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PORTRAITS WITH A PENTAX 645 WHO NEEDS A STUDIO? WHATEVER THE WEATHER Readers create medium-format marvels with the 645Z Top lighting tips for tight spots

We’ve got brilliant photo ideas come rain or shine

THE MAGAZINE THAT TAKES YOUR IMAGES SERIOUSLY

ISSUE 57 £4.95 ABSOLUTEPHOTO.COM

FULL TEST

SAMSUNG NX500 NX1 best bits in a smaller body – is this the perfect CSC?

READER SHOOT:

ON SAFARI How to make your big cat photography a roaring success

16 PAGES OF CANDID AND CREATIVE TECHNIQUES

Get on the road to great street images with our essential guide FEATURED INSIDE: NIKON D80O FUJIFILM X-T1 & 16-55mm MINDSHIFT RUCKSACK MANFROTTO HEAD CANON EOS 6D ap57-001 cover subbed.indd 1

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ISSUE 57

Welcome WILL CHEUNG FRPS, EDITOR Will has worked in photo mags for 30 years and has been taking pictures for even longer. His photographic interests are very broad, from landscape and nature to portraits, indoors and out.

COVER IMAGE: Poplar DLR bridge by Sean Batten, shot on a Nikon D800

ENIPAHDACONNCTEENDT AVAILABLE

When you see this logo, you know that there’s extra content on the interactive version of AP. Search iTunes for Advanced Photographer to get it.

We’re well on the way to the long, hopefully sunny, days of summer and plenty of great photography. Landscape, nature and people are core subjects and all get an outing in this exciting issue. Street photography has year-round potential but the higher light levels do make life easier and of course there are a great many more events where people gather. If you fancy street photography and need a steer we have the low-down on the techniques and kit that experts of the genre favour. Street photography does not appeal to everyone and it is without doubt a challenging subject but trying to catch fleeting moments of human behaviour can be addictive, so you have been warned. This issue also has several features where readers get their hands on nice kit and cameras, use Samsung Memory and enjoy the medium-format life with the Pentax 645Z. The Pentax is an incredible machine (yes, it is a serious investment and pricier than any top-end full-frame DSLR but it’s great value in its market) and the images it’s capable of are truly breathtaking – and all in a great-handling machine. In Photo Kit, we test the latest Samsung CSC to hit the shelves. The NX500 shares many features with the flagship NX1 including the sensor and AF system, so at £600 for the kit it promises to be a bargain, but is it? We check out its credentials as a price-busting CSC. Enjoy the issue and we’ll meet again next month.

Will Cheung FRPS, Editor

PAGE 26 COVER STORY

ON THE STREET

PAGE 90 COVER STORY

MINI TESTS PAGE 46

THOMAS LEUTHARD

READER SHOOT-OUT

Advanced Photographer is also available as a fully interactive magazine – go to iTunes now!

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ISSUE 57

CONTENTS PAGE 6

UPFRONT

Isn’t photography just the best thing since sliced bread? We think so, which is why we’re excited about the Sony World Photography Awards and drive-bys. PAGE 12

PHOTO 24

PAGE 50 COVER STORY

LIGHTING ACADEMY

KINGSLEY SINGLETON

The best 24 hours of your photographic year are nearly here. Time to start planning! PAGE 16

WHEN AP READERS WENT WILD

Five AP readers won a VIP photo safari at Longleat Park. Was it a roaring success? PAGE 24

CAMERA CLUB OF THE YEAR

They think it’s all over; it is now. The competition’s closed, so while we await the results, here’s round 4’s winner. PAGE 26

THE BIG FEATURE: STREETS

Take to the streets with your camera, a dollop of humour and a smidgen of bravery for stellar shots – guaranteed. PAGE 46

WHEN AP READERS WENT WILD

BARRY HORNE

PENTAX EYES OPEN

PAGE 16 COVER STORY

RICHARD SCOURFIELD

PAGE 56

SAMSUNG SHOOTS SCENICS

We all love to be beside the seaside, and what better place to let ten AP readers loose with the Samsung NX1. PAGE 50

PAGE 56 PAGE 63

LIGHTING ACADEMY

Leading a dog’s life, not sure how to light small subjects in small spaces? Prepare to escape your leash.

PENTAX EYES OPEN

Is the 645Z the perfect partner for a portrait shoot?

PROJECTS

PAGE 63

PROJECTS

Give your photography a boost with a project; it’ll bolster your skills and populate your portfolio. PAGE 102

INSPIRED

Fire up your imagination with shots from fellow readers. This month, they’ve been battling the elements. PAGE 106

AND FINALLY…

Could you select your top 50 shots of all time?

MIKE SHIEL

PHOTO KIT PAGE 71

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GEAR NEWS

Every snippet and story you need to know about the latest photographic kit.

SAMSUNG NX500

If you repackage the NX1’s BSI 28-megapixel CMOS sensor in a smaller body and put a sub-£600 price tag on it, you get the NX500 but will it deliver the goods?

COVER STORY

SAMSUNG NX500

PAGE 83

LONG-TERMERS

Only long-term, day-to-day use can tell you what a camera is really like. So what do the AP team and its readers think of their kit?

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LONG-TERMERS

WILL CHEUNG

PAGE 90 PAGE 83

MINI TESTS

The bits and pieces that are guaranteed to improve your shooting experience.

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STREET SHOOTING

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY IS ONE OF THE FASTEST GROWING GENRES OUT THERE, BUT TO RAISE THE QUALITY OF YOUR SHOTS ABOVE OTHERS’ YOU NEED TO MASTER A VERY SPECIAL BLEND OF VISUAL STORYTELLING. IT TAKES BRAVERY AND HUMOUR, PATHOS AND SPLIT-SECOND TIMING, AS WELL AS DRAWING ON EXPERIENCE FROM ALMOST EVERY OTHER PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE. TO MAP OUT YOUR PATH TO SUCCESS, THIS MONTH, SEASONED PROS TAKE US ON A STREET SAFARI…

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THOMAS LEUTHARD

STREET SHOOTING

Advanced Photographer is also available as a fully interactive magazine – go to iTunes now!

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STREET SHOOTING

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In the face of fear In today’s world, with its concerns about privacy, pointing your camera at a stranger, or even including them in a composition, can seem like a tough thing to do. But it’s that toughness which brings the reward. Very few good photos happen without effort in any discipline, but at least with street shooting you can head out whenever you like, regardless of the light, or the weather, and/or the location. You can even do it between coffees. That said, while it’s true you’re not frozen to a hillside, or risking high-speed collision

LAYING IN WAIT If you find a good framing device, like the light coming through the doorway in Thomas Leuthard’s shot (left), some comical advertising in Nico Goodden’s image (above), or a piece of street furniture like the bench below, it’s often a good idea to hang around the scene, and wait for the right subject to complete it.

THOMAS LEUTHARD

THOMAS LEUTHARD

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ecently,” says Nicholas Goodden, “a man’s daughter saw I was exhibiting a photo of him in my solo show. She emailed me and she was so happy, she bought it for him. And as for her dad, he brought his mates to the exhibition to show off a little!” Nico, as he prefers to be called, is an award-winning London-based photographer and founder of the Street Photography London collective. He’s also one of the experts on the subject you’ll be meeting this month. So, does this go on a lot? “No!” he laughs, “Can you imagine the odds of it happening even once in London?” They’d be high for sure. But highs are something that can happen frequently with street photography. Not the unlikely thrill of selling a picture to the daughter of an anonymous subject, maybe, but certainly the rush of bagging a great candid portrait; of a well-planned composition coming to fruition; even the more visceral, adrenaline pumping surge of a confrontation with your subject. Street photography is, quite honestly, not for the faint of heart. It’s an urban safari, where you stalk the prey with your camera, never knowing quite what’s going to happen. “It is,” says Thomas Leuthard, a passionate street photographer and tutor, based in the heart of Switzerland, “challenging, authentic and always unpredictable. You need the skills of all genres of photography to survive the battle on the street, and you have to be decisive, because these moments never repeat themselves. It’s this uncertainty and finding extraordinary moments in ordinary life that make it so exhilarating.”

NICO GOODDEN

STREET SHOOTING

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LIGHTING ACADEMY

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24/04/2015 10:25


FLASH ON LOCATION

WORDS & PICTURES KINGSLEY SINGLETON

CONTROLLING LIGHT IN TIGHT SPOTS

SPONSORED BY

When working with small subjects and in tight spaces, you need lots of control over the spread of light. In this month’s Lighting Academy, we’ll look at some quick and simple ways to achieve it

When you’re creating a portrait with flash on location you’ll often be obliged to work in small spaces, far more restrictive than a studio, so controlling the light as finely as possible is really important. Small spaces – and the subjects within them – are a challenge to light without one source of illumination spilling into another, so if you want to have very precise control you need to work on ways of limiting the spread. In this month’s Lighting Academy, we’ll look at a few ways of combatting spill so that you can build up the lighting as desired. This is, of course, a very different challenge to lighting large areas, where you’d turn to spreading modifiers like brollies, large softboxes and hemispheres or use the flash naked. Here, it’s more about grids, snoots and honeycombs, which restrict and focus the light, but of course controlling the power and the angle of the flashes can also have a big effect. We ended up using four lights for the final shots here, and while that may seem excessive for a small space, you’ll actually find that, in tight conditions, it’s really sensible; several well-marshalled lights are much easier to work with than a couple of heads that are

trying to light multiple areas. With each fitted with a radio trigger, the lights are simple to fire and control, meaning you don’t need to move around much, which can be tricky in a small area where bits of kit are set up close to one another, or where furniture’s in the way. The width of a room This location was the front room of a small Victorian terraced house, so there was little space to work in. At about 14ft long by 8ft wide at best, it’s not as restrictive as some spots, but certainly not the kind of space you’d expect in

even a modest studio. Fortunately, the subject was small, too (although often imagines he’s bigger). The first challenge then was to get enough space between the background wall and the chair to be able to put a spotlight on the wall, all the while taking care not to move it too far into the room, which would make the composition a more difficult squeeze. About 4ft was okay for this, and a Lencarta Atom 180 was then set up to camera-right and angled onto the wall from behind the subject. Immediately, even at this close range, it was obvious that a modifier was needed to

SET-UP The picture on the left uses a key, fill, background and kicker light. This might seem a lot, but used at low power and restricted in their spread by a beauty dish, honeycombs and a snoot respectively, they’re much more controllable, allowing us to light different parts of the scene separately. Advanced Photographer is also available as a fully interactive magazine – go to iTunes now!

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PHOTO KIT SAMSUNG NX500

SPECS PRICE £599 with 16-50mm power zoom CONTACT samsung.com SENSOR 28 megapixels , CMOS, 6480x4320 pixels SENSOR FORMAT APS-C 23.5x15.7mm, 1.5x crop factor ISO RANGE 10025,600, expandable to 51,200, auto SHUTTER 30secs1/6000sec, B (limited to 8 mins), flash sync 1/200sec DRIVE MODES Single, continuous at 9fps METERING SYSTEM Multi-zone (221 segments), centreweighted, spot EXPOSURE MODES PASM , auto, custom COMPENSATION ±5EV in 0.3EV steps MONITOR 3in articulating, touchscreen Super AMOLED, 1036k dots FOCUSING Hybrid AF with active, single, continuous and manual focusing FOCUSING POINTS 205 phase-detect, 153 cross-type, 209 contrast-detect VIDEO 4096x2160 (24fps), in 4K angle of view is narrowed by 1.68x CONNECTIVITY USB 2.0, HDMI, wireless, Bluetooth STORAGE MEDIA SD, SDHC, SDXC DIMENSIONS 119.3x63.6x42.5mm WEIGHT 292g body only

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FULL TEST: SAMSUNG NX500 WORD & PICTURES WILL CHEUNG

This CSC has the highest resolution in its class. Priced at £599, it boasts an impressive 28-megapixels plus many more exciting features The Samsung NX1 was probably the camera launch of 2014. It’s a top-end CSC bristling with innovation and great features including AF sensitivity over 90% of the image area, 4K video, 15fps shooting and an APS-C sensor with the highest megapixel resolution currently available. Hot on its heels comes the NX500, and while this is a £599 camera and lens outfit so it is inevitably pared down, it shares many highlights of its £1300 body-only bigger brother. It is worth dwelling on the key points of difference and similarities. The two highlights in terms of feature sharing are the APS-C BSI sensor and AF system. This means the NX500 has an amazing 28.2-megapixel resolution, producing images packed with exquisite fine detail especially at the lower ISO speeds. Speaking of which, the ISO range extends up to 25,600 with the option of expansion to 51,200. High ISO performance is good thanks to the BSI (back

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side illumination) design. The NX1/500’s sensor uses the BSI design (the first APS-C sensor to do so) to maximise the amount of light reaching the sensor. Put simply, a BSI sensor is like an FSI (front side illumination) sensor turned upside down and the supporting substrate machined down so very thin that light can reach the light sensitive receivers without having to travel through circuitry to get there. The result is less digital noise. The NX500’s AF system features 205 phase-detect sensors with 153 cross-type and these cover over 90% of the image area so it’s very flexible if you like placing subjects at the extremes of the frame. AF sensitivity and responsiveness, as with the NX1, are impressively fast and accurate in good conditions but fall off as light levels drop. The builtin AF lamp comes into its own when it is darker, but it’s not something to use if you are trying to steal some candids down the pub.

@advancedphotog

Another feature common to both cameras is 4K video shooting. However, the NX500 crops 4K footage by a factor of 1.68x. As the NX500 is more than half the price of the NX1, there have significant differences. Pick up the two cameras and one difference is immediately apparent. The NX500 is much lighter for any number of reasons – the body weighs in at 292g against the 550g of the NX1. For a start, the NX500 is not as rugged. It lacks the environment seals of the NX1 to protect its innards in dusty or wet situations. There’s no EVF either – and no option to fit one. As we are all getting used to monitors, this might not be an issue but it will inevitably deter people who prefer shooting with the camera up to the eye. It’s a good thing, though, that the NX500’s monitor does provide a bright image. The monitor itself folds up to face forwards – handy for selfie shooting and low-level shooting too.

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24/04/2015 09:27


SAMSUNG NX500 PHOTO KIT

SAMSUNG NX500 ANATOMY FROM THE FRONT The NX500 features Samsung’s NX lens mount 1 . Samsung offers an extensive range of lenses that includes high spec primes as well as zooms. Third-party support is not so extensive right now although that is likely to change in time. The contoured handgrip 2 is deep enough for a good grip and the sloping fascia helps comfortable finger placement for a smooth shutter release 3 . The nearby placement of the AEL button 4 is excellent too. The AF auxiliary lamp 5 helps AF in the dark and it can be turned off if you want to be more discreet.

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2 FROM BEHIND The touch-sensitive screen 1 provides a bright image and it can be angled right up for easy selfie shooting. The rear control layout is good with buttons clearly marked. The scrolling control 2 is the camera’s second command dial. The function of this (and the command dial on the top-plate) can be altered using the Key Mapping function in the menu system. Press Fn 3 and a selection of key camera functions shows on the screen and can be quickly adjusted using the touchscreen – or with the control buttons if you prefer. Push OK 4 in selective focusing and you can move the focusing zone around using the fourway control or with the touchscreen, and vary its size.

FROM ABOVE Simplicity is very much the keyword here with minimal controls. The exposure mode dial 1 is firmly click-stopped and recessed enough to avoid unintentional use. The scrolling control 2 is marked as a zoom control during image review, but it’s also a command dial and its main function is adjusting aperture or shutter speed (depending on exposure mode) during capture. Push this 3 and you get various connectivity options on the LCD monitor. Perhaps not so relevant to experienced photographers but handy for social media fans.

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The NX500 control layout is clean and uncluttered which is typical for a camera aimed at less experienced camera users, but it ‘s detailed enough to suit those who want to get deeper into their photography. Quick access to features like ISO and drive control (via dedicated buttons or the Fn menu) is much appreciated. The same applies to the OK button that takes you directly into AF zone adjustment – the active zone can be moved using the four-way button cluster or by touching the screen whichever is quicker. The top-plate (far left) is clean and unfussy with the right-side dominated by the exposure mode dial. The black serrated command dial adjusts settings in capture mode and is a magnifier/zoom control during image playback.

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INSPIRED THE ELEMENTS

Wonderful weather Want to get shooting, but need a creative nudge? Then you’ve come to the right place. Every month we’ll bring you a different subject to inspire your next project, challenge your creativity and show how simple themes can be tackled in lots of exciting ways… Great weather for photography means very different things to different people. To some, it’s just a sunny day which presents a chance to get out shooting. To others, exactly the right combination of light and cloud is required to create the right view. But what if the weather becomes the subject itself, or is used in a way that makes the elements an undeniable part of the scene? In those cases, great weather can mean anything from braving high winds that whip the sea into a frenzy of movement, to shooting right in middle of a blizzard. That’s why, in this month’s Inspired gallery we’re celebrating the wonder of weather and illustrating exactly what it can bring to your pictures. Here you’ll find readers who got out there and grabbed something special in a range of conditions that would have many fleeing for the indoors. In these images, which have a very tangible sense of the elements, there’s a

feeling of ‘realness’ that’s often lost in calmer conditions and it creates the kind of drama that makes pictures memorable. So, for example, if you’re shooting landscapes, don’t just head out when the skies are clear; tattered and broken clouds can look amazing too, just as the energy of crashing waves in a seascape offers something different to the calming long exposures we’ve all grown used to. Thanks to the reflections in drenched city streets they can look far more appealing than the same views on dry days, and swathes of mist and fog can turn busy subjects into iconic shapes. Whatever the weather there’s a way of using it if you’re willing to make the effort. So, thanks to all the readers who did that and entered their pictures this month – and if you want to see your pictures displayed here, and maybe even win a prize for your efforts, you can find out how in the panel over the page.

ABOVE

RICHARD GUNN

You don’t have to capture the rain actually falling to generate a strong feeling of the elements in your shots; seeing its impact can be just as effective. In Richard’s picture of the flooding River Seine, taken by the Pont Royal Bridge, on Paris’s Left Bank, the banks of the river are inundated. The stairway leading down to the water and the submerged tree is a great lead-in and the eye is rewarded by the reflections dancing on its surface. Shooting at twilight under the street lamps helps this of course, but rather than using a slow shutter, ISO 12,800 was used to keep the shutter speed up and freeze the light in the ripples. FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/RICHARDGUNN

RIGHT

ABOVE

PAUL DUNMALL

In Paul’s shot, the crashing waves breaking over the harbour wall produce a picture that’s as brimming with texture as it is with the energy of the tumultuous sea. Shot during St Jude’s storm at Newhaven harbour, there was plenty of weather about, enough in fact to hide the lighthouse behind one of the waves here. Paul buried himself ankle deep in the stoney beach so as not to be blown over and shot for about 40 minutes in the cyclonic conditions, capturing the ferocity of the storm. Shooting on his Canon EOS 7D and 28105mm, he used an exposure of 1/5000sec at f/8, and ISO 250, the fast shutter speed being vital to catch the slightly back-lit spray. FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/PSD1/

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JAMES HOLDSWORTH

If you want a picture that says ‘blizzard’, you’ve found it. James’s snow-filled scene is striking, and was shot right in the middle of a snowstorm. It’s tough to compose with that much white, but he packed in some lovely delicate textures in the surface of the forming drifts, and shot low enough to make the crests seem almost overwhelming. There’s also a strong lead-in line in the shape of the soon-tobe buried fence which anchors the elements and gives a sense of their scale. Shot walking to Queensbury, Bradford he used a Panasonic Lumix G3 and Panasonic 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6, shooting at 1/640sec, f/8 and ISO 160. @advancedphotog

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THE ELEMENTS INSPIRED

SAMSUNG PRO SDXC CARD ABOVE

MARTIN RAK

WINNER

There’s nothing quite like a bit of juxtaposition to illustrate how puny mankind’s creations seem when confronted by nature’s own. This shot from Martin was taken in Prague in late March and clearly shows the enormity of the gathering storm, like a rolling mountain towering over the city. Shooting during sunset, the wind calmed down briefly and here he was able to capture the clouds boiling menacingly towards the Charles Bridge. Martin shot with his Canon EOS 5D Mark II and EF 16-35mm f/4L, using a long exposure of 8secs, which shows some movement in the clouds. This illustrates their aggressive pace, which is an interesting contrast to the calm, pastel colours of the sunset. MARTINRAK.CZ

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And finally…

www.advancedphotographer.co.uk www.twitter.com/AdvancedPhotog

Editor Will Cheung on his photographic month

EDITORIAL TEAM

I WENT TO THE PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW AT THE NEC IN MARCH WITH THE INTENTION OF TREATING MYSELF TO SOMETHING NICE. I had in mind a shiny, fast aperture lens but by the time I’d hmmed and ahhed, the one I wanted was sold out. Or rather the neat pile that had been sitting there temptingly in the glass showcase at the start of the show had vanished. In the end I spent £42 on a photo book. You know, one of those where you download a template software and you add your own pictures. Upload the whole lot and the next thing you know is a beautiful, professionally bound book with nice thick pages graced by your own images, lands on your doorstep. I made the investment because I had this, perhaps fanciful, notion of producing a tome of my favourite pictures from over four decades of photography. The book has 60 pages so there is not that much room to cram in potentially a great many pictures. Questions like how many pictures per page, colour or black & white and book format, square or landscape, all needed answering. There was also the vexed and fundamental question of what qualifies as a ‘favourite’ shot. It’s inevitable that over time you gain a good number of favourite images. They may qualify from a purely emotional perspective (it could be a shot of someone no longer around) or it might be because you triumphed over adversity to get that particular shot. Or it might just be a great memory shot from a trip of a lifetime. After a great deal of thought I have modified my approach and have decided to put in my best 50 pictures. ‘Best’, of course, is no more cut and dried than ‘favourite’ and it’s equally subjective but I thought it was an easier distinction to work with.

I made another decision early on, and that was to have one picture per page. Indeed I’m going even further and having one picture per spread, so every image has space to breathe and not compete with what’s opposite. I thought this was important because the book has no central theme and could feature colour and monochrome pictures. Giving each image space was important, I figured. So 60 pages equals 59 spreads so 59 pictures, but with a title page, credits and probably a few other things I haven’t thought of yet, I’ll probably need 50 pictures. It’s going to be a very exclusive collection indeed. Now all I have got to do is find my 50 best shots. Digital images I can easily shortlist just by going through my Lightroom catalogues so not too much effort there. My film archive is more difficult and is probably where the majority of my 50 is going to come from. Although I do have digital copies of thousands of my contact sheets, going through them is going to be a chore and then I have to find the relevant negative. I have a few negatives scanned but the odds are I’ll be doing plenty of scanning and retouching over the coming months. Basically it is going to be a fiddly, intensive process that is going to soak up lots of time. So over the coming summer months, it looks like I’ll be neck-deep in my archive when I should be out enjoying the sun. I have given myself a load of work which I hope ultimately will be thoroughly worthwhile. On the other hand, I could have saved a load of pain by buying a new lens.

Editor Will Cheung FRPS ☎ 01223 499469 willcheung@bright-publishing.com Features writer Megan Croft ☎ 01223 499466 megancroft@bright-publishing.com Contributing editor Kingsley Singleton kingsleysingleton@bright-publishing.com Sub editors Lisa Clatworthy & Catherine Brodie

CONTRIBUTORS THIS ISSUE Ian Fyfe, Thomas Leuthard, Nico Goodden, Darren Athersmith, Sean Batten, Mike Shiel, Mark George

ADVERTISING TEAM

Sales director Matt Snow ☎ 01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Mike Elliott ☎ 01223 499458 mikeelliott@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Krishan Parmar ☎ 01223 499462 krishanparmar@bright-publishing.com

DESIGN TEAM Design director Andy Jennings Design manager Alan Gray Ad production Lucy Woolcomb

WEB TEAM Flash developer Ashley Norton Web developer Will Woodgate

PUBLISHING TEAM Publishing director Andy Brogden Publishing director Matt Pluck Editorial director Roger Payne Head of circulation Chris Haslum

CONTRIBUTING TO ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER Advanced Photographer is always looking for photographic talent so if you feel your pictures are worthy of being featured in the magazine we would love to hear from you. In particular we want creative pictures showing the use of popular and innovative camera techniques. BY POST: Send us a CD with 12 images or fewer, together with a contact print of images, and a brief covering letter outlining your ideas and photographic credentials. In terms of file size, please ensure that the image is at least A4 size (21x29.7cm) and 300ppi resolution. If you prefer, up to 12 unmounted A4 prints can be submitted. Please enclose a stamped SAE if you want the CD/prints returned. Advanced Photographer, Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ. BY EMAIL: Please email us at info@advancedphotographer.co.uk. Attach no more than six low-resolution JPEGs (1000 pixels on the longest dimension) and a brief, 100-word email outlining your ideas and key photographic credentials. We will contact you for high-resolution files if your images are chosen for publication.

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When you have finished with this magazine, please recycle it Advanced Photographer is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Advanced Photographer is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Advanced Photographer that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. While Bright Publishing makes every effort to ensure accuracy, it can’t be guaranteed. Street pricing at the time of writing is quoted for products.

An old film image I am very fond of that brings back loads of great memories. But is it a ‘favourite’ or a ‘best’, that is the question.

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@advancedphotog

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27/04/2015 10:21

Profile for Bright Publishing

Advanced Photographer 57  

Get on the right track with our guide to street shooting and lighting tips for tight spots, plus the NX500 on test

Advanced Photographer 57  

Get on the right track with our guide to street shooting and lighting tips for tight spots, plus the NX500 on test