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School Readiness Calendar

September 2016 to August 2017


Welcome to our 7th annual Bright Futures

School Readiness Calendar! Wow! I can’t believe it’s that time of year again! Our calendar has been updated to provide your family with a wealth of early childhood knowledge along with tons of activities to support your child during the early years. As a parent, you are the 1st and most influential teacher for your child. We hope our calendar will assist you in spending quality, fun-filled time with your family. To receive additional resources or to find child care in your area, please call us at 970-728-5613. Bright Futures would like to thank Alpine Bank for sponsoring this project again this year. Enjoy!

— Kathleen Merritt, Executive Director

Bright Futures for Early Childhood & Families is dedicated to providing leadership, innovation, influence and resources to ensure that Ouray, San Miguel, Delta and Montrose Counties have quality early childhood care, education, health, mental health and family services. Your child care resource and referral agency for Delta, Montrose, Ouray & San Miguel Counties.

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org


is a proud supporter of education in our communities “An easy way to

make a difference.” Education 4190 VALID FROM

GOOD THRU

Each time you use your Education Loyalty Debit Card, Alpine Bank donates 10 cents per transaction to help local, school-related organizations and projects.

Because where you bank matters.

Alpine Bank wants to reward your child for getting good grades. Bring a copy of your child's most recent school report card into any of the Alpine Bank locations listed below. Four times during the school year, we'll draw several winning report cards from the bunch. Winning report cards will receive $10 for every A, O, or 4 and $5 for every B, S, or 3 for up to 5 main subjects. That means your child could earn $50 for a straight-A report card!

Delta | 1660 Highway 92 | 874-0922 • East Montrose | 1400 East Main Street | 249-0400 • Montrose | 2770 Alpine Drive | 240-0900 Ouray | 917 Main Street | 325-4200 • Ridgway | 119 Liddell Drive | 626-4100 • Telluride | 120 S. Pine Street | 728-5050


The Importance of the Early Years The early years from birth to age eight are critically important for all areas of learning and development. We know that 80 percent of a child’s intellect, personality, and social skills are developed in the first five years of life. Those skills and personality traits continue to develop as kids grow. That is why it is important for everyone – parents, grandparents, friends and neighbors – to help kids develop and start on a path to success. Early experiences are important in shaping how successful children are later in life. Studies show that kids who have quality early childhood experiences, including attending quality early childhood programs, are more likely to graduate from high school, own a home, have a job and earn a higher income. Learning in the early years lays the foundation for a successful and happy future for Colorado’s kids.


Key Points for Transitioning to Kindergarten Skills that will make your child's transition easier:  Know their first and last name, phone number and parent’s names  Able to listen and follow directions  Know how to play cooperatively and take turns  Use words like yesterday and tomorrow when talking about activities  Can sit in a group for a story  Practice cutting on a line  Identify basic shapes, colors, numbers and count 10 objects  Recognize upper and lower case letters  Able to use materials properly and put them away  Independently put on and tie shoes, boots, zip/button coat, wash hands, go the bathroom  Can write their first name

How Parents can help prepare and support their children:  Read to your child daily. Have your child retell the story in their own words. Ask questions such as: how many? What is their name? What do you think is going to happen? What would you do? What happened first? Next? Last?  Stress the value of education and the importance of lifelong learning.  Send your child to school rested and fed.  Communicate with your child. Ask questions, listen and be interested.  Communicate with your child’s teacher:  Read any notes and/or newsletters that are sent home  Attend parent-teacher conferences. How is your child doing socially and academically? How can you help your child’s progress at home?  Volunteer to help in the school or do projects from home.  Inform the teacher of life events which may impact learning or school behavior.  Voice questions and concerns about your child’s adjustment to school.


Did you know... THERE ARE ONLY ABOUT 2,000 days between the day a child is born and the first day they begin school? In this short time, 80% of a child’s intellect, personality, and social skills are developed. Those skills and personality traits continue to develop as kids grow.

by Victoria

books to look for at the library: Welcome to Kindergarten by Anne Rockwell My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss Amigos en la Escuela by Rochelle Bunnett My Mom Made Me Go To School by Judy Delton Llama Llama Misses Mama by Anna Dewdney

High-quality, early-childhood programs allow children to experience stimulating interactions in safe and healthy environments. Quality interactions facilitate up to 700 neural connections every second during these early years. This is why it is important for everyone– parents, grandparents, friends and neighbors– to help Colorado kids develop and start on a path to success.


2016

September Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Children who attend high-quality early learning programs 1 2 3 do better in school, and in life. Quality programs promote positive relationships among children, teachers, and parents, and include a curriculum that fosters all areas of a child’s development. For more information go to www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

Talk with your child about community helpers

Day 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Labor

Help your child practice writing their name

Day 11 Grandparents 12 Patriot Day

18

13

Take your child to buy writing and drawing supplies

19

14

15

26

16

17

23

24

Collect leaves with your child and help them make a collage

20

21

22

27

Listen to an audiobook with your child

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

Fall Equinox

Play “I Spy” with your child

Make leaf rubbings with your child

25

Federal Lands Cleanup Day - find and participate in a local campaign!

Cut out shapes and play a matching game

28

29

30


How to Help Your Child Have a Successful Morning Mornings can be a particularly challenging time for parents. Getting your entire family up and out the door is no easy task! It is important to understand that your morning routine serves as the foundation for your family’s entire day. You can create a morning routine that not only helps your day to begin more smoothly, but also teaches your child important skills that he needs to become more independent and confident. TRY THIS AT HOME:  Use a visual schedule with items such as photos, clipart, or objects that shows your child the steps in his morning routine. This visual schedule can help him to understand the expectations of the morning routine.  If your child has trouble waking up in the morning, it might be because he is not getting enough sleep at night. Set a consistent bedtime and stick with it. When a child’s bedtime changes it can make it harder for him to wake up in the morning.  Plan ahead. Use your bedtime routine to plan for the next day together. 1. Lay out the clothes your child will wear. 2. Pack their backpack. 3. Discuss the morning routine and talk about the day ahead.

by Dante

books to look for at the library: The Family Book by Todd Parr How do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight? by Jane Yolen Cinco Monitos Bincando en la Cama (5 Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed) by Eileen Christelow The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard Atwater

 Offer your child options to give them some power over their morning routine. For example, “First, get dressed. Then, you get a choice! Would you like to have cereal or pancakes for breakfast?”  Include bonding time in your morning routine. Time to read, bathe or snuggle will help your child feel loved and calm beginning his tasks for the day.  Encourage your child. When your child completes a task and follows the routine, provide positive and specific encouragement.

When you follow a repetitive morning routine, you allow your child to gain practice with important skills such as dressing, bathing and grooming and give him a feeling of confidence and success. A calm, loving morning routine at home sets the tone for the entire day.


2016

October Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Does your family need help with health insurance coverage? 1 Contact Tri-County Health Network. Certified enrollment navigators are available to help process and enroll eligible children, pregnant women, and low-income families into programs such as Medicaid and CHP+. Health Coverage Guides are trained individuals who help navigate the Colorado Health Benefits Exchange, as well as provide information on the Afforadable Care Act. For more info, visit online at tchnetwork.org or call 970-708-7096.

As you shop for foods, name the colors you see with your child

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Child Health Day Talk with your child about balanced nutrition and exercise

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10

Cut a picture into puzzle shapes and have your child put it back together

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17

15

Play pattern games outside: stomp-stompclap, jump-clap-jump

Have your child read you their favorite story

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22

Let your child help you make a simple meal for lunch

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Halloween

31

Help your child make up a song about their favorite animal

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

Read a Halloween story


How to Help Your Child Have a Successful Bedtime TRY THIS AT HOME:  Watch for and acknowledge your child’s signs of sleepiness. She might pull on her ears, rub her eyes or put her head on your shoulder. For example, you can say, “I see you rubbing your eyes. You look sleepy. Let’s get ready for bed.” Teaching your child to label and understand her body cues will help her to use language instead of challenging behavior to communicate.  Use a visual schedule made with photos, clipart or other objects to help your child see the steps in her bedtime routine. A visual schedule can help her to understand the steps and expectations of the routine.  Provide your child with activities, sounds or objects that help her feel calm and restful during the hour before bedtime. Make these activities part of your nightly routine. For example, reading books, listening to soft, calming music, and/or giving your child her pacifier, favorite blanket or stuffed animal will all help her to understand that it is time to calm down and prepare for sleep.  Tell your child what will happen when she wakes up. She may be resistant to going to sleep because she does not want to miss out on an activity or have her day to come to an end. Reassure her that tomorrow will be filled with more fun and special time. You can also include tomorrow’s activity on the visual schedule (e.g., provide a picture of her teacher or preschool).

by Ashley

books to look for at the library: Puss in Boots by Robert Munsch Strega Nona by Tomie de Paola El Pez Arco Iris by Marcus Pfister The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by John Scieszka My Father’s Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett

 Give your child your undivided and unrushed attention as you prepare her for bed. Bedtime can be a positive experience filled with quality time for you and your child. Bedtime is a daily opportunity for you to build and nurture a positive relationship with your child.

Predictable routines make children feel safe and secure. When you provide a predictable bedtime routine, you are teaching your child the skills she needs to relax and transition from the busy activity of the day to preparation for sleep. When your child is able to get a restful sleep, you will also feel more calm and rested.


2016

November Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 2 3 4 5 National Novel Writing Month - help your child write their own story

Savings Day Day 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Time Ends Daylight

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14

Election

Veterans

Let your child vote for what to have for dinner

Ask your child to talk about they did yesterday and what they will do tomorrow

15

16

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18

Help your child learn to spell their name

20

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22

Have a picnic in the living room

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24

Thanksgiving

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Talk with your child about things they are thankful for

Name three foods that are yellow

27

19

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29

Practice jumping, throwing and catching a ball

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

30

The average kid will have

153 teachers.

The first one determines whether they love the other 152.


Building Math Skills Use number words and point out written numbers when you and your child do things together. • Show your child numbers on clocks, calendars, houses, etc. Once they learn to recognize numbers, have them call them out to you when they see them. In the Kitchen: • Let them count how many pieces of cereal, raisins, etc, are in their snack. • Tell your child, “Put three forks and three plates on the table please.” At the Store: • Have your child count and cross off items on your shopping list. • Let your child help get four apples, or two cans of peas, etc.

by Wilder

books to look for at the library: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein ¡Llegó la Navidad, David! (It’s Christmas, David!) by David Shannon Click ,Clack, Moo: Cows that Type by Doreen Cronin Kindergarten Rocks! by Katie Davis

Play number and counting games with your child. • Can your child find three different socks? Two magnets? Six toy cars? • Play Simon Says using numbers. “Simon Says clap 5 times. Stomp two times.” • Play games like “What Time is it, Mr. Fox?” with your child.

Read, tell stories and sing songs. • Read or tell stories such as “The Three Little Pigs” to your child. • Teach your child nursery rhymes like “This Little Piggie,” and “One, Two, Buckle my Shoe.”


2016

December Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 2 3 In the 1960s... In 2013... Only 1 in 10 mothers of children under five worked outside the home. 11% of working mothers were the primary earner.

Nearly two-thirds of working mothers had children under five. 40% of working mothers were the primary earner.

At the grocery store, let your child help you pick out items on your list

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Help your child make a Menorah out of construction paper

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12

Make handmade holiday gifts with your children

13

Go for a walk with your child

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22

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Help your child build a snowman

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Christmas Day

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21

Winter Solstice

Show your child what time it is throughout the day

Leave a night light on to welcome back the sun

25

14

Find the number “4� on different things today

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27

Kwanzaa begins

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

Read a Christmas story with your child

28 Have a pint-sized celebration with your child

29

Hanukkah begins

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31

New Year's Eve


Play is Learning Your child loves to play.

From the time they are born they have been discovering what their body can do. Every time she plays, your child’s brain is making new connections that help her development. Their play may look messy, silly, noisy or repetitive. But know that they are doing some serious learning! Play is how they test the possibilities and explore their world. There is no “right” way to play! Play is good for your child’s brain NO MATTER WHAT. But it can be better if you join in! Remember to let them LEAD THE WAY. When you take over, they feel that their ideas don’t have value.

by Caroline When you play with your child…

books to look for at the library: Snowmen at Night by Caralyn Buehner Buenas Noches, Luna (Good Night Moon) by Margaret Wise Brown The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst

 It builds attachment between you  It helps a child express their feelings and boosts their feelings of self-worth  It enhances your child’s persistence, attention span, memory and ability to focus, all skills that are important for school success!


2017

January Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

New Year’s

Day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Hanukkah and Kwanzaa end

8

9

10

Keep the TV off today and read books with your child instead

15

11

12

18

14

Practice singing the ABCs with your child

Have your child name letters in tonight’s dinner

King, 16 LutherMartin 17 Jr. Day

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Use a cookbook to make something new together

Have a family game night

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Make a shopping list with your child

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Find animals that start with the first letter of your child’s name

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

Chinese New Year

Draw a picture with your child

What is Child Find? Child Find is a school district service for the screening and assessment of children birth to five. It includes all cognition, motor skills, speech & language, social emotional, hearing, and vision. There is no cost for these services. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait; speak to your doctor or local Child Find. See back cover for contact information.


Read with your child every day. Create a cozy book nook for your child. • Keep a variety of reading materials in this special place. • Let your child pick out a colorful rug or small pillow to keep in their special reading place. • Talk with your child about the different parts of a book, and how to take care of books. • Show your child how to read a book (left to right, front to back).

Encourage a lifelong love of reading. • Let your child see you reading, and read with your child every day. Point to the words as you read them out loud. • Give your child books or magazine subscriptions as gifts.

by Justine

books to look for at the library: Butterfly, Butterfly by Petr Horacek Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale by Mo Willems ¡Fiesta! by Ginger Foglesong Guy The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes

• Get a library card for your family, and visit the library often. • Let your child pick out a variety of different types of books and other reading materials.

Teach your child that words are everywhere. • Name a letter and have your child find things that begin with that letter. Next, see if they can find that letter in a word. • If you let your child watch TV, turn on closed-captioning. You might be surprised at the words your child will recognize!


2017

February Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Day 1 2 3 4 Groundhog

Make homemade Valentine’s Day cards with your child this month

Find animal tracks in the snow

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Make a dragon out of an old egg carton

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14

Valentine’s Day

Set up a play date for your child

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20

Presidents’ Day

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25

Help your child write a note to a friend or relative

Show your child who the president is

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Use a cookbook to make a new recipe together with your child

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28

Help your child practice identifying letters in their favorite book

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

Every time you read to your child, new brain cells are formed, thousands of other brain cells are “turned on,” and existing neural pathways are strengthened. Children who are read to at an early age are more successful at learning to read, and reading aloud to a child is the single most important step in developing their early literacy skills.


Have your child do things each day that use large muscles. Collect toys to help your child use big muscles. • Make bean bags by filling a sock part way with dry beans, then tying a knot in the sock. You can play catch or a variety of other games. • Empty plastic bottles make great bowling pins or targets.

Let your child spend time outside. • Go for a walk with your child and practice different ways of walking: sideways, backwards, long and short steps, marching, fast, slow, etc. • Listen for different animal sounds. Ask your child to make the same sound, and guess what animal it is. • Take your child to a playground.

Give your child things to do when playing. by Rye

books to look for at the library: Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss Is Your Buffalo Ready for Kindergarten? by Audrey Vernick Llama Llama, Rojo Pijama by Anna Dewdney I Like Myself by Karen Beaumont Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

• Set up an obstacle course: let your child crawl over, under and around chairs and tables. • Lay a rope on the floor, or draw one outside on the ground. Have your child walk on it without falling off. • Have your child throw bean bags into buckets, or draw a circle on the ground and have your child throw bean bags into it.

Can your child... Bounce like a kangaroo? Waddle like a duck? Flutter like a butterfly?

Stomp like an elephant? Gallop like a horse? Strut like a rooster?


2017

March Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 2 3 4 At the end of the day, the most overwhelming key to a child’s success is the positive involvement of parents.

Dr. Seuss’ birthday Read your favorite Dr. Seuss book

Make a puppet out of a paper bag or a sock

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 See how many times your child can hop on one foot

Time 12 SavingDaylight 13 starts

Play a card game or a board game with your child

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16

Day 17 St. Patrick’s 18

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See how many green things you can find

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Spring Equinox

21

First Day of Spring Plant some seeds with your child

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25 Let your child splash in a puddle

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28 Count things like socks, beans, and buttons

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

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Supervise and limit your family's technology time. Here are some ideas:

by Eddie

• Before you let your child watch a show, screen it first and make sure it’s appropriate, and teaches the kind of lessons you want your child to learn. • Watch TV with your child, and ask them questions about what is going on. • Interest your child in other activities, such as reading, drawing, playing outside, listening to or making music and card or board games. • Make meal time family time, and turn off the TV. Talk about what you did that day, and your plans for the next day. • Set a good example by watching less TV yourself. • Act out scenes from your favorite show or movie with your child. • Find books that extend from the programs your child enjoys.

Know what your child is watching.

books to look for at the library: Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin Las Nanas de Abuelita (Grandmother’s Nursery Rhymes) by Nelly Palacio Jaramillo The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt Good Night, Gorilla by Peggy Rathmann

• Know what is developmentally-appropriate for your child. • Ask your child about the kinds of shows or movies they like to watch. • Ask your child what their favorite/least favorite part of the show or movie was, and what they liked/didn’t like about it. • Keep the TV out of your child’s bedroom. • Choose programs that encourage creative and critical thinking.


2017

April Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 Did you know that...

April Fool’s Day

‌every $1 invested in early childhood learning can save more than $7 later on? Quality early childhood education programs can improve math and reading skills, reduce violent crime, and teen pregnancy rates, and increase social intelligence and graduation rates.

Let your child wear a mismatched outfit

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Look for words that start with the same letter

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11

National Library Week - take your child to the library for a library card

16

Easter

Have your child guess what books will be about by looking at the covers

Go for a walk with your child

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22

Help your child sort and count coins

17

Tax Day

18

Plant a tree with your child

Walk outside and look for birds

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

Have your child read you their favorite book

Earth Day

Let your child help you clean up after dinner


Skills that help ease

transition into kindergarten READING READINESS  Remembers pictures from a printed page  Repeats a 6 to 8 word sentence  Pretends to read  Identifies own first name in writing  Attempts to print own first name  Answers questions about a short story

by Griffin

Go Away, Big Green Monster by Ed Emberley The Lorax by Dr. Seuss Rin, Rin, Rin (Do, Re, Mi) by José-Luis Orozco The Monster at the End of This Book by Jon Stone The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper

 Recognizes triangles, circles, squares & rectangle

 Alternate feet walking downstairs

LISTENING & SEQUENCING  Follows simple directions  Pays attention

 Understands words are read left to right

 Retells a simple story in sequence

 Familiar with the letters of the alphabet

 Repeats a sequence of sounds

 Knows some nursery rhymes

 Repeats a sequence of numbers heard

SIZE, POSITION & DIRECTION

 Counts objects

 Up and down  In and out

 Understands day and night  Knows age and birthday

 Front and back  Empty and full  More and less  Fast and slow  Top and bottom

 Expresses self verbally  Looks forward to going to school  Recognizes authority  Shares with others

 Walk backwards for 5 feet

 Helps with family chores

 Throw a ball

 Works independently

 Clap hands  Build with blocks

 Identifies other children by name

 Complete simple 5 piece puzzle or less

 Can take care of toilet needs independently

 Draw or color beyond a simple scribble

 Cares for own belongings

 Button clothes

 Zip clothes  Control pencil and crayon well  Cut and draw simple shapes

 Big and little  Long and short

SOCIALEMOTIONAL

 Stand on one foot for 10 seconds

 Handle scissors

 Counts to 10

TIME

 Run, Jump & Hop  Walk a straight line

 Looks at pictures and tells a story

 Knows the meaning of simple words

MOTOR SKILLS

 Recognizes primary colors

 Recognizes common sounds

NUMBERS

books to look for at the library:

RECOGNIZES COLORS & SHAPES

MY CHILD KNOWS...

 Dresses self  Brushes teeth  Can be away from parents for 2 to 3 hours  Joins in family conversation  Carries a plate of food

 Body parts

 Maintains self-control

 Own first & last name

 Gets along well with others

 Parents’ names

 Talks easily

 Home address

 Meets visitors without shyness

 Home phone number

 Puts toys away


2017

May Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

de Mayo 1 2 3 4 5 6 Cinco

Read a new story with your child, then ask them what their favorite part was and why

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Turn on some music and dance with your child

14

Mothers’ Day

15

16

Make tissue paper flowers with your child

Find things that start with the letter “M”

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Listen to a book on tape or a CD with your child.

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23

Help your child find different shapes around the house

Count the doors and windows in your home

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Memorial Day

24

30 Let your child read to their animals, dolls, stuffed animals and family

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

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25

Play outside with your child

Visit your local library, book store, or nature preserve. Look for books or exhibits on how local wildlife adapt to winter, and learn about what kinds of animal tracks you might find in the snow!


Art Fun

Parent Child Activity  Read a bunch of art books. Take this opportunity to talk about what authors and illustrators do. Remind the child that they will be the author and illustrator of their own book.  Point out colors and shapes and how we use our imagination.  Let kiddos do some crazy painting — finger paint, use huge brushes, mix colors, etc.  Process over product! by Luke

books to look for at the library: Eating the Alphabet by Lois Ehlert Skippyjon Jones by Judy Schachner ¿Has Llenada una Cubeta Hoy? (Have You Filled a Bucket Today?) by Carol McCloud Glad Monster, Sad Monster by Ed Emberley The Peace Book by Todd Parr

 Cut out shapes for your child or let them practice using scissors.  Let them glue shapes onto a page and then decorate with markers, crayons, etc. They are illustrating!  Have them tell you the story about their illustration while you write it down, WORD FOR WORD!  They are the author now too!


2017

June Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

New science tells us that our children's first years 1 2 3 are when they develop the foundation for all future learning. Every time we connect with them, it’s not just their eyes that light up– it’s their brains. In these moments, half a million neurons fire at once, taking in all the things we say and do.

Teach your child your address, and telephone and cell phone numbers

Cut out shapes and play a matching game

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Read a story together, then act it out using puppets, dolls or stuffed animals

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13

Point out signs throughout the day and read them together

14

Flag Day

Help your child make and decorate a bookmark

18

Fathers’ Day

19

15

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17

23

24

Together, make up a story about visiting the library

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21

Summer Solstice

22

Let your child use utensils and pots and pans to play a live concert

With your child, make an animal collage

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Help your child think of an animal for each letter of the alphabet

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

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Books About Going to School

by Jaye

books to look for at the library: Chicka, Chicka, Boom Boom by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems My Mexico / México Mío by Tony Johnston Little Blue and Little Yellow by Leo Lionni Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes by Eric Litwin

Carlos Goes to School – ANDERSON

I Started School Today – FRANDESEN

I’d Rather Stay Home – BARKIN

My First Days of School – HAMILTON-MERITT

Berenstain Bears Go to School – BERENSTAIN

The School Mouse – HARRIS

The Kindergarten Book – CALMENSON

The Monkey that Went to School – MESHOVAR

Look Out Kindergarten Here I Come – CARLSON

Who’s Going to Take Care of Me? – MESHOVAR

We Like Kindergarten – CASSIDY

Twenty-One Children – ORMSBY

Will I have a Friend? – COHEN

First Day of School – OXENBURY

Kindergarten Rocks – DAVIS

The Kissing Hand – PENA

Carl Goes to Daycare – DAY

Molly at the Library – RADLAUER

Llama, llama Misses Mama – DEUDNEY

The Night Before Kindergarten – WING

Grover Goes to School – ELLIOTT

Morris Goes to School – WISEMAN


2017

July Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 Kids are ready to learn sooner than you think. In fact, studies show that 90% of brain growth occurs before age 5. A top-quality pre-kindergarten program gets kids off to a great start. And with a great start, who knows where they’ll end up?

Eat an apple together and help your child count the seeds

Day 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Independence

Help your child make patriotic decorations for your home

9

Take a walk outside and look for insects and animals

Play ‘which is bigger?’ using animals

10

11

12

13

Take a walk with your child and look for butterflies

16

17

18

Pretend to be different animals with your child

14

15

Have a concert with instruments made from items around your home

19

20

21

22

Fill a container with dirt and small toys, then let your child dig for treasure

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

31

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org


Getting Ready for.. Kindergarten Play school with your child. • Make a picture list of school supplies your child can find around your home, and let them go ‘shopping’ for supplies. • Practice following a daily schedule: sing songs, read stories, play outdoors, and eat a meal from a lunch box. • Use stuffed animals and/or dolls to let your child pretend to be the teacher. • Let your child practice using different school supplies: crayons, scissors, glue sticks, etc. • Pretend your car is the school bus.

Visit your child's school with them. • Find the classroom, restrooms, playground, cafeteria and library.

by Declan

• Call ahead and schedule a meeting with your child’s teacher. • See if you can visit the when class is in session.

books to look for at the library: More More More, Said the Baby by Vera B. Williams What Makes a Rainbow? by Betty Ann Schwartz Cuando Estoy (When I Am) by Gladys Rosa-Mendoza My Very First Mother Goose by Iona Opie My Lucky Day by Keiko Kasza

Establish a school routine. • Practice going to bed at the same time every night, and getting up at the same time every morning. • Store backpacks and school supplies in the same place every day. • Pick out clothes the night before.


2017

August Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Day 1 2 3 4 5 Colorado

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Talk about seeds, plants, and how different vegetables grow

13

14

Make a healthy snack with your child

15

16

17

21

22

Help your child go outside and make mud pies

27

23

24

29 Take a walk outside with your child and talk about what you hear

www.BrightFuturesForChildren.org

30

25

26 Visit the library and check out a music CD with your child

Bake something together, and let your child practice measuring

28

19

Talk about how the weather changes throughout the year

Jump in place while counting to ten

20

18

31


School Districts Calendar Norwood School District First Day

Delta County School District

August 23

First Day

Montrose & Olathe School District

August 22

Septemberember 5

No School

September 5

Half Day

September 16

No School

September 26

Half Day

September 30

No School

October 10-14

Half Day

October 14

No School

October 31

October 28

No School

November 23-25

November 4

No School

Dec. 19-January 2

November 11

No School

January 16

November 21-25

No School

February 20-24

December 2

No School

April 10-14

No School

Half Day No School Half Day No School Half Day Half Day

December 16

Half Day

December 22

Last Day

No School

Dec. 23- January 9

No School

January 16

No School

January 27

No School

February 3

No School

February 17

First Day

No School

February 20

No School

Half Day

March 10

No School

Half Day

March 24

Half Day

No School

May 26

Ridgway School District

Telluride School District

August 29 September 2-5 October 24 November 9-10

March 31-April 9

No School

November 11

Half Day

April 28

No School

November 21-25

Half Day

May 12

No School

Dec. 22-January 6

Last Day

May 25

No School

February 20-27

Half Day

March 8-9

No School

March 10

No School

April 3-10

No School

May 29

Last Day

First Day August 17 No School September 5 No School October 14 No School October 17-18 No School November 21-25 No School Dec. 19-January 3 No School January 16 No School February 17-21 No School March 10 No School April 3-7 No School April 28 & May 1 Last Day - Half Day May 24

June 1

First day August 18 Half day September 2 Labor Day - No School September 5 No School - K-6 ONLY September 20 Half day October 28 No School K-12 November 1 Thanksgiving Holiday Nov. 21-25 Winter Break December 19-30 MLK Day - No School January 16 No School February 17-20 Half day Mar 24 No School March 28 Spring Break April 3-1 Memorial Day - No School May 29 Last Day June 8 Graduation/Teacher Work Day June 9

Ouray School District First Day No School Half Day No School Half Day No School No School No School No School No School No School Last Day

September 6 October 13-14 November 23 November 24-25 December 23 Dec. 26- January 9 January 16 February 16-20 March 27- April 3 April 3 May 5 May 26


Helpful Links: zerotothree.org

nationaljewish.org

Science-based info and tools designed to help parents and caregivers nurture their young children’s development. Their approach to parent education is based on the belief that parents are the true experts on their children, and that there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach to raising children.

Allergy & asthma info. Use their Asthma Wizard to read about medication.

aap.org American Academy of Pediatrics. Visit the Parenting Corner and Health Tips links.

childrenshospitalden.org Denver Children’s Hospital. You can access information about services for all children in Colorado. This site is a good source for additional resources for families about certain conditions and diseases. Just use the search engine.

chop.edu Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Visit this site for helpful children health tips.

unbocs.org Uncompahgre Board of Cooperative Services and Child Find provides a comprehensive set of services that support learning in the Uncompahgre region of Southwestern Colorado.

aad.org American Academy of Dermatology. The best dermatology site.

NIH.gov National Institutes of Health. Current info on children’s health issues.

familyeducation.com The best of the internet’s content, resources, and shopping for parents, teachers, and kids. Launched in September, 2000, the company’s mission is to be an online consumer network of the world’s best learning and information resources, personalized to help parents, teachers, and students of all ages take contriol of their learning and make it part of their everyday lives.

cdc.gov

The Center of Disease Control and Prevention. They bill themselves as “Your online source for credible health information”. This site has fabulous resources on all kinds of health and safety topics.

montessoriconnections.com Informative website for the Montessori Community.

parentsasteachers.org Parents As Teachers National Center.

tchnetwork.org

TCHNetwork is improving the overall health of our rural region by identifying, developing and operating Community Programs focused on quality and in reducing costs to increase access to care in our region.

earlylearningco.org

Here you will find developmental guidelines for your kids from birth to 8 years old!

csefel.vanderbilt.edu babycenter.com Track your baby’s development during pregnancy and beyond. Subscribe to the free email newsletter millions of parents rave about. You’ll also receive valuable coupons, sale notices, and free offers from BabyCenter and partners.

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning. Information about the Pyramid Model and scripted stories to help your children understand social interactions, situations, expectations, social cues, the script of unfamiliar activities, and/or social rules.

coloradoshines.com Colorado Shines is a quality rating and improvement system used to assess, improve and communicate the level of quality in early care and education programs. Colorado Shines assigns a quality rating to licensed early care and education programs, similar to rating systems for other service-related industries like hotels and restaurants.

pyramidplus.org The Colorado Center for Social Emotional Competence and Inclusion

coaimh.org A nonprofit organization of volunteers promoting education and research related to infant mental health and facilitate networking and cooperation among those concerned with the optimal development of infants and infant-caregiver relationships. We also strive to advocate for use of scientificallybased programs of care, intervention, and prevention of mental impairment in infancy and support local and state policies that promote family and infant mental health.


numbers to know:

child care/family resources

Bright Beginnings Colorado...............................728-5613 Childcare Referral...................................... 970-728-5613 Colorado Division of Childcare................... 800-799-5876 Parents As Teachers...........................................728-5613

child find Montrose County...............................................249-2405 Delta County......................................................874-7607 Ouray, San Miguel & West Montrose...................626-2978

health services Basin Clinic........................................................865-2666

community resources/ dept. of health & human services

Delta.............874-2165 Montrose.......252-5000

Ouray............... 626-2299 San Miguel........ 728-4411

emergency / sheriff's department Emergencies – All Areas – Call 911 Poison Control............................................. 800-222-1222 Delta County Sheriff...........................................874-2000 Montrose County Sheriff....................................252-4023 Montrose County Sheriff - Nucla........................864-2281 Ouray County Sheriff.........................................325-7272 San Miguel County Sheriff – Telluride................728-4442 San Miguel County Sheriff – Norwood................327-4393

Colorado Child Health Plans+..................... 800-359-1991

public libraries

Delta Memorial Hospital....................................874-7681

Delta.............874-9630 Ouray............... 325-4616 Montrose.......249-9656 Ridgway........... 626-5252 Naturita.........865-2848 Telluride.......... 728-4519 Norwood.......327-4833

Midwestern Colorado Mental Health Center.........................................252-3200 Montrose Memorial Hospital..............................249-2211 Mountain Medical Center..................................626-5123 Ouray Family Medicine......................................325-9900 Telluride Medical Center...................................728-3848 Uncompahgre Medical Center...........................327-4233 - All numbers are area code 970 unless indicated otherwise -

school districts Delta.............874-4438 Norwood.......... 327-4336 Montrose.......249-2653 Ouray............... 325-4505 West End: Naturita/Nucla Ridgway........... 626-4320 .....................864-7350 Telluride.......... 728-6617

Bright Futures School Readiness Calendar 16-17  

A calendar comprised of student artwork, useful information, and details about the Bright Futures organization.