Page 1

Cambridge EDITION XXXXXXXX

YOUR MON N TT H HLLYY FF II XX O FF

D ER 2 018 MEACRECMHB 2 018

LLO OCCAALL LLIIFFEE

≤e

CHRISTMAS I S S U E

WE’VE GOT CHRISTMAS IN CAMBRIDGE ALL WRAPPED UP

indie food gift and guide drink

D E C E M B E R 2 018

festive theatre

mill road winter fair

TOP YULETIDE SHOWS THIS SEASON

EAT, DRINK, DANCE, SHOP AND BE MERRY!

1

S I G N U P TO O U R W E E K LY D I G I TA L N E W S L E T T E R CE12_001 (COVER).indd 1

new year's eve ideas SIX OF THE BEST NIGHTS OUT IN TOWN

Cambridge

EDI T

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O. U K 22/11/2018 09:58


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 2

22/11/2018 17:56


EDITORIAL

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editor Felicity Evans

ADVERTISING

Senior Sales executive Lee Fifield 01223 492240 leefifield@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Chris Jacobs 01223 499463 chrisjacobs@bright-publishing.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Cathy Moore, Charlotte Griffiths, Siobhan Godwood, Daisy Dickinson, Elodie Cameron, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Anna Taylor, Gianpiero Rocca

DESIGN & PRODUCTION Senior designer & Production Manager Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong 01223 499468 manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com

MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK find us @cambsedition CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

This month’s cover illustration was created by Flo Thomas. See more of Flo’s illustrations on Etsy at HeydayDesignsUK or at heydaydesigns.co.uk

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

Welcome

T

he lights have been switched on, the ice rink is open and the final Christmas countdown has begun. As with every December here in Cambridge, there’s an avalanche of festive fun to throw yourself into: beginning on the 1st of the month with the lovely Mill Road Winter Fair. If you need a little nudge to get in the seasonal spirit, you can’t beat this cocklewarming community party, which sees Mill Road transformed by a sea of people and stalls, music and delicious food at every turn. A fixture of the winter calendar since 2005, when just 40 venues participated, the fair has grown into one of the city’s best-loved annual events and now sprawls across the whole of Mill Road and its adjoining streets. Wrap up warm, grab a steaming cup of mulled wine and enjoy the fun – a good tip is to arrive early to avoid the inevitable crush. Once you’ve got your shopping done and had something tasty to eat, turn your feet to the Empress or the Cambridge Blue, both of which throw themselves into the spirit of things with decorations, special guests (Santa and real reindeer respectively) and a bucket-load of Christmassy good cheer. Read our run down of what’s happening at the fair on page 28. Cambridge’s theatres are going into overdrive this month, offering up all sorts of Christmassy shows, from beautiful ballets, to a quirky, musical take on Snow White, and of course, the Arts Theatre’s exuberant annual panto, which runs right the way through until the new year – find out more on page 21. Christmas list still need blitzing? I recommend thumbing your way to our gift guide, where we’ve got a sack-load of perfect pressie ideas, all from local independent retailers. If you’ve got a really tricky friend or family member to buy for (there’s always one), help is at hand in the form of the new Love Cambridge gift card, which is redeemable at a vast range of restaurants, shops and attractions across the city and can be topped up with as little as £10. Not only does it give your giftee a huge choice, you’ll be benefitting Cambridge’s economy by keeping the spend local. Win-win! If you’d prefer to opt out of the Christmas madness and curl up with a mug of tea and a really good read – check out the Edition Book Club (page 36), where we chat to author Elly Griffiths about her latest offering The Stranger Diaries: a gripping gothic pageturner that’s ideal for hibernating with. However you spend it, have a great Christmas – I’ll see you on the other side!

Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_003 (WELCOME)sg.indd 3

3

D E C E M B E R 2 018

23/11/2018 10:28


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 4

22/11/2018 17:56


CONTENTS 6 l STARTERS

Top things to do and see in the city, plus our favourite social media pics of the month

11 l ARTS & CULTURE Exhibitions, art shows and theatre highlights to enjoy this month

19 l ART INSIDER

Ruthie Collins, founder of Cambridge Art Salon, shares her arty picks of the month

21 l CHRISTMAS SHOWS A preview of the festive treats in store for the city’s theatres this month

28 l WINTER FAIR

Mill Road’s huge festive market returns with stalls, music and more

32 l XMAS GIVEAWAY

More than £1500 worth of prizes for one lucky Cambridge Edition reader!

36 l BOOK CLUB

Book recommendations, special offers and author interviews

41 l FAMILY

Outdoorsy fun for the kids

42 l AFTER HOURS

Comedy, festivals, gigs and more nightlife fun to seek out this December

47 l NEW YEAR’S EVE

See off 2018 in style by partying the night away at one of these local events

4 2 49 l LISTINGS

81 l NATURE’S LARDER

56 l REVIEW

84 l DRINKS TROLLEY

Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this month We pay a visit to the acclaimed Three Hills in Bartlow

59 l FOOD NEWS

All the latest news from Cambridge’s buzzing food scene

66 l HOW TO FLOURISH

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_005 (CONTENTS)sg.indd 5

Wine tips, cocktail recipes, top boozy gifts and more

89 l INDIE GIFT GUIDE

Great Christmas pressies for him, for her and for kids, all from independent local shops

94 l INDIE OF THE MONTH

Edition meets Calixta Killander, a revolutionary local produce grower

The Cambridge Flower School on training the florists of the future

70 l MAKE THE BEST

97 l BEAUTY & WELLNESS

How to whip up a flavourpacked roast squash soup

107

The Gog highlights the seasonal ingredients to seek out this month

73 l CHEF’S TABLE

Chef Alex Rushmer on creating a Christmas Day breakfast fit for a king

75 l FESTIVE RECIPES Seasonal treats from Sean Melville, chef at Bedford Lodge Hotel & Spa

5

Beauty tips, plus we review Cambridge Countour Clinic’s microblading treatment

103 l GARDENING

Anna Taylor, owner of Anna’s Flower Farm, on what’s going on in the garden this month

107 l INTERIORS

Angelina Villa-Clarke shows you how to give your home a stunning seasonal makeover

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:26


STA RT E R S

@ELENSHAM

Starters @TWOGOTRAVELLING

@POLABUR

#INSTACAMB

O U R FAVO U R I T E C A M B R I D G E I N S TAG R A M P I C S O F T H E M O N T H . H A S H TAG # I N S TAC A M B F O R A C H A N C E TO F E AT U R E ! FOLLOW @CAMBSEDITION ON INSTAGRAM FOR MORE GREAT PICS OF CAMBRIDGE

DECEMBER ESSENTIAL

MILL ROAD WINTER FAIR The first Saturday in December means one thing only in Cambridge: it’s the day when Mill Road transforms into a sea of people (rather than cars) as independent traders, restaurants and more spill on to the street to bring a glittering array of food, drink and crafts to the thousands who visit throughout the day. Time travellers and machines is the theme for the parade, which we’re pleased to see is back after a couple of years off (best get your thinking cap on for costumes!). There will be all styles of music from individual buskers, bands and Cambridge Morris Men, plus demonstrations and a fire engine pull (emergencies permitting). It runs until 4pm and part of the fun and charm of the day is that, while you’re looking around, you’re very likely to spot people you know for a catch-up. To find out more, read our feature on page 28.

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_006-007 (STARTERS) BF.indd 6

6

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 17:24


XXXXXXXX

AN ENCHANTED CHRISTMAS Enchanted Cinema is transforming The Guildhall in Cambridge into a magical cinematic wonderland this month when it screens three days of classic films. Some are very festive indeed, others just happen to be set during the holiday season – and a few are just great films! On 20 December, there’s the Disney mega-hit Frozen, as well as Home Alone and action hit Die Hard, while The Muppet Christmas Carol, which features Michael Caine as Ebenezer Scrooge, Elf and perfect romcom, Love Actually, are showing the next day. Slow-burning singalong hit of the year, The Greatest Showman, is on 22 December, which also features huge crowd-pleaser Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again and dress-up inspiring cult classic, The Rocky Horror Picture Show. There will be live music before the films, plus a craft market featuring local artists and craftspeople every day from 12pm (which is open to all), with the Cambridge Live team providing drinks. For mouth-watering food, there’s options from Signorelli’s Deli and Afternoon Tease, who will be serving treats including cheese scones. Tickets are on sale at enchantedcinema.co.uk

W IN T ER WON DER If you’re looking for a place to walk – perhaps after a hearty lunch – keep in mind the Cambridge University Botanic Garden, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary next year. You might think of it as a summer day out, but take a trip during the winter months and you will be rewarded with spectacularly gorgeous sights. Nowadays, floral colour in the winter seems commonplace, but CUBG was a pioneer of this approach: back in 1979, a garden designed to be beautiful in the depths of winter was a novel idea. Pete Kerley, the gardener in charge of it, has been working at the Botanic Garden for all 40 years. botanic.cam.ac.uk

CH R ISTM A S BEGI NS AT BU RWA SH Get into the festive spirit with carol singing, mulled wine and plenty of shopping at Burwash Manor’s Christmas Begins event on 2 December. Warming food will be in huge supply thanks to street food faves, The Vargas Brothers, The Wandering Yak and Churros Bar, with gin, mulled wine and cider from the on-site Cozzi & Boffa Bar. Going with children? Book them in to see Father Christmas: tickets cost £8.50, including a £5 voucher to spend in the Rocking Horse Toy Shop. Children get to make and take home reindeer food, too! Contact the Rocking Horse to book. burwashmanor.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_006-007 (STARTERS) BF.indd 7

GET YOU R SK AT ES ON!

The North Pole ice rink is back on Parker’s Piece for skating for all ages and abilities… and this year all-weather, too! A new clear polygon roof gives skaters the chance to not only go out under the sun and stars, but the rain. After you glide, you can ride, with a funfair and amusements to keep the whole family entertained, plus a cosy Alpine-themed cabin bar on-site, too. It’s open until 6 January, every day except Christmas Day, from 12pm to 9pm and from 11am on weekends. thenorthpolecambridge.co.uk

7

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:24


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 8

22/11/2018 17:56


Culture Club ART

EXHIBITIONS

THEATRE

BOOK

CLUB

CHRISTMAS

SHOWS

Get A piece in the bymood Pete Hawkins, for Christmas exhibited with aatFestival Byard Art of Carols this at Elymont Cathedral

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_009 (CULTURE CLUB)lm.indd 9

9

D E C E M B E R 2 018

22/11/2018 13:03


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 10

22/11/2018 17:56


A RTS & C U LT U R E

CHR IS TM A S CR ACK ER CON T IN U ES After launching in November, Byard Art’s popular Christmas Cracker show continues into its second month, offering an ever-changing collection of art to enjoy in a range of media. Pieces on display include paintings, sculpture, ceramics, mixed media artwork, limited-edition prints, photography and handmade jewellery CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_011-017 (ARTS) BF.indd 11

by more than 50 artists and designermakers. It’s ideal if you are on the lookout for original art, jewellery or crafts to gift loved ones this Christmas. Among the artists displaying their work is Laura Jordan, the extraordinarily talented artist behind the above Cambridge illustration. It’s typical of her intricate, beautiful

11

cityscapes, created as she travels around the world observing how people live in different places before putting pen to paper to tell their stories. She’s currently exhibiting across four continents and has built an impressive international reputation. See her work at Christmas Cracker, which runs until 24 December. byardart.co.uk D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 11:00


S A F F RON HALL There’s a busy month ahead at Saffron Hall, beginning with New Sussex Opera, who will be stopping by with Charles Villiers Stanford’s little-performed The Travelling Companion on 2 December. Then, jazz fans can catch Kansas Smitty’s House Band on 8 December, while the legendary London Community Gospel Choir will bring an uplifting Christmas celebration on the 9th, filled with tidings of deep comfort and pure joy. On the 16th at 3pm, composers John Rutter and Bob Chilcott take turns to conduct their own carols with the BBC Singers and BBC Concert Orchestra, then, Britten Sinfonia perform Handel’s Messiah on 22 December: its brilliant arias making it a popular one on many a Christmas list. On 23 December, celebrate the delights of Christmas past at A Victorian Christmas, which features an afternoon of readings and music from the likes of Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, and Gilbert and Sullivan. Saffronhall.com

AC A DEM Y OF A NCIEN T MUSIC: M ESSI A H Christmas isn’t Christmas without a performance of Handel’s epic oratorio, Messiah. The Academy of Ancient Music joins forces with one of the hottest young choirs, VOCES8, for a spine-tingling start to the festive season on 5 December at Trinity College Chapel. Messiah depicts the birth, life and death of Christ, and features some of Handel’s best-known pieces, including For unto us a child is born, I know that my redeemer liveth and the Hallelujah chorus. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_011-017 (ARTS) BF.indd 12

12

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

21/11/2018 11:01


A RTS & C U LT U R E

DECEMBER AT AUDLEY END HOUSE & GARDENS There’s a fun-packed month in store at Audley End House, with a chance to meet Father Christmas himself every weekend until the big day, from 1 December. It’s free for English Heritage members. Also, there’s a carol concert on 4 December at 6.30pm and 8.30pm with

carols sung by Christ’s College Choir in the Great Hall, with the option to book a two- or threecourse Christmas dinner if you go to the earlier performance (sittings from 4.45pm). Enchanted Audley End transforms the grounds into an illuminated new world in which

you can step through tunnels and paths of fairy lights, cross an enchanted bridge and more on 6-9, 13-16, 20-23 and 27-30 December from 4.30 to 9pm. Finally, there’s wreath-making on 13 and 14 December. It’s £60 for non-members. English-heritage.org.uk

15

MUPPETS FOR ADULTS

DEC

A Christmas show that’s strictly for over-18s, Sing-a-Long-a Muppet Christmas Carol, features one of the more surprising festive hit films of the last 30 years, with Sh!t Theatre providing added extras. Includes free goody bags and whiskey. Catch the laughs at Cambridge Junction on 15 December, tickets cost £12.50. junction.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_011-017 (ARTS) BF.indd 13

13

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 11:01


XXXXXXXX

5

DEC

THE OVERTONES

The Overtones return to Cambridge as a foursome for the first time following the untimely passing of bandmate Timmy Matley. Their new album of covers and originals is a tribute to him, with songs of reflection but also ones to put a smile on your face. Catch them at the Corn Exchange on 5 December. Tickets from £25.50. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

R ET RO G A M E N IGH T GE T S F ES T I V E The Centre for Computing History hosts its final Retro Video Game Night of the year with a festive flavour on 7 December. Christmas-themed games will be out to play and the tournament is Winter Heat on the Sega Saturn. So head to the centre for consoles and games galore, plus a bar courtesy of Lord Conrad’s Brewery and a food stall/truck to be announced. Booking is required (£10) and it’s an over-18s event. computinghistory.org.uk D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_011-017 (ARTS) BF.indd 14

14

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

23/11/2018 11:07


A RTS & C U LT U R E

SING-SONG MERRILY ON HIGH Feeling festive? In need of a carol service or concert to get your vocal cords into? There’s plenty going on over the course of the month to tempt. Broadcast live from King’s College Chapel on BBC Radio 4 on Christmas Eve at 3pm, A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is the main event for huge numbers of people, with queues forming before dawn. The service started in 1918 and has been broadcast since 1928. Nowadays, millions tune in around the world as it is also broadcast live on the BBC World Service (with a repeat on BBC Radio 3 on Christmas Day, too) and since 1919 it always starts with Once in Royal David’s City. If you want to go, get there very early on Christmas Eve with some form of photo ID, as staff will begin distributing tickets from 7am. Each ticket – there are approximately 500 – will be for a specific seat and valid only for the person who collects it; only one ticket will be given per person. If you’re lucky to get one, you can go back for admission from 1.30pm for the 90-minute service from 3pm. Despite its popularity, the event is often confused with Carols From King’s. This is televised on BBC Two on Christmas Eve, but recorded earlier in the month. Ely Cathedral has a huge choice throughout December in the run up to the big day, culminating in Hark! The Herald, the annual carol concert on the 22nd. Expect traditional carols and seasonal music with a 30ft Christmas tree in the background. The soaring voices of the cathedral’s choir will be accompanied by Ely Sinfonia. Tickets from £10. On 7 December, the cathedral also hosts its Festival of Carols, featuring special guest Ruthie Henshall – who has had a long career in musical theatre, starring in Cats and Miss Saigon – plus seasonal readings and poems. Tickets from £12. Littleport Brass band takes centre stage at Ely Cathedral at 2pm on 15 December, for a Community Christmas Carol Sing-a-long, with free entry. Events for younger children and families include the Big Christmas Tree Lights Switch-on Service on 9 December and Christmas Story and Song Time on the 13th. A Rotary Club charity carol concert in aid of Arthur Rank Hospice Charity and Cambridge Churches Homeless Project takes place at Great St Mary’s Church on 10 December, featuring five local school choirs. Tickets are £10. On 16 December at 6.30pm there will be carols by candlelight at The Leper Chapel on Newmarket Road, with Cottenham Brass Band performaing at the atmospheric 12th-century building. If singing’s not quite your thing, sit back and watch New Cambridge Singers’ Christmas Concert. It features Benjamin Britten’s A Ceremony of Carols and one-act opera Amahl and the Night Visitors, by Gian Carlo Menotti, in which the three kings bring gifts to children. It takes place at St Vigor’s Church, Fulbourn, on 8 December, and St John the Evangelist Church, Hills Road, on 15 December. Cambridge Early Music presents Baroque Christmas Music from Germany and France at Great St Mary’s Church on 6 December. Featuring the Choir of Gonville & Caius College and Caius Consort, Baroque pieces for Christmas include Charpentier’s Messe de Minuit.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_011-017 (ARTS) BF.indd 15

15

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 11:01


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 16

22/11/2018 17:56


A RTS & C U LT U R E

15 DEC

PR I M E BR A SS

Prime Brass performs three family concerts of carols and festive music this month. Children of all ages can dress up in festive fashion if they wish for the shows that will see the Cambridge brass ensemble, formed in 1989, joined by talented young players, Junior Prime Brass and school choirs. The ensemble plays Stapleford Granary on 15 December at 3pm, and West Road Concert Hall on 16 December at 3.30pm and 5.30pm. primebrass.co.uk

LOV E AC T UA L LY IN CONCER T A hit film can’t really qualify as a cult classic, but Love Actually has enjoyed the sort of enduring appeal that’s normally only reserved for the quirky slow-burn genre flicks that keep fans watching. Richard Curtis’ tale of ten intertwining stories is 15 years old and was shown in 2017 with a live orchestra performing the soundtrack on a sold-out tour. It’s back for a second year, with Craig Armstrong’s evocative score being performed by Senbla Concert Orchestra at Cambridge Corn Exchange on 12 December. Tickets from £42.50. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

22

MUCH ADO ABOUT CRIMBO!

DEC

Get yourself in the Christmas spirit with Much Ado About Crimbo! on the 22nd: a seasonal, silly and slightly Shakespearean game of musical bingo at the Junction. Starring Boogaloo Stu as crimplene-clad comedy character Derek Daniels, with special guest Lorraine Bowen of Britain’s Got Talent fame, the game goes as follows: Derek sings a medley of festive classics at the piano while you, the audience, check your bingo card for quotes. Derek will casually drop Shakespeare into his comical reminiscence of his first Christmas with his long-suffering wife, Beverley. It’s a race to win it big and claim your gift from under the tree! Tickets are £12.50 and you’re encouraged to join the party in your finest 70s attire. Flares at the ready! junction.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_011-017 (ARTS) BF.indd 17

17

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 11:01


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 18

22/11/2018 17:56


A RTS & C U LT U R E

The

Art Insider RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH

‘S

he walks in beauty like the night’. One of the most exquisite lines of poetry ever – written by radical poet Lord Byron (famous for keeping a pet bear while at Cambridge – hmmm) which could easily describe sparkling, dressedup Cambridge at this time of year. There’s nothing more festive, or sumptuous, than dark nights and glittering trees (the Empress pub is the queen of bling – go for the decorations alone). Mill Road Winter Fair is no exception, starting the month with a bang on Saturday 1 December, boasting all manner of community treats and treasures. It’s a fantastic day to sip a mulled wine, pick up gifts – and support some of Cambridge’s best-loved artists and makers (such as Loukas Morley, offering his bespoke design wizardry working with reclaimed wood) by buying from them. In fact, why not start a new family tradition of choosing handmade decorations, gifts or cards from artisans at the fair each year? Another must-visit this month is Gallery 9, just round the corner from Mill Road on Norfolk Street, and one of Cambridge’s best galleries – take the chance to find fabulous gifts while you’re visiting the fair, and all year round. A stone’s throw from Mill Road, across Parker’s Piece on Regent Street, is the Heong Gallery at Downing College. Currently running is Halfboy, the gallery’s latest show, by one of the UK’s most acclaimed living painters, Stuart Pearson Wright. “An exhibition can often be either intensely moving or deeply thoughtprovoking. Halfboy is both,” comments Master of Downing College, Alan

Bookbinder, on the show, which explores the artist’s paternal roots – or lack of – with breathtaking results. Fans of the BP Portrait Awardwinning artist include HRH Prince of Wales, JK Rowling, Kiera Knightley and Daniel Radcliffe, who all own his works. You can also find him in public collections including the British Museum, Government Art Collection, the Ashmolean and Fitzwilliam museums, and many others. “The male has got to be heroic – if he’s wearing a codpiece, he’s got to get his sword out, win the maiden, and save the day... So, I wanted to take all of those references and expectations and piss them up the wall: explode the myth of the hero,” comments Stuart Pearson Wright on MAZE, a film piece made in collaboration with Kiera Knightley, screened as part of the programme to mark the opening of Halfboy. His examination of the masculine haunts Halfboy, too, along with the fresh-faced innocence of the artist as a young boy. The show runs until 6 February. Also not to be missed is Richard Pousette-Dart: Beginnings at Kettle’s Yard, reflecting on the artist’s time as a young abstract expressionist in New York, which runs until 6 January. This is the first UK solo show of US artist Richard Pousette-Dart, whose contemporaries included Pollock and Rothko – those abstract expressionists who put New York city at the centre of the art world in the 1940s. The youngest member of The Irascibles – a group of artists struggling to find a new sense of self, plus gain recognition for their rebellious new art

“I wanted to explode the myth of the hero” CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_019 (RUTHIE) V2 copy_FE.indd 19

19

movement in the aftermath of the Second World War – Pousette-Dart kept a lively correspondence with Jim Ede, founder of Kettle’s Yard. It’s relationships like theirs that highlight Kettle’s Yard’s own legacy – a long-standing commitment to nurturing a careful selection of young, original voices within the artworld. Featuring paintings, drawings, photography and sculpture that all mark Pousette-Dart’s significant contribution to American art, this show touches on that often-hidden fluidity between disciplines that happens as an artist finds their own voice. Standout use of text, alongside stunning works created at the start of Pousette-Dart’s incipient career, makes this a show that is high on concept, but not at the cost of craft – many of his works on show seem as fresh now as they must have felt when they were first made. And don’t we all love the idea of a young artist in New York? “Artists are the real heroes of humanity,” Pousette-Dart once said. “All great art is spiritual.” Maybe he was right. “I’m interested in helping people get on their own thread of their own creative being... I don’t think one is better than another – they are all unique.” Finally, if you haven’t already experienced a Cambridge Junction Christmas show, known for arty twists and fresh ideas, then put Snow White in your diary. Produced by New International Encounter, this lively and engaging show opens on 5 December. Yarn bombers are also called to transform the foyer of the Junction for this, with the help of Tigerchilli, Cambridge’s yarn bomber extraordinaire. December’s silly season would not be complete without a feel-good festive bash like this! Whatever you do, make sure you have a fabulous, happy and creative December. l D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:13


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 20

22/11/2018 17:56


C H R I STMAS S H O WS

Festive theatre treats THERE’S SO MUCH TO SEE THIS FESTIVE SEASON IN CAMBRIDGE: SIOBHAN GODWOOD ROUNDS UP THE SHOWS THAT WILL GET YOU FEELING ALL CHRISTMASSY

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_023-026 (CHRISTMAS SHOWS)sg.indd 21

21

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:11


XXXXXXXX Images Ballet Central’s production of The Nutcracker is perfect for younger audiences

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_023-026 (CHRISTMAS SHOWS)sg.indd 22

22

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 17:11


C H R I STMAS S H O WS

Above The St Petersburg Classic Ballet company makes its annual festive appearance at the Corn Exchange

29 NOVEMBER – 6 JANUARY

CAMBRIDGE ARTS THEATRE

ALADDIN Forget advent calendars – in Cambridge, the Christmas countdown officially starts once the Arts Theatre panto comes to town, and this year there’s a real treat in store with ‘the most thrilling pantomime of them all’, Aladdin. This genie-us production tells the story of a young man who is short of cash but big on personality, finding a way to help his family escape the mean streets of Old Peking, and discovering true love along the way – all with a little bit of help from a magic lamp. This Christmas classic features some of the most iconic panto characters, including Wishee Washee, played by ventriloquist Max Fulham and, of course, the ultimate evil villain, Abanazar, played by Wayne Sleep in full baddie mode. Matt Crosby will be making his 13th – yes, 13th! – appearance as the Arts Theatre’s panto dame, this time playing Widow Twanky. Tickets from £16 to £45. cambridgeartstheatre.com

past, with two legends of stage and screen – Holby City’s Robert Powell and New Tricks’ Susan Jameson – sharing the words and music of figures including Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll, Alfred Lord Tennyson and Queen Victoria herself. It’s a veritable stocking full of festive good cheer. Tickets from £5 to £20. saffronhall.com

18 – 22 DECEMBER

GREAT HALL AT THE LEYS

P E T E R PA N : A M U S I C A L A DV E N T U R E The much-loved story of the boy who never grew up, and his adventures with Peter, Wendy, John and Michael when they fly away to Neverland. This production from Cambridge Theatre Company follows 2017’s James and the Giant Peach and 2016’s Goodnight Mister Tom, and features a gorgeous musical score from George Stiles and Anthony Drewe. Tickets cost from £18 to £22.50 camtheatrecompany.co.uk

23 DECEMBER

SAFFRON HALL

A V I C TO R I A N C H R I S TM A S The Christmas that we celebrate is heavily influenced by the Victorians, from the cards that we send to the trees we decorate and the food we eat. Saffron Walden’s award-winning concert venue, Saffron Hall, is the venue for this show celebrating the delights of Christmas

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_023-026 (CHRISTMAS SHOWS)sg.indd 23

29 DECEMBER – 1 JANUARY

CORN EXCHANGE

T H E N U TC R AC K E R A N D S WA N L A K E For an unmissable, breathtaking Christmas treat, nothing can beat an outing to the ballet. Every winter at the Corn Exchange, the St Petersburg Classic Ballet company

23

rounds off one year and welcomes the next with performances of two beautiful classical ballets set to the timeless music of Tchaikovsky, and featuring stunning costumes and dazzling dancers. First up, from 29 to 31 December, is The Nutcracker, a festive flight of fancy following our heroine Clara as she is transported from an old Russian toyshop to a magical forest filled with toys who come to life, and meets her Nutcracker Prince. Next, on 1 January, is the achingly romantic Swan Lake, the tragic tale of Prince Siegfried and his true love Odette, who are tricked by evil sorcerer Von Rothbart and his daughter Odile, but would rather die than live apart. What better way to greet the new year? Tickets cost from £18 to £38 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:11


C H R I STMAS S H O WS 5 – 31 DECEMBER

CAMBRIDGE JUNCTION

S N OW W H I T E New International Encounter, the team behind the Junction’s Beauty and the Beast in 2016 and Around the World in Eighty Days in 2014, brings another unique theatrical Christmas experience to Cambridge this year, with their interpretation of Snow White. “We’ve done three Christmas shows at the Junction, so we’re delighted to be back this year,” said Alex Byrne, Snow White’s director. The production is of course based on the traditional fairy tale that we all know and love; but with a modern twist. The story offers a great opportunity to address modern dilemmas, with its themes of family conflict and the obsession with youth and beauty, embodied by the evil stepmother with her talking mirror and famous catchphrase, “who is the fairest of them all?” “The show looks at what our idea of beauty is, and what we see when we look at ourselves in the mirror,” explains Alex. “That’s a big question in our contemporary world, and while we don’t want to get too serious in a fun family show, that’s an underlying issue in our production.” This version of Snow White will have plenty of drama, too, as the real appeal of the story, Alex believes, lies in its archetypal fairy-tale baddie, the evil stepmother. “That character is what really attracted me to this story,” says Alex. “She’s brilliantly scary in the grand tradition of wicked witches, and when we started doing our first workshops, that was one of the things that we had lots of fun with. It’s such a fantastic, timeless storyline – the ageing beauty who realises that her charms are fading, choked up with murderous envy of her young, gorgeous stepdaughter.” The show is packed with comedy and rough and tumble action. While Snow White definitely isn’t a panto – there’s no cross-dressing, no pantomime dame, and no ‘he’s behind you!’ it is a really fun, fast-paced adventure for the whole family. “I really like it when the action spills off the stage and into the audience,” says Alex, “and when kids in the audience get so

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_023-026 (CHRISTMAS SHOWS)sg.indd 24

Above Cambridge Junction’s production of Snow White is a fun-packed musical extravaganza, with a modern twist to the tale and a live band on stage

caught up that they shout things out and get involved. We’ve had lots of really successful Christmas shows in Cambridge and they’ve all had that element of audience interaction, and that’s what we’re doing with Snow White. All our productions are musical, so there will be a live band on stage and the show will be packed with fantastic original songs. The J2 is a perfect venue for that, with its intimate feel; we’ll be taking some seats out and putting some on the stage, with the action happening right in the middle, so wherever you are, you’re only five or six metres from the actors. The audience will be right there with us as the story unfolds.” And as for the seven dwarves who take Snow White in and protect her – they’ll be given a modern makeover, offering a contrast to the image-conscious, opulent world in which Snow White has grown up. “They’ll be more like ‘the seven vegans’,” says Alex, “getting back to the land and living off-grid. It’s a reimagining of what these guys might be doing living out in the forest, so we’ll be seeing them as eco warriors, cutting back on plastic and reducing their carbon footprint.” Much more 2018! Tickets from £10 to £15.50, with discounts for groups. junction.co.uk

24

13 – 15 DECEMBER

ADC THEATRE

T H E N U TC R AC K E R For a short run of eight performances, Ballet Central returns to the ADC theatre this Christmas for a special version of the classic ballet The Nutcracker, performed to the iconic Tchaikovsky score. It’s Christmas Eve, and Clara is exploring Drosselmeyer’s toyshop when the dolls come alive and she is transported to an enchanted forest and a kingdom of sweets, where she meets the Nutracker Prince and the Sugar Plum Fairy. This shorter, 45-minute interpretation of the ballet is perfect for young audiences and a beautiful, Christmassy introduction to the world of ballet and classical music. Tickets cost £10. adctheatre.com

21 NOVEMBER – 1 DECEMBER

ADC THEATRE

THE GINGERBREAD MAN Run, run, as fast as you can! We all know that the Gingerbread Man has been running since he first popped out of that oven. But this Christmas at Cambridge’s ADC theatre, he’s breaking with tradition and entering into an epic, chocolatey battle against the forces of evil in the form of venture capitalist Mrs Badbury and the menacing Milky Bar Kid, when they turn Quality Street from a utopia of flavour equality into a soul-destroying factory. Gingie has to learn the importance of friendship and tolerance and join forces with an intrepid gang of baked goods. But can he do it in time to stop the baddies turning the moon into a giant creme egg for profit? Footlights’ annual panto is a byword for quirky, anarchic, hilarious fun, and this year’s show promises to be choc-a-bloc with gooey goodness for the whole family. There are evening shows every day except Sundays, and matinee performances too. Tickets £10-£16 adctheatre.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 17:11


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 25

22/11/2018 17:56


A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

EXPLORE CAMBRIDGE'S CENTRE FOR COMPUTING HISTORY Discover a place where old computers and consoles live forever in this hands-on museum that adults and children alike will enjoy

L

ooking for a unique day out in Cambridge? Retro tech heaven awaits at the Centre for Computing History on Coldham’s Road: a fascinating and fun hands-on museum experience for all ages. Chronicling the story of the Information Age through exploring the historical, social and cultural impact of developments in personal computing, the centre is home to a vast collection of vintage computers and consoles. Totalling some 32,000 items, this internationally significant archive contains everything from an Altair 8800 – the first home computer – to mobile phones, games consoles and calculators. Visitors can play, learn and have fun getting nostalgic as they go on a journey through video gaming from the early 1970s and consoles like the Magnavox Odyssey, through to the 1990s and the

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_027 (CENTRE FOR COMPUTING ADV).indd 26

Super Nintendo and Sega Mega Drive days, right up to the Sony PlayStation 4 with Virtual Reality. You can also deep dive into the history of personal computers, discovering everything from the Cambridge-born Acorn to Apricot (remember them?), Amstrad and, of course, Apple. You’ll also be able to find out more about the centre’s new project: Swiss Rolls, Tea and the Electronic Office: A History of LEO, the First Business Computer. Made possible by National Lottery players, the project brings together, preserves, archives and digitises a range of LEO computer artefacts, documents and personal memories to share the fascinating, yet largely unknown, story of LEO with a new audience. The Centre for Computing History is much more than a museum – it’s hands-

26

on exhibitions, educational workshops and a wide range of activities and special events. Coming up this month there’s a Christmas Quiz Night – which is like your typical pub quiz with rounds on music, films, sports and general trivia – but with a retro-computing twist, beer from Lord Conrad’s brewery and great prizes. Join the fun on the 1st! There’s also the latest instalment of the regular Retro Gaming Night (7 December), with loads of consoles and games from the archive for you to play on, or you can get into the festive spirit and build your very own digital Christmas tree at the Electronics Lab event on 8 December. Technology moves at breakneck speed, but the centre is preserving it and making the history of computing relevant and fun for all ages – pay a visit to discover this unique gem on your doorstep. l

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

22/11/2018 11:54


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 27

22/11/2018 17:56


A fair to remember

MEDIA PARTNE R

E

MILL ROAD WINTER FAIR RETURNS ON THE FIRST OF THE MONTH FOR ITS ANNUAL WINTERY BONANZA. HERE’S SOME HIGHLIGHTS NOT TO MISS!

at, drink, shop, dance and be merry at the marvellous Mill Road Winter Fair, which returns for its annual outing on 1 December. One of the most treasured events in the local calendar, the fair attracts around 10,000 guests each year, offering a joyful celebration of not just the Mill Road neighbourhood but the whole Cambridge community. As ever, there’s more food and fun than you can shake your woolly glove at, plus a plethora of stalls selling everything from Christmas decorations to handmade books and artworks, not to mention plenty of family activities. Mill Road will be closed (for drivers and cyclists) from East Road to Coleridge Road from 9am until 5.30pm, so visitors can roam around freely and enjoy the party. Here’s a taster of what’s in store!

DON ’ T MISS

After a two year hiatus, the community parade is back and will snake its way from Romsey Terrace up to East Road from 12.30pm. This year, there’s a time traveller theme, so expect all sorts of fantastical machines, gadgets and fabulously fancy

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_028-031 (MILL ROAD WINTER FAIR) BF.indd 28

dressed characters as the local schools and youth groups shimmy and bop their way through the fair. This year’s Mill Road Winter Fair will also see the unveiling of a new piece of public art, which will sit on the corner of Cavendish Road. The Romsey R, a striking sculpture conceived by local artist Harry Gray and typography specialist Will Hill, nods to the area’s history, community and railway heritage. It will be revealed to the public at 12pm on the day. It wouldn’t be a Mill Road Winter Fair day without a trip to The Empress, Cambridge’s most exuberantly decorated pub. Step inside and ogle the kitschness, sip on mulled wine and warm up with a hog roast in the garden. There’ll be a selection of Christmas beers, too, plus Father Christmas will be there from 3pm to 5pm with presents for all the kids. The other pub you need on your radar on fair day is The Cambridge Blue on Gwydir Street. This much-loved watering hole pulls out all the stops with seasonal hot drinks and real reindeer out the back. Fancy getting lost? Pay a visit to Petersfield Green, where Kay Barrett and her team are constructing a temporary labyrinth from 10.30am. It will be ready for exploring by visitors of all ages from midday, and come 3pm the labyrinth will be illuminated with tea lights for a magical mood as darkness falls.

MUSIC & MER R IMEN T From funk to punk and every genre in between, you’ll be able to soak up all

sorts of sounds from performers up and down the Mill Road mile. Highlights are sure to include the Latin carnival sounds of Arco Iris Samba Band, the uplifting voices of the Bibleway Gospel Choir and lively covers of classic hits by The Brass Funkeys. Head to Hope Street Yard for a party vibe and music from swing, be-bop and hip-hop maestros The Accidentalists, plus lively Eastern European beats from The Balkanoes. Calverley’s Brewery will be doling out craft beers and mulled cider, plus Lily’s Kitchen will be popping up with warming Thai curry, chow mein and spring rolls. Elsewhere, there’s indie-pop-punk and wacky lyrics from Goddammit Jeremiah, funk from the Hi-Fi Dropouts and alt-folk from Honeywitch plus plenty more – grab a programme for the full line-up and dust off your dancing shoes. Speaking of dancing: both the Cambridge and Coton Morris Men will be out in handkerchief-waving, bell-jangling force, while the brilliant Cambridge Swing Dance company will be lindy hopping around, too. If you fancy getting a little more involved, Cambridge Community Circus is offering free workshops at Great Eastern Street car park (12pm and 3.30pm), where you can pick up some new skills including juggling, spinning plates and mastering a diabolo.

FO OD

The vast and varied range of delicious eats is always a huge draw for the fair and this year is no different. You’ll never

u

“The fair attracts around 10,000 guests each year” 28

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 17:07


M I L L ROA D W I N T E R FA I R

W H AT:

Lively community celebration with food market, music and stalls.

W H EN: Saturday 1 December, 10.30am - 4.30pm

HOW MUCH: It’s free!

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_028-031 (MILL ROAD WINTER FAIR) BF.indd 29

29

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:07


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 30

23/11/2018 10:51


©BOOKS AT HUGHES HALL LIBRARY BY SARA RAWLINSON

Images Discover great food and unique gifts from independent traders and artists including Sara Rawlinson (work pictured below left), who'll be exhibiting her fine art photography of Cambridge

be more than a few steps away from something tasty at the event, but for the biggest concentration of traders make a beeline for the Gwydir Street car park, which is once again hosting a large food market. Those with a sweet tooth should seek out Audrey’s Vegan Cakes, which specialise in traditional bakes such as Bakewell tarts, lemon drizzles, carrot cakes, Victoria sponges, cupcakes and brownies – all created without an animal product in sight. They’ll also have some special seasonal treats including vegan Christmas cake, mince pies and gift bags of gingerbread and festive cookies – an ideal present for any pal on a plantbased diet. Another treat not to miss at Gwydir Street is Kerief Catering, who’ll be serving soul-warming Caribbean dishes including Jamaican pulled jerk chicken with pineapple salsa and jerk mayo, plus braised pork belly with homemade tomato chutney. While there, pick up a loaf or two from Dovecote Bakery, which makes fantastic artisan sourdough bread. It will also have a selection of seasonal specials, too. At St Barnabas, swing by Bam Bam Crêpe, one of the city’s newest street food vendors. It will be serving a mouthwatering range of crêpes for £5 a piece with fillings including the signature Nutella and crushed Oreo. There’ll also

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_028-031 (MILL ROAD WINTER FAIR) BF.indd 31

“It is a great chance to blitz your Christmas shopping list” be gourmet burgers courtesy of local faves Steak & Honour, fluffy steamed bao with lip-smacking fillings from Guerrilla Kitchen and tempting Austrian treats from Holy Schnitzels. If you’re after a sit down and something warm to drink, nip over to Donkey Common, which is by the swimming pool, and visit The Rural Coffee Project. Or, if you’re after something a little stronger, Cambridge Wine Merchants will be doling out winter cocktails and dance-worthy tunes at its Vino Vinyl Bar and Disco outside Bharat Bhavan, while Thirsty’s beer bus will be busy keeping the crowds full of Christmas spirit at St Barnabas.

SHOP

The fair is a great chance to blitz your Christmas shopping list and pick up unique gifts from local independent

31

traders. Donkey Common is hosting a mix of market and craft stalls, including local charities and a face painting stall. From handmade soaps to original artworks to homewares and gifts, there will be plenty to explore. At the Petersfield Green marquee, visit fine art photographer Sara Rawlinson for a stunning image of a local landmark. She’ll be selling work from two projects: one that focuses on Cambridge College Libraries, another that shows King’s College Chapel in all its glory. As well as originals, there will be greeting cards and prints available for purchase on the day. The Petersfield Green marquee will also house festive décor and gifts from Hook & Light, illustrated cards, books and prints from Jo Clark Design, handmade ceramics from Roxane’s Creations and silver jewellery from Argentarre, plus lots more. l

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:07


B U RWA S H L A R D E R VO U C H E R WORTH £50

Found at Burwash Manor in Barton, The Larder is one of the region’s finest delicatessens. Stuffed to the brim with hand-picked delicacies, only the very best food and drink makes the shelves, as all the food on display here is rigorously tasted and approved to ensure that it makes the grade. Being on a farm directly influences the produce being sold; Burwash Larder sells pork and pork products from Burwash Manor Farm’s own herd of Essex Saddlebacks and, in season, asparagus is available, freshly picked from Burwash’s own beds. burwashmanor.com

DI N N ER FOR T WO AT HOT EL DU V I N WORTH £100

£1500! WORTH OVER

Cambridge Edition

CHRISTMAS GIVEAWAY!

Our lucky winner and a guest will be treated to a delicious three-course dinner at the newly refurbished Bistro at Hotel du Vin. Signifying a return to its roots, the revamped Bistro is reminiscent of the French bistros that first inspired it, but with a distinctly contemporary feel. Muted hues, clean lines and soft lighting complement the vast windows to create a bright but warm space, perfect for retreating from the autumn weather. And, as the cooler temperatures set in, Hotel du Vin’s Executive Chef Director Matt Powell has introduced a new menu that focuses on heart-warming, mouthwatering, home-style French cooking. hotelduvin.com

OUR BIG FESTIVE GIVEAWAY IS BACK! ONE LUCKY READER WILL WIN ALL OF THESE FANTASTIC PRIZES – TO BE IN WITH A CHANCE, HEAD TO THE CAMBRIDGE EDITION WEBSITE FOR DETAILS ON HOW TO ENTER

SCUDA MOR E ’ S A N N UA L BOAT I NG T ICK ET S WORTH £270

VO U C H E R F O R T H E A R T H O U N D GA L L E RY WORTH £50

The Art Hound Gallery, at Burwash Manor, is Cambridge’s premier modern and contemporary art gallery, offering a unique urban art experience in a country setting. The gallery is an unexpected space filled with works by some of the biggest names in art, as well as the fast rising stars of the current scene. The Art Hound specialises in Pop Art and its contemporary legacy, but also houses a huge and varied collection of works for sale from 1910 to the present. thearthoundgallery.com

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_032-035 (GIVEAWAY)sg.indd 32

32

Enjoy some messing about on the river, Cambridge style, with Scudamore’s, who’ll be giving our winner an Annual Boating Ticket worth £270. Redeemable on self-hire punts, canoes or kayaks, you get a choice of boat to take out every day for an entire year, with the exception of Christmas Day. You’ll be free to explore some of Cambridge’s most iconic sights, from the College Backs to the glorious Grantchester Meadows, for the whole of 2019. scudamores.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

21/11/2018 11:26


CO M P E T I T I O N

TO BE IN WITH A CHANCE OF WINNING THIS FANTASTIC PRIZE BUNDLE AND READ FULL TS & CS VISIT CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK

HO T EL CHOCOL AT W R E AT H BOX WORTH £40 This Hotel Chocolat treat box contains a whopping forty chocolates, two grand snowflakes and one festive wreath. Crunch into awardwinning treacle tarts, new honey and cashew supernovas or patisserie-inspired cinnamon buns. You can also toast the season with the champagne truffles or delicate mulled wine chocolates. Hello chocolate heaven! hotelchocolat.com/uk

CH A MPAGN E A F T ER NO ON T E A FOR T WO, BEDFOR D L ODGE HO T EL & SPA WORTH £53.90

Our winner will also be treated to a sumptuous champagne afternoon tea at Newmarket’s Bedford Lodge Hotel. In the luxurious setting of Squires restaurant, you’ll enjoy an array of finger sandwiches including local smoked salmon and horseradish, tuck into freshly-baked warm scones slathered in clotted cream, strawberry jam and lemon curd, and a delicious selection of cakes such as seasonal berry tart, praline and chocolate eclairs and vanilla and strawberry macaron. The tea also comes with a glass of Moët & Chandon. bedfordlodgehotel.co.uk

N E A L’S YA R D B E AU T Y S L E E P C O L L E C T I O N WORTH £50

Get the ultimate night’s sleep with the Neal’s Yard Bedtime Collection: a gentle lullaby for the senses containing a trio of calming products. Inside, you’ll fund the sumptuously rich Beauty Sleep Body Butter, which is perfect pre-sleep prep, plus Beauty Sleep Concentrate: a best-selling lightweight serum which helps to support your skin’s natural night-time regeneration. There’s also a bottle of Goodnight Pillow Mist, which contains gorgeously scented, relaxing botanicals to help you curl up peacefully and wake up refreshed. nealsyardremedies.com

ESCAPE ROOM FOR SIX AT LOCKHOUSE GAMES WORTH £140

Located on Regent Street, LockHouse Games offers thrilling escape games for all ages. They’re open almost every day of the year and offer a variety of tricky ‘missions’, from Armageddon, where you must work with your team to destroy a giant meteor, to Egyptian Tomb, fill with secret doors, big wooden puzzles, Egyptian art and a life-size sarcophagus! Our winner will receive a session at LockHouse for six people. lockhouse.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_032-035 (GIVEAWAY)sg.indd 33

33

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 11:26


CO M P E T I T I O N

XECO WINES F I N O S H E R RY WORTH £15.95

XECO Wines are making it their mission to bring sherry back into the limelight with their eye-popping and modern brand of sherry wines. Working with a family owned Bodega in Jerez, which was established in 1876, XECO sherries are made using the finest Palomino grapes and the portfolio currently includes a Fino and an Amontillado. XECO Fino is light and fresh on the palate with dry nutty flavours – delicious served straight up and fridge-cold, or try the 'She & T' by adding a glug of tonic. XECO Amontillado takes its colour from the oak barrels it has been aged in. It smells sweet but is dry on the palate, making it a great aperitif before dinner or paired with cheese /charcuterie. xecowines.com

SPA DAY AT T HE VA R SI T Y HOT EL’ S GL A SS WOR K S SPA FOR 2 WORTH £150

An urban spa in the heart of the city centre, the stunning Glassworks Gym & Spa is located at the Varsity Hotel on Thompson Lane. Our lucky winner will enjoy a day of relaxing and pampering, taking advantage of the steam room, sauna and jacuzzi, which looks out across the Cam. As well as a full day’s access to the spa, the winner and their guest will be treated to a full body massage (available any day but Saturday). theglassworksgym.co.uk

CAMBRIDGE DISTILLERY MASTERCLASSES & GIN

WORTH £105 Our world-famous local gin distillery is giving our lucky winner a bottle of its awardwinning Cambridge Dry Gin, plus a chance to experience a masterclass at the Gin Lab on Green Street, which offers engaging, entertaining and informative tutored tastings. You’ll get a one-hour tasting revealing how the gins are made and why, including a short background on gin history and production as well as teaching you how to taste like a professional, plus a G&T on arrival and plenty of tasters throughout. cambridgeginlab.co.uk

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_032-035 (GIVEAWAY)sg.indd 34

L IL LY PU DS PU DDING WORTH £12.75 Our winner will finish their Christmas dinner in style with this plum pudding laced with damson gin by renowned artisan Christmas Pudding producer, LillyPuds. A new launch for this festive season, the pudding is a treat for the tastebuds, with a deliciously rich combination of the finest vine fruits, prunes and walnuts, blended together with stout, brandy and an added kick from the generous lacing of damson gin. lillypuds.co.uk

34

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

21/11/2018 11:26


CO M P E T I T I O N

TO BE IN WITH A CHANCE OF WINNING THIS FANTASTIC PRIZE BUNDLE AND READ FULL TS & CS VISIT CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK

2 T I C K E T S TO B I G R E T R E AT WA L E S WORTH £338

A glorious festival set in the heart of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, Big Retreat takes place 24-27 May 2019. Set in a beautiful riverside location, it offers a fusion of feel-good activities, from fitness and wellbeing fun to arts and crafts, fascinating talks, fabulous food and drink and plenty of great live music on the main stage, where you can soak up the sounds and sights while relaxing on a deckchair. With over 200 classes and workshops included in your tickets, from yoga to cookery workshops, you’re sure to have a fun-packed, feel good weekend! thebigretreatwales.co.uk

MURAD 'THE ULTIMATE GLOW-TOS' GIFT SET WORTH £50

Feel the invigorating rush of hydration! This deeply hydrating set by prestigious skincare brand Murad replenishes key vitamins, minerals and peptides to lock in hydration for plump, radiant, perfectly primed skin. It includes Nutrient Charged Water Gel, AHA/BHA Exfoliating Cleanser, MultiVitamin Infusion Oil and Invisiblur Perfecting Shield SPF30. Ready, Set, Glow! murad.co.uk

F U DGEM A K I NG EX PER I ENCE WORTH £100

Fudge Kitchen on King’s Parade is a Cambridge institution, loved by locals and visitors alike for its authentic handmade fudge, made using a recipe from the 1800s and traditional techniques of ‘slabbing and loafing’ on marble counters. Fresh fudge is made in this way on a daily basis in full view of the customers; accompanied by much banter, fudge sampling and a fascinating lesson on the history and science of fudge making. It is not just a Mecca for the confectionery cognoscenti, but a tourist attraction. They’re giving away an hour-long fudge making experience (for 1-3 people), featuring lots of tasters, a six slice box to take home, and a ‘make fudge at home’ kit. fudgekitchen.co.uk

G I F T S E T F RO M LO N D O N S O C K C O M PA N Y WORTH £89 Cocoon your feet in luxury with the London Sock Company’s Spot of Style collection. The set contains six pairs of designer socks made with finely knitted luxury Scottish Lisle cotton and sporting designs inspired by the classic movie Roman Holiday: multicoloured Vespas, polka dots and timeless sense of style. Classic, assured and simply stylish.

londonsockcompany.com

T H E GOG H A MPER WORTH £50

The Gog – our award-winning local farm shop, butchery, deli and café – has contributed a hamper packed with treats. Inside you’ll find loose leaf teas from Kandula, a chocolate bouquet from Chocolat Chocolat, plus a pack of Chocolate Oat Crumbles and jar of tasty apricot preserve from Cartwright and Butler. There’s a fantastic bottle of red too (Bodega Classica Hacienda Lopez de Haro Crianza Rioja), plus a tin of Brindisa Casa Eceiza Cigarillo Biscuits and some melt in the mouth Buttermilk Caramel Sea Salt fudge – all packaged up in an attractive wicker basket.

thegog.com CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_032-035 (GIVEAWAY)sg.indd 35

35

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 11:26


CAMBRIDGE EDITION

Book Club

BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

T HE S T R A NGER DI A R IES BY EL LY GR IF F I T HS INTERVIEW BY CHARLOT TE GRIFFITHS

D

raw the curtains, lock your door and settle down with the perfect wintry read: The Stranger Diaries follows Clare Cassidy, a teacher who specialises in the (fictional) Gothic writer R.M. Holland, and two other narrators – Clare’s teenage daughter Georgia, and Detective Sergeant Harbinder Kaur. The book opens as one of Clare’s fellow teachers is killed in mysterious circumstances, a quotation from R.M. Holland found next to the body – colliding Clare’s worlds and giving ever-suspicious DS Kaur good reason to keep an eye on Clare. A habitual diary keeper, Clare records her fears for herself and her daughter in her journal, giving us glimpses into her innermost thoughts. But in a frightening twist, it turns out that it’s not just us who’s spying on Clare’s diary: she starts to spot writing in her journal which isn’t her own. And wherever there are diaries, there are always secrets... The Stranger Diaries is the first Elly Griffiths novel not to be part of a sequence: if you’re already familiar with the author’s pen name, it’s probably because of her hit series following forensic archeologist Dr Ruth Galloway, or the Stephens and Mephisto novels, set in the 1950s – both of which keep Elly extremely busy. “I’ve also written four standalone books under my own name, as Domenica de Rosa, which were mainly romances about Italy and families,” the author explains. “At the moment I’m writing two books a year for my two series – but this is the first standalone crime novel as Elly Griffiths, which I finished writing in February this year.” This book’s beginnings were appropriately sinister: “I started writing it on that day last October when the sky

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_038-039 (BOOK CLUB)sg.indd 36

“I just let the story take me” went strangely yellow,” Domenica says. “I’d had lunch with my editor Jane in Brighton, I’d had some ideas about what I was going to do with this book. We came out of the restaurant and people were looking up at the sky – it was really weird,” she continues. “As I was driving home, I suddenly realised how I was going to start the story – with the story of the Stranger, the man on the train – and I got home and wrote the first chapter.” Domenica had wanted to write Gothic horror for a while, but didn’t want her book to be historical, or set in the Victorian era, so struggled with how best to work in this genre. One of the key elements of any horror is an atmospheric location, which in The Stranger Diaries almost becomes a character itself. “The school is an amalgamation: a sort of concentrated broth,” she says. “It’s a little bit based on a place called West Dean College, where I teach creative writing, and my old comprehensive school,

36

Cardinal Newman in Hove, which was partly an old convent complete with a story about a nun who fell down the stairs and haunts the building…” As you’d expect from such a prolific writer, Domenica is normally careful to plot her way through a book before starting out. However, The Stranger Diaries saw her take a looser approach. “This has really been a book where I just let the story take me,” she says. “I vaguely knew where I wanted it to go. I didn’t really know who my three narrators were when I started, but I knew I wanted to thread the Victorian ghost story through it, and that I wanted to bring in the idea of the diary. I’m very interested in the idea of why people keep diaries: I’ve kept one since I was 11 – and I still write in it quite often, but I’m interested as to why people do this. I’ve always really been struck by that bit in The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins, where Count Fosco finds Marian’s diary and doesn’t just read CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 14:12


BOOK CLUB

C AT H Y MO OR E ON T H E ST R A NGER DI A R I ES novel is told through the eyes of Clare Cassidy, a literature teacher specialising in the Gothic writer R.M. Holland. Her life and work tragically collide when a colleague is found dead, with a line from an R.M. Holland story by her body. What follows is an accomplished, funny and gripping tale told through the eyes of several protagonists including Harbinder, the very appealing detective. It is made all the more enjoyable by Griffiths’s obvious mastery of and pleasure in the gothic form. If you enjoy it do go on and read The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins and almost anything by the quite brilliant M.R. James. Cathy Moore is the director of Cambridge Literary Festival.

I have long been a fan of Elly Griffiths and her best-selling Dr Ruth Galloway mysteries so I was curious and excited to read her new standalone novel The Stranger Diaries. I was not disappointed. She has written a pitch-perfect contemporary gothic thriller which owes much to the writings of M.R. James and Wilkie Collins. The opening lines immediately set the tone. “‘If you will permit me,’ said the Stranger, ‘I’d like to tell you a story. After all, it’s a long journey and, by the look of those skies, we’re not going to be leaving this carriage for some time. So, why not pass the hours with some storytelling? The perfect thing for a late October evening.’” The

it, but writes in it – I’ve always thought that was just so villainous!” she laughs. One of her narrators, Clare, keeps a handwritten diary, while the character’s daughter Georgia writes a digital journal: this generational difference was something the author was keen to explore. “For me, that process of going from the brain, to the hand, to the page, is almost therapeutic – but I think for young people, that’s a bit different,” she says. “It’s always struck me that it’s very easy for people like me to

say ‘Ooh, they’re on their phone again…’ – but they’re not always ‘on their phone’. It’s my generation – I’m 55 – who are on Twitter and Facebook and things. Quite a lot of what the younger generation is doing is creative, and quite literate. They’re reading a lot, and sometimes they’re writing, and we forget that: we say ‘oh, they’re playing…’ I wanted to explore that, and show that Clare, a devoted mother, didn’t understand what Georgia was doing or that she was also a writer, just in a different way.” Along with diary-keeping, creative writing features heavily in the plot. As a creative writing teacher herself, Domenica had a lot of fun with some of the criticism that her characters come out with. “It’s funny,” she says, “people say, ‘Either you can write, or you can’t…’ but there’s no doubt that you can become a better writer: you can become better at anything, can’t you? The real plus about creative writing courses, writers groups, anything like that, is that it does just make you write. Maybe that’s the main thing: when you’re on a course you have to do an assignment, you have to write…” As with most writers, Domenica is an avid reader. “I’m always reading – I usually have a couple of books on the go,” she says. “In my hotel room I have Tombland, the new C.J. Sansom and in my bag I also have Venetia by

Georgette Heyer.” It was a book group recommendation that first introduced her to C.J. Sansom’s work. “I really enjoy my book club,” she says. “They introduced me to all sorts of books, and just getting together, drinking wine and talking about books is great…plus people who like books do tend to be really nice!” she laughs. If you’re convinced enough to consider putting The Stranger Diaries forward to your own book club, Domenica has some advice to help you persuade others: “I hope they’d find it an interesting story, that’s both a ghost story and a modern crime, and with a bit of humour in it and some memorable characters. And a nice dog – it’s important to have a nice dog.” l

Look out for the Cambridge Edition book club stickers in Heffers and get money off our monthly pick. Heffers is located at 20 Trinity Street, Cambridge blackwells.co.uk

UP NEXT MONTH

THE LIGHT IN THE DA R K: A WINTER JOUR NA L Our first non-fiction selection, next month’s Edition Book Club pick is The Light in the Dark: A Winter Journal, by multi award-winning memoirist, nature and travel writer Horatio Clare. This evocative exploration of the season combines scintillating nature writing with a moving personal narrative, touching on issues of depression and Seasonal Affective Disorder. In a powerful and lyrical exploration of a British winter and the feelings it inspires, Clare holds a torch against the darkness, illuminating the blackest corners of the season and delving into memory and myth to explore the powerful hold the season has on us. By learning to see, he writes, we can find the magic, the light that burns bright at the heart of winter: spring will come again. THE LIGHT IN THE DARK IS AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE AT HEFFERS. READ ALONG AND TWEET US YOUR THOUGHTS @CAMBSEDITION, WITH THE HASHTAG #EDITIONBOOKCLUB FOR A CHANCE TO FEATURE IN THE NEXT ISSUE!

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_038-039 (BOOK CLUB)sg.indd 37

37

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 14:13


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 38

22/11/2018 17:56


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 39

22/11/2018 17:56


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 40

22/11/2018 17:56


FA M I LY DAYS O U T

Family days out

T HE GR E AT OU T DOOR S Cosying up with the family is one of the great joys of winter, but there comes a point when what’s needed is a run around in the great outdoors and a few lungfuls of fresh air. Take a stroll at Wicken Fen, the National Trust’s oldest nature reserve and England’s most famous fen. It’s one of Europe’s most important wetlands, home to more than 9,000 species, including wigeons (medium-sized ducks with chestnut and yellow heads)

and short-eared owls. Easy to spot are the large flocks of starlings, whose stunning ‘murmurations’ signify their intention to settle down for the night. Kids can also have a go at bushcraft over at Wandlebury Country Park on 21 December. Designed for children aged 5 to 12, the day is run by experienced, qualified teachers, who aim to inspire children about the outdoors. It’s £38 per child.

W I N T ER PR I N T S AT BO TA N IC G A R DEN There’s a wealth of arty inspiration to be had at the Botanic Garden, so why not combine some of those ideas with a bit of card to create something new, at a winter prints drop-in event that’s free for children. Print from plants, and make your own unique gift tags and cards to take home. There’s also the chance to take a close look at Christmas plants such as mistletoe, fir trees and holly. botanic.cam.ac.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_041 (FAMILY)_FE.indd 41

41

FA M I LY F I R S T S AT U R DAY The Fitzwilliam Museum holds its latest Family First Saturday on 1 December. Make art on a finders-keepers theme, and enjoy family tours lasting 30 minutes at 2pm and 3pm (recommended for children five and up). There are also 30-minute storytelling sessions at 2.30pm and 3.30pm, which are suitable for under-fives. It’s free, just collect a sticker from the courtyard entrance. fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

STAR & MOUSE CINEMA

Enjoy the ultimate family Christmas movie on 15 December, when The Star & Mouse Pictureshow presents Home Alone at Manor Farm in Bourn. Promising an abundance of festive cheer, guests can also join in with carols and have a cup of cocoa with Santa himself. Hot food and mulled wine will be on offer, along with a live brass band, toasted marshmallows and a stocking filler Christmas market. Tickets are £10. manorfarmbourn.com D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 10:53


After Hours

NOW BOOKING

THE NIGHTLIFE EVENTS NOT TO MISS THIS MONTH

ST EP H EN K A MOS 29 JANUARY, JUNCTION, £19.50

As everyone seems pushed to extremes, Stephen’s main aim is to cheer us up, so snap up your tickets.

13 DEC

JOH N GR A N T 7 FEBRUARY, CORN EX, FROM £28

TRAVIS Travis play their hit album, The Man Who, in its entirety at the Cambridge Corn Exchange on 13 December. It was the biggest-selling album of 2000, spending 11 weeks at number 1, and includes Driftwood, Turn, Writing To Reach You and perhaps most-loved, Why Does It Always Rain On Me? Their second album sold three million copies and earned Brit Awards for best album and British band. Tickets are £42.50. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

Grant creates synthpop with soaring harmonies and offbeat grooves. His fourth solo album, Love Is Magic, came out in October.

EZIO Ezio, the legendary local

band formed in 1990, play the Junction’s J1 on 15 December. Featuring core duo Ezio Lunedei and Mark “Booga” Fowell, they’ve built up a sizeable, loyal fan base, without ever quite breaking into the mainstream. Tickets are £17. junction.co.uk

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_036-039 (AFTER HOURS)sg.indd 42

42

H AY SEED DI X I E 16 MARCH, JUNCTION, £19

The inventors of ‘rockgrass’, this group from East Nashville have been blending Hank Williams and AC/DC for more than 18 years.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 16:28


NIG X XHXTXLXI XF EX X

12 DEC

A WINTER UNION

A festive folk band like no other, A Winter Union features five leading lights of the British roots scene. Expect soaring harmonies and exquisite musicianship, as they perform original seasonal songs. The band comprises Jade Rhiannon, Katriona Gilmore, Jamie Roberts, Hannah Sanders and Ben Savage. Catch them at St Barnabus Church, on Mill Road, on 12 December. Tickets are £19. junction.co.uk

CRAIG CHARLES FUNK AND SOUL CLUB

The Craig Charles Funk and Soul Club returns to the Junction on 21 December for the BBC Radio 6 Music DJ’s latest club night at the venue. Expect lashings of 70s grooves, oodles of vintage soul and some brand new beats. It’s the ultimate Christmas warm-up and always a fantastic night out. From 10pm, tickets £18.50. junction.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_042-045 (AFTER HOURS)sg.indd 43

Gig Guide JORDAN WORLAND FROM LOCAL MUSIC WEBSITE SLATE THE DISCO GIVES HIS TOP LIVE MUSIC PICKS FOR THE MONTH AHEAD

H

ere we are, presenting our annual end of year ‘escape from the Christmas music’ article. And this December sees a great selection of live music options for us to enjoy. Our top tip goes down at the NCI on the 6th, when jazz/ electronic supergroup Szun Waves perform. The trio comprises saxophonist Jack Wyllie, of minimalist tech-jazz combo Portico Quartet, drummer Laurence Pike, from outer-rock experimentalists PVT, and solo electronic explorer Luke Abbott. Sometimes in improvised music there can be a distance between listener and players, a sense you’re sitting back and admiring their interplay and abstraction, but with Szun Waves’ second album New Hymn To Freedom, you’re right in there with them, inside the playing, experiencing the absolute joy the three musicians feel as they circle around each other, exploring the spaces they’ve opened up. Remember Razorlight? The band enjoyed hits galore and widespread success during indie’s mid-noughties heyday. Fronted by Johnny Borrell, the band have emerged from a 10-year hiatus with a new record; they play the Cambridge Junction on the 19th. It’s not Christmas without an Ezio or Dr Feelgood show; fortunately both are at the Junction this month, as is Chris Wood (1st) and Alabama 3 (14th). Way back at the turn of the century, Travis graced Glastonbury’s Pyramid Stage in a headline slot. It was the Scottish rockers’ sophomore record The Man Who that had propelled the outfit into global superstardom. 18 years on, Travis are touring the nine-times platinum album, including a stop at the Cambridge Corn Exchange on the 13th. Talking of Glastonbury, as you do in December, Orbital have graced Worthy Farm with numerous appearances, their 1994 set being widely considered a pivotal moment for UK dance music. 2018 has seen the electronic duo celebrate 30 years in music and release their ninth studio album, Monsters Exist. The Hartnoll brothers bring that new album, plus their extensive back catalogue, to the Corn Exchange on the 19th. Nothing says Christmas like the annual UK Subs Portland Arms show in December, this year taking place on the 6th with Freedom Faction in support. The same venue also hosts the Green Mind end-of-year shindig. Taking place on the 29th, the night will be headlined by one of Cambridge’s biggest revelations this year, Lemondaze. The four-piece mix 90s shoegaze twisted with energetic new shapes.

43

D E C E M B E R 2 018

23/11/2018 09:20


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 44

22/11/2018 17:56


XXXXXXXX

T HE M AGIC OF MOTOW N

DISCO U N DERGROU N D Disco Underground – the new club night from Wonky Disco and Wild Wood Disco, returns to 2648 for its second outing on 22 December. With DJs including Stuart Banks, Tonky, Valerio and a yet-to-berevealed special guest taking to the decks, you can be sure of a night of great tunes: expect house, disco and funk music. There’ll also be crazy décor, a whole lot of glitter, face paint and plenty more surprises. The event runs 9pm to 2am and tickets are £10, available from Ticket Tailor. tickettailor.com

The most soulful party in town is back with 40 non-stop classic Motown hits, glittering costume changes and dazzling dance moves at the Corn Exchange on 8 December. Catch the timeless tunes of Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder, The Temptations, The Supremes, The Four Tops, Martha Reeves, the Jackson 5, Smokey Robinson and more. Tickets from £21.75. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

ORBITAL Having split up twice over the years, electronic music legends Orbital are now back together, on the road and making music again. Monsters Exist, released in September this year, was the veteran dance duo’s first album since 2012 and met widespread critical acclaim. Catch them at the Cambridge Corn Exchange on 19 December, tickets are £28. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_036-039 (AFTER HOURS)sg.indd 45

45

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 16:28


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 46

22/11/2018 17:56


NEW YEAR'S EVE

Party Time SEE IN 2019 WITH A BANG AT ONE OF THESE NEW YEAR’S EVE EVENTS

B E D F O R D LO D G E Welcome in 2019 in style at Newmarket's Bedford Lodge Hotel & Spa. Choose between a black tie Gala Dinner (£135 per person) in the award-winning Squires Restaurant, which offers a luxury fivecourse dinner and a piper to see in the New Year, or alternatively, spend your evening at the New Year’s Eve Classics Ball (£115 per person) with a black tie Dinner Dance. The four-course dinner starts at 7pm, then comes disco tunes, a traditional piper, plus haggis, neeps and tatties for both NYE packages. bedfordlodgehotel.co.uk

THIRST Y W I N T E RGA R T E N The final night of this year’s Wintergarten – in its new home in the garden at the Gonville Hotel next to Parker’s Piece – is on New Year’s Eve for a double send off to 2018 and the popular al fresco drinks and street food spot. Get a fab selection of craft beer from the Thirstybus bar, together with great choonz inside giant tipis, and warm up next to fire pits and heaters. There will also be a choice of street food from the best vans in town. wearethirsty.co.uk

D E LU C A A sumptuous five-course menu and exclusive access to the top floor piano bar takes place at this ticket-only celebration. After dinner, Robin P-iano will lead the requests and sing-along as midnight approaches. Early booking is highly recommended as the restaurant and piano bar will not be open to the public on New Year’s Eve. delucacucina.co.uk

T H E W I L LOW T R E E Embrace the Parisian spirit at The Willow Tree on New Year’s Eve, with a dinner and show from 8pm. Featuring a Midnight in Paris theme, choose gourmet delights from a fabulous five-course taster menu, including fizz on arrival. This themed dining party and show is a collaboration with the Neon Moon Club and will feature enchanting French décor, close-

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_041 (NEW YEARS EVE).indd 47

up performers and live music until the early hours, bringing a glamorous vintage vibe from the capital of style. Tickets are £90 per person. feastandfrolic.co.uk/the-willow-tree

B ROW N S Feast on a whopping five courses at Browns with its treat of a New Year’s Eve menu. There’s the aforementioned five courses for £44.95, which includes a classic Bellini, a blend of prosecco and peach that’s always a delight. After canapés on arrival, try beetroot, porcini and red wine crumble for starters, followed by 28-day aged sirloin steak or slow-cooked salted pork belly for your

47

main, with apple, cranberry and prosecco crumble for dessert. browns-restaurants.co.uk

N OV I Sometimes it’s good to be left in the dark, but just a little bit! At Novi, see in the New Year at a Glow in the Dark bash, complete with local DJs and bespoke drinks packages. Go dressed to glow with tickets costing £10 in advance and £15 on the door. The winter terrace will be a fully covered and heated winter wonderland, complete with festoon lighting, blankets and an array of cocktail specials. novicambridge.co.uk

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 10:50


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 48

22/11/2018 17:56


W H AT ’ S O N

What’s On

A ROUND-UP OF EVENTS IN AND AROUND CAMBRIDGESHIRE THIS MONTH

1 DECEMBER

1 DECEMBER

2 DECEMBER

DRAGTIME! The Xmas extravaganza has dancing, lip-sync battles – and everything in-between! It promises to be Santa’s most fabulous outing yet... 11pm | ADC theatre | from £7 adctheatre.com

CITY OF CAMBRIDGE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

WINTER WONDERLAND SUPPER CLUB

An evening of wonderful music including Elgar’s Sea Pictures and Britten’s Four Sea Interludes. 7.30pm | West Road Concert Hall | adult £18 children £5 | westroad.org

1 DECEMBER

1 DECEMBER

The spectacular event is back for one night of glamour and glitz with a special collaboration between the Willow Tree in Bourn and the fantastically theatrical Neon Moon club. 7pm | The Willow Tree | £65 feastandfrolic.co.uk

RAREFEST

DEACON BLUE

A new kind of science festival comes to Cambridge, with exhibitions, talks, performances and films geared towards raising awareness for rare diseases. 10am | Guildhall | camraredisease.org

Celebrating 30 years of their greatest shows and hits, this stop on the 2018 tour To Be Here Someday celebrates the band’s entire career. 7pm | Corn Exchange | from £23.25 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

4 DECEMBER

BJÖRN AGAIN The internationally acclaimed show stops off in Cambridge as part of its 30th anniversary tour. Come down and enjoy the timeless and enduring appeal of ABBA’s greatest music in this show-stopping performance. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £28 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk 8 DECEMBER

THE MAGIC OF MOTOWN Seen by over one million people worldwide, this hugely popular and seemingly unstoppable show comes to the Corn Exchange, presenting flamboyant style and toe-tapping, instantly recognisable songs. It all adds up to a proper slice of Motown magic. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £21.75 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk 8 DECEMBER

CAMBRIDGE PHILHARMONIC Commemorating the centenary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth, this orchestral performance showcases the work of a giant of 20th century music. Enjoy tunes from West Side Story and Wonderful Town. 7.30pm | West Road Concert Hall | from £10 westroad.org 9 DECEMBER

5 DECEMBER

LONDON COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHOIR

T HE OV ER TON ES This slick vocal group light up the Corn Exchange with a night of fabulous, Christmassy covers and original songs. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £25.50 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_053-055 (LISTINGS)_FE.indd 49

49

They’ve sung for Nelson Mandela and Freddie Mercury, recorded with Madonna and Elton John. Come along and experience this legendary choir for yourself – expect tidings of deep comfort and pure, roof-raising joy. 7.30pm | Saffron Hall | from £15 saffronhall.com

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 12:55


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 50

22/11/2018 17:56


W H AT ' S O N

10 DECEMBER

AUSTRALIAN PINK FLOYD SHOW The leading and biggest show of its kind in the world, the Australian Pink Floyd Experience is a must for fans of the band. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £32.50 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk 12 DECEMBER

1 DECEMBER

M IL L ROA D W IN T ER FA IR The annual festive bonanza adds some tinsel sparkle to Mill Road with seasonal treats, gift and craft stalls – plus Christmas fun to get you in the holiday spirit. 10.30am-4.30pm | Mill Road | millroadwinterfair.org

TOM ALLEN: ABSOLUTELY As seen on Mock the Week and Royalty Variety Performance, Tom Allen brings his riotous comedy show to Cambridge for the extended dates of his hugely popular tour. 8pm | West Road Concert Hall | £17 westroad.org 12 DECEMBER

LOVE ACTUALLY IN CONCERT Following the sell-out tour last year, everybody’s favourite Christmas film actually is coming to Cambridge – along with an incredible live orchestra. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £42.50 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk 13 DECEMBER

TRAVIS – THE MAN WHO The leading Britpop band take their seminal album on tour again – and it sounds as fresh as when it was released 19 years ago. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £42.50 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_053-055 (LISTINGS)_FE.indd 51

16 DECEMBER

19 DECEMBER

FESTIVE CHOCOLATE PATISSERIE

ORBITAL

Divertimenti cookery school’s Javier presents another of his popular masterclasses. This time, try chocolate pyramids, chocolate mousse and lemon cream gateaux. 11am-3pm | Cambridge Cookery | £150 Homerton Gardens cambridgecookery.com

After a hugely well-received reunion in 2017, 90s electronic music pioneers Orbital (brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll) are promising their fans that this time, they’re back for good. They hit Cambridge this month with one of their hypnotic, unmissable shows. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £28 cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

16 DECEMBER

23 DECEMBER

RUTTER & CHILCOTT CHRISTMAS CAROLS

A VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS

Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without carols arranged by Rutter and Chilcott. The composers take turns to conduct the BBC singers and incredible concert orchestra. 3pm & 5pm | Saffron Hall | from £24 saffronhall.com

51

Join Robert Powell and Susan Jameson on a journey back in time to the Victorian era, for a special Christmas show filled with magical ideas and well-loved music from the likes of Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, and Gilbert and Sullivan. 3pm & 5pm | from £10 | Saffron Hall saffronhall.com

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 12:55


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 52

22/11/2018 17:56


A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

DOORS NOW OPEN TO MODERN NEW CAMBRIDGE SHOW HOMES Three- and four-bedroom homes released for sale at exciting Hauxton Road site

B

arratt Homes Eastern Counties recently opened the doors to two beautiful new show homes at Trumpington Meadows, presenting Cambridge homebuyers with an exclusive opportunity to view the sought-after properties on the latest phase of the development. Sylva is the tenth phase of the popular Hauxton Road development, which will deliver 1,200 new homes to Cambridge. The five-star homebuilder has unveiled its Casa Plus and Heim show homes, which both feature four bedrooms and are a showcase of the contemporary style of properties on offer at Sylva, with floor to ceiling windows and modern layouts throughout the development. Annette Hurst, Sales Director at Barratt Homes Eastern Counties, said: “We are very pleased to have launched our highly anticipated new show homes at Trumpington Meadows. “The desirable Casa Plus and Heim style homes are perfect for growing families but boast strong qualities suitable for a range of different homebuyers due to their contemporary layouts carefully designed for modern living. “Our show homes are a great tool for buyers to see the high quality of the properties themselves as well as allowing them to picture what their dream home

at the development could look like.” The Casa Plus show home also boasts a self-contained studio over the double detached garage, which a number of the properties at Sylva benefit from. Annette continued: “Having a studio over the garage is a unique feature of some of the properties at Sylva and our new show home is a great example of how this space can be utilised by purchasers.” The new show homes are also a great opportunity for property seekers to see the latest in interior design, as the Casa Plus and Heim show homes have been kitted out to encompass the contemporary feel of Cambridge. Trumpington Meadows is an awardwinning collection of homes set next to an 148-acre country park and less than

three miles from Cambridge city centre. Residents benefit from the best of both worlds with all that the city centre has to offer within easy reach, while still being able to make the most of the tranquil surroundings. The development’s unique location offers a chance to retreat from the hustle and bustle to a beautiful parkland setting, while keeping city amenities close by. There are currently two-, three- and four-bedroom homes for sale with prices starting from £375,000.l To find out more information or to view the newly opened show homes, please visit the sales centre on Hauxton Road, open Monday 12.30pm-5.30pm and Tuesday to Sunday 10am-5.30pm. Alternatively call the sales information line on 0330 057 6000 or visit www.barratthomes.co.uk.

TERMS & CONDITIONS APPLY

Offer available on selected plots only. Terms and conditions apply. See website for details, subject to contract and status. Prices correct at time of going to press. Images include optional upgrades at additional cost. Following withdrawal or termination of any offer, we reserve the right to extend, reintroduce or amend any such offer as we see fit at any time. Calls to 03 numbers are charged at the same rate as dialling an 01 or 02 number. If your fixed line or mobile service has inclusive minutes to 01/02 numbers, then calls to 03 are counted as part of this inclusive call volume. Non-BT customers and mobile phone users should contact their service providers for information about the cost of calls.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_053 (BIDWELLS ADV)sg.indd 53

53

D E C E M B E R 2 018

22/11/2018 12:24


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 54

22/11/2018 17:56


Food & Drink N E WS • R E V I E WS • CHRISTMAS

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_055 (FOOD OPENER)SG.indd 55

55

R E C I P E S • FO O D I E G I F TS

D E C E M B E R 2 018

22/11/2018 12:58


R E S TAU R A N T R E V I E W

The Three Hills

P

UP THIS MONTH, WE PAY A VISIT TO BARTLOW’S COSY COUNTRYSIDE HIDEAWAY WITH ROOMS AND A RENOWNED RESTAURANT

riding itself on offering guests ‘the warmest welcome in Cambridgeshire’, The Three Hills is found nestled on the Cambs-Essex border in Bartlow, a stone’s throw from Linton. It’s the only remaining pub in this tiny, historysteeped village, which is surrounded by pretty countryside and home to a small community of just over 100 residents. It’s also home to our area’s answer to the Pyramids, the Bartlow Hills: a series of huge ancient burial mounds that date back to early Roman times. It’s this historical claim to fame which inspired the name of The Three Hills pub – though the building has a rich and storied past in its own right, having been open as an alehouse since 1847. The pub has experienced both huge success and dismal failure in its long history, but after waxing and waning in popularity for decades, the current trajectory is pointing determinedly upwards thanks to current owners Chris and Sarah Field, who took the reins in late 2015. Under their steer, The Three Hills has been restored to its former glory thanks to a tasteful makeover (including the doing away with of some unappealing post-war modern features) and the addition of chic new accommodation. The food offering, too, has had a fabulously successful overhaul, resulting in the pub receiving two AA Rosettes and a nod in the 2019 Michelin Guide. But a cash injection and culinary ambition have not come at the expense of

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_058-059 (REVIEW)sg.indd 56

charm and community spirit. What greets you when you cross the threshold at The Three Hills is a welcoming, irresistibly cosy country pub with smiling staff, happy locals, roaring log fires, comfy armchairs and a book-lined snug that calls out to be relaxed in. THE FOOD

Come dinner time, we’re led through the bar area into a smart, oak-beamed orangery, which hums with happy diners on our Thursday evening visit. The food offering is divided into pub classics (including steaks and an excellentsounding burger), and a small menu of elegant restaurant fare. We began with a ‘Hen of the Woods’ starter, which made a worthy centrepiece out of these deliciously earthy mushrooms, artfully served with girolles, caper berries, and a sweet and sour green bean salad. Equally beautifully presented was the Scottish salmon starter, which arrived adorned with edible flowers and a feisty wasabi cream and buttermilk dressing. There were more Japanese flavours to come in my main course, the miso steak. A perfectly pink and rare sirloin cooked in an umami-rich miso marinade, the meat was taken to decadent new heights with a mound of truffle mash and lashings of rich caramelised onion broth. Over on the other side of the table, a steamed venison pudding was being consumed with impressive speed. Perfect pastry, rich gravy and meltingly tender meat made this hearty plate of food a soul-warming winner: the venison’s gamey flavour a perfect match for its accompanying juniper sauce. The desserts continued the high standards set for presentation, but while the caramelised pineapple with Szechuan pepper had wow-factor, the highlight

was the velvety chocolate and caramel fondant, surrounded by a cornucopia of handmade confections including truffles and roasted white chocolate. THE ROOMS

The Three Hills has six bedrooms, each with their own distinct character. Ours, the beautifully appointed Rosetta, was located on the ground floor of the plush B&B annex across the carpark. Tucked away from the bustle of the pub, it was peaceful and tastefully decorated: all Farrow and Ball paints, vases of fresh lavender, paperback-lined bookshelves and thick goose down duvets. The luxurious bathroom – complete with rain shower and White Company toiletries – got a big thumbs up, as did the king-sized bed and array of mod cons including a dinky Roberts radio and fully-stocked Nespresso machine. These are rooms designed for hunkering down and cosying up in, which we happily did, enjoying a blissful night’s sleep in the ludicrously comfy bed before awaking to a crisp winter’s morning and crunching across the carpark for a hearty full English. THE VERDICT

Combining village pub, fine dining restaurant and mini boutique hotel, The Three Hills succeeds in each category. The cosy, country-chic interiors make it a prime spot for a wintery feast, but with its charming terrace and large garden, extending all the way down to the river, it’s a pub for seasons. As smart as the place looks though, the food is the star attraction: stunningly presented throughout, it more than lives up to its visual promise. If you’re after an indulgent night away, surrounded by peaceful countryside, make The Three Hills top of your minibreak wish list. l

“The food is the star attraction” 56

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

22/11/2018 11:54


R E STAU RA N T R E V I E W

W H AT:

A cosy pub offering both pub classics and elegant dining. Chic, newly refurbished rooms are also available

W H ER E:

Bartlow, Cambridgeshire, right on the Essex border

HOW MUCH:

Two courses £27.50, three courses £35

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_058-059 (REVIEW)sg.indd 57

57

D E C E M B E R 2 018

22/11/2018 11:54


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 58

22/11/2018 17:56


Food News A MONTHLY ROUND-UP OF GASTRO GOINGS-ON AROUND CAMBRIDGESHIRE

TEA BACK IN TIME Experience the splendour of a bygone age in the luxurious surroundings of Parker’s Tavern, with their new historical afternoon tea. Inspired by the city and the long list of academics that have made their mark on Cambridge, chef Tristan Welch’s playful style and flair extends to the tea, which will be served in the library at the restaurant. Every dish on the menu has a story behind it. A trio of sandwiches are inspired by the 4th Earl of Sandwich, who invented his namesake afternoon tea staple (and studied at Trinity College). Fillings include coronation chicken with charred apricots – capturing the spirit of the CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_059-065 (FOOD NEWS)_FE.indd 59

original coronation feast on Parker’s Piece – and house-cured spiced beef with Norfolk mustard and spiced Parker’s pickles (honouring the cows that used to graze on Parker’s Piece). For those with a sweet tooth, there’s Duke of Cambridge tart, Parker’s football truffles, or Sir Isaac Newton’s apple, a glazed apple mousse with a compote centre. No afternoon tea would be complete without scones – plum pudding with caramelised apple butter, raspberry jam and clotted cream are sure to hit the spot. The afternoon tea costs £33 per person and must be booked 24 hours in advance. parkerstavern.com

59

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 12:50


NEW MENU AT NEW-LOOK BISTRO Hotel du Vin’s revamped bistro returns to its roots with a look that’s reminiscent of the French bistros that first inspired it. Muted hues and soft lighting create a bright, warm space, and the hotel’s executive chef director Matt Powell has a new menu that focuses on mouthwatering, home-style French cooking. Firm favourites coq au vin and cassoulet return, as well as new specials such as duck shepherd’s pie and whole roast partridge. Lighter dishes include sole meunière or Roquefort, pear and walnut salad, while tarte au citron, crème brûlée and Bramley apple charlotte offer sweet treats for your tastebuds. As well as the bistro, both the bar and bedrooms have been revamped in recent months. While retaining the warmth of the former cellar, the bar’s modern update features a carefully selected wine list that brings together various regions and grapes to suit all palates. hotelduvin.com

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_059-065 (FOOD NEWS)_FE.indd 60

60

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 12:50


FO O D & D R I N K

My Favourite Table TINE ROCHE, DIRECTOR AT CAMBRIDGE COOKERY SCHOOL & CAFE, GIVES HER EATING AND DRINKING TIPS FOR THE CITY l WHERE

IS YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE TO EAT IN CAMBRIDGE?

Restaurant 22, since Sam and Alex took over. Modern, beautiful, seasonal and simply plate-lickingly delicious food. Sustainably and locally sourced, fairly priced and served without any pomp or fuss. Perfect. l YOU’RE

HAVING A NIGHT IN: WHERE ARE YOU CALLING FOR TAKEAWAY?

I don’t. I know it makes me a bit of a weirdo. But no matter what I think I fancy, what arrives is without fail disappointing. It’s the combination of the soulless presentation and the total lack of declaration of source. I only eat animal protein when I trust the supplier to serve sustainable, high welfare meat or fish. With many companies there is no clarity at all as to where the food comes from, and by that I mean what the standards of animal welfare were as well as what the restaurant’s sourcing policy is. I find it very surprising how blindly people trust food from out of sight production kitchens. l WHERE

DO YOU LIKE TO SHOP FOR INGREDIENTS?

Simon Steel’s stall on the market on a Sunday morning. Superb, freshly dug vegetables at wonderfully low prices, directly from the grower. l WHAT

DO YOU LOVE ABOUT THE CAMBRIDGE FOOD SCENE?

As well as the recent arrival of assured but informal dining such as Restaurant 22, I’ve welcomed the arrival of Maison Clement on Hills Road. We are artisan bakers here, and I confess I am very particular about bread, so this French baker who bakes to the exacting standards of bakeries in France is a small miracle. l WHAT

WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE MORE OF?

The high rents and rates in Cambridge make it nigh on impossible for independent businesses to establish themselves. I would love to see new restaurants offering genuine cuisines – Middle Eastern, South American, Vietnamese and Japanese. London is full of high quality, contemporary places who have swapped the old school decor for modern and fresh, and who cook genuine dishes without pandering to perceived British palate preferences. I would like to see more of that here.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_059-063 (FOOD NEWS)_FE.indd 61

61

D E C E M B E R 2 018

23/11/2018 09:26


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 62

22/11/2018 17:56


FO O D & D R I N K

BOTANICAL DELIGHTS Chefs Alex Rushmer and Lawrence Butler are again joining forces with Cambridge Distillery to create a delicious winter dining experience at the gin-maker’s Grantchester showroom. Formerly found at The Hole in the Wall in Little Wibraham, and soon to be cooking treats at the much-anticipated Vanderlyle on Mill Road, the pair began talking with distillery co-founders William and Lucy Lowe about a winter collaboration as soon as their summer pop-up at the venue ended. “I’m even more excited about this one,” says Lawrence. “Winter is my favourite time of year to cook, and the gins’ botanicals are a perfect match for bold dishes and big flavours. “We’ve had a fantastic time coming up with the menu and are really excited about cooking in Grantchester again.” William, the master distiller, will be creating a matched drinks flight to complement the botanical tasting menu. “Our innovative approach to distillation focuses on capturing fresh botanicals at precisely the right time of year, to create our award-winning gins – which is the philosophy that Alex and Lawrence have regarding seasonal produce,” says Lucy. The pop-up takes place over ten nights from 27 November to 8 December (excluding Sundays and Mondays). There are six courses at £70 per person, with tickets through eventbrite.co.uk

SIX GETS FESTIVE Fancy unlimited mulled wine to go with your afternoon tea? Sounds too good, but it’s true at Six, the panoramic bar and brasserie at Varsity Hotel & Spa. Their suitably-titled bottomless afternoon tea features a seasonally scrumptious selection of sweet and savoury delights, from warm mince pies to homemade Christmas cake, not to mention a hot, ginbased cocktail with orange juice and honey on arrival. Enjoy looking over historic Cambridge’s heart from the sixth-floor vantage point, with floor-to-ceiling windows throughout giving you stunning views. Scones, jam and clotted cream accompany smoked salmon, coronation chicken and cucumber sandwiches, and festive decorations get everyone into seasonal spirits, making Six a jolly Yuletide destination. The afternoon tea is £29.50 per person, for a maximum of two hours. sixcambridge.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_059-065 (FOOD NEWS)_FE.indd 63

63

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 12:51


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 64

22/11/2018 18:14


FO O D & D R I N K

FESTIVE FOODIE MUST HAVES THE TEAM FROM GRUB CLUB, CAMBRIDGE’S FOODIE NETWORKING GROUP, ADVISE ON SOME TASTY TOP BUYS

CHRISTMAS AT ELY MARKET It’s a busy month at Ely Markets, beginning with Festive Lates, which take place on the first three Wednesdays in December. Pop along from 4pm to 8.30pm to enjoy delicious street food, live music and to discover unique gifts from local artisans and producers. In the week leading up to Christmas, there will be daytime mini-markets selling festive food, gifts and flowers (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday), followed by the Charter Market on the 20th and a special Christmas Market on Friday 21 December. On the weekend before Christmas Day, the Farmers’ Market and the regular Saturday Craft, Food & Vintage Market will be bigger than ever, while Sunday’s market is the perfect time to finish your last-minute shopping. elymarkets.co.uk

CHO CC A MO CC A

PUK K A T E A A DV EN T C A L EN DA R

A luxurious gift, featuring a range of chocolate-covered nuts and fruits. £8.99, available nationwide in farm shops and delis or via chocca-mocca.com

Try a different tea every day in the build up to Christmas! £10, available from Simply Stylish simplystylishsuffolk.co.uk

T H E OR A NGERY GI N

BEE BEE WR APS

Ideal for a wonderfully Christmassy G&T or in a festive cocktail – check out this website for lots of tasty serving suggestions that will see you through Christmas and the New Year in style. £35, available at Majestic Wine and Burwash Manor

Reduce the volume of plastic wrap used in your house with these practical and pretty wraps. They help to keep your food for longer, reducing waste without the need for disposable plastic. £14, available from beebeewraps.com

FOR AGI NG FOX M AYOS

H A R RY P O T T ER WA N DS

W IN E A N D TA PA S AT C W M A mouth-watering festive edition of Que Rico Tapas and Cambridge Wine Merchants’ popular collaboration takes place on 15 December. The Christmas Special Wine and Tapas Tasting features Spanish festive dishes complemented by the best wines from the country, paired by CWM, at its Cherry Hinton Road branch. On arrival, guests will receive a glass of cava, hand-carved serrano bodega ham and canapés. There will be a raffle at the end of dinner, with several prizes on offer. Tickets are £40 each. If you can’t wait till then, there’s also Sunday Tapas on 2 December, from 12.30 to 3.30pm. quericotapas.com

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_065 (FOOD NEWS FINAL PAGE) BF.indd 65

A Boxing Day must for brunch – a perfect accompaniment for leftovers. £2.99, available on Ocado and at farm shops and delis nationwide

65

A must for budding magicians and Potterheads. £10, available via originalcandyco.com

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 10:44


How to Flourish CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS MEETS CALIXTA KILLANDER, A REVOLUTIONARY LOCAL PRODUCE GROWER WHO SUPPLIES SOME EXQUISITE VEG, SALADS AND GREENS TO SOME OF THE FINEST RESTAURANTS IN THE COUNTRY

B

ack in October, after months of creeping concern for the planet and ardent campaigns against plastic straws, the word of 2018 was announced as “single-use”. But as you’d expect, Cambridge foodies were ahead of the curve: it feels like every coffee shop in the city now offers its own branded Keep-Cup, and vibrantly coloured metal water bottles were clearly the commuter’s accessory du jour during the long hot summer. Whether it’s down to that slightly unsettling weather, or programmes such as Blue Planet highlighting damage caused by waste products, there’s no question that many of us are starting to take a more considered approach to how we treat our habitat. Avoiding single-use items is a start, and we’re all too aware of the power of consumers voting with their feet – but what else should a foodie be looking for, besides a pot of metal straws on the backbar? Nowadays, menus filled with tales of provenance have become almost commonplace: dishes are rarely seen without a geolocator or seasonal suffix telling a story, and giving the customer a warm glow – but what does it all actually mean? Like the reusable cup nestling in your bag, this isn’t a single-use question: it’s one we should be asking over and over again, especially of our most favourite

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_066-069 (FOOD FEATURE)sg.indd 66

restaurants. Where does your produce come from? As long as you don’t ask them midservice, most responsibly minded chefs will take great delight in sharing their reasoning, in enthusiastic detail. Knowing where your produce comes from and why you’ve chosen it is the starting point for any independent eatery worth its salt, and a growing number of top-flight restaurants in London and Cambridge, including several adorned with Michelin stars, would – when asked – put one hand on their heart and with the other, point at an unassuming cluster of buildings just off the A1307, between Linton and Abington. Meet Calixta Killander, farmer and founder of Flourish, whose singleminded pursuit of flavour and steadfast commitment to doing things properly has seen her 18-month old business bloom. Born locally, Calixta spent seven years studying, working and learning from agricultural businesses across America, before returning to this small set of rolling fields to take a different approach to farming. This revolutionary fresh produce grower now supplies some of the finest restaurants in the country with exquisite vegetables, unexpected salads and unusual greens: all fresh, all grown by hand, and all – most importantly – completely delicious. At Flourish, organic is only the beginning. Calixta’s fields also never see tractor fumes, with heavy work done by Bill and Ben – two Comtois horses – and a small team of workers who carry out the finer weeding and handharvesting required to produce crops of this astonishing quality. But it all starts with the soil. “It’s boring to hear about for a lot of people – it’s very farmy, and not very foodie – but things like green manures are absolutely central to regenerative agriculture, which is what we’re trying to

66

do here,” Calixta says. “We’re investing in the fertility bank of the farm, rather than just extracting from it. It’s beyond organic agriculture, beyond sustainability, and it’s absolutely key – not just for a biodiverse ecosystem, but for flavourful produce. For us, flavour is so important – it’s something we absolutely cannot compromise on. And building amazing rich soil filled with microorganisms and beneficial bacteria has a huge impact on what you’re going to harvest.” As a producer, putting time and energy into growing non-sellable crops like green manures, for example, is costly, and it’s understandable why other small-scale growers wouldn’t be able to do it. But for Calixta, it’s a non-negotiable. “This approach is really challenging. It’s not as easy as planting a seed and harvesting it later, but it’s one of those things: if you invest now, and incorporate it into your farm, you’ll be paid back one thousand times in the future.” Keen foodies might recognise Calixta from a recent issue of Observer Food Monthly, where chef Tomos Parry from CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 12:39


FO O D & D R I N K

CALIXTA’S FOODIE PICK One place that I adore is the Queen’s Head in Newton – it’s my favourite pub. They have food trucks there, and because I don’t have time to get to foodPark, or the events, it’s a really great way to go and try different food trucks… and also the pub is just amazing.

“I adore crazy vegetables. It gives me so much joy” newly-starred restaurant Brat – one of Flourish’s clients – was photographed at the farm, alongside Calixta and her horses, to show the close connection between chef and grower. And it’s this link that Calixta was focused on when she started Flourish in the summer of 2017, having been inspired by her experiences in the States and spotting that selling direct to restaurants was the most sensible route to follow. But it’s not just about business strategy: it’s also the joy of interacting with people who share her enthusiasm for unusual produce. “I adore crazy vegetables,” Calixta laughs. “I love hunting out wild, wacky

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_066-069 (FOOD FEATURE)sg.indd 67

things, and that’s something which gives me so much drive and joy. I wanted to be able to do that, but I also understand that most people wouldn’t know what to do with celtuce, for example – but I know there’d be chefs out there who’d be overjoyed. When I moved back, I made a list of all these restaurants in the UK, mainly in London, that I thought – in ten years’ time, this is who I want to be working with. And… it’s crazy, and I don’t know how, but we’re already working with most of those restaurants. It’s a combination of lots of magical things that have happened, with wonderful people helping.”

67

As you’d expect, it’s difficult to grow to order, with long seasons, changing trends and unpredictable weather sometimes causing havoc – but Calixta’s clients now trust her judgement and quality enough that they’ll take whatever produce Flourish can share. “The chefs we’re working with like trying new things,” she says, “and they’re just supportive of us as a farm rather than asking for a specific carrot.” In return for such astonishing quality produce, Calixta hopes that Flourish’s regenerative, rather than sustainable, approach will be shared more widely. “Chefs have this amazing opportunity – they’re leading the industry,” she says. “They decide what the next trendy vegetable is, and everyone will copy – supermarkets and so on. So if this regenerative approach can be shared with the public, hopefully that information will spread further. It’s got to be talked about in different areas before it becomes recognised.” So what’s a day like at Cooks Pen Farm? “In peak season, I’ll get up about 4am. u D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 12:39


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 68

22/11/2018 17:56


FO O D X&X XDXRXIXNX KX

I’ll have a quick brekkie and tea, and then head out immediately,” Calixta says. “On a farm, in the summer, lots of tasks have to be done first thing, when it’s cooler. Usually we’ll get harvesting right away, especially the finer leaves that need to be picked really early or the quality becomes terrible and their shelf-life diminishes. “Then we get things brought in and packed up – and usually then I’ll do horse work, which also has to happen early in the morning. I’ll go and get Bill and Ben from the pasture, bring them up, groom them, harness, and hitch them up to – usually – the cultivator… And afterward

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_066-069 (FOOD FEATURE)sg.indd 69

they have a shower, go in the stables and cool down, and it sounds ridiculous but they have fans, because they’re such big horses… they’ve got the good life!” she laughs. “We’re also trying to be organised with a weekly routine – so all of our tomatoes need to be trellised and pruned weekly, courgettes and cucumbers are picked daily, which usually happens after lunch – planting usually happens in the morning because there are better conditions… then we’d do weeding, cultivating, all sorts of different jobs.” Delivery days, when Flourish produce is dropped off at restaurants throughout Cambridge and London, are totally different, seeing the whole team focus on harvesting, packing and then delivering on the very same day – meaning that in some Flourish-supplied eateries, you’ll be served produce that was in the ground that morning. “For example – our mixed salad is seeded weekly: some are cut multiple times and will regrow, but some are single cut, because we want to keep the quality really high. We don’t currently wash our salads – we don’t have the infrastructure, but also we think the chefs probably do a better job of that than we can at the moment. Everything that’s picked is brought in individually, and then we’ll do the mixing: sometimes customers

69

specify when they want more or less of an ingredient, but others are happy to have our daily pick, where we choose what’s really at their best in the field. And then it’s packed, and we deliver it. The salads, herbs and edible leaves, and lots of the greens – they’ll be in kitchens within three, four hours of picking.” As you’d expect with a schedule like this, Calixta hasn’t had a holiday in a long time. “I would love to one day,” she laughs, “and that’s part of what we’re trying to do here, growing unusual things that people want – I’d love to travel and find new varieties… but I love what I do. I know it’s not sustainable to work hard forever, but the beginnings of a project are always hard.” Calixta is hoping to run events and open days in the future, and there’s a plan for Flourish’s website to be revamped with a space for longer updates – but for now, you can live vicariously through Flourish’s Instagram feed, where they post photos of crops in the fields, horses hard at work, and polytunnels gently glowing in the sideways winter sun. And if that inspires you to hunt out Flourish produce for yourself, here’s a tip: the one place you can find Calixta’s wares without having to be a chef is the Farm Shop at Old Granary Organics in Linton. See you in the queue... l instagram.com/flourishproduce

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 12:40


H OW TO M A K E T H E B E S T

Butternut Squash Soup ALEX RUSHMER SERVES UP A SOUL-WARMING SOUP THAT’S PERFECT FOR A CHILLY AFTERNOON

INGREDIENTS

1kg of pumpkin, sliced and deseeded Cooking oil T  wo white onions, peeled and chopped T  wo garlic cloves, peeled T  wo sticks celery, washed and roughly chopped 5 0g unsalted butter 1 .5l vegetable or chicken stock S  alt T  o garnish: pumpkin seeds and pumpkin oil (and plenty of toast)

l 

Cooking soup is about concentrating flavours – making something wholesome and warming that tastes of the very essence of the ingredients that went into it. Roasting achieves this intense flavour: the process caramelises the pumpkin, giving a deep, satisfying result. Make plenty, freeze any you don’t eat and you’re only ever minutes away from a hearty lunch. D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_070-071 (HOW TO MAKE THE BEST)sg.indd 70

70

l  l

l l

l l l l

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE l

l

l

l

 reheat the oven to 190°C. Place P the pumpkin slices in an ovenproof dish, drizzle with cooking oil and season with salt. Cook in the oven until soft and beginning to brown – about 30 minutes. M  eanwhile, melt the butter over a medium heat in a saucepan large enough to hold all the ingredients. Add the onion, garlic and celery. Season with salt and cook gently for 25 minutes, stirring occasionally. W  hen the pumpkin is cooked, remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes. Use a spoon to remove the flesh from the skin and add to the pan with the rest of the ingredients. Add the stock, cook for ten minutes then blend until smooth. T  o serve, sprinkle over a few pumpkin seeds and drizzle over a little pumpkin seed oil.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

22/11/2018 18:18


© CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

FO O D X&X XDXRXIXNX KX

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_070-071 (HOW TO MAKE THE BEST)sg.indd 71

71

D E C E M B E R 2 018

23/11/2018 09:10


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 72

22/11/2018 17:56


FO O D & D R I N K C H E F ’S TA B L E

Have yourself a merry little breakfast

I

CHEF ALEX RUSHMER ON CREATING A CHRISTMAS DAY BRUNCH OF KINGS

t’s always about dinner. The roasted meats, potatoes, sprouts and cranberry sauce get all the glory whenever anyone mentions eating on Christmas Day. Sometimes the late night/Boxing Day sandwich might get a cursory mention but, by and large, turkey and trimmings dominates Christmas food chat. The king of roasts piles the pressure on to the wise fool who elects to do the cooking. “All I wanted was a day like Nigella’s,” says Caroline Aherne’s masterful creation Denise Royle through panicked tears as she realises the turkey hasn’t defrosted and won’t fit in the oven. It’s a common Christmas sentiment. So this year, I’m not even going to mention Turkey. Instead let’s talk about breakfast. Christmas Day breakfast is the unsung hero of the festive season yet it rarely gets the credit it deserves, forever overshadowed by stuffing and chipolatas. Firstly, it’s far easier to accommodate everyone’s wishes over the breakfast table. On Christmas Day, families can fracture over untold issues: when to open the presents, who allowed your 12-year-old cousin free access to the prosecco or why there isn’t a vegan gravy to accompany the tofu and mushroom filo pastry crown. Breakfast is blissfully free of these flash points and, other than the possibility that there may be a few sore heads from Christmas Eve-based indulgence, spirits are usually high. Secondly, putting together an antemeridiem feast is a far less labourintensive affair than that which is expected as darkness begins to descend. There are certain expectations that the assembled family members will have when it comes to dinner, but these are totally absent for the first meal of the day. What’s more, requests and restrictions can be far more easily accommodated: need a quick dairy-free alternative? No problem: just poach the eggs instead of CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_075 (CHEF'S TABLE)sg.indd 73

scrambling them. Eldest son has a sore head? Smile, hand him a Bloody Mary and he need not feel guilty that he doesn’t want to eat the fruits of your labours. Thirdly, the options available to you are near infinite and there is plenty of scope for outrageous indulgence. Eggs are probably a must, but from that simple starting point you can delight everyone. Sausages and dry-cured bacon for the traditionalist. Eggs Royale with smoked salmon and hollandaise sauce for the decadently minded. French toast, spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg for the sweettoothed. Or freshly shaved truffles for anyone you wish to truly spoil. Drinks options too, can offer a neat nod towards the luxurious end of the spectrum. Really good single estate coffee. A sweet juice, pressed from a few of those clementines sitting in their pretty wooden box. An outrageously expensive loose leaf from Fortnum & Mason. Savoury, spicy red snappers with a cooling stick of celery. Thick hot chocolate with whipped cream and marshmallows. And, of course, champagne. There really should be champagne: the occasions when it is deemed appropriate to drink sparkling wine before 11am are few and far between.

73

Christmas is certainly one of them. This flexible feast can take place at any time between 7am and midday and should last at least an hour, giving those who take a little more time to gain consciousness the appropriate window to join the party. Youngsters can be quieted with small gifts and chocolate selection boxes. Early risers can be placated with liquid refreshment and latecomers need not feel they have ruined the event through tardiness, if they require a little more shut eye (having been in this position myself, several times, thanks to a birthday on Christmas Eve, I can attest to its importance). If you do decide to pull out all the stops at breakfast you can be forgiven for going easy later on in the day. Let someone else peel the potatoes, cross the sprouts and worry about the turkey, leaving you plenty of space to finish the champagne and, at a push, make the carrot crush. Just follow Nigella’s recipe, rather than Denise’s. l D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 10:30


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 74

22/11/2018 17:56


FO O D X&X XDXRXIXNX KX

Festive SEAN MELVILLE, EXECUTIVE HEAD CHEF AT BEDFORD LODGE HOTEL’S ACCLAIMED SQUIRES RESTAURANT, SHARES A SELECTION OF ELEGANT CHRISTMAS RECIPES CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_075-079 (CHRISTMAS RECIPES)_FE.indd 75

75

D E C E M B E R 2 018

23/11/2018 10:10


FO X X XOX D X X& X XD R I N K

ROA S T T U R K E Y W I T H P OR K , A PPL E & A L MON D S T U F F ING GIVE YOUR CHRISTMAS TURKEY A TWIST WITH THIS SUMPTUOUS RECIPE INGREDIENTS 5kg free-range Golden turkey l 1  lemon, quartered l 6  thyme sprigs l 1  onion, peeled and coarsely chopped l 1  large carrot, peeled and coarsely chopped l 1  stick of celery, coarsely chopped l 1  bay leaf l 2  tbsp plain flour l 1  50ml dry Marsala l 5  00ml turkey stock l 2  tbsp redcurrant jelly l 4  tbsp rapeseed oil l S  ea salt and black pepper l 

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_075-079 (CHRISTMAS RECIPES)_FE.indd 76

For the pork stuffing l 3  50g breadcrumbs, made from ciabatta bread l 5  00g good quality sausage meat l 8  Cox’s apples, 6 peeled and coarsely grated; 2 with the tops removed and cored l 4  garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped l 1  00g chopped almonds l 1  50g parmesan, finely grated l 4  tbsp flat-leaf parsley, chopped l 2  tbsp fresh thyme, finely chopped l 5  eggs, lightly beaten l 1  00g butter, melted l S  ea salt and black pepper

76

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE Preheat oven to 230°C/Gas Mark 8. Remove turkey giblets and reserve. Rinse the turkey inside and out and dry well.

l 

For the stuffing, combine the breadcrumbs, sausage meat, apple, garlic, almonds, parmesan, chopped herbs, sea salt and black pepper. Stir in the eggs and half of the butter and bind together well.

l 

Grease a loaf tin and line the bottom of it with baking paper. Loosely place some of the stuffing into the loaf tin,

l 

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

21/11/2018 10:13


XXXXXXXX

HOME-MADE TURKEY & SHERRY GRAVY INGREDIENTS

l G  iblets from a Golden turkey l 1  onion, cut into quarters l 2  carrots, cut into chunks

l 1  stick of celery, cut into chunks l 1  fresh bay leaf

l

l 1  sprig of thyme

l

l 3  sprigs of parsley l 5  black peppercorns

To finish the gravy

l 1  tsp redcurrant jelly

l 7  50ml of Golden turkey giblet stock l 1  00ml sherry

l 2  tbsp of plain flour

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

l

l P  reheat oven to 400°F/200°C/Gas 6.

l

press down a little, then cover and place in fridge until ready. Take the remaining apples and cut the top off, one-third of the way down. Remove core and fill each apple with the remaining stuffing and replace the lid. Brush well with rapeseed oil or melted butter and place in the fridge. Place two tablespoons of the stuffing into the small cavity (neck end) of the turkey, pull excess skin over stuffing and secure to underside of turkey with a wooden skewer. Place the turkey in a large roasting pan; fill the large cavity with lemon and thyme sprigs. Brush the turkey generously with rapeseed oil and season with sea salt and black pepper, and cover with foil.

l 

To make the turkey stock, place the turkey giblets, chopped onion,

l 

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_075-079 (CHRISTMAS RECIPES)_FE.indd 77

Wash the giblets in cold water, place in a large pan with 1.5 litres of cold water. Bring to the boil and remove any scum off the top of the water. Then add the rest of the ingredients, cover and simmer for 40 minutes. U  ncover the pan and simmer for a

carrot, celery and bay leaf in a heavy based saucepan, cover with water and bring to the boil. Simmer for two hours, then strain. Cool and store in the fridge until needed (this can be done the night before).

l

further 20 to 30 minutes or until the stock has reduced by half. Remove from the heat and strain into a bowl, leave to cool, cover and place in the fridge or use immediately. B  ring the stock back to the boil and remove from the heat. W  hen the turkey is cooked, pour off the fat from the roasting juices, place the tin on the hob, whisk in the flour and place over a low heat and cook the flour mixture making sure you have scraped up all the meaty, sticky bits on the bottom of the tin. Stir constantly. A  fter two minutes, remove from the heat and whisk in the turkey giblet stock and redcurrant jelly, bring slowly to the boil, stirring constantly. A  dd the sherry and cook for a further three minutes, stirring constantly. Season to taste, add a little more sherry if you want, and then strain into a warm jug and serve.

When you are satisfied the turkey is properly cooked, transfer it to a platter and place the apples around it. Cover loosely with foil and leave to rest for 20 to 30 minutes.

l 

For the Marsala gravy, place the roasting pan over a medium heat, sprinkle over the flour, then gradually stir in the Marsala, followed by the turkey stock and bring to the boil. Strain the mixture through a sieve into a saucepan. Add the redcurrant jelly and any juices that have collected on the platter. Stir over a medium heat until the mixture boils; simmer for 10 minutes and season with sea salt and black pepper.

l 

Place the turkey in the pre-heated oven and cook at this temperature for 30 minutes. Then, lower the oven temperature to 180°C/Gas Mark 4 and cook for approximately 30 minutes per kilo, basting every hour.

l 

Meanwhile, cook the stuffing in the loaf tin for 40 to 45 minutes or until golden brown.

l 

About 35 minutes before the end of cooking the turkey, remove the foil, drain off any of the excess fat and place the stuffed apples around the bird; cook them until golden brown.

l 

77

Serve the turkey carved with slices of stuffing, stuffed apples and warm Marsala gravy.

l 

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 10:13


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 78

22/11/2018 17:56


FO O D & D R I N K

PUM PK IN SOU F F L É PUMPKINS AREN’T JUST HALLOWEEN DECORATIONS – THEY HAVE A WONDERFUL, DEEP FLAVOUR AND SMOOTH TEXTURE. THIS IS A SHOWSTOPPER OF A VEGETARIAN MAIN COURSE, GUARANTEED TO MAKE ANYONE FEEL SPECIAL DURING THE FESTIVE SEASON INGREDIENTS 4 mini pumpkins l 1  0g tarragon l ½  tsp agar l 1  /2pt water l 2  0g sugar l 2  5g dark chocolate (keep frozen) l 2  0g plain flour l 5  0g butter l 1  0g chilli seasoning l 1  00ml double cream Seasoning l 1  small jar pesto l 2  0g pumpkin seeds l 4  baby beetroots cooked l 4  baby carrots cooked l 2  0ml balsamic glaze l Edible flowers (if possible) l 1  small butternut squash l 2  cloves garlic l S  mall sprig thyme l 

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_075-079 (CHRISTMAS RECIPES)_FE.indd 79

25ml olive oil 2 egg yolks 4 egg whites (whisked)

l  l  l

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE Poach the mini pumpkins gently for 30 minutes and leave to cool. Then carefully cut the top off to form a lid; scoop out the seeds and leave a ring of flesh to help it hold its shape. l D  ice the butternut, toss in olive oil, add any excess flesh from the mini pumpkins, toss with the cracked garlic cloves and thyme sprig, roast until very tender, then set aside. l F  or the chocolate soil, blitz the frozen chocolate in a blender until a fine soil is formed with the chilli seasoning; keep frozen until needed. l F  or the tarragon jelly, boil the water and sugar with the tarragon (you l 

79

l

l

l

l

can add a drop of green food colour for effect). Once boiled, strain out the leaves, add the agar, then place in a bowl on a flat tray to set in the fridge. When plating the dish, cut strips of the jelly to place around the pumpkin. B  oil the double cream and reduce by half, add the pumpkin mix and blend until a smooth paste; leave to cool. M  ake the soufflé base: melt 20g of butter, beat in the flour and add the egg yolks; once this is smooth and nicely seasoned fold in the whisked egg whites. P  lace this mix inside the hollowedout mini pumpkins and bake at 190°C for about 20 minutes. W  hile this is cooking, toss the cooked baby roots in a little balsamic glaze, then plate as shown. D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 10:13


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 80

22/11/2018 18:15


FO O D & D R I N K

Nature’s Larder THE TEAM FROM THE GOG, OUR AWARD-WINNING LOCAL FARM SHOP, BUTCHERY, DELI AND CAFÉ, GIVE THE LOW-DOWN ON THE SEASONAL PRODUCE TO SEEK OUT THIS MONTH

I

t’s a common misconception that the turkey has always been the star of the British Christmas dinner – in fact, it’s only been gracing our tables since the 16th century. The first turkeys are believed to have been imported from the American colonies in the 1500s by English landowner William Strickland, who bought the birds, native to Mexico, and sold their offspring in Bristol for tuppence apiece. He went on to make a fortune, allowing him to buy a mansion in Yorkshire and incorporate a turkey in the family coat of arms. Authentic British turkey breeds like the Norfolk Bronze are still related to these first six imported wild birds. Historically, the goose had the starring role, but its popularity took a severe decline as the bird of choice largely thanks to Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, because Scrooge sent Bob Cratchit a turkey to replace his goose, making it a more luxurious choice. Part of the reason the turkey became desirable was due to its larger size – it came to be associated with feasts, celebrations and family gatherings. Henry VIII was reported to be the first King to feast on a turkey. Whilst now a lesser sung hero, you can maximise the amount of meat and retain moisture in a goose by creating a ballotine – a piece of roasted meat which has first been boned, stuffed and folded or rolled into a cylindrical shape for cooking. A roast goose and stuffing recipe makes the most of the flavour and texture of the bird. This requires first boning it, cooking it in a water bath and then roasting it. With this method, the meat remains juicy and moist. Boning a goose is easy when you know how, but it is time-consuming so make it easy on yourself and ask your butcher to do the job for you. Whatever your meat of choice, there is a wealth of tasty accompaniments that are mostly interchangeable and all part of the traditional menu for a British Christmas. In a recent YouGov survey to establish the most important ingredient in Christmas dinner, 85% said the roast potato was top of the list – don’t forget to use the goose fat to make the tastiest roasties – with stuffing and gravy ranking closely behind. Despite the stereotypical disdain of the brussel sprout, 62% of people would have them as part of their ideal Christmas dinner, making them slightly more popular than pigs in blankets! If brussels aren’t for you, try kale as an excellent alternative. It’s a wonderfully British vegetable, in season now and has a naturally sweet taste, as opposed to the slightly bitter flavour of sprouts. Simply boil the kale in water, adding a good helping of salt, remove from the boiling water after five minutes and place immediately in iced water, which will help to retain the crunch. Toss in butter, salt and pepper and perhaps add a touch of nutmeg for an extra Christmassy flavour. A final top Chrimbo tip: you can cook your turkey, wrap it in old towels and store it in a cool box, where it will stay warm for eight hours, freeing up your time and oven to focus on the veg and all the trimmings. Winner, winner turkey dinner! l The Gog, Heath Farm, Shelford Bottom, Cambridge CB22 3AD 01223 248352 | www.thegog.com/christmas

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_081 (NATURES LARDER)_DvW.indd 81

HOW TO E AT I T IN THE SPIRIT OF MAKING THINGS SIMPLE, OUR FAVOURITE TIP IS TO CAPITALISE ON THE PRE-PREP THAT GOES INTO THE MAIN EVENT AND CREATE A TASTY LEFTOVER PIE • When you’re clearing up, simply pop all your leftovers, meat, veg and roasties into a roasting tray or nice dish and leave to cool. • Store in the fridge overnight. • When you’re ready for Boxing Day lunch, make up a fresh batch of extra thick gravy and whizz through the relevant condiments – horseradish for beef, apple sauce for goose, cranberry for turkey. • Give it a good stir and pop on a pastry lid of your choice; shortcrust or puff will both work well. • Pop it in the oven for 30 minutes until piping hot. • Serve it with seasonal veg on Boxing Day or cool and freeze until New Year’s Day.

81

D E C E M B E R 2 018

21/11/2018 11:19


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 82

22/11/2018 17:56


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 83

23/11/2018 10:49


Drinks TROLLEY

Christmas Spiri� THE TOP 3 LOCALLY-MADE TIPPLES TO GIFT THIS CHRISTMAS

THE PINKSTER CHRISTMAS CRACKER

(£47.50 FOR 6) The perfect gift for the gin-lover in your life, these classy crackers contain either a Dinkster 5cl bottle or a mini jar of Gin Jam, as well as jokes and party hats. pinkstergin.com D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_050-051 (DRINKS TROLLEY)sg.indd 84

CRANES DRINKS CRANBERRY & BLOOD ORANGE LIQUEUR

(£19.99 FOR 50CL) Forget cranberry sauce, we’ll be teaming our turkey with a drop of cranberry and blood orange liqueur from Cranes Drinks. Top tip: add a splash to pimp up your prosecco. drinkcranes.co.uk

84

ELY GIN MINCE PIE WHIMSIES

(£13, 250ML BOTTLE) They love experimenting at Ely Gin, resulting in very-limited-edition runs of new ideas and seasonal fruits. This one, a mince pie gin, would make a perfect pressie. elygin.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 12:58


XDXRXIXNXKS XXX F E E L I N G T H I R S T Y?

WA R M OR A NGE JU ICE & HON E Y GIN COCK TA IL THE VARSITY HOTEL & SPA’S SIX BRASSERIE SHARES A RECIPE FOR A TIPPLE THAT WILL WARM YOUR COCKLES YOU WILL NEED

50ml of Cambridge gin 6 cloves 75ml of orange juice 1 teaspoon of runny honey HOW TO MAKE IT

Warm the orange juice and cloves together, add the honey and stir, before adding the gin

“A festive cocktail that really smells – and tastes – like Christmas”

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_084-087 (DRINKS TROLLEY)sg.indd 85

Try something different this Christmas FED UP WITH FIZZ? ELODIE CAMERON FROM THIRSTY SHARES SOME MUST-TRY ALTERNATIVE XMAS TIPPLES

W

e all love to drink seasonally and, of course Christmas is the ultimate season for indulging. Many of us drink wine or fizz with the key festive dishes, but sometimes you just fancy something a little different. As is well known in these parts, at Thirsty we are partial to a brew or two – yes, we love beer! The great thing about beer is that brewing schedules come and go with the seasons which means that the beer suits the food we are eating and the weather outside. This also means that breweries can work with seasonal ingredients either in terms of the grains used or the flavours added. A great example of this is stouts: dark and rich with a luscious mouth-feel that is well suited to winter, they are characterised by flavours of chocolate, coffee and roasted malts. In particular we love milk stout at this time of year – these dark, thick ales have sweet notes of chocolate and coffee. They’re not actually sugar-sweet, but are more akin to the sweetness you will find in a milky dessert as they are made with lactose, the sugar found in milk – hence the name. These sweet notes are an excellent complement to the bitter notes that come from the hops and barley. As part of our ongoing love of all things Scandinavian (a part of the world that does Christmas pretty well too), we are already enjoying Jule Maelk (Christmas Milk) from To-øl in Denmark, even though at the time of writing it’s only mid November. We just can’t resist the dark chocolate, espresso,

85

candied fruit and vanilla. You can’t get much more Christmassy than that! My second suggestion is just what you need on a cold winter’s night – something warming and spiced. Because we all love the classic Christmas combination of apples and spices, plus a tot of rum – it has to be mulled cider. This is the winter warmer at its best, whichever recipe you use; star anise or cloves with your cinnamon, or a glug of sloe gin with sugar or honey. Perfect after that Christmas stroll along the Backs or a windy walk with the dog. You’ll be following a long tradition: this is a drink that has been popular since the 17th Century when Samuel Pepys referred to the pleasures of drinking a ‘mulled sacke’. However we won’t commend the traditional addition of eggs! What we do recommend is that you pop over to Chesterton Road where our rum-spiced Mulled Cider is at the ready (£4.50 by the glass). Last but not least, we all need a treat at Christmas, and my favourite indulgence has to be a plate of cheese with a glass of Sebastiano Passito from Riecine (£33). Forget the port, this dessert wine is only made in good years when the grapes are left to dry, concentrating all the luscious honeyed character. Yes, this wine is sweet but not overly so; the caramel and citrus notes balance perfectly and the acidity cuts beautifully through the fat and richness of cheese. Alternatively, this is equally good with a dark chocolate dessert, especially if there are also nuts. Merry Christmas!

D E C E M B E R 2 018

23/11/2018 09:36


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 86

22/11/2018 17:56


D R I N KS

Langhe: Great lands for great wines GIANPIERO ROCCA FROM LOCAL WINE E-SHOP VINE&CORK ON THE ULTIMATE ITALIAN WINE EXPERIENCE

W

hat is a great wine? At this question most wine connoisseurs would reply with the academic statement, “a perfect balance of tannins, complexity and depth of flavours”. Yes sure, but what makes it special? The most poetic and heartfelt answer was instead given to us by one of our friend and winemaker: “a great wine is a unique emotion”. The best wines bring something extra. A sense of occasion. A feeling that something wonderful is happening that cannot be quantified. Wine has brought this joy to people for some 6000 years and in Italy, wine is a birthright, an expectation – as important to a daily routine as the requisite eight glasses of water, and making wine is so utterly natural that it almost seems instinctive. Great wines are certainly at home in the Langhe (in Piedmont), one of Italy’s most exciting regions when it comes to all things vinous. Appointed UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2014, this is a land filled with places of memories, imagination and

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_050-051 (DRINKS TROLLEY)sg.indd 87

literature, where every village has a castle or tower and every historic centre is distinguished by an overlapping of many styles. The landscape is a geometrical succession of vineyards, the ideal setting for nature and men to create one of the most intriguing forms of art: wine! Langhe’s most famous grape variety, Nebbiolo, is not grown in any meaningful way anywhere else in the world. It just doesn’t really work. Nebbiolo is the key grape variety for Barbaresco and one of Italy’s most prestigious nectars, Barolo, wine of kings, king of wines. Its name derives from the Italian for fog, “nebbia”, abundant here in autumn when grapes are harvested. Nebbiolo wines are usually a pale, bricky colour, with a “tar and roses” aroma and a deep, leathery character that pairs amazingly with food. Barbera and Dolcetto are two other key red grapes grown here, with the best coming from around Alba. Barbera has a distinctive cherry character, a soft, fresh wine, with good balance. Dolcetto makes fruit-driven wines with subtle spice.

87

Langhe also makes several white and dessert wines, like the famous Roero Arneis, a fresh, aromatic white wine with a nutty, pear-like character. It is a grape difficult to grow (in the local dialect it means “little rascal”), but those who have made the effort have been rewarded with a complex and unique white wine. At Vine&Cork we believe in telling the great story enclosed in a small bottle, and we pride ourselves on personally selecting small, independent wine producers that make the best artisan Italian wines. Italian by heart, but British by geography, we want to expand the culture of wine, sharing our knowledge and love of wine and the tradition and passion from our winemakers. Vine&Cork offers wine lovers the chance to engage with Italian wine on a deeper level, introducing new appellations, regions and explaining their history. Our mission is to bring unique emotions into wine lovers’ homes, the ultimate Italian wine experience. Why? Because life is too short to drink bad wine! l D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 12:58


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 88

22/11/2018 17:56


GIFT GUIDE

BROMPTON 2019 M-TYPE 6-SPEED FOLDING BIKE, STEEL GREEN

£1069.99, Rutland Cycling

TEN-INCH DESK GLOBE

£59.95, The Geographer, Impington

CHOCOLATE GIFT BASKET

£39.50, The Geographer, Impington

CAMBRIDGE DRY GIN

£45, Cambridge Distillery

FOR HIM GI V E T H E GI F T OF F L IGH T! CAMBRIDGE COASTERS

£4 each or four for £15, by local artist Naomi Davies

Dare to dream and take to the skies in an aircraft that won the hearts of both pilots and public in WWII. A symbol of Britain’s refusal to give up, the Spitfire is an icon with unbridled horsepower, a fighter with heart and a joy to watch. Aerial Collective Spitfire flights start from £2,750.

BUTCHERY MASTERCLASSES

Taking place on 6 Feb, 6 Mar and 3 Apr, £128pp, The Gog Farm Shop CHESTNUT ROASTER PAN

BREWBOARD LE COMMANDANT

£16.99, The Secret Garden, Burwash Manor

£4.60, The Larder, Burwash Manor

ANGRY WASP DRY CIDER BY THE CAMBRIDGE CIDER COMPANY

£3.20, The Larder, Burwash Manor

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_089 (GIFT GUIDE FOR HIM) BF.indd 89

89

SMALL METAL SHEEP

£28.99, The Secret Garden, Burwash Manor

D E C E M B E R 2 018

22/11/2018 12:18


A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

M&S MUST-HAVES From statement party pieces to cosy outerwear and gorgeous gifts, discover this season’s style essentials at Marks & Spencer Cambridge on Sidney Street SPARKLY LONG SLEEVE BODYCON DRESS, £55

SEQUIN EMBELLISHED VEST TOP, £25

FAUX LEATHER A-LINE MINI SKIRT, £27.50

SINGLE BREASTED COAT, £89

JEWEL BLOCK HEEL, £35 EMBELLISHED SIDE STRIPE TROUSERS, £35

MARKS & SPENCER CAMBRIDGE 6-11 SIDNEY STREET CAMBRIDGE CB2 3HH 01223 355219

CE12_092 (M&S ADV).indd 90

90

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

22/11/2018 12:15


GIFT GUIDE PASHLEY ROADSTER SOVEREIGN 5 SPEED STEEL HYBRID BIKE BLACK

£544.99, Rutland Cycling

LAUREN BAKER ’YOU ARE PURE MAGIC‘

L OV E C A MBR I D GE GI F T C A R D

Framed original limited edition signed print with screened gloss overlay, £510, The Art Hound, Burwash Manor

ISABELLA WOOL GLOVES

£22, Lilac Rose

CATHERINE TOUGH LAMBS WOOL SOCKS

£22 per pair, Cuckoo Clothing, St Mary’s Passage & Burwash Manor

MINI MUGS

£6.95 each, Country Traditionals

FOR HER

Struggling to find the perfect pressie? The Love Cambridge gift card is redeemable at more than 170 restaurants, shops and attractions across the city, ranging from big brands such as John Lewis, Topshop and Yo Sushi, to local indies including Millers Music, Aromi and Podarok. The cards can be purchased love-cambridgegiftcard.com or in person at the Visitor Information Centre, and topped up with as little as £10 or as much as £200.

HONEY & SEA SALT CARAMELS

£11.99, Suffolk Beekeepers, The Larder, Burwash Manor

HELLO CAMBRIDGE TOTE BAG

£14.99, Jack’s On Trinity

STUDIO NILLI 3D PRINTED SHORT AND TALL LEGGED PLANTERS

DISASTER DESIGNS PAINT MAKE-UP BAG

from £28, Kettle’s Yard

£22.50, Lilac Rose

RACHEL JACKSON SHOOTING STAR EARRINGS

£75, Boudoir Femme

MAKE YOUR OWN SOCKS GIFT SET

£22, Knitting Needle Lane

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_091 (GIFT GUIDE FOR HER)sg.indd 91

91

D E C E M B E R 2 018

22/11/2018 12:17


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 92

22/11/2018 17:56


GIFT GUIDE GUITAR CASE LUNCHBOX

£14.99, Millers Music

SANTA IS COMING TO CAMBRIDGE

£4.99, Rocking Horse Toy Shop, Burwash Manor

FOR KIDS

THE BOTTLED BAKING COMPANY UNICORN CAKE

£13.99, The Gog

FITZ AND WILL THE CHRISTMAS ADVENTURE

£7.99, Jack’s On Trinity

FRANKIE KNITTED FOX CUDDLY SNOWMAN

£16.99, Jack’s On Trinity

£17.99, Rocking Horse, Burwash Manor

REINDEER BISCUIT TIN

£6.99, The Gog RUDOLPH SNOW GLOBE

£22.99, Blackthorpe Barn

NOAH’S ARK BISCUITS

£13.99, The Larder, Burwash Manor

BODY PARTS DUVET SET

£120, See Say Do

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_093 (GIFT GUIDE FOR kids)sg.indd 93

93

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 17:31


INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH

The Cambridge Flower School WHETHER YOU ARE CONSIDERING FLORISTRY AS A NEW CAREER OPTION, OR JUST LOVE FLOWER ARRANGING AND WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR SKILLS, THE CAMBRIDGE FLOWER SCHOOL HAS SOMETHING TO OFFER YOU, AS SIOBHAN GODWOOD DISCOVERS

W

ho doesn’t love flowers? There’s nothing like a beautiful arrangement of gorgeous, fresh blooms to transform any environment, whether it’s a small bunch in a vase to brighten your kitchen, or an elaborate centrepiece as the finishing touch to a celebration dinner. But for Sarah Clerke and her colleagues Gussie Sneddon and Claire McNamara at The Cambridge Flower School, flowers are more than just an occasional treat: they’re a way of life. They specialise in sharing their love of blooms with others through their flower-arranging workshops and floristry career courses. “I’ve worked in floristry a long time, and have had three shops over the years,” says Sarah. “I also have a background in teaching, and I wanted to combine my two passions. If anything, I actually love teaching even more than I love flowers!” The floristry course at the local college in Cambridge had recently closed down, so there was a need for someone to step into that gap. “I started off just running workshops now and then, and combining that with my day job,” explains Sarah. “The business really just grew organically from there, and now we have students coming to us from all round the world.

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_094-095 (INDIE)lm.indd 94

Because Sarah had run her own businesses before, she didn’t see setting up the flower school as a huge risk. “I really believe that you have to give things a go; you’re much more likely to regret the things that you haven’t done than those you have,” she says. “For the first year or so I wasn’t doing it every day, then four years ago I took the plunge, gave up my job and set up the school full-time.” The school has a permanent base at Newton Hall, an early 20th century country house just outside Cambridge. Sarah has found that there’s a real diversity in the people who come to do the career courses. “Our students are of all ages, from 16 to 85,” she says. “Lots are looking to change their career and others simply want to be more adventurous with their flowers at home. Many people have always had a passion to be a florist but have felt the need to follow a more traditional career path. Whether you are 25 or 55, you no longer have to stay in a job that doesn’t inspire you, and lots of students come to us having had this nagging dream of being a florist. We make that dream a reality – warts and all: floristry is wonderful, but it is hard work!” The career course at The Cambridge Flower School is a week-long, intensive course, and is almost always oversubscribed, attracting students both locally and from around the world. Sarah finds teaching floristry incredibly rewarding, but she says that students are often surprised to realise how much business knowledge is required to take it up as a career. “A lot of people have a love of flowers and are attracted to floristry because of that,” she explains, “but you have to make money out of it, so we look at how we make a profit out

94

of everything we make, how to look after flowers, how to store them, all the things that we need to get right if we are going to make a success of our career. It’s definitely not a ‘ladies who lunch’ kind of course, the students have to get involved with clearing up, sweeping the floor, just like in a real floristry environment.” As for flower-arranging and wreathmaking courses, “people come along to them for all sorts of different reasons,” says Sarah. “For some, it’s the first step in realising that they want to do floristry as a career, and they end up coming along to one of the career courses. But often people come along because it’s so different to their day-to-day jobs so it’s a great way to relax in the evenings or weekends. It’s very creative, and that can be relaxing if you spend the rest of your time at a desk looking at a computer.” With Christmas fast approaching, it’s an incredibly busy time of year for Sarah and her team. “Our festive workshops are really popular,” she says, “and are usually fully booked from November. At the moment we are running several classes a week, in the evenings and half days, with classes ranging from making hanging chandeliers and wreaths, to a Festive Opulence course with fabulous Christmas table topiary. And as for the career courses, they’re busy too, with the floristry industry gearing up for next year’s summer wedding season. “That’s the wonderful thing about floristry,” says Sarah. “We think of it as being very seasonal, but the people who work with us in the industry are always there, bringing beautiful flowers into people’s lives all year round.”l The Cambridge Flower School Newton Hall, Newton, Cambridge CB22 7ZE | 01223 655661 thecambridgeflowerschool.co.uk

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

22/11/2018 18:17


INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH

W H AT:

A place to be inspired by the beauty of flowers and discover the art of floristry for fun or a future career

W H ER E:

Newton, Cambridgeshire

HOW MUCH:

Workshops from £65 and professional courses from £155

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_094-095 (INDIE)lm.indd 95

95

D E C E M B E R 2 018

22/11/2018 18:17


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 96

22/11/2018 17:56


B E AU T Y

the

BEAUTY T

he shops may have been pumping out the Christmas tunes for what feels like months now, but I can hardly believe it’s December. There is one thing guaranteed to put me in a festive frame of mind though, and that’s poring over the gift sets and offerings to be had beauty-wise this time of year. Sleek always smashes it, making it easy to pick up a bargain. The Gloss Like a Boss pack features four mini lip shots of glass-like gloss for just £8.50 from Superdrug. I like to break up gift sets like this for cheap and cheerful individual stocking fillers. And for the makeup mad in your life, the All Day, All Night kit includes highlighter, liquid eye colour, a metallic lip cream and my favourite; dip it eyeliner (£20, Superdrug). Murad package their bestsellers into dedicated boxes for Christmas: Rapidly Radiant (£70, John Lewis) includes Rapid Age Spot Correcting Serum, and Essential-C Day Moisturiser – the perfect combo for sun-loving skin, both products work together to improve environmental damage and smooth the signs of aging. And to hang on your tree, the Dew a Little (£10) is a teeny box of Hydro-Dynamic Ultimate Moisturiser, one of my favourite luxury moisturisers. It’s thick, creamy and soothing and this dinky pot is a fab way to try it out before committing to the full size. Pop to Neal’s Yard on Rose Crescent and take a peep at their Christmas display. The Beauty Sleep Collection (£50) is perfect for

bible

WORDS BY DAISY DICKINSON

basically anyone, including new parents. A hug in a box, it includes everything you need to promote a more restful night. They’ve also got the blissfully relaxing Prepare for Bed Duo (£12.50) which includes pillow mist and roll-on aromatherapy blend... aahh! If you’re looking to gift something a little more blingy, I’m currently obsessed with cruelty-free brand Prima Makeup (primamakeup.com), which makes affordable, pigmented palettes, plus their pressed glitters are amazing. From £4.50 for one pan, you can build your own magnetic palette or favourites, or pick from the readymade sets. Fairy Dust Chameleon is the prettiest iridescent sheen ideal for unicorn and mermaid fans! The Mermazing magnetic palette will hold 18 pans – or use it to mix and match with your own favourites. Too Faced always have great offerings for the sparkle-conscious and the Then and Now Eyeshadow palette (£52, Debenhams) is packed with 20 pretty shades and glitters, which all smell like birthday cake! And who could resist the limited-edition Peach Tinsel gift set (£36); peach powder and a peach kiss moisture matte lipstick. Don’t forget to gift fluttering lashes too. My faves right now are Pinky Goat lashes – in the 3D silk collection I love Yasmina (£11.99, Superdrug). l

“There is one thing guaranteed to put me in a festive frame of mind, and that’s poring over gift sets” CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_099 (BEAUTY)sg.indd 97

97

THE ONE THAT I WANT

It’s been breaking the internet over on Instagram and the new Huda Beauty Nude palette is definitely on my wish list. An all-in-one eyeshadow palette with 18 highly pigmented shades, from flattering mattes to shimmery hues. Formulated with aloe vera and coconut oil for butter-like application; it’s the four reflective shades that have me losing it. The shimmering pearl flecks offer an insane duochromatic finish, and just look at that glitter! It’s available online at Cult Beauty now for £56, but be warned, it’s going to be flying off the virtual shelves, so add your name to the waiting list now.

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 11:38


W E L L N E SS TRIED & TESTED

Microblading DAISY DICKINSON VISITS CAMBRIDGE CONTOUR CLINIC TO TRY OUT MICROBLADING, THE LATEST CRAZE IN SEMI-PERMANENT MAKE-UP

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_098-099 (WELLNESS) BF.indd 98

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

I

f you’re into the beauty scene and are on Instagram, chances are you’ll be well aware of microblading. It’s the trend that’s swept the nation, giving those perfect ‘I woke up like this’ brows that can last around a year – yes, that’s a whole year without having to pencil in! Now, let’s get real, while microblading offers a more natural look than ‘classic’ block-style tattooing, it’s still a serious commitment, and I urge anyone to arm themselves with plenty of research before taking the plunge. While I’d perfected the art of creating arches where there weren’t any and adding colour where it was lacking, I was bored with the time I was spending on my brows each morning. I’d been looking into microblading techniques for about a year, conscious of the cost and commitment – as well as finding someone I could trust to get the style to my liking. Microblading originated in Asia and, though it’s been around for a long time, has recently grown in popularity thanks to celebrity trends. Karen Betts was one of the first professionals to bring such treatments to the UK and it was her company, KB PRO, that trained Natalie Tooke, the microblading artist at Cambridge Contour Clinic (CCC). Gearing up to celebrate its first birthday, CCC launched with a team of five practitioners and artists, offering an array of aesthetic treatments which includes injectables, dermaplaning, microneedling and microblading. Director Bradley Melbourne Wilks explains the ethos behind CCC and how it likes to keep things simple: “A vast majority of our treatments revolve around assisting the body to do what it does best. Encouraging habitual changes or offering services that will give the best chance to achieve the desired results, a more refined you.” Before my brows went anywhere even close to a blade, I was invited to the

“Some may feel discomfort, but no watery eyes or squirming, I promise!” clinic to have a consultation with Natalie, who’s been in the industry for a decade, previously owning a successful local beauty salon. When I walked through the door, the first thing I noted were Natalie’s own well-groomed brows. A good sign. Natalie was incredibly thorough, talking me through the procedure, as well as discussing her own training and methods with me. Microblading is still fairly unregulated and, technically, you can get ‘qualified’ in just a day. However, Natalie’s extensive training with KB PRO took nine months, which was reassuring. I had lots of questions of my own, but

98

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 11:41


W E L L N E SS BEFORE

the longer I was with Natalie, the more at ease and excited I felt. Bradley had explained that “you can almost get everything you need from a photo. There is a range of expertise and experience out there in the world of microblading, but it is shockingly unregulated. We have definitely opted for what, in our opinion, best replicates natural brows. Most notably we allot ample time and we use it. We also avoid linear lines or a patterned approach as much as reasonably possible. We could easily half the time of treatments if we did, though it is a simple choice for us: if you can provide better, you should.” The images on CCC’s growing Instagram page, @merefined, speak for themselves and are especially reassuring, as one of my main concerns were the results looking fake. At the end of the consultation, clients are encouraged to go home and give it some additional thought – armed with a tonne of information. When my appointment came, the preparation took around an hour and involved colour matching before using all sorts of rulers and tools to map out my brows. Now as we know, brows are sisters and not twins, and because no face is really symmetrical Natalie explained how some freehand tweaking of the shape would be necessary for the most natural result. Numbing cream on, I laid back comfortably. Using a small bladed tool, Natalie proceeded to create little strokes to my brows. Pain is one of the top questions people have before this treatment, but as the owner of multiple tattoos, it wasn’t top of my concerns. However, it really didn’t hurt. There is a light scratching sensation and some people may feel slight discomfort, but no watery eyes or squirming, I promise! After around an hour, we were done and I got to take a first look at my new brows. With all microblading, there should be two treatments as standard. One initial and a touch-up appointment around four to six weeks later. Natalie explained that with her approach she prefers to go softer on the first CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_098-099 (WELLNESS) BF.indd 99

AFTER

appointment to make sure the client is comfortable and happy, as well as give her the chance to see how the skin reacts – as everyone is different when it comes to pigment retention and healing. The most important thing is to follow the aftercare instructions exactly – and do as you’re told! You’ve essentially got wounds on your face, so they need to be treated with care. Don’t get them wet and no make-up or creams can go near them until they’re healed. There can be a little scabbing, but you’ll be back to normal after around 10 days. After four weeks, I was ready for my top up – this is where the magic happened. I’d become used to my new brows, but as a make-up fiend, I was keen for a little more definition. We went a little deeper and extended my arches and tails a little more. I was very pleased with the results. Natalie is an absolute artist at what she does and, of course, it’s not just the beauty-conscious who benefit from microblading. While I love waking up with beautiful, natural-looking brows, it’s a fantastic treatment for those who have lost their brows due to health conditions or chemotherapy – helping to restore a little confidence. Of course, because it’s semi-permanent, after 12 to 18 months it’s possible to revisit and adjust the shape, style and colour rather than being stuck with the same design for ever. Microblading at CCC costs £395 and includes a free touch-up four to six weeks after your first treatment. l Cambridge Contour Clinic, Cambridge CB4 2JD | cambridgecontourclinic.com

99

C A MBR I D GE CON TOUR CL I N IC ’ S TOP 5 MICROBL A DI NG CH ECK L IST

1

Always ask for original photos, look out for photo editing and be suspicious of filtered images. If the person’s skin has no texture or blemishes, chances are it’s filtered.

2

You should not be able to easily decree a pattern, nor linear lines.

3

Have a look for yellow bins! If there is no sharps box or clinical waste disposal, be wary.

4

Check for a sink in the room. Seems simple, but it is essential and, in most cases, hygiene-compliant.

5

Ask to see training certificates and proof of insurance, as well as the certificate from the local authority to operate.

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 11:41


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 100

22/11/2018 17:56


Home Edition © NEXT

F E ST I V E I N T E R I O R S • E D I T I O N LO V E S • W I N T E R B LO O MS & W R E AT H S

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_101 (PROPERTY OPENER)sg.indd 101

101

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 11:36


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 102

22/11/2018 17:56


INTERIORS

How does your

GARDEN GROW?

ANNA TAYLOR, OWNER OF ANNA’S FLOWER FARM IN AUDLEY END, SHARES WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE GARDEN THIS MONTH

T

he shortest day of the year makes December the obvious month for many festivals of light. Well before it was known as Christmas, the Roman God of Saturn was honoured at the winter solstice, celebrating the festival of midwinter, Saturnalia. Today we still feast, light fires and candles to enliven the mood of the darkest month. Out in the garden, it may look as though plants have retreated, lost leaves and gone to sleep, but the truth is far from that. Some seeds (and tulips) will need a period of cold weather to allow germination; called vernalisation. The roots of the hardy annuals, biennials and bulbs we planted in the autumn grow underground throughout the winter. These plants might look battered above ground but as soon as the soil warms and the days lengthen, there will be rapid growth and far bigger, earlier flowers. That, combined with the swelling leaf and flower buds on trees, brings much optimism as the circle of the year is apparent again. In fact, the Christmas wreath is symbolic of the wheel and reminds us that the cold dark nights will pass into spring again. There are many plants that shine this month, including the traditional evergreens, holly, mistletoe, ivy and fir trees. Some shrubs are must-haves in my garden and plot. These include viburnum tinus with its small white and pink flowers, lonicera winter beauty with its exquisite tiny blooms and delicious scent hanging on semi-evergreen branches, and not forgetting sarcococca, with the most delicate winter flowers. These combine with the first of the winter bulbs and hellebores to make an intricate show. To bring the essence of the outside in, I love to decorate my home with evergreen branches, symbolising life through the darkness, bringing fresh scents at this most precious and evocative time. We plant bowls of narcissus paperwhite every couple of weeks for a brilliant display of bulbs, emerging through the moss and supported CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_103 (FLOWER COLUMN)sg.indd 103

by bare branches of hazel and birch. These compositions make great presents and can flower in just five weeks with very little care. I cut armfuls of branches and tuck nuts, seed heads and berries into garlands for a sumptuous table centrepiece or over-thefireplace mantle. The mixture of scents makes Christmas for me. Studding oranges with cloves creates that exotic atmosphere, as wells as lighting candles, especially on midwinter’s night. The slow, longer dark days encourage me to beautify my home with generosity, seeking warmth and beauty. On the doors and walls, I increasingly prefer dried wreaths, rings with beech, hazel and birch branches and creating wilder arrangements with wiring on cones, dried grasses and seed heads. In early autumn, I always look at the reducing garden for material that might dry. I don’t like clearing the house on Twelfth Night and prefer to retain some natural decoration into January with these wreaths. I might pop vials of water within the branches for hellebores or bulbs on special days. l

103

THIS MONTH

See Anna at her Christmas Bazaar and Open Studio with friends at the farm on 2 December, 10am to 4pm. If you’re feeling Christmassy, try the moss wreath making class at the Grantchester Distillery, 8 December, 10am to 12.30pm. annasflowerfarm.com

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 11:36


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 104

22/11/2018 17:56


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 105

22/11/2018 17:57


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 106

22/11/2018 17:57


Fabulous

INTERIORS

& festive

© NEXT

FROM TWINKLING TREES TO CANDLELIT TABLES, IT’S TIME TO ADORN OUR HOMES WITH A TOUCH OF GLITZ. WHETHER YOU GO ALL OUT WITH THE TINSEL OR WANT A PARED-BACK MINIMALIST THEME, ANGELINA VILLA-CLARKE REVEALS HOW TO KEEP YOUR HOME STYLISH THIS CHRISTMAS

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_107-114 (INTERIORS)v2lm.indd 107

107

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 11:27


or many of us, the focus of our Christmas decorating is the tree. A real tree – such as a Douglas Fir – with its pine aroma and lush needles, gives lovers of a traditional aesthetic that authentic feel. Artificial versions, meanwhile, offer a more practical approach, and these days there is a wide choice available. At Christmas Tree World, for instance, you can source realistic, luxury trees, which can come pre-lit or ‘snow-covered’ as well as dramatic black, white and even upside down options. When it comes to decorating the tree, you can update your scheme by taking note of some of the latest trends from high street retailers. John Lewis, for example, has revealed seven different key looks for this year, such as ‘Sapphire’, an underwater, oceanic theme, and the allwhite ‘Moonstone’, but predicts that its ‘Rainbow’ theme will be the most popular. Scott Bartle, junior Christmas buyer and partner, reveals more: “The rainbow trend originates from social media platforms, like Instagram and Pinterest, where a colourful post means more likes! We wanted to capture customers’ imaginations by showing them how to create something truly different this Christmas.” Meanwhile, at Yonder Living, a homewares company focused on craftsmanship, the look is all about the tropical vibe with brass palm-tree candlesticks, beaded lobster decorations and retro pineapple baubles all the rage. Lovers of a simple Nordic look should check out Sue Parkinson’s minimalist range of mango wood stars, antique silver baubles and zinc wreaths. And, adding a sense of fun to the branches, meanwhile, are Cody Foster’s multi-coloured decorations – from blue roller-skates to scarlet ketchup bottles, available at WA Green. u D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_107-114 (INTERIORS)v2lm.indd 108

108

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 11:27


INTERIORS

“Artificial trees offer a more practical approach”

Opposite Balmoral table (from £370), Suffolk oak chairs (from £235), Fenton crockery (dinner plates, from £96 for six), all Neptune This page Nordic Nature Christmas Collection, from £1, B&Q; Coloured baubles, from £2, John Lewis; glass Ketchup tree decoration, £14, WA Green; palm candlestick, from £36, Yonder; Antique gold effect baubles, from £16.95, Sue Parkinson

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_107-114 (INTERIORS)v2lm.indd 109

109

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 11:28


This page Indigo linen tablecloth, £240, Ottolenghi; pre-lit Ultra tree, from £65.99, ChristmasTree World; Peppermint Grove candles, from £12.95, Ocada

© SARAH HOGAN

IXN X XT XE XR XI O X XR S

“If it’s your turn to host, serve up on stylish crockery” Christopher Ray, category manager for Christmas at B&Q, however, predicts that the Dachshund dog will be the musthave adornment this Christmas. “One of the highlights from our new Christmas range is the Sausage Dog Tinsel Pop-up Character,” he says. “It’s one of this year’s hottest trends and a great way to inject some fun into your interior style. It is sure to be a hit with kids and adults.” From golden fairy lights to twinkling candles, lighting, of course, is vital to

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_107-114 (INTERIORS)v2lm.indd 110

add that all-important ambience at Christmas-time. Offering a wide range of scented candles in elegant glass vessels, Peppermint Grove Australia has launched a new Christmas range which aims to capture the magic of the season. Hannah Staples, director and coowner, says: “We have three new scents, including ‘Sugared Shortbread’ – which has sweet, buttery notes and smells good enough to eat. ‘Crushed pine’ conjures up the aroma of a freshly-cut tree. While ‘Coconut & Lychee’ is a fruity fragrance reminiscent of bright lights, starry nights, sweet treats and tasty feasts!” A highlight of the festive period is, of course, time spent with family and friends, much of which is centred around the dining table. If it’s your turn to host this year, then serve up your fare on stylish table linen, such as Ottolenghi’s limited edition tablecloths and Clarissa Hulse’s Midnight Blue crockery collection – perfect for giving a wintry feel to family get-togethers. Emma Britton’s etched glassware is ideal for raising a toast, while the emerald and scarlet u

110

TOP TREES INTERIOR DESIGNER JOANNA WOOD GIVES HER FESTIVE STYLE TIPS TOP IT OFF:

Instead of a fairy, which can look a bit twee, go for a treetopper star which gives a more glamorous finish. HIDE IT AWAY:

Opt for a willow tree skirt to add a touch of rustic charm and to hide the tree stand and wires. SCENT THE ROOM:

If you go for an artificial tree, invest in a spritz or a room candle scented with pine, candied citrus fruits or red berries, to give that authentic touch.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

23/11/2018 09:39


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 111

22/11/2018 17:57


XXXXXXXX

PEACE & PETALS BLOOM & WILD’S SARA GORDON ON HOW TO INCORPORATE FRESH FLOWERS IN YOUR SCHEME THE MANTELPIECE

Mantels suit either exaggerated tall arrangements: think branches – or short ones with stems that tumble off the mantel edge – like ferns. TABLE SET TINGS

Once the table is set, pop napkins onto plates and tie them with ribbon or twine with a name tag. For a lovely finishing touch, slide in a flower or piece of foliage, like rosemary. BRANCHES ABOVE THE TABLE

Source a lovely branch from your local florist or garden centre. String each end up quite solidly with fishing wire for strength and fix in place with Command hooks. It’s simple but effective.

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_107-114 (INTERIORS)v2lm.indd 112

goblets at Nisi Living add a regal theme to parties. “Most importantly, it all starts with the right table,” says John Sims Hilditch, co-founder of Neptune. “You can’t beat a solid timber dining table and chairs, or indeed a bench. When you dine on a natural material, it makes you feel connected to the great outdoors and that’s particularly special at Christmas. It helps to create a woodland atmosphere that is intimate yet inviting – perfect for a gathering in the country." The winter period means prolonged time in the home, and a few cosy elements can add all the difference to comfort. Giving the ultimate in snugness is a wood burner, like those from ACR Stoves. While the addition of a soft carpet will also create an inviting feel. Natalie Littlehales, Brintons’ consumer marketing manager, agrees: “The texture of wool underfoot makes it a great way to build a comfortable and inviting décor scheme. For many years it has been all about neutral shades and a plain finish, however, we are seeing a return to patterned styles, such as tartans and plaids, creating a warm, cosy feeling.”

112

Meanwhile, DFS’s senior designer Lauren Harris suggests adding a touch of festive luxe by going bold with furniture and accessories. “People tend to opt for neutral furniture and bolder accessories, but by turning this on its head, the end result makes a real statement. Don’t forget about texture; colour adds depth and character to a room, but texture is just as important. If you want a luxurious feel then rich, tactile textures like velvet are always a great option.”

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 11:28


INTERIORS

STOCKISTS ACR Stoves 0121 706 8266 acrheatproducts.com B&Q 0333 014 3098 diy.com Bloom & Wild 020 7352 9499 bloomandwild.com Brintons 0800 505055 brintons.co.uk Christmas Tree World 01257 754795 christmastreeworld.co.uk Clarissa Hulse 020 7226 7055 clarissahulse.com DFS 0333 999 9777 dfs.co.uk Emma Britton 07989 269347 emmabritton.net Joanna Wood 020 7730 5064 joannawood.co.uk John Lewis Cambridge 01223 361292 Johnlewis.com Magic Flower Company 01473 785454 magicflowercompany.co.uk Neptune 01793 427 300 neptune.com Nisi Living 01275 390521 nisiliving.co.uk Ottolenghi ottolenghi.co.uk

If you are looking to redecorate a room, then Valspar Paints suggests that a pastel blue palette is the perfect backdrop to festive decorations: “It wouldn’t be Christmas without holly greens, berry reds and deep chestnut browns, but this year we’re taking a leaf out of Elvis Presley’s book and predicting a blue Christmas,” says the brand. “Skip traditional red shades and paint your room with light, bright pastel blue hues to chase those winter nights away.” Finally, Jack Hinshelwood, managing director of The Magic Flower Company, which specialises in preserved flowers, suggests how to give the ultimate finishing touch. “Fresh flowers and foliage are a beautiful addition to your home during this time, but they don’t always stand the test of time. “A great solution is investing in natural flowers that have been preserved to last for many months, or even a year, in the home. Timeless combinations, such as sprigs of eucalyptus and pale white or rich red roses, achieve that festive finish with ease, yet also promise to look beautiful in the home all year round.” l

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CE12_107-114 (INTERIORS)v2lm.indd 113

Peppermint Grove Australia peppermintgroveaustralia.com from ocado.com Sue Parkinson 01386 859233 sue-parkinson.com Valspar Paint valsparpaint.co.uk WA Green 020 7729 8599 wagreen.co.uk Yonder Living yonderliving.com

Opposite Velvet scatter cushions, from £15, DFS; Beach House Blue wall, from £27 for 2.5l, Valspar This page Letterbox flowers from £23, Bloom & Wild; Silver Classic and similar, £99.95, The Magic Flower Company

113

D E C E M B E R 2 018

20/11/2018 11:28


INTERIORS CERAMIC CHRISTMAS TREE

£45, nisiliving.co.uk

MOONSTONE SNOWBALL AND PEARL WREATH

£30, johnlewis.com

TALISKER DECANTER PENDANT LIGHT

£34.99, my-furniture.com BRASS PALM SPOON

£8, yonderliving.com

AGED SMOKE AND BLACK ROUND DANOA BAUBLE

from £16.95, sue-parkinson.com

EDI T ION

LOVES STAR DECORATION

£49, ellajames.co.uk

CODY FOSTER LIPS DECORATION

£12, wagreen.co.uk

WHITE AND GOLD CELESTIAL PLATE

£12.50, saramiller.london

FLORAL CHAMPAGNE FLUTE

£9, emmabritton.net

JOY WREATH POM POM CUSHION

£20, kaleidoscope.co.uk

D E C E M B E R 2 018

CE12_107-114 (INTERIORS)v2lm.indd 114

114

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

20/11/2018 11:28


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 115

22/11/2018 17:57


CE ADS_DECEMBER.indd 116

22/11/2018 17:57

Cambridge Edition December 2018  

Cambridge Edition December 2018 issue

Cambridge Edition December 2018  

Cambridge Edition December 2018 issue