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New company pushing for marijuana operation in Brighton industrial park SARAH HYATT sarah.hyatt24@gmail.com

Brighton — Representatives proposing a local-based marijuana operation say they will not just cash in and move on. “The best way I can describe it, this is a Phase 1 pharmaceutical production business, so there are greenhouses involved,” said Graham Healer, a realtor representing Gnome Works Greenhouses Inc. prior to introducing the principal partners of the development at a recent council meeting. “The [proposed] total building is 57,000 square feet, which will be built in two phases.” Healer, alongside the principal partners for the development recently appeared before council and spoke to the proposal to purchase land and set up shop in the industrial park. In documentation provided by the proponents to the municipality, it states Gnome Works Greenhouses Inc. will service a few clients that operate within the cannabis industry, which include, but are not limited to: small to mid-sized pharmaceutical firms, retail stores, extraction specialists and companies that produce consumables, such as beverages and edibles. “There’s one lot you have in the business park that’s large enough to fit this building, so it’s quite unique,” said Healer during his introductory

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statement. “Again, it’s two phases, so there’s a warehouse production facility and greenhouse on one side. Phase 2, which would be built within two-to-three years of Phase 1 being complete, is the same thing again … more production and more greenhouse.” This latest presentation is the second for Brighton within a month’s time regarding a proposed marijuana operation. Back on Jan. 15, council and the public heard a new startup company would like to establish a medical marijuana facility on Highway 30, just north of the 401. This proposal is also for a 50,000-square-foot facility, but the proponents already own the land. At that time, it was made public that another company was interested in land in the industrial park, also for a marijuana production. As council was set to discuss the offer during an in camera session that night, as well as other real-estate terms for the park, no other details were available. Representatives have since come forward regarding the industrial park proposal, looking to share their vision John Campbell/Metroland for the land publicly. This operation would grow the product, package it and send it off to a Phase 2 producer to be used in the Scott Hamilton said his company’s proposed marijuana production fapharmaceutical industry, said Healer. cility will employ 15 people initially but 50 after it expands. For com-

Plans for marijuana facility in Cramahe

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Council members, residents don't have high hopes for marijuana production facility in Cramahe JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Cramahe Township — A Belleville company plans to establish a medical marijuana production facility on Lakeport Road, and despite its claim that up to 50 jobs will ultimately be created, a few members of council and the community voiced their reservations about the proposal. Sharpshooter Industries Inc. has entered into an agreement to purchase the four-acre property from its owner and obtained approval from Health Canada to operate the facility, subject to receiving a licence to cultivate after an existing building that is to be retrofitted passes an inspection. Council provided a resolution in support of the proposal at its Feb. 6 meeting on the recommendation of its planning co-ordinator, Himanshu Katyal, who noted in a report that the property's general industrial zoning permits a facility of this kind to locate there.

However, when asked later in the evening for comment on Sharpshooter's plans, some members of council raised concerns, which were added to by residents during the public question period. “I'm not in favour of it,” Mayor Marc Coombs admitted, based on his “personal feeling. I don't agree with it” — marijuana being used for recreational purposes, which federal law will allow starting in July. But there's “not much” the township can do “other than to just make sure that we look after the zoning properly,” he said. “What we've had happen is that a lot of vacant buildings” have been turned into marijuana production facilities which neighbours aren't thrilled to have next door “because there's still always that criminal element. Even if the people who operate are fine” there are others who will try to break in, “so it creates a lot of issues,” Coombs said. “The OPP are very concerned about this because there is that element and we've had issues with peo-

ple coming in that are armed trying to steal drugs from these facilities and that's a real concern.” Coun. Ed Van Egmond cited “the cost of maintaining peace,” saying there have been “police operations going on in Cramahe Township now for the last three years.” The number of sites in Cramahe where medical marijuana is being grown legally is not known. It wasn't until Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations came into effect more than a year ago that prospective producers were required to notify local authorities. Coun. Tim Gilligan said the federal law legalizing the production and sale of recreational marijuana has been “poorly rolled out. It's horrible ... There's nothing done to protect anybody else other than the federal government trying to get tax dollars. They're not looking after communities whatsoever. They're not looking after children, they're not looking after anybody, other than their pockets.” Coombs said the Association of

Municipalities of Ontario has been “lobbying hard” for additional government funding to cover increased costs for policing and other services that will result from recreational marijuana use being made legal. “It's a major issue,” he said, because those costs are “going to be born” by municipalities. Coun. Don Clark cited problems with licensing which he said will need to be “more restrictive” to guard against overproduction and to ensure better monitoring. “It's definitely in the government's best interest to make sure that it works properly.” “I don't want it in my backyard,” Cramahe resident Ken Awender told council. He said a better location would be Colborne's industrial park, citing concerns about hazardous chemicals, smells emanating from the site, and “barb wire fences with spotlights.” Katyal said Sharpshooter will be required to amend the property's current site plan agreement to update the new use which will give the

township some say. A municipality can only regulate the land use, “not the operation” which the federal government regulates, including security provisions, he said. Gritt Koehl also talked about security fencing and lighting disrupting the neighbourhood. “Putting a medical marijuana facility down in that area in Lakeport just seems so wrong, it's such a pretty little area,” she said.

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Marijuana production facility will be mindful of residents' concerns JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Cramahe Township — The company planning to establish a marijuana production facility on Lakeport Road will be “sympathetic” to the concerns of local residents. “If they're complaining, we're going to be on it,” Scott Hamilton, the president of Sharpshooter Industries Inc., said in an interview. “That's the last thing we want ... the people around the area to be complaining about us being there. “We want to keep it just as tranquil as it is now,” he said. “We think that's a beautiful area out there.” Council members and residents voiced concerns when Sharpshooter asked for and obtained a letter of support from council Feb. 6 saying the proposed venture was in compliance with the land's zoning. Fears about the facility becoming a target for thieves, smells wafting offsite, and the impact on local property values were among the issues raised. “I'm sure we're going to be tested, it's just a matter of time before the criminal element finds out where it is,” Hamilton said, but “our security is top-notch and was designed by professionals” to meet guidelines set by Health Canada. The security system costs “about $2.5

GNOME From front page

In other words, there would be no sale of product locally. Anton Cobzev and Shawn Pahwa are two of the partners for the project. (A third partner could not attend the recent meeting). The duo didn’t plan to get into cannabis production, council and residents recently heard. Pahwa started out in the culinary arts and later earned his bachelor of commerce. Cobzev pursued police foundations and later criminology, also earning a bachelor’s degree. After graduating, Cobzev took an interest in computer systems and “drawing from his mechanical experience, began designing new agriculture technologies aimed at providing a more sustainable means of production,” as stated online via the duo’s website for their Mise En Place catering company. The duo got started down the path of canna-

million, that's a lot of money.” Hamilton said he intends to invite the heads of police and fire on a tour of the facility once it's up and running, and the company already has someone on staff who will deal with complaints from the community. Residents in the area will be given contact information so if there are any concerns or questions, they can get in touch with the community liaison officer. “Give us a call, we'll fix it,” Hamilton said. “We're not going in there to offend anybody ... (or) screw up anybody's way of life, or anything like that. If they just treat us like a normal business we'll be fine.” The Lakeport Road property with its building was chosen because it was “really the only one that fit the bill” when the company conducted its search for a site, he said. “There's some extensive work we have to do in there. We're going to be using all the local trades as well so they're going to be benefiting. It will put about $4 million, $5 million into the economy just for our build.” Hamilton said his company will employ 15 people initially, but that number will jump to 50 once its expansion is completed within three years, with construction of a second building. “We have to see how things go before we can do that,” he said.

“I'd like to see our first load go out in September, that would be ideal, with the setup and all the inspections that we still have to go through with Health Canada,” said Hamilton, a family man whose background includes eight years in the military and 20 years operating his own computer business in Trenton, where he resides. Sharpshooter was formed in 2015 to begin what has been “a long process” to obtain a licence, Hamilton said. It's “extensive (and) they really put you through the wringer.” The company will be licensed to cultivate and process cannabis. “It's all medicinal right now,” Hamilton said, “but we're gearing up for the recreational,” when product for that use becomes legal in the summer. Gregory Parker, the solicitor for Sharpshooter, said in a letter to the township's planning co-ordinator that the new venture “will bring significant tax dollars, employment and notoriety to the Township of Cramahe.” However, when questioned by Deputy Mayor Sandra Arthur, Parker said the “economic impact” of the jobs created will be “in the township's benefit” but he admitted touting higher tax revenue “may have been an inaccuracy. There's not going to be much more tax dollars than would be in any industrial operation.”

bis production after deciding to open a business and following the development of their own, “sustainable, highly efficient irrigation system, used to grow produce and herbs in-house.” At first, they were growing on a small scale in a greenhouse for the catering company. Friends and family were almost always asking half-jokingly, whether the pair was growing marijuana or planning to, said Cobzev. And while they weren’t and weren’t planning on it, eventually the pair started to bounce around the idea and realized their system “works with cannabis, really, really well.” That led the two to eventually partner with patients and they went through the motions to get proper licensing and to grow those patients’ plants on their behalf. The first trial runs went exceptionally well and the duo got excited about their new work, said Pahwa. Their interests, they say, remain learning

more about new technologies and growing methods for farming and agriculture. Pahwa is “very passionate” about all plants. “We’re not looking to just develop this company, cash in and move on, we really want to develop our careers here, we want to grow and perhaps become part of the community,” said Pahwa.

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Product will “speak for itself”: Hamilton With proposals for marijuana production facilities cropping up throughout Northumberland County, Scott Hamilton said he's “not too worried” about the competition. “The product will speak for itself,” he said, adding: “We have some intellectual property that will be ... revolutionary in the industry. “Several master growers sampled the product, they all think it's outstanding.” Hamilton said “marijuana has got a pretty rough ride in the last 30, 40 years,” even though “smoking a joint is no different” from having “a couple of beers after work.” “There's nothing addictive about marijuana,” he said. “The government is finally waking up to that fact to say that it's really not that harmful a drug,” and it has a wide array of medical benefits. “However, anything you inhale is going to be dangerous (as a carcinogen), it doesn't matter if you're vaping,” he added. “That's the risk you take in smoking it. It's just like cigarettes (and) alcohol. It's just weighing the dangers against the benefits.” Those risks are reduced by consuming marijuana in edible form, such as a brownie.

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EDITORIAL

Connected to your community

COMMENTARY A note of caution about welcome movement The #MeToo movement is reshaping society and the change is long overdue. A new ethos is being created that encourages women to stand up to those who behave abominably, exploiting positions of influence and authority. No longer are the victims of abuse – physical, sexual, emotional, verbal – to be cowed into submission and silence, fearing their avowals of misconduct will not be believed or that the system will fail them. In the past year the movement has let loose a tide of allegations that has swept out of offices and boardrooms individuals who allegedly preyed on females. In Ontario, accusations of sexual misconduct cost Patrick Brown leadership of the Progressive Conservative Party. He denied he did anything wrong but resigned for the good of the party and to mount a defence to prove his innocence. TVO host Steven Paikin has been accused of sexual harassment by a former Toronto mayoral Submitted photo candidate. He's also fighting back, saying the A donation of $500 was presented to Trenton Memorial Hospital Foundation, for equip- allegation is pure fiction, while continuing to ment purchases from Community - York Road Women’s Institute, on Wednesday, Jan.17. host The Agenda. His employer has hired an Here, Shirley Young (left) and Kathy Teng (right) present the cheque to Wendy Warner. independent third party to investigate.

In both cases the alleged incidents occurred several years ago and are only coming to light presumably because a new climate exists that's receptive to women coming forward with tales of mistreatment. Women who are victims now know they need not remain silent. They will be listened to. But this new and welcome willingness by society to hear what they have to say and to support remedies for the injustices they have suffered comes with a caution: Women must also realize, in the absence of criminal proceedings, just how difficult it is for the court of public opinion to determine guilt and innocence. Assertions of fact cannot be accepted reflexively as an accurate rendering of the truth, although substantive weight must be given to allegations in cases where there are multiple women independently providing detailed accounts of their experiences. The court of public opinion is being asked to take on a greater role to keep conduct in check. What it needs to do now, and quickly, is determine what are the 'rules' it will apply to ensure both accuser and accused are given a fair hearing.

Aprons played a number of important roles for mother Even though I had long since changed out of my school clothes, and what I had on was called play clothes, mother noticed right away that I had forgotten to put on my pinny. It was always my job to set the supper table, and for the life of me I couldn’t imagine why I would have to wear a pinny when I was handling clean dishes. But that was the rule. Any house chores were done only when you had donned your pinny. All mother had to do was say “Mary” and point to the nail behind the kitchen door. We had aprons, or a pinny, for every occasion. Ones made out of flour bags were enormous. When I had to wear one of those when I was churning the cream to make butter, it came from my neck and draped around my feet on the floor. That was so that the splatters of cream didn’t land on whatever clothes I was wearing. These flour bag aprons were well used. mother wore them to do heavy house chores and when she baked, and they covered her from her

250 Sidney Street Belleville, ON K8P 3Z3 Phone: 613-966-2034 Fax: 613-966-8747

Mary Cook’s Memories MARY COOK

neck to her knees. My sister Audrey wore one too when she was doing her Saturday house chores. And there was always a goodly supply hanging on the nail beside the back door. A full apron was what mother put on when it was time for all of us to sit down to a meal. Off came the big white pinny and on went the print apron. Often it was the same material that had been used for one of mother’s Dan River house dresses. They were bound all around the outside edges with colourful tape, and had a pocket for mother’s hanky. Always there was one

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hanging at the back door too. Washed and ironed and at the ready. This was so that if mother heard someone drive in the lane, and she was caught wearing the big white flour bag pinny, she would swiftly take it off and grab the clean one at the back door before welcoming anyone into the house. Heaven forbid that she would be caught wearing a pinny with a spot on it, especially if it was one of the big flour bag creations. My favourite apron was the little half apron; the one that just came from your waist to your knees and tied at the back. They almost always had a frill around them, and certainly there would be a little pocket. If mother had any rickrack braid left over from something she had made, it would be used to fancy up the little half apron. These came in two sizes … bigger ones for mother and my sister, and then smaller ones for me. This was the apron I had to use to set the supper table. Aprons were changed as soon as a spot appeared. They would be tossed in the hamper waiting for REGIONAL DIRECTOR OF DISTRIBUTION Greg Esnard 613-706-8385 For delivery concerns call 1-705-742-8450 or toll free 1-855-742-8450 SALES MANAGER Adam Milligan 705-761-7990 ADVERTISING SALES Jean Convey, 613-966-2034, ext 527 Tim Sheppard, 613-966-2034, ext 528

the Monday washing and of course, they would be ironed, and often the little half apron would be treated to a dab of starch so they were always crisp and never went limp over whatever you were wearing. The print aprons were kept in a washstand that sat between the bake table and the back door. This washstand was bigger than the other ones in the house, and had a deep drawer, and once an apron was washed and ironed, it was laid out flat in the washstand. And there was no rooting around in the drawer either. Even though I might like one little half apron better than another, I had to take the one closest to the top. It seemed to me there was a lot of fuss made over something as simple as an apron. Why I had to wear one just to set the supper table, why mother only wore the flour bag aprons if no one was around, and why they couldn’t be worn until they were good and soiled, were all mysteries to me.

It was my sister Audrey who taught me that there were other uses for aprons too. They were ideal to bunch up to carry eggs from the egg house, or vegetables from the cellar. And if I accidentally soiled the clothes I was wearing, the apron hid the spot until I could change before mother discovered it. Always homemade, they came from scraps of material or flour bags, and were a lot cheaper than the ones at Walker’s Store, which cost at least 19 cents. Imagine, a whole 19 cents … a waste of a hard earned dollar. Interested in an electronic version of Mary’s books? Go to https://www. smashwords.com and type MaryRCook for ebook purchase details, or if you would like a hard copy, please contact Mary at wick2@sympatico.ca. Mary Cook is a longtime writer with several books in print and in electronic copies. She appears as a regular columnist.

CLASSIFIEDS 1-888-657-6193 EDITORIAL Brighton Independent John Campbell jcampbell@metroland.com Sarah Hyatt sarah.hyatt24@gmail.com PRODUCTION 613-966-2034 Read us online at https://www.northumberlandnews.com/northumberlandcounty-special/brighton-news/

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Conservatives won't be hurt at the polls by scandal that toppled leader: Piccini in the leadership race “because she has the experience to be premier, she's proven, she's a woman of incredible integrity, and a very strong and effective leader. She's going to get Ontario back on track and tackle our debt.”

JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Brighton — The recent sudden resignation of Patrick Brown as leader of the Progressive Conservatives in response to allegations of sexual misconduct will not hurt the party's prospects at the polls in June, says its local candidate. “Of course, you never like to see any sort of adversity hit your party,” said David Piccini, who hopes to become MPP for the new riding of Northumberland-Peterborough South. But “I honestly don't think this is a setback. Polls are showing we're even more popular today, I'm seeing it at the doors.” Brown resigned after two women accused him of sexual impropriety in separate incidents dating back several years. He has strenuously denied the allegations and is working to clear his name. “We need to create a climate ... where women are comfortable to come forward and voice concerns,” Piccini said, speaking before a meet-and-greet got underway at Trinity-St. Andrew's United Church hall. “There's no place for harassment in the workplace, certainly not in politics. We need to hold our politicians to a higher standard.” But, at the same time, “the media can't be the judge, jury and executioner,” he added. “Everyone is entitled to due

Rezoning of property at 6 Elizabeth St. not justified, says staff SARAH HYATT sarah.hyatt24@gmail.com

John Campbell/Metroland

PC candidate David Piccini, on the right, held a meet-and-greet in Brighton Feb. 10. Among those attending were Councillor Brian Ostrander. process.” The Port Hope resident said the Progressive Conservatives “have the most members of any party in Canada,” even with the number now having been pegged lower than the 200,000 that was touted when Brown was the leader. “I applaud our interim leader Vic Fedeli in getting to the bottom of any

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irregularities,” he said. “It's refreshing to see a party that, for better or worse, is being open and honest with Ontarians.” In Northumberland there are now more than 1,300 members, he said. “That's unheard of. We were at 50 to 60 when I started. It's incredible the interest now in the PC party.” Brown is supporting Christine Elliott

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Brighton — Council can’t easily choose to just rezone the property located at the corner of Elizabeth and Prince Edward streets, say staff. As council discussed the potential purchase of the land during a recent committee-of-the-whole budget meeting, there was also some talk as to how council may go about essentially preventing a gas station from being developed on the property. Coun. Brian Ostrander has been quite open in recent meetings and during discussions surrounding the land, saying he doesn’t particularly want to see another gas station established in the downtown core and at the 6 Elizabeth St. property. He also spearheaded the effort to have staff return to council with more information regarding the potential rezoning of the property. This information came alongside the history of the property and asking price, as council also discussed the potential purchase of land. “The challenge is that council approved the gas station [there before], it went to the OMB, the OMB upheld the decision and they gave rationale for upholding the decision, so it’s a little tricky to say, ‘OK, well, we’re taking away your zoning rights,’ ” said Stephen Ashton, manager of plan-

ning, building and community development. Not long ago, council approved the rezoning of the site and there was an application for the development of a gas station at 6 Elizabeth St., which also included adjacent properties at 21 and 23 Prince Edward St. This decision was appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board, as referenced by Ashton above here. Council’s decision was upheld, with the zoning for the property slightly modified in the board’s decision. The board found that the rezoning was consistent with the core commercial designation of the official plan. One-of-three staff recommendations provided to council recently related to the rezoning of the property. This staff recommendation outlines that if council wishes to look further at rezoning the land, council would need to authorize the undertaking of a review of the core commercial and special development area official plan policies and boundaries, and update the commercial area zoning. That’s really the only way to do it, though council could try and take away those zoning rights, but if it’s appealed, it’s right back to square one, Ashton told council in response to inquiries. In other words, without a comprehensive review of official plan policies, site-specific rezoning wouldn’t be justified and if council wants to rezone lands and this land, it should be part of larger review of the policies associated with the core commercial area. Through this official plan review, an update to the zoning bylaw would also be undertaken to align with the plan. This would require public consultation and could still be appealed by individual property owners, say staff. Estimated costs to do all of this are between $30,000-$40,000. No decision was made to earmark funds this year as of the latest budget meeting.

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Temporary boutique library opening at 10 Alice St. SARAH HYATT sarah.hyatt24@gmail.com

Brighton — As renovations are underway at 35 Alice St., the Brighton Public Library will be relocating to a temporary boutique space. “We did say early on that we were committed to providing library services in some capacity to our patrons throughout the construction period,” said Mellissa D’Onofrio-Jones, CEO for the library. This temporary boutique library will be located beside the China King restaurant at 10 Alice St. The boutique space will operate much like the current library does, with the same hours of service. It will open on Monday, Feb. 26. The 35 Alice St. library will close on Thursday, Feb. 22 through to Saturday, Feb. 24 to prepare for the move, said D’Onofrio-Jones. The library will operate out of the boutique space until the renovation project at 35 Alice St. is complete in the summer. The move does mean some services will be limited to patrons for a time, noted the CEO. The library’s full collection will not be housed at the boutique space and there will be a reduction in public-use computers. “We will be working with a taste of the existing collection,” said D’OnofrioJones. Library staffers will be bringing over the most recent items and titles, so patrons will be able to get the latest James Patterson book, for example. “The other key items of our collec-

Sarah Hyatt/Metroland

Mellissa D’Onofrio-Jones, CEO for the Brighton Public Library, says a new boutique space will offer library services until the 35 Alice St. renovation project is complete. tion and the titles we know are most popular, we will be bringing those over as well,” said D’Onofrio-Jones. Staff will continue to support patrons through interlibrary loans and say this system will also help address patrons’ needs as renovations are underway. While the library has to store some of its current collection, there will be lots of opportunity and support available through the lending of materials, said D’Onofrio-Jones. This system is huge and patrons should be able to get almost

anything, she added. Patrons will continue to have Internet access on their own devices at the boutique space and three public-use computers will be relocated to the space for residents. Staffers and the library board realize the reduction in services and materials isn’t ideal and services will not be what patrons are used to, said D’OnofrioJones, noting they did consider trying to maintain the current collection and all equipment throughout construction.

That option, however, would mean staff and the board would be repeatedly trying to essentially shuffle the library around within the 35 Alice St. building while renovations were taking place. Not only would this be difficult to work around with the various phases of construction, along with repeated packing and setup, it would have meant multiple and long closures, said D’Onofrio-

Jones. The boutique space may house a reduced collection and it is smaller, but it requires just one closure and means services will be maintained and regularly available, so this was favourable when staff and the board were examining options, said D’Onofrio-Jones. Through a partnership with EarlyON, the kids’ storytime programming will continue. The EarlyON child and family centre is located at Brighton Public School and library staff will continue to offer the regular 10:30 a.m. program on Wednesdays, starting on March 7. “To try and host that program at the boutique space would be difficult, as it often attracts some 30 kids and parents, and it would be really crowded,” said D’Onofrio-Jones. “We know it’s important, though, so we wanted to keep it going.” Families can access the EarlyON space through the north entrance of the school, near the back of the building. Library staff are also reminding residents the Codrington branch will continue to operate as normal, should patrons wish to make use of that space or access services there. This is temporary and until the new expanded space opens later this year, which in the long-term will serve and support the community better, said D’Onofrio-Jones, who is also thanking patrons for their continued patience and understanding. This renovation project will double library space and the end result will be so worth it, said the CEO.

Minimal tax rate increase in the offing for Cramahe homeowners JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Cramahe Township — Council is poised to approve a $11.2-million budget that will have little impact on the municipal portion of residents' property tax bills. “It's probably going to be a very little tax rate increase, if any,” treasurer Nicole Leach-Bihun told council members Feb. 6 after they had gone through the draft budget for the third time since Jan. 9. “I would say less than half a per cent.” Last year the local tax rate went down slightly. The latest budget deliberations focused on grant requests and issue papers that hadn't been dealt with. Those decisions coupled with using more of reserves and lowering spending estimates and raising projected revenues in various areas have resulted in the initial levy increase being reduced from 11 per cent to between three and four per cent. Council had set a goal of between two and three per cent. “We've done a really responsible job to getting as close as we have (to council's goal),” said chief administrative of-

ficer Craig Brooks. “If we can come in with a 3.5 per cent, it's a good number,” he said. Mayor Marc Coombs agreed, saying staff had done “an excellent job” to get it that close. “We started out last year with only a one per cent increase (and) we really put ourselves in the hole,” he said. “Cramahe Township was one of the lowest in the county last year for increases and definitely well below the county average, (so) it is understandable

that the proposed levy would increase this year.” It didn't help that the province reduced its Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund payment to the municipality by $100,000. It had been around $700,000 and “going up most years,” Coombs said. “Everybody's done their best,” Coun. Ed Van Egmond said. “We're just about where we need to be.” A final draft of the budget will be presented for council's approval when it meets later this month.

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Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018 7


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It is with sincere gratitude we thank the many volunteers who tended the Salvation Army kettles this season. Our list consisted of 51 members of the Brighton community, contributing 356 hours at Sobeys, No Frills, and the LCBO. The financial result due to the generosity of the community totalled almost $24,000 in donations, all of which are used to help local families.

This was the 127th year of the Salvation Army Christmas Kettle Campaign, and involved 2,000 kettles in 400 communities across Canada. If you are interested in joining the cadre of volunteers for the next season, please contact us at 613-475-1323 or Captain Rob Hardy at 613403-3152. Thank you, Darryl & Catherine Stutt

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Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018 9


Gnome Works partners weigh in on details Strike two for hospice care centre, as Cramahe refuses to give it money for proposed marijuana facility JOHN CAMPBELL

SARAH HYATT sarah.hyatt24@gmail.com

Brighton — The proponents of a marijuana operation in the industrial park say on a whim they just happened to land in Brighton. And now, the principal partners of Gnome Works Greenhouses Inc. believe Brighton is the ideal spot for their new business. Anton Cobzev and Shawn Pahwa, alongside Graham Healer, their realtor, recently shared publicly their desire to build a marijuana operation in the industrial park. “When we got started looking around at the various properties for this project, we’d been driving around for a few hours and we found the advertisement for the industrial park,” said Pahwa. “So, we happened to drive out here just on a whim.” It turns out, the land here just kind of fit with what the pair was looking for, they say. While the duo is from the city, they described themselves as more low-key individuals. The “quaintness and quietness” of the town is really attractive, said Pahwa. The pair was further enticed as they researched the town and its history, and the town motto apparently also

influenced the decision. As silly as it sounds, there’s something about this potentially revolutionary work happening, ‘Where the Past Greets the Future,’ said Pahwa. For clarification, council has not granted any approvals for the sale of land or for such facilities to date. Should the project go ahead, it’s looking like a rough two years, before the project gets off the ground. The cannabis industry is a bit unique, there’s a lot of back-and-forth as far as the application process goes and with the government, explains Pahwa. The duo is hopeful their application will be submitted within three months. Following that stage, it will take several more months for the first few initial phases of the application review process, which the government has to conduct, said Pahwa. In other words, construction isn’t likely to start until about a year’s time, if Gnome Works receives all approvals. Construction would last for an estimated six months. Then, pre-licensing inspections would occur, so it’s about two years from “the time we acquire a property, to licensing,” said Pahwa. Phase 1 of the project would involve construction of the primary

jcampbell@metroland.com

Cramahe Township — The municipality has joined Trent Hills in turning down a request to help fund construction of a Northumberland Community Hospice Care Centre near Cobourg. Community Care Northumberland had asked Cramahe to contribute $70,000 over three years to the $7-million project to build a 10,000-square-foot facility that will be both a hospice and a centre of excellence for palliative care, grief and bereavement support. “Good presentation, but we can't afford it,” Coun. Tim Gilligan said of the plea made to council by the chair of the agency's building committee last November. Trent Hills was asked to contribute $150,000 but said no last month. The township also declined a request to give $1,500 in support of a Cramahe Studio Tour, which made its debut in 2017 as part of the Canada 150 and Cramahe 225 celebrations. “We're going to have to have user fees,” Gilligan said when council met Feb. 6, so organizations in need of assistance won't look to the township to give out “handouts ev-

ery single time.” What the municipality is being asked to contribute in support of various groups is “unbelievable,” he said. The Apple Blossom Tyme committee requested $5,000 this year — more than double the $2,000 it has received in the past — because the event will mark its 30th anniversary this year. Council decided to stick with $2,000. “Unfortunately, we don't have the money,” Coun. Don Clark said. Castleton Sports Club was granted $2,000, the same as always. “I'd hate to low ball them because they do a lot of work out there,” running different programs, Coun. Ed Van Egmond said. “If staff have to start taking that stuff over ...” “There's no way we could do the programming,” Mayor Marc Coombs said. “The worst thing that would ever happen is if they decide to fold. We couldn't cut the grass up there for $1,500 probably, or maintain the road in, (or pay the) hydro bill.” Council turned down requests for unspecified amounts submitted by the Beacon Youth Centre in Brighton and the ukulele program for students that was launched at

local elementary schools last year. “A lot of these grants we're giving were precedents set from other years,” Clark said. “I can live with that but new ones it's going to be quite a burden (and) challenge for our municipality to keep paying for all these new requests.” Gilligan repeated his advice that user fees would be appropriate. The Beacon, a safe haven for youth operated by a Christian organization, is used by young people in Cramahe who attend East Northumberland Secondary School. “The churches need to back it, and council needs to stay out of that kind of stuff,” Van Egmond said. Also turned down was the Rotary Club of Colborne as it benefits from other forms of assistance the township provides. Council did include in the 2018 municipal budget it still has to pass grants to: Community Care Northumberland's dedicated transportation program, $10,000; West Northumberland Physician Recruitment and Retention Committee, $5,600; private roads upkeep, $10,258; Colborne Curling Club, $2,500; Shiloh, Waite and Cramahe Hill cemeteries, $540 apiece; and, Cramahe Horticultural Society, $1,000.

See PHASE page 11

RURAL ROOTS

Brighton History Week 2018 Celebrate Our Farming History From Axe to Smartphone

Come Join Us at King Edward Park Community Centre in Brighton Rural Roots Show (Two Showings!) Saturday, February 24, 2018, 7 to 9 pm Sunday, February 25, 2018, 2 to 4 pm

Rural Roots Open House Saturday, March 3, 2018, 10 am to 4 pm It’s the sixth year for the Open House!

Dan Buchanan, The History Guy will tell the story of farming from clearing the trees to the modern electronic farm. See how agriculture has changed over the years – and still changes today. Enjoy the music of RandR and hear unique stories from guest speakers. Informative AND entertaining!

Browse the displays of local museums and historians, all focussing on farm history. See the fascinating pictures and talk to the interesting folks. Meet your friends and have a good conflab. Enjoy coffee, tea and the delicious goodies at The Heritage Tea provided by the Women’s Institutes of the area.

Free Admission!

Donations appreciated.

Presented by volunteers under the auspices of the Brighton Heritage Advisory Committee. Contact Dan Buchanan danbuchanan@cogeco.ca 613-439-8992 10 Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018


Trillium Party candidate admits he faces uphill battle but he won't be whipped

Stay-at-home dad Derek Sharp admits he has “a huge hill to climb” in his bid to become MPP for Northumberland-Peterborough South.

Sharp has never run for office before. “My political experience is limited to working on friends' campaigns, and even managing a couple of campaigns,” he said. Sharp, who's 42, describes himself as a “stay-at-home dad” with “a heavy background of volunteer work” in Ajax where he lived before he, his wife Cheri, and their family moved to Colborne in 2015. “My daughters keep me pretty busy,” he said. One is two years old and the other, who's 14, is autistic. He worked as a volunteer for a halfdozen Ontario Junior Hockey League teams and was a longtime member of the Kinsmen Club of Ajax, serving three terms on its executive committee. He also served on the executive of the Royal Canadian Legion branch in Ajax.

Sharp organized and promoted many fundraising events for both organizations, some of the hockey teams, and Autism Ontario. Prior to becoming a stay-at-home father, he worked mostly in retail management, he said. Sharp acknowledged he's at a disadvantage being a candidate for a lesserknown party that lacks the financial resources of its rivals. But he also has “a huge hill to climb” because Lou Rinaldi, the incumbent MPP, is “so well-respected in the community.” To raise his profile Sharp has organized a Northumberland's Got Talent contest. “I've got to be as creative as I can in how I get my name out there,” he said. The main message he will be putting across as he goes door-to-door beginning this month is that “the other

parties are looking out” for their own parties' interests, and not their constituents'. Trillium's “guiding principles are transparency, accountability and no whipped voting,” Sharp said. “We believe everybody deserves all the facts and figures on everything. There should be no hidden contracts.” MPPs who vote against what their constituents want “had better be able to answer for that,” Sharp continued. “The party will never tell me how to vote, on anything, it's the people of Northumberland-Peterborough who will tell me how to vote,” he said. His party's platform includes lowering hydro rates by ending the practice of selling surplus electricity to American states “for pennies on the dollar, and offering it to our residents instead, and our businesses.”

be employed during Phase 1 of the project. Up to eight full-time and 15 part-time workers would be employed during Phase 2. The duo reports they’ve budgeted for part-time workers to be paid $20$25 per hour. Company ambitions also extend beyond just cultivating the plant, noted Pahwa. There is currently a space in the phase- floor plan, which its specific

use has not yet been determined but it is hoped that at some point, proponents can also pursue some sort of research initiative, maybe even with a university. There’s also some interest to look further at hemp as a sustainable/construction material. Such ideas just aren’t in the current proposal because it’s hard to project past the five-year timeline, said Pahwa. Activated carbon filters should

control odours, as should the facility’s exhaust port, as it emits a solution, which has an ion bond with a molecule to change and essentially eliminate the cannabis smell. The greenhouse portion would be completely sealed and the only air inand-out would be expelled through filters, said Cobzev. It’s probably more adequate to say the greenhouse is similar to a warehouse with a transparent roof, he said.

Coun. Steven Baker questioned whether the facility would be “lit up like a Christmas tree,” and the duo has assured council there would be no permanent glow like that. Such details would also be further addressed during the site plan process, to ensure lighting would not bleed over onto neighbouring properties, said Stephen Ashton, manager of planning, building and community development.

JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Colborne — Derek Sharp, the Trillium Party of Ontario's candidate for Northumberland-Peterborough South in this year's provincial election, said he was drawn to the party because he had become “so sick of whipped voting.” That, he explains on his website, www.dereksharptrillium.com, is when MPPs are instructed by their party whip to vote the party line on key issues, and not what their constituents want. One of the Trillium Party's “core fundamental principles is that we do not participate in whipped voting,” Sharp said. “So if I'm elected, the people of Northumberland-Peterborough South come first before anything else, in everything that I vote on ... which is how it should be.”

PHASE From page 10

warehouse and six adjacent greenhouses, which would support 10,880 square feet of flowering space. Phase 2 would include an additional six greenhouses, doubling the flowering space to 21,760 square feet, which is expected to yield a monthly average of 340 pounds of cannabis. Three administrators, four full-time and seven part-time workers would

Submitted photo

See TRILLIUM page 12

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Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018 11


Art on Main “starting over” by holding fundraisers in support of July event JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Brighton – As organizers of Art On Main (AOM) prepare for its fifth year of showcasing the visual and performing arts, they’ve added to their workload by scheduling a series of fundraisers for the July 7 event. The first, a Sadie Hawkins dance, will take place Feb. 24 at the Brighton Legion. Four local acts have been booked: Derek Arsenault, Jus’ Rockin’, Michael Arthur and Cindy & Scott. Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the door. It’s being billed as a boot stompin’, heel kickin’ good time and an award will be presented to the person with the best costume. “What we’re trying to do is just include the public a little bit more in helping us keep the event alive,” said Art of the Main founder Sheryl Delorme who also chairs the organizing committee. This is the first year AOM will take place

without the Brighton DBIA providing funding; its contributions varied but were usually around $10,000. “This year we’ve decided that we wanted to go a different route,” Delorme said. She thanked the business organization for its past support but “we were limited to the downtown. We figured that by expanding our wings a little bit we’re able to incorporate more people and more areas (and) can actually expand the event in the long run.” Delorme typically has six artists show their work at her location, Special Effects Decorating, during Art on the Main when between 40 and 50 artists take part, setting up at other shops or in Memorial Park. “And every year it grows a little bit more,” she said. “We want to get in as many as we can” by “starting over.” It’s become “a whole community event as opposed to just a downtown event,” Delorme said. “In the last four years every time we’ve held this event we get a lot of amazing

feedback on it.” Two more fundraisers are planned and sponsors are being sought locally “to help us promote the arts, because there are so many amazingly talented people in this community,” she said. New this year at AON will be a culinary pavilion -- “everybody loves food” -- and a partnership with the local Kinsmen club. There are going to be “a few surprises” as well “but we don’t want to let the cat out of the bag” too soon, Delorme said. “We’re still working on a lot of different things.” Another fundraiser, a pub quiz, will be held March 24 at the legion. The theme will be the 1960s, and there will be prizes for the best dressed and the winner of the quiz. There will also be an auction for a painting by local artist Nikki Crone-Stafford.

OPP identify pedestrian struck by vehicle Feb. 12 Trent Hills — A pedestrian died after being struck by a vehicle in Campbellford on Monday morning. Northumberland OPP released the name of the 56-year-old woman, who was hit by a vehicle on Bridge Street East at Front Street North, as Lisa Anne Bredin, of Hastings. OPP reported the woman was hit around 11 a.m. on Feb. 12. She had been transported to hospital where she was pronounced dead. The OPP continue to investigate. Bridge Street East re-opened to traffic from Front Street North to Doxsee Avenue around 3:30 p.m. that afternoon.

TRILLIUM From page 11

Trillium opposes Ontario's carbon tax because, as Sharp explains on his website, it's “punitive and ... has never been proven to lower emissions anywhere.” The Trillium Party also believes the province's sex education curriculum “should be repealed or at the very least reviewed with parental input” because what's now in place For more information, visit www.bright- “goes way too far.” It should teach children about their bodies, “respect for onaom.com. other people's bodies” and how to protect themselves from diseases. “We think it crosses the line when it gets into specifics about different kinds of sex, different types of sexual relationships, and things like that,” Sharp said. “We do a lot of stuff for our genera“There was not enough parental input when the curricution,” from the 1960s and 1970s, “very lum was created,” he added. much geared to dance,” Schukov said. The full range of the Trillium Party's policies can be viewed “We play a lot of the standards.” at www.trilliumontario.ca. Art On Main “is like Applefest, it’s But they are “more or less guidelines because what I besynonymous with the town,” he said. lieve or what the party believes is not going to affect my vote, it's what the people of Northumberland want,” he reiterated.

Jus’ Rockin’ jus’ wants to help Jus’ Rockin’, one of the musical acts booked for the Feb. 24 Art On Main fundraiser, was formed a little more than two years ago “in part to be able to do such benefits for the town,” while having “a lot of fun,” says one of its

members, Vic Schukov. He and his fellow retirees – Frank Blanchet, Dave Prasky and Dan Mahoney – are all “seasoned musicians” who “have wonderful chemistry” performing together.

Employment Opportunities Currently, we are looking to fill the following vacancies: Student Assistants (contract, full-time) for the following areas: • Tourism • Energy Conservation Plan • Roads Operations • Records & Archival Services • Engineering/Reflectivity • Forest Check out the full job postings on our website at www.northumberlandcounty.ca Please note that accommodations are available, upon request, to support applicants with disabilities throughout the recruitment process. Please e-mail your request to accessibility@northumberlandcounty.ca or call 905-372-3329 ext. 2327. Kate Campbell: 905-372-3329 x2335 campbellk@northumberlandcounty.ca Alternative formats of this information are available upon request: accessibility@northumberlandcounty.ca or 905-372-3329 ext. 2327. 12 Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018

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As part of the transaction, dealer may request documentation and contact General Motors of Canada Company (GM Canada) to verify eligibility. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. Conditions and limitations apply. Void where prohibited. See Dealer for full program details. GM Canada reserves the right to amend or terminate offers for any reason in whole or in part at any time without prior notice. 2018 Silverado Double Cab Custom Edition 4X4 Lease: Lease based on a purchase price of $46,425 for a 2018 Silverado Double Cab Custom Edition 4X4, includes $3,870 CDA, $2,000 Lease Cash Bonus and $1,000 GM card application bonus (this offer applies to individuals who have applied for the Scotiabank® GM® Visa* Card [GM card] and to current Scotiabank® GM® Visa* Cardholders) (taxes included). Biweekly payment is $185 for 48 months at 2.5% lease rate on approved credit to qualified retail customers by GM Financial. Annual kilometer limit of 20,000 km, $0.16 per excess kilometer. $3,200 down payment required. Payment may vary depending on down payment trade. Total obligation is $22,482. Taxes, license, insurance, registration and applicable fees, levies, duties and, except in Quebec, dealer fees (all of which may vary by dealer and region) are extra. Option to purchase at lease end is $20,003. 2018 Colorado Z71 Crew Cab Lease: Lease based on a purchase price of $41,285 for a 2018 Colorado Z71 Crew Cab, includes $500 CDA, $1,500 Lease Cash Bonus and $750 GM card application bonus (this offer applies to individuals who have applied for the Scotiabank® GM® Visa* Card [GM card] and to current Scotiabank® GM® Visa* Cardholders) (taxes included). Bi-weekly payment is $179 for 48 months at 2.5% lease rate on approved credit to qualified retail customers by GM Financial. Annual kilometer limit of 20,000 km, $0.16 per excess kilometer. $3,350 down payment required. Payment may vary depending on down payment trade. Total obligation is $21,984. Taxes, license, insurance, registration and applicable fees, levies, duties and, except in Quebec, dealer fees (all of which may vary by dealer and region) are extra. Option to purchase at lease end is $19,359. 0/72 Finance: Offer available to qualified retail customers in Canada on select vehicles from February 1 to February 28, 2018. 0% purchase financing offered on approved credit by TD Auto Finance Services, Scotiabank® or RBC Royal Bank for 72 months on eligible 2018 Chevrolet models: Silverado 1500. Other trims may have effective rates higher than 0%. Participating lenders are subject to change. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $40,000 financed at 0% nominal rate (0% APR) equals $555.56 monthly for 72 months. Total Value consists of $3,870 manufacturer-todealer (tax exclusive) delivery credit, $2,100 manufacturer-to-dealer finance cash (tax exclusive) and $1,000 manufacturer-to-consumer GM Card Application Bonus (offer applies to individuals who apply for a Scotiabank GM Visa Card [GM Card] or current GM Card cardholders) (tax inclusive). Cost of borrowing is $0, for a total obligation of $40,000. Offer is unconditionally interest-free. Freight and air charge ($100, if applicable) included. License, insurance, registration, PPSA, applicable taxes and dealer fees not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offer which may not be combined with certain other offers. General Motors of Canada Company may modify, extend or terminate offers in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. ®Registered trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia. RBC and Royal Bank are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Visit onstar.ca for vehicle availability. Services and connectivity vary by model and conditions as well as geographical and technical restrictions. Requires active OnStar service and data plan. Data plans provided by AT&T or its local service provider. Accessory Power must be active to use the Wi-Fi hotspot.

Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018 13


Sports Three Brighton teams qualify for quarter-finals in EOMHL JOHN CAMPBELL

match 3-0 at home Feb. 10. Brighton will host the Dukes this Saturday. Game time is 8 p.m. Brighton finished in second place in the EOMHL, with 35 points, one behind Douro. Also headed to the quarter-finals are the atom Braves, who overcame a

jcampbell@metroland.com

Brighton – Three local teams have advanced to the next round of the playoffs. The peewee Brighton Braves joined the atom and midget teams in moving on to the quarter-finals of the Eastern Ontario Minor Hockey League (EOMHL) with a 5-4 overtime win on Monday night against the Loyalist Jets. Brighton held a 4-2 lead late in the third period at the King Edward Arena but the visitors scored twice in the last 91 seconds to even the score. The Jets’ Charlie Ford completed the hat trick with just 10 seconds showing on the clock. But Tyler Bird ended the Jets’ season and extended Brighton’s with a goal, his second of the game, little more than three minutes into the extra frame. That gave the home town the series win in what was an evenly contested set of games, with Brighton losing its first two games at home while winning twice on the road. The Braves won two of the last three and tied the other. Four of the games were decided by

2-1 series deficit against the Bancroft Jets to win the six-point series in five games, the last one a 9-3 victory at home on Feb. 11. They will play Frontenac, which finished third in the regular season, three points ahead of Brighton, which had 31.

John Campbell/Metroland

Tieran Tsokos came close to scoring on this play in Brighton’s serieswinning victory at home Feb. 12. one goal. Justin Murdoch, Carter Barre and Zack Flatt also scored in the Braves’ win Monday night. Brighton will face Frontenac in the next round. The Flyers finished third in the league, five points above the fifth-place Braves.

Brighton’s midget squad will square off against Douro after vanquishing the Frontenac Flyers 3-2 in a five-game series. The Braves won the first two games, John Campbell/Metroland dropped the next two, with the margin of victory being one goal in all four Cole Hazelwood and the peewee Brighton Braves edged the Loyalist contests, before winning the deciding Jets 5-4 in overtime Monday night at the King Edward Arena.

The slide is over! Stars win their first Colborne soccer fields relocation will be done in sections game since mid-December JOHN CAMPBELL

jcampbell@metroland.com

JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Colborne — The Northumberland Stars ended a 12-game losing streak in spectacular fashion at home Feb. 9, thumping the Tottenham Steam 11-3. Benjamin Crowchild, the game's first star, scored twice and added three assists, while Robert James registered a hat trick and was chosen second star. Tyler McGregor, the team's leading scorer, was the third star, contributing a goal and two assists, as did Bob Stevenson, Joshua Hall, Connor Sikma and Tyler Brackin. Henry Malik had a goal and an assist. Curtis Campbell stopped 17 of 20 shots for his fifth win of the season. The home team directed 50 shots the other way and five of its goals were scored on the power play. Alas, the Stars didn't have long to savour their first victory since Dec. 15 as they fell 5-4 to the Steam in overtime the next day in Tottenham. It was a hard loss to endure as Nor-

thumberland led 3-1 after the first period and 4-2 in the second before Tottenham tied it. There was no scoring in the third period or overtime. First star Matthew Psaras was involved in all five goals for the victors, scoring twice and collecting a pair of assists in regulation before deciding the game in the shootout. Hall, Crowchild and Tim Lavigne each had a goal and an assist for Northumberland. Tyler Brackin scored his 27th of the season. He's second on the team with 51 points, trailing only McGregor who has 35 goals and 32 assists. Northumberland's three points in the two games improved its record to 15 wins, 17 losses and 7 overtime losses, good for 37 points. As it has for much of the season the team continues to occupy sixth place in the South Division of the Greater Metro Jr. A Hockey League. The Stars have four games remaining in the schedule, none of them at home.

14 Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018

Cramahe Township — Most of the spending requests made by staff in the form of issue papers, have been approved by council, but hiring a public works operator ($47,857) wasn't among them. As well, the reconstruction of Ontario Street ($700,000) has been delayed once again. Treasurer Nicole Leach-Bihun said “further discussions” by management led to the addition of a public works employee being taken off the table “in order to assist in bringing the levy down.” “It's a shame, (an extra man is) really something we need,” Coun. Ed Van Egmond said. Chief administrative officer Craig Brooks recommended removing the Ontario Street project from the budget so he could do a “further analysis.” He said a report will be brought back to council for consideration “before the end of this year.” Council also balked at purchasing a replacement tractor for $220,000 to plow snow in the winter and cut grass in the summer, along with brushing, saying

staff should be able to find one for much cheaper. “We've got to shop around,” Van Egmond said. Operations manager Jeff Hoskin was instructed to come back with a staff report that offered better pricing. Council did give the go-ahead to hiring a customer service co-ordinator ($53,755), renovating and expanding the Colborne library ($251,000), carrying out $141,500 in bridge repairs, upgrading the municipal website ($40,000), retrofitting the Keeler Centre with LED lighting ($75,000), and installing fibre optic hardware at the centre as well as town hall and the two libraries to improve internet service ($30,600). Also approved were renovations to the third floor of the town hall, the purchase of a thermal imaging device ($10,000), demolition of the former lawn bowling clubhouse ($15,000). Council okayed putting aside $50,000 for building soccer fields beside the Keeler Centre but the work will not be extensive the first year. The soccer club is “really excited” about relocating from its current site, Hoskin said, but there are issues with moving to an area used once a year by

the Apple Blossom Tyme Festival and a country music jamboree. He suggested a “short field” could be used by the younger children initially because “there's no real construction” required and the rest could be developed in sections, starting in back of the arena. “So would we not be best to wait for a year and see what their (registration) numbers do, what complaints we get about the field, what concerns (there are) before we do anything?” asked Deputy Mayor Sandra Arthur. “Why are we spending this until we know exactly what they need and where it needs to be and how we accommodate the other two groups?” “The only way we could move some of them up ... (is to use) the fields as we have them right now,” Hoskin said. With older players “we probably can't, the grounds aren't in a state that they could play soccer on them, but it's possible with the little kids we could. The rest of the kids would have to stay where they are right now.” Brooks told council that with its approval of the expenditure, he would have staff “build into that plan that it would be phased in so it doesn't have an impact on the other users of the Keeler Centre.”


Festival devoted to yarns of all kinds planned for Castleton heritage centre JOHN CAMPBELL jcampbell@metroland.com

Castleton — The Mill at Piper Creek Arts and Heritage Centre is organizing a two-day Yarns From The Mill festival for next September. It's “an extension ... of what we do,” said Candace Cox, which has been host to all sorts of special events featuring professional artists who perform in concerts and shows across Canada. “We thought it would be a good way to engage all of the community.” By calling the festival Yarns From The Mill, “we mean basically anything you can connect to that title,” she said. People who work with fibre quilting, weaving, knitting and spinning — “anything to do with sheep and yarns and that kind of work, which can be some really high end art” — will be part of the event. “I hugely admire their work,” Cox said.

Examples of their work will be on display in the area around the mill. “Yarns can also mean story telling,” Cox said. “Ideally, we're going to capture some of the local yarns” that have to do with heritage and history. Helping in that effort is a member of the centre's board of directors, a retired radio host from Toronto who will be recording “the old stories from the neighbourhood,” she said. “We already have some from the last miller” — Elwood Jones, who died in December. “In an ideal world we'd like to hire an improvising team who will come and weave some entertainment out of local stories,” Cox added. For the festival's first year “we're going to focus more on stories around the mill but really any community story (will be welcome),” Cox added. “We're hoping to do some interviews and some preparation in advance and maybe

Brighton eligible for $46,076 through Main Street Revitalization Initiative SARAH HYATT sarah.hyatt24@gmail.com

Brighton — Funding through the Main Street Revitalization Initiative should give small, rural communities a much-needed boost, says the province. Ontario will invest up to $26 million in the initiative and the Municipality of Brighton is eligible for about $46,076 of that sum, it was recently announced. Exactly how this initiative could benefit Brighton remains unknown, but the funds, if received, would be distributed locally for the enhancement and revitalization of the downtown core and Main Street areas. Jeff Leal, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and the Minister Responsible for Small Business, announced funding for the Main Street Revitalization Initiative at the Rural Ontario Municipal Association conference held recently in Toronto. “Main streets are at the core of small, rural communities and are home to thousands of small businesses across the province,” said Leal. “That’s why our government is committed to ensuring they continue to remain vibrant hubs where residents meet, tourists visit and small businesses grow and prosper.” Here in Brighton, municipal staff will continue to work with ministry representatives to better understand what the next steps are to potentially receive this funding and how these funds could be utilized locally, said Mayor Mark Walas. It’s said the provincial funding will help communities to enhance and revitalize downtown cores and main streets through improvements like installations of pedestrian crosswalks or through landscaping projects. Municipalities may also choose to direct funding to local businesses to help improve the appearance of storefronts by installing lighting or new signage. The province says the goal is to support capital improvements in small businesses and generate strategic public investments in municipal and other public infrastructure, which

in turn will benefit the small businesses within main street areas. The Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) and its rural arm, the Rural Ontario Municipal Association will administer the funding, though the ministry has determined the allocation of monies for each community. “AMO welcomes new funding through the Main Street Revitalization Initiative and we are pleased that municipal governments won’t have to provide matching funds to access the program,” said Lynn Dollin, AMO president and Deputy Mayor of the Town of Innisfil. “This funding will help move projects forward on Ontario’s main streets, helping to attract residents [and] visitors, and supports the business community.” Nearby townships and cities in Northumberland and the Quinte region are also eligible to receive a portion of the funding. AMO’s experience in administering the federal gas tax will help put appropriate accountability framework in place efficiently, said the organization on the day of the funding announcement. “AMO’s desire is to finalize an OMAFRA (Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs)/AMO transfer payment agreement as quickly as possible so that it can undertake the necessary work to distribute the funds and reporting obligations for municipal governments.” Neighbouring communities could receive the following in funding: Cramahe $41,426, Trent Hills $46,970, Alnwick/Haldimand $41,862, Quinte West $63,239, Belleville $71,286, Cobourg $52,509 and Port Hope $50,234. “AMO will keep municipal governments informed of our progress so that they can get ready to make these funds work locally to support their main streets,” said the organization. This initiative is part of a $40-million investment over three years through the Main Street Enhancement Fund and is meant to expand upon and complement the Downtown Revitalization program, reports the province.

show some footage of these stories at the Yarns festival but also we'll do interviews (while it's going on),” she said. A place will be set up where people can reminisce. The interviews will be archived. “Our dream has always been” that once the mill building is restored, there will be audiovisual presentations, Cox said. It's to bring “local history a little bit more to life, and make it accessible, that's part of what our mandate is,” she said. There will be entertainment as well. “The bigger budget we have the more we can do, but we will have live music happening,” she said, adding: “We're hoping to include poets, both local and (from a wider area).” Events such as the festival “is why we want

to develop the mill,” Cox said. “It's always been ... to have community integration of both local people and professional artists.” Part of it is to help “people who aren't close to the arts understand the work that goes into being a musician or an actor.” Cox said “the mill was a gathering point for this community” after its construction in the 1800s. A real community hub Anyone she's met who talks about the mill said it was “a real community hub, and we don't have that” now in Cramahe Township, “a place to connect and to integrate ... There's just no place for people to come and just have fun in a simple, cheap, affordable kind of way. That's really what we want to serve.”

MUNICIPALITY OF BRIGHTON EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY PUBLIC WORKS OPERATOR The Municipality of Brighton is currently accepting applications for a full time permanent Public Works Operator. Reporting to the Public Works Operations Supervisor the successful candidate will operate municipal vehicles and equipment for winter control, general maintenance and construction operations. Responsibilities • Operate vehicles and heavy equipment including but not limited to snowplows and wing, dump trucks, loaders and other machinery for winter control, general maintenance and construction operations. • Construction and maintenance work including carpentry, masonry, pipe laying and general labour as assigned. Qualifications • Ontario Secondary School diploma • Proven experience operating heavy equipment with a valid “DZ” License,

Air Brake Certification and a safe driving record.

• Experience in snow plow operations with wing, will be considered a

definite asset.

• Knowledge of the Occupational Health and Safety Act and

Highway Traffic Act regulations. • Good verbal communication and customer service skills. • Clean Criminal Records Check Hours: 40 hours per week includes weekend work. This position requires regular stand-by duty, weekend and evening overtime, emergency call-out. Pay Rate: CUPE Band 9 To apply: Submit a cover letter and resume by 4:30 p.m. February 16, 2018 clearly marked ‘Position of Public Works Operator’ to hr@brighton.ca. or by mail to:

Human Resources Municipality of Brighton Bx 189, 35 Alice St Brighton, ON K0K 1H0.

The Municipality of Brighton wishes to acknowledge and thank all candidates for your interest in responding to this posting, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Personal information and any supporting material is obtained and used in accordance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Alternate formats of job postings and accommodations are available upon request to support the participation of persons with disabilities in applying for jobs and during the interview and assessment process. If you require an accommodation email or phone Human Resources at 613-475-0670. Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018 15


Brighton’s Own: A valentine to us Over 150 interviews later and an education in how to become a better person, Vic Schukov's Brighton's Own VIC SCHUKOV

Three years ago, last October, my wife and I moved (permanently) to Brighton from our hometown of Montreal. Like many people here, we gratefully traded concrete, stress and neighbours we never met for nature at its most peaceful glory, low blood pressure and adding daily to a long list of new and kind friends. All while saying hello to everyone we pass on the street. We traded in long faces for smiles. As I said, it was October, so one of the first things that caught my eye was an odd, old house nesting on Prince Edward Street in a scatter of Halloween decorations that even creative folk might call creepy. I called it the Addams family house. You all know

Bill and Rose Kuzmich’s place, the one with a customized Black Widow Hearse with bats painted all over it in the driveway. That same day, I saw Alice moving up the street with her walker. I stopped naively to introduce myself and offered her a ride to town, like it was the first time she was doing this. She smiled under her smart hat and declined, saying that she did this every day. Then I saw a Chinese fellow with an authentic Fu Manchu beard, chanting loudly as he walked down Main Street. Expecting to be enlightened, I stopped and asked him what he was chanting. He replied in very bad English, “I am singing top 40 hits on my Walkman.” I thought, what an interesting town

2018 MUNICIPAL BUDGET PUBLIC MEETING

(of possibly strange people). So, I came up with the idea for the Brighton’s Own column. Over 150 interviews later, what I really got was an education in how to become a better person. A small town should have character. A perfect small town has characters. Brighton is that perfect small town; the kind that Stephen Leacock and Mark Twain would have written about. Located close enough between but far enough away from the big wheels of Toronto and Montreal, Mayberry, Ontario is an oasis of nice. Everyone here appreciates and praises the small town warmth and decency of Brighton’s own. But here’s the amazing thing: most of the people I interview are not from here. And there is no discernible difference in niceness between those from somewhere else and those who have been here for generations. People like me came here to be with people who are unstressed, considerate and friendly. We all soon find out that the collective congeniality has pleasantly rubbed off on us all. It’s as if Brighton is constantly being sprinkled with invisible magic dust to make its residents so nice. Cheryl Lafferty/Submitted It seems we are all products of our Vic Schukov shown here in his environment composed of a neighwriting room. bouring provincial park, a beautiful

lake that looks like an ocean, a town rich in history and filled with volunteers. Brighton has the best of both worlds: a town just big enough surrounded by a variety of country settings. No wonder it inspires people who settle here to reinvent themselves. One of my earliest interviews was with writer and artist Bill Murtha, a typical Brightonian; genuinely interested in people and walks the talk. Bill, a former head of the English department at ENSS, nailed it: “When you retire, don’t retire from something. Retire to something.” So, this column aptly titled Brighton’s Own is dedicated like a valentine to all of us. Brighton resident Vic Schukov is a longtime journalist and writer of biography books for everyday people; victorschukov@gmail.com

Wednesday, February 28th, 2018 COMMENCING AT 7:00 P.M. at the Centreton Community Centre 2363 County Road 23 Grafton ON K0K 2G0 This notice is also posted on: www.alnwickhaldimand.ca

Help keep your community clean.

Arryn McNichol Municipal Treasurer Phone: 905-349-2822 ext #26 Fax: 905-349-2982 Email: amcnichol@ahtwp.ca

Please recycle this newspaper.

16 Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018


Council will financially support local business awards SARAH HYATT sarah.hyatt24@gmail.com

Brighton — It looks like the Brighton-Cramahe Chamber of Commerce will get municipal support for its first-time Business Achievement Awards Gala. At a recent committee of the whole budget meeting, the consensus was that the municipality should financially support the awards, with the requested $2,000 gold-title sponsorship. The decision, however, was not unanimous and two councillors hardly held back words when voicing their opposition to the funding. Spending public money on an awards ceremony, “I think it’s a waste of money,” said Coun. John Martinello. Funding a private organization makes no sense, it is there to support businesses that are members and “I just don’t see why we’re doing it,” he said. Coun. Steven Baker also pushed for the $2,000 allocated for the event to be removed from the budget. The spending of $2,000 of the taxpayers’ money, for what Baker considered to be basically two dinner tickets wasn’t something he would support, he said. Prior to budget deliberations, chamber presi-

dent Kristen Fletcher and Laurie-Ann McCulloch, chair for the chamber awards committee, visited with Brighton council and spoke about their plans for the first-time gala. The duo made a presentation to Cramahe as well, ultimately asking the communities to partner with the chamber for the event and by serving as gold-title sponsors. The proposed partnership asked municipalities to sponsor the top two awards for the event, which includes the Business of the Year Award and the New Business of the Year Award. “The chamber believes there is a need for more recognition of the businesses in our communities …” said manager Sherry Hamilton in a former Brighton Independent article. Brighton has for many years supported the Quinte Business Achievement Awards in a similar way and with sponsorship, which costs about $1,000 annually. Coun. Laura Vink made sure to clarify this with help from staff at the latest budget meeting. The municipality has sponsored the Quinte awards for at least 10 years, maybe even longer, said Linda Widdifield, director of finance and administrative services. The chamber has also been involved at the regional level with the Quinte business awards for

THE MUNICIPALITY OF BRIGHTON SUMMER YOUTH EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The Municipality of Brighton is currently accepting applications for summer student positions. To be considered for a student position you must be a minimum of age 16 years and provide proof of registration in a full-time program of education in this academic year and returning to school on a full-time basis in the fall. Positions will be offered pending budget approval. Full job descriptions are available on the municipal website. Parks Summer Student To assist in the maintenance of parks, gardens, sports fields, cemeteries, trails and boat launches and perform custodial duties at municipal facilities. Evening and weekend work required. Term: May 7 to August 31, 2018 Rate: $15.00/hour Public Works Operations Summer Student To assist in the construction and maintenance of municipal infrastructure including roads, ditches, culverts, water and waste water collection systems and buildings. Students may also assist in construction design and project reviews and the municipal capital asset management program. Term: May 7 to August 31, 2018 Rate: $15.00/hour Downtown Business Improvement Association Student To assist in the maintenance of the Brighton Downtown core with duties including litter collection, side walk sweeping, cleaning, weeding, planting, trimming and other duties as assigned. Term: weekends in June increase to 20 hours/week in July & August, 2018 Rate: $13.15/hour (under 18 years of age student rate) To apply: submit a completed Application Form to hr@brighton.ca by Noon, Monday, March 5, 2018. Forms are available at www.brighton.ca/employment or pick one up at the Municipal Office, 35 Alice Street, Brighton The Municipality of Brighton wishes to acknowledge and thank all candidates for your interest in responding to this posting, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Personal information and any supporting material is obtained and used in accordance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Alternative formats of job postings and accommodation during recruitment are available upon request by contacting Human Resources at 613-475-0670.

about 17 years. As previously explained by Fletcher, that partnership will still continue, but the idea behind the new awards gala, is that it would bring people together to celebrate local successes and also serve as a networking-type event. And by recognizing excellence, this would also promote business activity that leads to growth in both Brighton and Cramahe, Fletcher said during her delegation to council. For its first year, the gala will be hosted in Colborne but will take place in alternate locations, meaning in 2019, the event will take place in Brighton. So, they’d be looking to recognize “more of our local businesses” and they do currently have the support from Cramahe, noted Walas, as he tried to explain to council how he believed the awards ceremony would work at the local level and pulling from his experience through the Quinte awards event.

Walas regularly attends and presents awards at the Quinte event in his role as mayor and as a member of the Quinte Economic Development Commission. As discussion surrounding the sponsorship continued, it was clear Deputy Mayor Roger McMurray has had a change of heart since the last time council discussed and eventually quashed funding for the chamber during 2017 budget deliberations. “The war with the chamber of commerce has gone on for three years now and I’m personally getting fed up with it,” he said. “These businessmen [and women] are not ogres, they’re taxpayers and citizens, just like we are.” A majority of council, which included McMurray, is willing to support the event. “Also you do not have to be a member of the Brighton-Cramahe Chamber of Commerce, this is for the whole community of Brighton and Cramahe, and anyone can be nominated,” said Vink.

A BRIGHTON CHRISTMAS HAMPER VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE THANK YOU FOR 2017

The “Brighton CHRISTMAS HAMPER VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE” would like to thank the Town of Brighton, The Town of Smithfield, and all those from other areas, for all their support, donations and hard work. We would also like to say a very special “THANK YOU” to the Businesses, Service Clubs, Organizations, Churches, Individuals and volunteers etc., who donated food, gift coupons, mittens, socks, games, toys, money, their efforts and volunteered time are really appreciated. There were about 125 or more volunteers who worked hard putting the Hampers together for the pick up day. All the volunteers help made it easy to put the hampers together. All the volunteers that were able to help, did a fantastic job. It was really great having people donate items to our teenagers. Teenagers are an important part of their families, and they too need to feel special at Christmas. We did 43 teenagers in the Town of Brighton and Town of Smithfield this year, and you made them feel very special. You made Christmas very special for 110 children. There were 120 families who received Christmas Hampers. The donations and help we receive for this wonderful adventure were incredible. I am always in awe of how wonderful, generous and giving people are to others in need. We always have Angels who do that little something special every year to show that miracle really do exist. Had we not received so much help it would not have been possible for us to assist all those who need help at this very special time of year. It was wonderful of Three of our Police Officers to take time out of their busy schedules to come and help the people carry the food and gifts they were given in their Christmas Hampers to their cars on the pick up day. There were a lot of other volunteers who also worked hard, helping the people carry their Christmas Hampers to their cars. I know the people receiving. assistance really appreciated all the efforts of these peoples help on the pick up day. It is hard to find the right words to express how great full we are for all the help we received. The “BRIGHTON, CHRISTMAS HAMPERS” have been done for more than fifty years. Your assistance with the “BRIGHTON CHRISTMAS HAMPERS” and “CHRISTMAS HAMPERS” being done by “SMITH FIELD” over the past years, and present is greatly appreciated. We do hope you all had a wonderful Christmas and a very Happy New year. Thank you all again for making Christmas special for so many families. Brighton Christmas Hamper Volunteer Committee

Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018 17


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DEATH NOTICE

DEATH NOTICE

BENNETT, Charles Valentine After a long full life, passed away peacefully six days before his 99th birthday on Thursday, February 8, 2018. Loving husband of Dorothy (Nicholson), dear Dad to Charles of Trenton, and Jennifer Peters (Lloyd) of Bancroft and a loving grandfather to Natalie Smith (Bill), Karina Trolley (Greg), and four great grandchildren. Charles â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bennyâ&#x20AC;? will also be missed by his sister-in-law Joyce Beanland and many nieces and nephews. Born in Newtown, Hampshire, U.K., February 14, 1919 to Charles Wm. and Frances (nee Purkiss) Bennett. Charles served in the R.A.F. 1938-1945 Ground Crew U.K. and Burma, R.C.A.F. 1945-1965. Charles eldest of four grew up in East York, winning medals in competitive swimming. A social man, he enjoyed his family and friends, took pleasure in travelling, swimming, singing, dancing, and gardening. A private family graveside service at Carman Cemetery will be held at a later date.

DEATH NOTICE

DEATH NOTICE

COOPER, Madeline Rose (nee Semple) Passed away January 17, 2018, in her 85th year. Loving wife of the late Stanley Cooper. Dear mother of Jacqueline (Mrs. Ross Petch), the late William Cooper, his wife Karen, Lisa (Mrs. Sandy Campbell), Ellen (Mrs. Richard Ibbotson), Karen (Mrs. Brad Ibbotson), and Harold (Selena Halliburton). Loving daughter of the late Everett and Gladys Semple. Loving sister to the late Joan Moynes, Don Semple, Margie Reid, the late Clifford Semple, the late Diane Sheppard, Marilyn MacDonald, Jim Semple, and Jean Pandachuck. Survived and sadly missed by her 14 grandchildren, and 18 great-grandchildren. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll finally be at peace knowing sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be with her Stanley again. The love of her life. A celebration of life will be held upstairs at the Brighton Legion on February 17, 2018, from 1pm-5pm. Donations can be made to the Alzheimers Society.

DEATH NOTICE

ROWE, Linda Isabelle Peacefully at her home in Brighton on Thursday, February 8, 2017, age 74 years. Linda Rowe, daughter of the late Norman Chatten and the late Margaret (Reid). Loving wife of John Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobâ&#x20AC;? Rowe. Dear mother of Michelle Baker of South Carolina, and Jason Baker of Calgary. Step-mother of Penny Hayes of Hamilton. Sister of Heather Rathbun (Dan) of Trenton, Jim Chatten (Betty Ann) of Hilton, and Gwen Best (Claude) of Bancroft. Linda will be fondly remembered by her nieces, nephews, aunts, cousins and friends. The family will receive friends at the Fellowship Christian Reform Church, 204 Main Street, Brighton on Friday, February 16 from 6 to 9 p.m., and Saturday, February 17 at 10 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock. Memorial Service to follow in the Church Saturday, February 17, 2018 at 11 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock. Cremation with interment at Hilton Cemetery at a later date. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Northumberland Community Care Brighton, or the Samaritanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Purse, would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements in care of the Brighton Funeral Home (613-475-2121). www.rushnellfamilyservices.com

WANTED

WANTED

Buyers of Standing Timber -hard maple, soft maple, red and white oak, etc. Work is done through good forestry practices with professional foresters and certified tree markers on staff. 705-957-7087.

BUYING COMIC BOOKS. Old comic books in the house? Turn them into cash today. My hobby, your gain. kentscomics@yahoo.ca 613-539-9617.

HELP WANTED

2 bedroom, bath, eat-in kitchen, living room, large deck, fridge, stove, dryer, washer hookup, & parking.

$880/MONTH

Plus gas & hydro Water & sewer included

AVAILABLE NOW 613-475-2149

BUSINESS SERVICES

DUMP RUNS Junk removal & willing to move articles for individuals.

BUSINESS SERVICES

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Trinity-St. Andrews United Church

Responsibilities include: Regular maintenance, Occasional cleaning, Yard work, and Furniture arrangement The position requires 15 hours for an average week. Salary will be negotiated. For consideration by the Search Committee, please provide a cover letter and resume care of: Custodian Search Committee, Trinity-St. Andrews United Church, 56 Prince Edward St, Box 1052, Brighton, ON K0K 1H0 or to careers@trinitystandrews.ca with the subject line Custodian.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Job Posting Job Title: BUSINESS UNIT:

Print Sales Representative Full Time (2017-2821) Metroland East , Advertising 65 Lorne St., Smiths Falls, ON, K7A 3K8

KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES: t 1SPTQFDUGPSOFXBDDPVOUT TPVSDFMFBET DPMEDBMM BOESFTFBSDIUP generate sales in print platforms t 3FTQPOTJCMFGPSPOHPJOHTBMFTXJUICPUIOFXBOEFYJTUJOHDMJFOUT t $POTJTUFOUMZBUUBJOBOEPSTVSQBTTTBMFTUBSHFUTBOEIJUUJOHSFWFOVF targets t %FWFMPQBOENBJOUBJOTUSPOHCVTJOFTTSFMBUJPOTIJQTXJUIDMJFOUTUP build business opportunities in the print industry t 1SPWJEFQSPGFTTJPOBMDVTUPNFSTFSWJDFJOFOTVSJOHTVQFSJPSDMJFOU satisfaction at all times t $SFBUFQSPQPTBMTBOEBEWFSUJTJOHTPMVUJPOTUISPVHIDPNQFMMJOH business cases t 1SPWJEFDVTUPNFSTXJUIDSFBUJWFBOEFèFDUJWFBEWFSUJTJOHTPMVUJPOT and play a key role in the overall success of our organization t "TQBSUPGUIJTSPMF ZPVXJMMCFSFRVJSFEUPIBOEMFDSFEJUDBSE  JOGPSNBUJPO.FUSPMBOE.FEJBJTB1$*DPNQMJBOUDPNQBOZ BOE  SFRVJSFTQFPQMFJOUIJTSPMFUPUBLF1$*USBJOJOHUPIBOEMFDBSETJOB safe and compliant manner WHAT WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE LOOKING FOR t $PMMFHF%JQMPNBJO#VTJOFTT .BSLFUJOHPSSFMBUFEmFME t "WBMJE%SJWFST-JDFOTFBOESFMJBCMFWFIJDMF OUR AODA COMMITMENT Metroland is committed to accessibility in employment and to FOTVSJOHFRVBMBDDFTTUPFNQMPZNFOUPQQPSUVOJUJFTGPSDBOEJEBUFT  JODMVEJOHQFSTPOTXJUIEJTBCJMJUJFT*ODPNQMJBODFXJUI"0%"  Metroland will endeavour to provide accommodation to persons with EJTBCJMJUJFTJOUIFSFDSVJUNFOUQSPDFTTVQPOSFRVFTU*GZPVBSFTFMFDUFE GPSBOJOUFSWJFXBOEZPVSFRVJSFBDDPNNPEBUJPOEVFUPBEJTBCJMJUZ EVSJOHUIFSFDSVJUNFOUQSPDFTT QMFBTFOPUJGZUIFIJSJOHNBOBHFSVQPO scheduling your interview. *GUIJTTPVOETMJLFBmUGPSZPVQMFBTFBQQMZCZMarch 2, 2018:

18 Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018

HELP WANTED

in Brighton is searching for a qualified, responsible and detail oriented custodian able to perform regular maintenance and cleaning tasks in and around our multi-building church property and grounds.

We are looking for an individual interested in a PRINT Sales Representative position. Applicants must be self-starters and exceptionally goal oriented as the focus of this position is on developing new revenue opportunities for both the print and digital media products.

ADULT BUILDING DOWNTON BRIGHTON

613-475-9591

HELP WANTED

THE OPPORTUNITY:

FOR RENT

DEATH NOTICE

HELP WANTED

Internal Candidates: apply to our internal posting portal on .Z.FU/FUVOEFS.Z$BSFFS External Candidates:BQQMZUPIUUQTDBSFFSTFONFUSPMBOEJDJNTDPN Thank you for your interest. Only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Job Posting Job Title: Business Unit:

Sales Representative, Full Time (2018-2991) Metroland East, Advertising 250 Sydney Street, Belleville, ON, K8P 3Z3

THE OPPORTUNITY: We are looking for an individual interested in a Sales Representative position, for our Belleville Office. Applicants must be self-starters and exceptionally goal oriented as the focus of this position is on developing new revenue opportunities for both the print and digital media products. KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES: t 1SPTQFDUGPSOFXBDDPVOUT TPVSDFMFBET DPMEDBMM BOESFTFBSDIUP generate sales in multi-media platforms t 3FTQPOTJCMFGPSPOHPJOHTBMFTXJUICPUIOFXBOEFYJTUJOHDMJFOUT t $POTJTUFOUMZBUUBJOBOEPSTVSQBTTTBMFTUBSHFUTBOEIJUUJOHSFWFOVF targets t %FWFMPQBOENBJOUBJOTUSPOHCVTJOFTTSFMBUJPOTIJQTXJUIDMJFOUTUP build business opportunities t 1SPWJEFQSPGFTTJPOBMDVTUPNFSTFSWJDFJOFOTVSJOHTVQFSJPSDMJFOU satisfaction at all times t $SFBUFQSPQPTBMTBOEBEWFSUJTJOHTPMVUJPOTUISPVHIDPNQFMMJOH business cases t 1SPWJEFDVTUPNFSTXJUIDSFBUJWFBOEFèFDUJWFBEWFSUJTJOHTPMVUJPOTBOE play a key role in the overall success of our organization t "TQBSUPGUIJTSPMF ZPVXJMMCFSFRVJSFEUPIBOEMFDSFEJUDBSE  JOGPSNBUJPO.FUSPMBOE.FEJBJT1$*DPNQMJBOUDPNQBOZ BOESFRVJSFT  QFPQMFJOUIJTSPMFUPUBLF1$*USBJOJOHUPIBOEMFDBSETJOBTBGFBOE compliant manner WHAT WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE LOOKING FOR t $PMMFHF%JQMPNBJO#VTJOFTT .BSLFUJOHPSSFMBUFEmFME t "WBMJE%SJWFST-JDFOTFBOESFMJBCMFWFIJDMF OUR AODA COMMITMENT Metroland is committed to accessibility in employment and to ensuring FRVBMBDDFTTUPFNQMPZNFOUPQQPSUVOJUJFTGPSDBOEJEBUFT JODMVEJOH QFSTPOTXJUIEJTBCJMJUJFT*ODPNQMJBODFXJUI"0%" .FUSPMBOEXJMM endeavour to provide accommodation to persons with disabilities in the SFDSVJUNFOUQSPDFTTVQPOSFRVFTU*GZPVBSFTFMFDUFEGPSBOJOUFSWJFXBOE ZPVSFRVJSFBDDPNNPEBUJPOEVFUPBEJTBCJMJUZEVSJOHUIFSFDSVJUNFOU process, please notify the hiring manager upon scheduling your interview. *GUIJTTPVOETMJLFBmUGPSZPVQMFBTFBQQMZCZMarch 2, 2018: Internal Candidates: apply to our internal posting portal on MyMetNet VOEFS.Z$BSFFS External Candidates:BQQMZUPIUUQTDBSFFSTFONFUSPMBOEJDJNTDPN Thank you for your interest. Only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Job Posting Job Title: Business Unit:

Mail and Variable Imaging Coordinator Full Time (2018-3000) Metroland East, 65 Lorne St., Smiths Falls, ON, K7A 3K8

THE OPPORTUNITY: Metroland East/Performance Printing is looking for a Mail and Variable Imaging Coordinator Do you like working with numbers, data and spreadsheets? Are you detailed oriented? This would be a great career for you. KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES: t t  t t t t t t t t  t t t t t t  t

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WHAT WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE LOOKING FOR t 1PTU4FDPOEBSZ&EVDBUJPOJOBOZPSSFMBUFEmFME t .JOJNVN ZFBSTJO-FUUFSTIPQBOEPSQSJOUFOWJSPONFOU t 1SPmDJFOUXJUI.JDSPTPGU8PSE &YDFM 0VUMPPL $47mMFT 'VTJPO1SP t .BJOUBJOnVFODZXJUI$1$BOE6141QPTUBMQSFTPSUJOHTPGUXBSF JBEESFTT "DDV;JQ"DDV5SBDF 1PTUBM0OF 8JOEPX#PPL &45

t 4USPOHXSJUUFOBOEWFSCBMDPNNVOJDBUJPOBOEDPNQFUFOUMJTUFOFS t ʾPSPVHILOPXMFEHFBOEVOEFSTUBOEJOHPG$BOBEB1PTUBOE6414 postal systems and regulations t 4USPOHBENJOJTUSBUJPOTLJMMTXJUIBDDVSBUFMZVQEBUJOHBOENBJOUBJOJOH information t $BQBCMFPGUBLJOHJOJUJBUJWFBOEDBOXPSLJOEFQFOEFOUMZXJUINJOJNBM direction t "CJMJUZUPFYDFMJOBGBTUQBDFE EFBEMJOFESJWFOBOEEFNBOEJOH environment with strong attention to detail t &èFDUJWFPSHBOJ[BUJPOBMTLJMMT BCJMJUZUPNBOBHFUJNFBOEQSJPSJUJ[FUBTLT appropriately t 4VDDFTTGVMMZIBOEMFDPOmEFOUJBMJOGPSNBUJPOBOEVTFBQQSPQSJBUF discretion

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Job Posting Job Title: Business Unit:

Direct Mail Manager, Full Time (2018-2998) Metroland East, 65 Lorne St., Smiths Falls, ON, K7A 3K8

THE OPPORTUNITY: Metroland East / Performance Printing is a provider of direct mail services and commercial printing. We are looking for an enthusiastic leader to fill the position of Direct Mail Manager. You will be working out of our Head Office, in Smiths Falls, ON providing front line contact for all our external and internal customers. This is a full-time position. KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES: t 4FFLPVUOFXPQQPSUVOJUJFTUPCSJOH%JSFDU.BJMXPSLUPPVSDPNQBOZ via internal channels and external prospects and sales people. Evaluate marketing goals and highlight opportunities that take advantage of  EJSFDUNBJMTUSBUFHJFT1SFTFOUUIFDPNQBOZTDBQBCJMJUJFT FYQFSJFODF and expertise in Direct Mail and support sales teams in their client relationships. t 1SPWJEFDPOTVMUBUJPOUP$VTUPNFS4FSWJDFBOE4BMFT5FBNTPOUIF planning and execution of Direct Mail campaigns for customers. t 1FSGPSNEBUBMJTUNBOJQVMBUJPOT t $SFBUF7%1UFNQMBUFT 'VTJPO1SPPS'MFY.BJM XJUIDPSSFTQPOEJOH data-lists for non-routine jobs, produce proofs and compose final files. t #VJMEBOENBJOUBJOXFCUPQSJOUTPMVUJPOTGPSDVTUPNFSTBDDPSEJOHUP their marketing and administration needs. t 3FHVMBUFBOENPOJUPSUIFBENJOJTUSBUJPOPG1PTUBMBDDPVOUTPOCFIBMG of internal and external customers. t .BJOUBJONPOJUPSFMJHJCJMJUZSFRVJSFNFOUTGPS$1$BOE6414  EFTJHOBUJPOT TVDIBT4NBSU.BJMÂ&#x2122;.BSLFUJOH1BSUOFS $1$ BOE  'VMM4FSWJDF.BJMFS 6414 CZLFFQJOHDVSSFOUPOSFHVMBUJPOTBOE implementing operational standards. t &YUFOTJWFLOPXMFEHFPGFYJTUJOHQPTUBMSFHVMBUJPOTBOEUSFOET t &YFDVUJWF#PBSENFNCFSTIJQPG/"..6 /BUJPOBM"TTPDJBUJPOPG  .BKPS.BJM6TFST BOE$/:1$$ $FOUSBM/FX:PSL1PTUBM$VTUPNFS  $PVODJM SFHVMBSBUUFOEBODFPGDIBQUFSNFFUJOHTBOEFOFSHFUJD  QBSUJDJQBUJPOJOJOEVTUSZEJTDVTTJPOT t "DUJWFQBSUJDJQBUJPOJOUIF$BOBEB1PTU3FHJTUFSFE1BSUOFS1SPHSBN  JODMVEJOHXFCJOBST DFSUJmDBUJPOUFTUTBOEBOOVBM3PBE4IPXT t %FWFMPQTUSBUFHJFTGPSOFXSFQFBUNBJMKPCT JNQMFNFOUXPSLnPXTGPS  FëDJFODZBOEFSSPSNJUJHBUJPO EFMFHBUFOFXXPSLnPXUPBQQSPQSJBUF  TUBèBOEQFSJPEJDBMMZFWBMVBUFPOHPJOHGVMmMMNFOU t .BJOUBJOQSPmDJFODZXJUITPGUXBSFQSPEVDUTBOEQPSUBMTBQQMJDBCMFUP Direct Mail, Web-to-Print and variable data fulfillment. t *OWFTUJHBUFBOEIFMQSFTPMWFNBJMQSPCMFNTUIBUNBZPDDVS JODMVEJOH  OFHPUJBUJOHXJUI$BOBEB1PTU6414PODSFEJUT TVSDIBSHFT DBODFMMFE  4UBUFNFOUTBOEPUIFSEJTQVUFT3FWJFXNBJMJOHTUIBUGBMMTIPSUPG successful fulfillment and suggest appropriate implementations to improve our processes.

BUILD YOUR

DREAM TEAM

flyers. coupons. shopping lists.

Shop Smart

Get the best prices for everything on your shopping list

WHAT WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE LOOKING FOR t 1PTU4FDPOEBSZ&EVDBUJPOJOBOZPSSFMBUFEmFME t .JOJNVN ZFBSTJO-FUUFSTIPQBOEPSQSJOUFOWJSPONFOU t XPSLJOHXJUI/VNCFST EBUBBOETQSFBETIFFUT t 1SPmDJFOUXJUI.JDSPTPGU8PSE &YDFM 0VUMPPL $47mMFT 'VTJPO1SP t &YUFOTJWFLOPXMFEHFPGEJSFDUNBJMEBUBQSPDFTTJOH EPDVNFOU  DPNQPTJUJPO $BOBEB1PTUBOE6414QPTUBMSFHVMBUJPOT t &YDFMMFOUDPNNVOJDBUJPO BENJOJTUSBUJPOBOEQMBOOJOHTLJMMT t $BQBCMFPGUBLJOHJOJUJBUJWFBOEXPSLJOHJOEFQFOEFOUMZXJUINJOJNBM direction. t "CJMJUZUPFYDFMJOBGBTUQBDFE EFBEMJOFESJWFOBOEEFNBOEJOH environment with strong attention to detail. t 4VDDFTTGVMMZIBOEMFDPOmEFOUJBMJOGPSNBUJPOBOEVTFBQQSPQSJBUF discretion.

OUR AODA COMMITMENT Metroland is committed to accessibility in employment and to ensuring FRVBMBDDFTTUPFNQMPZNFOUPQQPSUVOJUJFTGPSDBOEJEBUFT JODMVEJOH QFSTPOTXJUIEJTBCJMJUJFT*ODPNQMJBODFXJUI"0%" .FUSPMBOEXJMM endeavour to provide accommodation to persons with disabilities in the SFDSVJUNFOUQSPDFTTVQPOSFRVFTU*GZPVBSFTFMFDUFEGPSBOJOUFSWJFXBOE ZPVSFRVJSFBDDPNNPEBUJPOEVFUPBEJTBCJMJUZEVSJOHUIFSFDSVJUNFOU process, please notify the hiring manager upon scheduling your interview.

OUR AODA COMMITMENT .FUSPMBOEJTDPNNJUUFEUPBDDFTTJCJMJUZJOFNQMPZNFOUBOEUPFOTVSJOH FRVBMBDDFTTUPFNQMPZNFOUPQQPSUVOJUJFTGPSDBOEJEBUFT JODMVEJOH QFSTPOTXJUIEJTBCJMJUJFT*ODPNQMJBODFXJUI"0%" .FUSPMBOEXJMM endeavour to provide accommodation to persons with disabilities JOUIFSFDSVJUNFOUQSPDFTTVQPOSFRVFTU*GZPVBSFTFMFDUFEGPSBO JOUFSWJFXBOEZPVSFRVJSFBDDPNNPEBUJPOEVFUPBEJTBCJMJUZEVSJOHUIF SFDSVJUNFOUQSPDFTT QMFBTFOPUJGZUIFIJSJOHNBOBHFSVQPOTDIFEVMJOH ZPVSJOUFSWJFX

If this sounds like a fit for you please apply by March 2, 2018:

*GUIJTTPVOETMJLFBmUGPSZPVQMFBTFBQQMZCZMarch 2, 2018:

Internal Candidates: apply to our internal posting portal on MyMetNet under My Career

Internal Candidates:BQQMZUPPVSJOUFSOBMQPTUJOHQPSUBMPO.Z.FU/FU VOEFS.Z$BSFFS

External Candidates:BQQMZUPIUUQTDBSFFSTFONFUSPMBOEJDJNTDPN

External Candidates:BQQMZUPIUUQTDBSFFSTFONFUSPMBOEJDJNTDPN

ʾBOLZPVGPSZPVSJOUFSFTU0OMZUIPTFDBOEJEBUFTTFMFDUFEGPSBO interview will be contacted.

ʾBOLZPVGPSZPVSJOUFSFTU0OMZUIPTFDBOEJEBUFTTFMFDUFEGPSBO interview will be contacted.

Download the Free Save.ca Mobile App

Learn more at Save.ca/mobile Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018 19


For a limited time you can have a New Energy Saving Furnace Installed at “COST PRICE” with purchase of off season Central Air! This is great news for your wallet if your current equipment is over 13 years old. Because, yes it’s absolutely true…you can actually replace your old (and probably very loud and inefficient) furnace and air conditioner as a package for less than you would have to pay at any other time of year. Why would I sell new furnaces at cost? Please allow me to explain… The winter months can be tough for my business. Most people want to wait until the weather improves to upgrade, and therefore my business always picks up in the spring. That is why I’ve decided to do something about it to improve business this winter. I employ some great local people. I really want to keep them working during these long winter months. I need to cover my rent, utilities, insurance and taxes during these challenging winter months too. I’m betting that if I make you an irresistible offer I can keep my professional staff busy working instead of not paying them to sit at home. This could be a win for you, me, and my employees.

Perfect Fit For Your Home Just call toll free 1-866-866-7886 anytime. We will come out and measure your home and determine the proper size for optimum energy savings. We will show you the real world price on the system that fits your home. Then, we will show you the substantial savings available now. And it will include all labour and installation materials, and include a 10 year warranty. Nothing is left out! Absolutely No Obligation Even after your free consultation is over, there is absolutely no obligation to buy. If you decide you don’t want to take advantage of the spectacular cost savings… that’s okay! You Can Buy With NO Cash Consider this….if you decide to make monthly investments instead of paying cash, the entire amount of your payments might even be offset by the savings on your utility bills. It’s like “having your cake and eating it too.

Kevin Dentremont, Owner

613-392-3039

RE: SAVE: EXPIRATION:

FURNACE TUNE-UP & SAFETY INSPECTION OR REPAIR TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS & 00 CENTS $25.00 MARCH 31, 2018

IS IT TIME FOR YOUR GAS FURNACE TUNE-UP & INSPECTION? AS A COURTESY, WE ARE REMINDING YOU THAT IT MAY BE TIME FOR A TUNE-UP AND SAFETY INSPECTION, WHICH WE RECOMMEND BE DONE ANNUALLY. YOU CAN USE THIS VOUCHER TO SAVE $25.00 ON OUR CHARGE FOR A TUNE-UP AND SAFETY INSPECTION. OUR STANDARD TUNE-UP CHARGE IS $155.64 FOR GAS AND $239.64 FOR OIL REDEEM BEFORE IT EXPIRES AND YOUR COST IS REDUCED TO $130.64 FOR GAS AND $215.64 FOR OIL. ONLY ONE VOUCHER PER HOUSEHOLD. PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE AT 613-392-3039 TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT

RECENT CUSTOMER COMMENT: “GREAT EXPERIENCE! ««««« Read our Great Reviews at homeairecare.ca AFTER CALLING SEVERAL DIFFERENT COMPANIES FOR QUOTES I WAS PLEASED THAT I FOUND HOME AIRE CARE. I CHOSE THEM BECAUSE THEIR CUSTOMER SERVICE WAS VERY PLEASANT. I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED AND LIKED THE PERSON WHO CAME OUT FOR QUOTING THE PROJECT AND COMFORTABLE WITH LETTING HIM INTO MY HOME. THE TECHNICIANS TOOK ALL THE NECESSARY PRECAUTIONS TO PROTECT MY HOME AND CLEAN UP AFTER THEMSELVES. I FOUND THEM VERY PROFESSIONAL IN THEIR WORK! EXCELLENT JOB FROM STARTING THE PROJECT TO FINISHING ON TIME AS THEY SAID THEY WOULD! .” ~ SIMON C., NAPANEE DEC. 21/17

613-392-3039

20 Brighton Independent - Thursday, February 15, 2018

Brighton021518  

Brighton Independent February 15, 2018

Brighton021518  

Brighton Independent February 15, 2018

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