabulous.com THE SHUTTER STORE 0800 0747 321 shutters.co.uk VALSPAR PAINT valsparpaint.co.uk

© PHOTO CREDIT

VANESSA ARBUTHNOTT 01285 831437 vanessaarbuthnott.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 101

VITA COPENHAGEN vitacopenhagen.com WHARFSIDE 01372 379810 wharfside.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

101 4/24/17 10:23 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 92

24/04/2017 14:43


INTERIORS

TRESS LAMPSHADE

£55, sianelin.com

STOCKHOLM CEILING LAMP IN METALLIC BRASS BY MADAM STOLTZ

£165, ovohome.com

DESIGN PROJECT NO.021 THROW IN EVERGREEN GREY

£120, johnlewis.com

Edition loves. GEOMETRIC GLASS LANTERN

£30, nordichouse.co.uk

MIDNATTSSOL ROUND TRAY

£28, isak.co.uk

PETALS DUSTY PINK DECORATIVE BOWL

£49, beandliv.com LOG AND KINDLING TABLE WITH WOODEN TOP MONTANA STOOL

£319, angelareed.co.uk

£99, barkerandstonehouse.co.uk

METAL GARDEN BENCH

£198, miafleur.com

KOIVUKUJA LICHEN FABRIC

£19.90/m, vallila.co.uk

NORWAY BLUE CUSHION

£55, pib-home.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_093-101 (INTERIORS) cbsg.indd 103

4/24/17 10:23 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 104

24/04/2017 14:45


INTERIORS

Langtry Fitted Furniture.

F

WORDS ANGELINA VILL A-CL ARKE

rom sleek and stylish bedrooms that wouldn’t look out of place in a boutique hotel, to covetable kitchens, Langtry Fitted Furniture has become a go-to expert for homeowners in the Cambridgeshire area due to its bespoke service. The Newmarket-based company has been in business for more than 20 years, and has built a reputation for offering exceptional quality fitted furniture – be it for kitchens, bedrooms or studies – to suit all budgets. Owner Tony Jones – who has been at the helm since 2005 – explains the company’s USP: “We manufacture on site and so we can fit to any space. Our cupboards are not ‘off the rack’. Most older houses, for instance, have odd-shaped rooms with sloping ceilings or unusual corners – and they will end up with furniture that fits perfectly. Because we make everything ourselves and build floor-to-ceiling, our customers are able to get maximum storage from our bedrooms, office furniture and in our kitchens.” Of course, committing to a new kitchen is one of the largest purchases a homeowner undertakes, with the process often a daunting task. “I would say to anyone looking to upgrade their kitchen to do some research first,” Tony advises. “Have a look in magazines or online and keep in mind a few styles of cabinet that you like. Think about the colours, worktops and appliances that you want and, most importantly, what you need. It can be overwhelming to come into a showroom ‘cold’, without knowing what you are after.” With kitchen styles changing year on year, can the company give any advice on what is currently in vogue? “At the moment, there is a trend towards a two-tone look. Maybe the island, for instance, is in a different colour or material than the rest of the kitchen. Or you can opt for wall cabinets in one colour and the rest of the kitchen in a different shade. It looks very stylish. Grey is the most popular colour and a matt finish is becoming

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_103 (PROPERTY SPOTLIGHT)_FE cb.indd 105

popular again. Kitchen larders have also come back in fashion and handle-less doors are here to stay.” With its bespoke offering, Langtry Fitted Furniture prides itself on its tailored service for its customers. “The benefit of being an independent company means that we can cater for personal specification, and importantly we can work to an individual’s budget,” says Tony. “I firmly believe that you don’t have to spend a huge amount to achieve a stylish end result. My advice is: don’t compromise or cut corners at the beginning of the design process. Go for what you want and we can always carve back and manipulate the scheme to suit the budget before you commit to anything. “Appliances and worktops are usually the most expensive thing in kitchens,” he continues. “I would say it is worth paying a bit extra for these – especially if you want integral appliances. We usually supply Bosch, which offers high specification products, with good guarantees and customer service. When it comes to worktops – there is a huge range to choose from. Laminate is the most affordable, then there is quartz and granite. Man-made materials, like Corian, are the most exclusive but they give a beautiful finish with no joints, and are very practical for busy kitchens.” Tony concludes: “At the end of the day, we can offer something to fit most people’s needs: whether you want a solid timber kitchen or new wardrobes for a newly decluttered bedroom – we can ensure you’ll get the wow factor.” n Langtry Fitted Furniture, Units 24 & 24A, Northfield Business Park, Northfield Road, Soham, Ely CB7 5UE | 01353 725380 | langtryfurniture.co.uk

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

105 4/24/17 10:48 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 106

24/04/2017 14:45


CE ADS_MAY.indd 107

24/04/2017 14:45


Myth busting:

estate agents all have nice houses.

W

hen you go for a haircut your hairdresser will probably have a considerably funkier ’do than you. Similarly, a fancy clothes shop is usually staffed by intimidatingly stylish assistants. Your personal trainer isn’t likely to be a seven-stone weakling. All this is very reassuring. These people obviously know their stuff, just look at them. But it’s not so with estate agents and their houses. At least not very often. Some have nice digs, but most don’t. The question is: should that worry you, like it might if you turned up to swimming lessons and the instructor was wearing armbands? Well, no. You see it’s not that simple. It’s not that we don’t have the judgment to know what would be a good house to buy, it’s that there are certain obstacles that make it very difficult. The first is that like many sales jobs, a lot, often the majority, of what an estate agent earns is made up of commission. I first took a job in estate agency at the turn of the millennium. I appreciate I don’t look old enough for this to be true, but it is. My basic salary was £6000. At that time they’d just started building Cambourne and a two-bed terrace was priced at £109,950. Mortgage lending was a bit more relaxed back then but even so, borrowing 18 times your basic salary wasn’t something lenders were keen on. My on-target-earnings were £12,000, which looked OK on paper, but was basically a totally unachievable target designed by my employer to use against me when I didn’t hit it. Not that I’m bitter. Fortunately, between what Uncle Tom left me in his will in the 80s, and what Mrs Cooke’s Grandma left her, assisted by the massive interest rates at the time, we put together a decent deposit and paid £64,000 for a five-year-old two-bed end terrace in Haverhill. I loved that house. We could have got a mid-terrace for £59,950 and saved ourselves the £640 stamp duty (it kicked in at £60k back then) but Vanners Road had a garage and that was worth stretching for. But that house wasn’t a bargain, I paid full market value. Maybe even a bit more. I had to. And that, rather

108

M A Y 2 017 | C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N

CE05_108-109 (PROPERTY NEWS)sg cb.indd 108

SAM COOKE, PA R T N E R AT COOKE, CURTIS & C O. S H A R E S A SURPRISING FAC T A B O U T E S TAT E AG E N T S’ HOMES

than the earnings thing, is actually the biggest obstacle to house buying as an agent: it’s very difficult to get a good deal, more difficult than it is for real people. I’ll explain. As an agent it’s tricky to buy a house you’re selling yourself. Make the owner an offer too early in the process and they’ll think you’ve quoted a lower price to snag a bargain. But wait until you’ve marketed it for a while and you’ll either have to get into competition with another buyer, or if there are no other buyers and you make an offer the owner might be suspicious you weren’t really trying hard to sell it before, you were saving it for yourself. Whichever way you approach it, it’s awkward and you’ll usually have to overpay to reassure the seller that you’re not somehow making something at their expense. But those complications are nothing compared to trying to buy something from another agent. Estate agency is a sales job and so it tends to attract competitive salesy-types. The sort that will do anything to stop other agents getting their way, including making it difficult for them to buy a house for themselves. Not all agents are like that, of course, but lots are and it’s a fair bet the mean ones will try to make it as tricky as possible for another agent to buy through them. So again, we must pay at least market value, but probably more so the other agent has no reason to dissuade the seller from selling to us. So you see, it’s not that we can’t spot a bargain, it’s that we find it surprisingly difficult to buy one. Every month I see something for sale that has an angle, something that could be bought, enhanced and sold again for profit, but buying these things is actually harder for us than for non-estate agents. The same problems just don’t exist for the buff personal trainer or the perfectly coiffured hairdresser. Nor for the classic car dealer who always has a little collection of their own tucked away. By now I expect you have your violins out. And so you should. I’m not, of course, suggesting you absolutely must sell your house cheaply to your friendly local estate agent out of sympathy, I’m just suggesting you consider it. Especially if you have something with an indoor pool in Newnham you’d let go for less than £250,000. I promise I’d look after it. n

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

4/24/17 10:21 AM


P R O P E RT Y

Dream home. Humberstone Road,

Cambridge £775,000

This delightful three-bedroom Victorian terrace is located on Humberstone Road, just off De Freville Avenue. It’s within a stone’s throw of Midsummer Common, the river and Cambridge’s new railway station in Chesterton, which is on the cusp of opening. The mature gardens create a leafy, secluded sanctuary to the rear of the property, whilst inside, the house is filled with character and natural light. Features downstairs include leaded stained glass, exposed floorboards, large sash windows and fireplaces, and upstairs there are three spacious bedrooms. A perfect family home in a great location, the property is on the market with Cheffins. cheffins.co.uk

O P E N H O U S E DAY. On the cusp of putting your home on the market? Perhaps you’re gearing up for a search for a new house this spring? Either way, you’ll want to check out local agent Strutt & Parker’s Open House Day on 13 May. This event, which takes place yearly, allows buyers who register with them the chance to view any property on their books, on the same day and at the same time (between 10am and

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_108-109 (PROPERTY NEWS)sg cb.indd 109

3pm). For sellers, it’s a chance to capitalise on curb appeal, explains Michael Houlden, partner at Strutt & Parker Cambridge. “If a prospective buyer instantly likes your house, but knows there are six other couples also walking around commenting on how beautiful the property is, this competitive edge might naturally encourage them to put in an offer sooner,” he explains. “Similarly, if a buyer likes

a house before our National Open House Day starts, it is not uncommon for an early offer to be secured in order to take it offline so as not to risk losing it.” If you are selling your house and want to take part in Strutt & Parker’s National Open House Day, contact your local Strutt & Parker office on 01223 459500 or visit struttandparker.com/openday.

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

109 4/24/17 10:21 AM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 110

24/04/2017 14:46


CE ADS_MAY.indd 111

24/04/2017 14:46


CE ADS_MAY.indd 112

24/04/2017 14:46


A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

5 STAR LUXURY AT TRUMPINGTON MEADOWS. LOCATED JUST minutes from Cambridge city centre but on the edge of one of the area’s most beautiful country parks, Trumpington Meadows boasts an ideal location for those looking for the convenience of city living but with the benefits of country life. This award-winning development, which comprises a collection of impressive, welldesigned homes and apartments, is built by Barratt Homes, a five-star homebuilder in Cambridge. The House Builder Federation (HBF) five-star seal of approval means that when you buy with Barratt, you’re choosing a major national house builder that received over 90% homeowner recommendation for the eighth year in a row. A fantastic array of amenities including Waitrose, Cambridge Lakes Golf Course and Addenbrooke’s Hospital are located nearby, whilst the proximity to Cambridge train station, with its fast track links to London will appeal to commuters. Residents will also be ideally placed to use the Trumpington Park & Ride to get into the centre of Cambridge without the hassles of parking and traffic to contend with.

The latest phase of the development includes a series of luxury two-bedroom apartments, which are currently available for reservation – meaning you could be in by the summer if you act now. Reserving now means you could also take advantage of a luxury flooring package on selected plots. The Benwick apartments offer bright and airy accommodation with an open-plan kitchen, living and dining area, two bedrooms with one en-suite, plus an appealing private balcony. The Benwick apartments are also available through the government-backed Help to Buy scheme, which allows first-time homebuyers to purchase a property with as little as a 5% deposit. For example, based on Plot 559 The Benwick, using the Government-backed Help to Buy scheme, with a £394,995 purchase price*, you arrange a mortgage for £296,246 (75%), deposit for £19,750 (5%) and we arrange an equity loan for £78,999 (20%). n

For more information, or to arrange a booking, contact Barratt Homes on 0844 811 4888 or visit barratthomes.co.uk

© PHOTO CREDIT

TERMS & CONDITIONS *Limited availability, selected plots only. Subject to status, terms and conditions apply. See barratthomes.co.uk for full details. BDW Trading Limited (number 03018173) whose registered office is at Barratt House, Cartwright Way, Forest Business Park, Bardon Hill, Coalville, Leicestershire LE67 1UF (“BDW”) is a subsidiary of Barratt Developments PLC. The Homes and Communities Agency (“HCA”) provides an equity loan for 20% of the purchase price of the property. The equity loan provided by the HCA is secured as second charge on your property. The amount you have to repay to the HCA may be more than the amount of the equity loan provided. Help to Buy England Scheme is available in England only and on properties up to £600k. Prices correct at time of going to press. £19,750 deposit is based on 5% and a purchase price of 394,995. Images depict typical Barratt interiors and include optional upgrades at additional cost. Calls to our 0844 numbers cost 7 pence per minute plus your phone company’s access charge.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE05_113 (BIDWELLS) cbljc.indd 113

C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | M A Y 2 017

113 4/24/17 5:08 PM


CE ADS_MAY.indd 114

24/04/2017 14:47


CE ADS_MAY.indd 115

24/04/2017 14:47


CE ADS_MAY.indd 116

24/04/2017 14:47

Cambridge Edition May  

Cambridge Edition May Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you