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FULL TEST

NIKON D610 Our verdict on the latest full-frame DSLR

TECHNIQUE

Shoot slow for impact Explore long exposures for stunning images

Head indoors and take your best-ever studio portraits GROUP TEST, PART 1

FULL TEST

70-300MM ZOOMS FUJIFILM X-E2 Three telezooms from Canon and Nikon battle it out

Time to ditch the DSLR? We test Fuji’s latest CSC

CAMERA REVIEW

CANON G16

A serious compact for serious photographers


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Welcome

WILL CHEUNG FRPS, EDITOR

Will has worked in photo mags for over 25 years and been taking pictures for even longer. His photographic interests are very broad, from nature to portraits.

You have to be quite focused (excuse the pun!) when it comes to photography at this time of year because life can get busy. If you can tear yourself away from the festive stuff, then you will have a great time because the light and the opportunities are there. Take our portfolios this month as an example. Russ Barnes’s scenic shots show what can be done with extreme long exposures, while Andrew Macdonald’s awesome fashion images embrace the total control available when shooting indoors. If their images fire you up, we have the technique advice to get you on the right track. In Photo Kit, we have an emphasis on cameras of all sorts. The Nikon D610 is our big test plus we have in-depth reviews of the Canon PowerShot G16, Fujifilm X-E2 and the Samsung Galaxy NX. The Canon and Fujifilm have an obvious appeal to the Advanced reader and perhaps the Samsung less so, but this is probably the camera that points towards the future the most with its connectivity potential and touch-screen control. Sharing and networking is big business. Have a wonderful Christmas and a great new year from all of us at Advanced Photographer. See you in 2014.

Will Cheung FRPS, Editor

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Contents

30

INSPIRE: Long exposures

44

CHALLENGE: Giotto’s tripods

The cover story... Andrew Macdonald’s cover image features model Shelly D’Inferno. “She is an accomplished clothes designer, stage performer and photographer as well as a model,” Andrew tells us. “It was a quite a straightforward shoot. Her being a performer made life very easy for me behind the camera. Shelly knew how to pose so it was just a case of minor adjustments to make sure of eye contact with the light and the lens.” Nikon D3, 24-70mm f/2.8, 1/160sec at f/9, ISO 200. Three light set-up: keylight, fill from the side and one on the background.

WWW.KILLERHEELSPHOTOGRAPHY.ORG

SEE PAGE 56 FOR DETAILS

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LIGHTING ACADEMY: Two heads

Inspiration, technique, opinion 6 UPFRONT Gadgets galore, fabulous firmware updates, compelling competitions to enter and news of the latest shows. 10 LIGHT UP MY LATEX: INSPIRE Self-styled fetish fashion photographer Andrew Macdonald sheds some light on his approach.

18 LIGHTING UP TIME: CAPTURE You’re inspired to

experiment with flash heads and you’ve splurged on some basic kit, but what now? You read editor Cheung’s advice to get started, that’s what.

24 TOP SPOT: MALHAM

It’s not just about the lone tree leaning over the magnificent limestone pavement (although that alone is worth the visit). There’s also the Cove, Janet’s Foss, Gordale Scar…

4 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 39

29 EXPOSED Sifting

through 40,000 images to choose the top ten is a hard task. It’s even harder when you’re judging your own work says editor Cheung.

30 TAKING THE LONG VIEW: INSPIRE When

Russ Barnes turns up at a location, he certainly takes the long view, specialising in shooting atmospheric, longexposure seascapes.

38 GO TO EXTREMES: CAPTURE For very long

exposures, you need several things, including a healthy dollop of patience and a lengthy shutter speed. You might also need our advice.

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Contents

24

58 FULL TEST: Nikon D610

TOP SPOT: Malham, Yorkshire

10

INSPIRE: Fetish fashion

76

COMPACT REVIEW: Canon G16

Photo Kit: the latest gear tested 44 TRIPOD CHALLENGE Take three Giotto’s tripods, add three seasoned readers and place in a photogenic location. Then leave for a day to see what develops.

48 LIGHTING ACADEMY

Proving that two heads really can be better than one, lighting guru John Denton demonstrates five different looks using two flash heads.

52 RAW MASTERCLASS Rescue the colours in your night-time shots with a little bit of help from Lightroom.

93 WIN A LENCARTA ATOM FLASHGUN Win this powerful portable flashgun worth £350.

114 NEXT ISSUE Outdoor

action, night shooting and the Nikon Df on test.

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58 NIKON D610

Barely 12 months after the launch of Nikon’s first budget full-frame, the D600, the D610 has arrived. Will it clean up?

68 SAMSUNG GALAXY NX Is it a phone? Is it a

camera? No, it’s a Galaxy NX – a SMART camera in a class all of its own.

72 FUJIFILM X-E2 It’s the first interchangeable lens camera to feature Fuji’s successful X-Trans CMOS II sensor. We wonder if that means fame and glory are assured for this wellspecified camera.

76 CANON POWERSHOT G16

Don’t be fooled by its diminutive sensor and mere 12 megapixels, this compact packs a powerful punch.

81 TELEZOOM LENSES

Lens tester extraordinaire Richard Hopkins gets to grips with three marque 70-300mm optics.

88 PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS 12 It’s 12 years

since Elements first graced our computer screens. Now version 12 graces all kinds of screens, but is it going to be your go-to image editing and managing software?

ISSUE 39 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER 5


INSPIRATION

Love the light

LIGHTS CAMERA REACTION Provocative, sexy, sassy, Andrew Macdonald’s fetish fashion photography is guaranteed to get a reaction. For this talented up-and-coming studio photographer, however, he says it’s all about how the light reacts with the latex… WORDS TIM McCANN PICTURES ANDREW MACDONALD

SHELLY D’INFERNO “With this black bob wig, Shelly struck me as a Christina Aguilera lookalike, and playing on that theme I kept making references about her music while directing the shoot. The lens flare was added in post-production, to obscure an ugly wall bracket. A dramatic single light on the right, enhanced with some Photoshop pop!” Nikon D3, 24-70mm, 1/160sec at f/9, ISO 200

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INSPIRATION

Love the light

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INSPIRATION

Long exposures

LUMIÈRE “A firm favourite of mine from northern France. It’s very much my favourite time of day, I just loved the combination of the early morning light with the reflections and suggestion of rippled sand in the foreground. ‘Sticks in the water’ are very much a cliché subject for long-exposure photography but I still love the overall mood in this frame.” Nikon D800,

Nikon 24mm f/3.5 PC-E, 120secs at f/11, ISO 200

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INSPIRATION

Long exposures

Taking it slow

Slow and steady wins the race, especially when your preferred genre is that of long-exposure seascapes. Russ Barnes’s atmospheric images are the result of a lifelong love for patient, practised picture-taking WORDS TIM McCANN PICTURES RUSS BARNES

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ChallengeChallenge

TRIPOD CHALLENGE Innovating something like a tripod is a challenge for any manufacturer, but it’s one Giotto’s has risen to time and time again. We let three readers loose with the latest Silk Road series models to see what they thought of them

The humble yet essential tripod is fundamentally a simple accessory. It’s nothing but a three-legged stand with a mount or platform to support the camera. Its role in life is simple enough too, ie. to keep the camera stable, although it’s fair to say that some do it better than others. Over the years tripods have been constantly refined and innovated and the latest models are lighter, more versatile and easier to use than ever before.

Giotto’s recently came up with its Silk Road series and the clever concept of a centre column with a Y-shaped cross section enabling a narrower profile for greater carrying convenience. This and the versatility of the 3D column are the key features we wanted our three readers, recruited from Welshot Photographic Academy, to try. Our location for the shoot was the Quinta Arboretum in Cheshire so plenty

of subjects that would test the flexibility of any tripod. As for challenging stability, there was a gusty, near gale-force wind that was certainly strong enough to give any tripod a run for its money. We tried three Giotto’s tripods. Two aluminium models, the Giotto’s YTL 9383 (£109.95) and Giotto’s YTL 9353 (£99.95), plus one carbon-fibre model, the Giotto’s YTL 8353 (£209). All three were fitted with the £74.95 MH1311 ball head.

MIKE CASTLE

GIOTTO’S SILK ROAD YTL 9383 “I am relatively new to photography and don’t regularly use a tripod. When I do use one, it is of the older, more traditional style with a basic head, so I was very pleased to have the opportunity to try the Giotto’s Silk Road YTL 9383, fitted with a ball head. “The tripod appeared to be well designed and solidly made. The thinner leg profile and soft grips on the top of the legs ensured it was comfortable to carry around, not at all bulky. Weight-wise I did not have any issues

IMAGES The good summer and mild autumn meant that even in early November there were plenty of leaves on the trees and lots of colour around. The wind was gusting at the start of the day and gradually grew more intense, making life tricky for photographers and tripods alike.

44 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 39

during the day; and would only be concerned if travelling by air somewhere, as it is quite heavy. The legs extended and locked into position very easily, and appeared to provide a sturdy platform for my Nikon D3 fitted with the 24-85mm Nikkor zoom lens. “The day was quite challenging due to the strong winds. Consequently some of my photographs did have movement in, but this was due to the subject moving and not camera shake. “The tripod felt sturdy throughout, and I was even able to try the three angle adjustment on the legs. Its versatility was further enhanced by the design of the central column, which allowed great flexibility with camera positioning. Low angle work was easy with the camera positioned near to the ground. “When I did want to hand-hold the camera, the quick release plate worked well but was also quick and easy to resecure. This was the first time I have used this type of ball head so it took me a few minutes to sort out all the various knobs and adjustments but then found it to be really comfortable to use. “In summary I found this tripod and ball head combination to be sturdy and very versatile. It was comfortable to carry around, and easy to operate once I became familiar with all the extra possible adjustments. If I had any reservations at all, it would be its weight for air travel and its minimum folded length. However I appreciate that it is always going to be necessary to compromise with size/weight/ flexibility/etc. so I found this tripod to be extremely good to use. At £200, considering the apparent high engineering quality, it seems reasonable value for regular use.”

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Challenge YVONNE CLOWES “For my test with the Giotto’s YTL 8353 I used an Olympus E5, Sigma 10-20mm wideangle lens, and a 35mm Olympus macro lens. “The Giotto’s YTL 8353 is compact and very easy to carry around, thanks to the thinner profile but also to the foam wrapped around the legs. I found it really easy to carry either folded down or extended, which meant I didn’t have to worry about collapsing it down when I was moving around. It was very windy at times, but the tripod held really steady and although lightweight I didn’t feel it was going to blow over at all. “The 3D column was quick and easy to manipulate into the positions I needed to get into to get my shots. I needed to get up close to a plant buried in the crevice of a tree stump, which had other stumps around it; I was able to get the legs splayed and where I wanted them and the adjustable 3D centre column let me get very close. It was also very stable. “The legs locked positively and were easy to let up and down. The whole tripod was very smooth and easy to use. “The only issue was that, although lovely to carry, the legs opened up while I was carrying it – the legs on my sample needed tightening, but this was easily sorted. “As an amateur I feel the price is a little hefty. Having said that if I were looking to pay out for a carbon fibre tripod, this is one I would consider.”

MIKE CASTLE

MIKE CASTLE

YVONNE CLOWES

GIOTTO’S YTL 8353

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ISSUE 39 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER 45


LIGHTING A C A D E M Y

1


Part 39

LIGHTING A C A D E M Y

One lighting unit is good and very versatile, but there’s no doubt that two heads are better than one. They offer many more creative avenues for you to explore WORDS & PICTURES JOHN DENTON

Last issue, we explored the world of one flash and how we could use a single light to give a range of looks to our model. Whilst I am a strong believer in keeping my lighting simple, there are occasions when one light just won’t cut it. Perhaps you’re shooting a dark-haired subject against a dark background. Of course you want them to be beautifully lit, but you also need to separate them from that dark void behind them. A second light is the key to that process and can provide edge or lighten the background. 1 In the main image here we see Della being lit from above with a beauty dish. The beauty dish is a wonderful tool for giving great light to the face but also carving into the features of your subject. See how it picks out the highlights on the face but also produces shadow down the cheekbones. Because the beauty dish was positioned to camera right and angled across Della’s body we are producing shadows to camera left. That needs a little lift to stop the eye just coming to a jarring halt at that side of the frame as her torso drifts into blackness. The answer is the second light. In this case fitted with a 135x50cm stripbox to camera left. The power on this was turned way down compared with the main light to give just a kiss of detail on Della’s arm, hair and cheek. Notice the way it just spills

LEFT & ABOVE The beauty dish gives a lovely effect that can be modified further with a honeycomb or 'shower cap'. Nikon D300, 70-200mm at 86mm, 1/200sec at f/18, ISO 200.

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IMAGES RIGHT A light fitted with a softbox can be turned to face the camera for a quick, easy white backdrop. Nikon D300, 70200mm at 125mm, 1/200sec at f/14, ISO 200.

under her chin to give a little emphasis but not distract. Positioning this light is crucial to the image. Had it been placed too far forward we would have had light spilling onto her cheek and effectively challenging the main light in describing her features. Too far back and it would have lit the background rather than her. Placed almost opposite the key light and feathered slightly towards the camera it put that sliver of light just where required. This is why I enjoy using the Elinchrom Quadra Rangers, or any flash unit with a modelling lamp. A modelling lamp allows me to see the angle the light is hitting the subject at and know exactly where the light will render in the final image. This picture was taken with a white wall in the background, but with no light spilling onto it and around ten feet separating Della from the wall, it rendered pure black in the image. 2 Black backgrounds have a very classical look whereas a pure white background has a more contemporary feel. There are many ways to achieve a white background. You can light the background itself, or, as we did in this instance, use a large softbox behind Della to provide the white ‘wall’. The angle of this softbox is key to the image. If it is flat and pointing straight into the camera then it will create a great degree of flare; that milky softness that can detract from the

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Black backgrounds have a very classical look whereas a pure white background has a more contemporary feel ISSUE 39 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER 49


Photo Kit NIKON D610

Nikon D610

The D610 is remarkably similar to the first version of Nikon’s affordable full-frame model and draws a line under the dust problems of the D600. But is that all there is to it?

WORDS & PICTURES IAN FYFE

KEY FEATURES £1549 BODY ONLY 24.3-MEGAPIXEL FX SENSOR 6 FRAMES-PER-SECOND QUIET CONTINUOUS SHOOTING WWW.NIKON.CO.UK

DUAL SD SLOTS You can have two SD cards in the D610 at any time, and you have a choice about the roles they play. The second can be a backup that records exactly what’s written to the first, or it can be an overflow to double your storage space. Alternatively, if you’re shooting Raw and JPEG, you can record Raws to one card, JPEGs to the other.

58 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 39

WI-FI COMPATIBILITY The D610 doesn’t have Wi-Fi built in, but it is compatible with the WU-1b adaptor. This allows you to connect your camera to a smartphone or tablet so that you can release the shutter remotely and transfer images to your mobile device for uploading online.

FLASH CONTROL The D610 includes a pop-up flash, something that’s missing from its main competitor, the Canon EOS 6D. Besides providing on-camera flash in a variety of modes, this can also be used in commander mode to control remote flash units in one or more groups, either in i-TTL, auto aperture or manual modes.

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Photo Kit NIKON D610

You could say that Nikon’s recent foray into affordable full-frame cameras has had a speckled history. Just a few weeks after the September 2012 launch of the D600, there was talk of problematic sensor dust plaguing the corners of its images. The talk was backed up by evidence and the problem eventually acknowledged by Nikon, but it was never really explained. Fast-forward just over a year, and here we are with the D610, a replacement that’s almost identical. Given this context, the D610 is a camera that, were it not for the D600 dust issue, may never have appeared in this form. Its only real difference from its predecessor is a redesigned shutter mechanism – given that the shutter was generally considered the most likely source of the D600 debris, starting from scratch seems like a good way to fix it. Of course, I’m reading between the lines here and Nikon has said nothing of how or why the D610 came about – a quiet and understated launch for a new full-frame camera perhaps speaks for itself though. At this stage, it’s also worth introducing some context of the full-frame world. When the D600 was launched, it was the first of its kind – a full-frame sensor in a relatively small and lightweight body at an affordable price. It was followed within a matter of days by the Canon EOS 6D, which offers essentially the same thing, and now the D610 enters the full-frame market that’s changed further. Sony has recently launched potentially gamechanging mirrorless full-frame cameras with the A7 and A7R, which are the smallest and lightest full-frame options around. Nikon itself has also brought out the Df, which is admittedly a lot more expensive, but includes D4 technology and beats the D610 when it comes to weight and portability. So making the decision to go full-frame is not such a straightforward matter of price and manufacturer as it was when the D600 first appeared. If you followed the D600 saga, or were perhaps put off by the problems, your first question about the D610 will be whether the dust problem has been resolved. Well, after just over 2000 shots with our sample, there were some small dust spots, but that’s not hugely surprising given that we swapped lenses many times, exposing the mirror box. There wasn’t so much obvious grime concentrated in one corner of the frame, which seemed to be the problem with the D600, so the new shutter mechanism seems to be doing what it was designed to do. But less dust isn’t the only benefit that the new shutter mechanism brings. It also pushes the camera’s top continuous shooting speed up from 5.5 to 6 framesper-second, a little faster than the D600.

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ANATOMY OF...

Nikon D610 FROM THE TOP The mode dial 1 is on the left shoulder and has a central lock to prevent accidental movement. Underneath this is another collar for setting the drive mode – this includes the new quiet continuous mode, and it also locks. This leaves space on the right for the top LCD 2 that offers a comprehensive display of settings. Within reach of your shutter finger is direct access to light measuring method 3 , exposure compensation 4 and movie recording 5 . In front of the hotshoe is a pop-up flash 6 that can double up as a command unit for off-camera flash.

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FROM THE FRONT Nikon says that the handgrip 1 on the D610 is ‘longer and deeper’, although big hands might find it a bit small. Tucked between the grip and the lens is a depthof-field preview button near the top 2 and a function button 3 at the bottom that can be assigned to one of 22 functions – by default, it switches between FX and DX format shooting. On the other side of the lens positioned for your left thumb is the focus control 4 – a rocking switch allows you to change between AF and MF, while a central button lets you change the AF mode. Further up is the bracketing button 5 for setting up quick exposure sets.

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FROM THE BACK Several of the buttons to the left of the LCD screen 1 have dual functions and include direct access to ISO, white-balance and image quality. The viewfinder 2 provides a 100 per cent field of view at a magnification of 0.7x. The LCD screen 3 is 3.2in and a protective cover comes in the box. The multi-selector 4 can be used to position the AF point, with a locking ring around it to prevent unintended changes. Live View is activated with the button below 5 , and in this mode you can select movie or stills shooting with the lever that surrounds the button. To the right of the handgrip are dual SD card slots 6 .

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AT-A-GLANCE SPECS PRICE £1549 body only CONTACT www.nikon.co.uk SENSOR 24.3 megapixels with EXPEED 3 processor IMAGE DIMENSIONS 6016x4016 pixels (FX) ISO RANGE 100-6400, 50-25,600 expanded AUTOFOCUS MODES Auto, single-servo, continuous servo, auto selection, predictive focus tracking, manual EXPOSURE COMPENSATION +/-5EV in 0.3EV

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or 0.5EV steps, AEB 2-3 frames +/-3EV, in 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1, 2 or 3EV steps SHUTTER 30secs-1/4000sec, flash 1/250sec METERING PATTERNS Matrix, centreweighted, average, spot SHOOTING SPEEDS Single, continuous L 1-5fps, continuous H 6fps, self-timer 2-20secs, quiet single, quiet continuous LCD SCREEN 3.2in with 921k dots STORAGE MEDIA SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I) DIMENSIONS (WXHXD) 141x113x82mm WEIGHT 850g inc battery and memory card

ISSUE 39 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER 59


Photo Kit FUJIFILM X-E2

Fujifilm X-E2

Fujifilm has hit a rich seam of success with its X-Trans CMOS sensor, now in its II guise, and we’ve already seen it on a couple of its compact cameras. Here’s the X-E2 – the first interchangeable lens camera to feature it

WORDS & PICTURES WILL CHEUNG

KEY FEATURES £1199 WITH 18-55MM LENS 16.3 MEGAPIXELS APS-C X-TRANS CMOS II SENSOR 7FPS TOP SPEED WI-FI CONNECTIVITY ADVANCED AF SYSTEM 3IN MONITOR WWW.FUJIFILM.CO.UK

Fujifilm’s first X-series camera, the X-Pro1, came out at the beginning of 2012 and you could forgive Fujifilm for resting on its laurels and taking time out to bask in the success of its innovative and radical move. The contrary has been the case and Fujifilm has brought out several X-series cameras in quite rapid succession, all housing the impressive X-Trans sensor, as well as more lenses. The X-E2 is the latest model and the follow-up to the X-E1, which itself was announced in late 2012. Fujifilm is moving things along very quickly indeed. The X-E1 is currently available for £890 with the 18-55mm standard zoom lens, or £600 body only. If you fancy the X-E2 you will need an extra £310 with the body and standard zoom lens combination selling at £1199. Given the fact that

72 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 39

the X-E1 is a fine camera and still in the shops, the question is whether it is worth forking out the extra cash for the X-E2. The X-E2 has many changes but whether you consider them significant improvements is up to you. The key change is the X-E2’s 16-megapixel resolution with the latest X-Trans CMOS sensor, now in its II version, that incorporates phase detection pixels and coupled with the EXR Processor II gives very fast autofocus. There’s also a 3in 1.04K dot resolution monitor, 7fps continuous shooting, creative filters, and a reconfigured control layout, such as individual exposure and focus locks. A feature called the Lens Modulation Optimizer also makes an appearance and this is to give the best possible JPEGs when shooting at small apertures. If

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Photo Kit FUJIFILM X-E2

you have an X-E1, update the camera’s firmware and you get this too. Cosmetically – the bigger screen apart – you do have to look hard to spot the changes, and some are worthwhile. For example, I must admit I’ve always struggled to understand why manufacturers have AEL and AFL combined on a single button. Having them separate, or at least the ability to separate them via a menu option, is one of the first things I look for. The fact that the X-E2 has them separately is good, but should you want to engage both at the same time it’s not possible because both are located for right thumb use. The way round this little conundrum is to have both controls as on/off switches. Thus if you want AEL push it once, its operation is confirmed in the viewfinder, and then you can use AFL as well, its operation being confirmed by the focus window frame staying green. One criticism I’ve had of all the X-series cameras is the exposure compensation dial – again this is designed for right-thumb operation. It is too easy to adjust it unintentionally when you pull the camera from a bag or pocket. The X-E2 is the same as its relations in this respect. To be fair it is handy when you want to use compensation quickly when the camera is raised up to the eye but there remains the risk of messing up a grab shot when you haven’t spotted that -3EV has been set accidentally. Fujifilm could take a leaf out of Olympus’s book. The OM-D E-M1 has an exposure mode dial that can be left to change quickly or locked in position. All you do is push in a spring-loaded button at its centre to choose the way you want the dial to work. The camera offers an impressive number of customisable options and there are no fewer than four buttons you can use to select key functions – AE, AF and the two actual function buttons. Features that you can dedicate to one of these four buttons include ISO, self-timer, image size, dynamic range, Advanced fwilters and film simulation modes. Accessing and adjusting a selection of key features can be done via the Q button and four-way control and then using the press in and rotate thumbwheel next to it. It’s really good to use once you get used to the thumbwheel. The X-E2’s handling is generally excellent and so too is exposure and focusing performance. I prefer using single-area AF with the default position being the centre position but moving the sensor around is quick to do. AF itself is swift and responsive most of the time and the X-E2 seems to be superior to other X models even with the latest firmware. That said, the X-E2 is still slower than the very best DSLRs in this respect.

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ANATOMY OF...

Fujifilm X-E2 FROM THE TOP A throwback to a bygone age is the shutter release 1 which is threaded for a cable release. The shutter speed dial 2 is good to use – have it set to A and the lens to A and you get program mode. With the lens set to the iris symbol you have aperturepriority AE. The exposure compensation dial 3 is firmly click-stopped and now with a range of +/-3 EV but it can still be moved unintentionally. The Fn button 4 can be set to one of 18 features – one of which is WiFi, hence the words under the button.

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FROM THE FRONT This is the focus control 1 with the option of single shot, continuous and manual focusing – nothing new there. In manual you have the menu option of setting standard, Digital Split Image or Focus Peak Highlight to aid accurate focusing. This white LED 2 blinks during self-timer countdown and also comes into play as an AF illuminator when the lighting is low. This can be turned off if you prefer. Press the lens release button 3 and twist the lens anticlockwise and it comes off.

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FROM THE BACK The AEL and AFL features are now on separate buttons 1 which will suit more people and they can be set to on/off function so you don’t have to keep them pushed down. The Q button 2 has been moved off the thumbgrip position of the X-E1 so it’s less likely to be accidently used. The 3in monitor 3 is lovely and gives a bright image – it’s not articulating though. The AE 4 and Fn2 5 can both be customised to your personal preferences. Raise the camera up to your eye and the sensor 6 detects this and switches from the monitor view to the electronic viewfinder.

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5

AT-A-GLANCE SPECS STREET PRICE £1199 with 18-55mm zoom, £900 body only CONTACT www.fujifilm.co.uk SENSOR 16.3 megapixels, 23.6x15.6mm, CMOS X-Trans II IMAGE DIMENSIONS 4896x3264 pixels STORAGE SD, SDHC, SDXC METERING PATTERNS Multi-zone, average and spot EXP COMPENSATION +/-3EV in 0.3EV steps

ISO RANGE 200-6400 in Raw and JPEG , expansion ISO 100, 12,800 and 25,600 JPEG quality only AUTOFOCUS Single, continuous AF, face detection, selective single point, multi area and more SHUTTER SPEEDS 30secs to 1/4000sec plus B (bulb) SHOOTING SPEEDS Single, continuous at 7fps, 3fps with continuous focusing DIMENSIONS (WXHXD) 129x75x37mm WEIGHT 350g body only

ISSUE 39 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER 73


Advanced PHOTOGRAPHER

www.advancedphotographer.co.uk www.twitter.com/AdvancedPhotog

EDITORIAL TEAM Editor Will Cheung FRPS ☎ 01223 499466 willcheung@bright-publishing.com Technical writer Ian Fyfe ☎ 01223 499456 ianfyfe@bright-publishing.com Sub editors Lisa Clatworthy, Hannah Bealey, Siobhan Godwood

ISSUE

40

SHOOT DIRTY Try action with a difference

NIGHT MOVES Creative techniques for your best ever night shots PLUS

RAW MASTERCLASS LIGHTING ACADEMY TOP SPOT PHOTO KIT: NIKON Df FULL TEST SONY A7 AND A7R REVIEW 70-300MM ZOOMS: PART 2 ISSUE 40 ON SALE 16 JANUARY 114 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER ISSUE 39

© JOHN POWELL

CONTRIBUTORS THIS ISSUE Richard Hopkins, Tim McCann, Andrew Macdonald, Russ Barnes, Andrew Williams, John Denton ADVERTISING TEAM Business development director Dave Stone ☎ 01223 499462 davestone@bright-publishing.com Sales director Matt Snow ☎ 01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.com Keyaccounts Maria Francis ☎ 01223 499457 mariafrancis@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Mike Elliott ☎ 01223 499458 mikeelliott@bright-publishing.com DESIGN TEAM Design director Andy Jennings Design director Dean Usher Senior designer Alan Gray Design & production manager Grant Gillard WEB TEAM Flash developer Ashley Norton Web developer Mike Grundel PUBLISHING TEAM Publishing director Andy Brogden Publishing director Matt Pluck Editorial director Roger Payne Head of crculation Chris Haslum CONTRIBUTING TO ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHER Advanced Photographer is always looking for photographic talent so if you feel your pictures are worthy of being featured on the magazine we would love to hear from you. In particular we want creative pictures showing the use of popular and innovative camera techniques. BY POST: Send us a CD with 12 images or fewer, together with a contact print of images, and a brief covering letter outlining your ideas and photographic credentials. In terms of file size, please ensure that the image is at least A4-size (21x29.7cm) and 300ppi resolution. If you prefer, up to 12 unmounted A4 prints can be submitted. Please enclose a stamped SAE if you want the CD/prints returned. ☎ Advanced Photographer, Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ. BY EMAIL: Please email us at info@advancedphotographer. co.uk. Attach no more than six low-resolution JPEGs (1000pixels on the longest dimension) and a brief, 100-word email outlining your ideas and key photographic credentials. We will contact you for high-resolution files if your images are chosen for publication.

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUES Subscribe online: www.advancedphotographer.co.uk Email: subs@advancedphotographer.co.uk Subscription hotline: 01371 851877 NEWS-STAND DISTRIBUTION COMAG, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 7QE ☎ 01895 433600

When you have finished with this magazine, please recycle it Advanced Photographer is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photo Professional is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Advanced Photographer that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

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Advanced Photographer 39  

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