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Meta Luxe Fall 2013

Fine Living Gracie Wallpaper

Journey to India METALUXEMAGAZINE.COM

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Treasures

World's Finest Spa Essence of Thai Relaxation

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

NEiMANMARCUs.CoM

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

1.800.365.7989

PLUS:

Inside the Bush Library Viva la Vida in San Miguel Global Connections


The Carlyle_9x10 875_Layout 1 10/5/12 4:57 PM Page 1

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ome to Princes, Presidents and New Yorkers alike.

Brilliantly positioned on Madison Avenue amidst designer boutiques, celebrated galleries, world-renowned museums and iconic Central Park, The Carlyle is a legend in its own right and is glorious proof that one need not be a Manhattan resident to feel like one. Revive your spirit and indulge your senses in a hotel rich with history.

Madison Avenue at 76th Street, New York, NY 10021 212.744.1600 www.rosewoodhotels.com/carlyle


ESTATE OF MIND

Robbie Briggs

The Story

An adventurous life is a true luxury.

I hope you find this cover of MetaLuxe as beautiful and artful as my creative team and I do. It actually is Gracie wallpaper, and in this cover story you will get a chance to read about the company and how its beautiful designs and great work are turning heads as they transform walls across the world. As you will see in other parts of this edition of MetaLuxe, a life full of adventure is a true luxury. We will take you to India where after a day on a safari in search of an elusive tiger you will find refuge in a tent outfitted for royalty. Bathe in the Spas of Thailand, where old customs and modern massage techniques amid lush foliage, waterfalls, cascading pools and the beauty of a place known as “coconut island” will soothe and rejuvenate you. Stroll through San Miguel de Allende in the highlands of central Mexico and you might run into a friend or old neighbor walking the centuries-old cobblestone streets. They may be among the countless Americans and Canadians who are making great contributions to the artistic and cultural aspects of this historic city that they now call home. Travel with us to Georgia’s Callaway Gardens on the southern foothills of the Appalachian Mountains—a 13,000-acre woodland and garden resort that combines golf, tennis, flora, indigenous wildlife and high-end comfort food with that special touch of Southern hospitality. Adventure and libraries don’t always go together, but this spring the George W. Bush Presidential Center opened on the campus of Southern Methodist University. Visiting this library north of downtown Dallas is not about being red or blue, but about how our world changed and how we came together as Americans. Meet Dallas’ first couple and see what is inside this library. After working in real estate for more than 35 years I have learned that you do not necessarily need to travel far and wide to find adventure. In this edition, you not only will see some incredible estates and luxury properties from around the globe you also will meet 21 members of my team as they discuss new styles, trends and architecture. Whether moving to Dubai or Dallas or across the street I can attest it always offers a “new-ness.”

We at Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty are in the real estate business, but, as you see, we also are about lifestyle. Luxury isn’t a price point, but a zest for the incredible and extraordinary. Allow yourself to be transported to this world of the extraordinary—the world of MetaLuxe . Please enjoy the read.

Robbie Briggs CEO and President Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty

On a personal note — While I have traveled the world and have lived in Beijing and had many adventures it’s the priceless moments that seem to go by in a flash and yet are embedded in your mind and soul forever. Like fine art we are all collectors of our moments, those moments in time, moments in places and moments among loved ones. With a field of beautiful wildflowers planted by my wife and our second home newly built near the ocean in Maine, I recently counted those moments with my family. With my daughter Avery on my arm beaming with joy as we walked down the aisle, a dream unfolded into reality. I gave her in marriage in front of God, family and friends to a wonderful man who promised to honor and cherish her. They will create in their own lives those special moments that many years from now will be an incredible painting, a textile that recounts the story of their lives. I hope that they will cherish those special moments, unique places and wonderful people as much as I have.

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Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s

IN THIS ISSUE

International Realty MetaLuxe Volume 2 Issue 2 Fall 2013

3

Estate of mind by Robbie Briggs

8-10

Thailand’s Spas for the Senses

14-17

On Safari in India, Tiger Tracking

20-21

City of Inspiration, San Miguel de Allende

29-31

Gracie Wallpaper, from Legacy to Modern Living

37-40

The First Couple, George and Laura Bush Redefining their World

46-47

Where Wishes Become Reality, Museum Tower, Dallas

48

Natural Paradise, Calloway Gardens, Golf Retreat

49-58

Global Connections, Insight and Inspiration

(THE INSIDERS)

18 11

24 19

2

12

25 23

13

26

11 It's all about the details Jonathan Rosen

18 DISTINCTIVE ARCHITECTURE

Wynne Moore Perry Moore

12 ARTFULLY EXECUTED 19 A PLACE TO GATHER Caroline Summers Cover photo – Dorchester Park wallpaper pattern courtesy of Gracie

13 ENTRĖE TO THE GOOD LIFE

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Ginger Nobles Susan Baldwin

Joan Eleazer, Jeff Eleazer

Layne Pitzer

23 A HIDDEN GEM IN

THE WORLD OF WINE Christy Berry

24 BUSINESS MAGNET Holly Deason

2

25 Global design

2

Local style John Zimmerman

26 Breaking with Tradition

Penny Tower Cook

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37-40 58

29-31 20-21

14-17 8-10

39

46-47 43

33 36

27

44

28

25

radition

56-57

48

34

41 35

45

32 27 Contemporary

Artful living Becky Frey

42 33 Modern edition 36 a manor of speaking

Pogir

modern english Michelle Wood

43 Redefining address

Life's location Ann Henry

28 Visual Impact 34 in the neighborhood 41 Breath of Fresh Air

44 it's different now

32 OPENLY FRESH

45 a fashionable address

Amy Detwiler

Judy Sessions

Gayle Johansen

35 Villa Vectura

Claire Dewar

42 Material Matters

Italian renaissance Jeannie Nethery

Jeff Watson

Susie Ryan Pete Ryan Ellen Terry Todd Terry

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luxefinder

meaSured The Quadski is 10.5 feet in overall length; 5.2 feet wide and 4.3 feet high with a wheelbase of 5.8 feet. It accommodates one rider and comes in red, yellow, blue, silver and black. powered The four-cylinder, watercooled engine is considered the lightest power plant in its class and features electronic fuel injection, a double-overhead camshaft and dry-sump lubrication.

equipped The 1,300-lb vehicle carries a 15-gallon fuel tank and is equipped with a 175-hp BMW Motorrad engine and transmission. With the press of a button, its wheels retract when entering the water and deploy when approaching land.

water

ways

The world’s first high-speed amphibious sports vehicle, the Quadski by Gibbs, reaches speeds of up to 45 mph on land or in the water and offers a new form of transportation to consumers. Approximately $40,000, gibbssports.com


luxefinder

hard body

Simultaneously sporty, elegant and legible, the FVi17 Chrono Bicompax Intrepido by Franc Vila continues its maker’s established tradition of creating extremely durable watches for modern active lifestyles. $18,000, 305.674.9670, francvila.com

Limited Each watch in the limited edition of 88 examples comes with either a black rubber strap or a leather strap with contrast stitching.

extreme The rugged titanium case has a bezel made of DieHard Extreme Steel in Franc Vila’s signature circular-elliptical Intrepido case shape, enhanced with protective inserts.

automatic Its automatic mechanical movement incorporates bicompax chronograph functions and prominent date indication. Franc Vila’s exclusive Gold Concept winding rotor keeps the movement ticking and supplies the 42-hour power reserve.


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By Diana Rowe

A

fter trekking across Thailand’s mainland for two weeks, I arrived at Koh Samui Airport with my share of traveler’s tension. I’d already regretted tacking on a three-day visit to Samui, even with promises of beach time and spa treatments. I’d experienced my first authentic Thai massage in Bangkok, and something about the pitter patter of a tiny therapist on my back while I was being twisted into a pretzel did not make for a soothing experience. Yet the moment I stepped off my Bangkok Airways flight, I felt like I’d jumped into a chapter of the NY Times bestseller Eat, Pray, Love. Only 700 kilometers south of Bangkok, Samui could be a million kilometers away with its picture-perfect coastline of white-sand beaches, coconut palms slightly lifting in the breeze and the turquoise seas sparkling in the sunlight. Banking on its reputation as a holiday destination for relaxation, Samui is now as popular as Phuket, offering more than 80 spa resorts (and counting). In 1993, just over a half-million annual visitors came to Samui, and almost a million people a year pack onto an island only 21 kilometers wide as Thailand’s third largest island. My driver/ guide Moo said it was good for his business that the small island was becoming so popular, but for traffic, not so good. Today, high-end resorts are replacing huts, and the constant flow of backpackers is slowly being priced out with the demands of leisure travelers. Some say Koh Samui has lost its paradise personality amid the luxury hotels and tourists, but like any other destination, part of the experience is stepping away from the familiar hotel brands and touristy areas. That’s what I hoped for when we turned off the main road, just 10 minutes from the airport, and another few minutes down a rocky dirt road winding past a handful of cottages before finally arriving at the secluded sanctuary of Melati Beach Resort & Spa, on the northern most tip of Samui.

Thailand’s Spas for the Senses

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Thailand’s Spas for the Senses

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ocated on nearly 20 acres, Melati Beach Resort & Spa emulates a tropical paradise, with its lush foliage crowding the walkways and edging the maze of 77 suites and villas, fashioned after a Thai Village. Each accommodation is a minimum of 77 square meters of indoor-outdoor space, with more than half also including plunge pools. Once I stepped into the destination resort and spa’s open-air lobby, I thought I’d hit a Lucky 7 jackpot at Melati.

Tropical Relaxation No time to soak in my surroundings just yet, as I had my first spa treatment scheduled. A seamless check-in and then, the valet transported me via golf cart down an incline into the tropical landscape surrounding the villas. I barely had time to take in my oversize deluxe suite before changing into yoga pants and a T-shirt. The Melati Spa was on the other side of the lobby, so back I went, this time a 5-minute walk on the winding path that snaked through the resort’s tropical foliage and up the hill, past the seven-level waterfall feature, up the stairs past a restaurant, through the lobby, and then across to the spa. Melati is the Indonesian word for jasmine. It’s only fitting that jasmine is the signature scent of the spa. Melati Spa, with a tagline of “the Essence of the Orient” is a merging of cultures – Thai, Balinese, Ayurvedic, Turkish – and another page in my Eat, Pray, Love déjà vu. The spa reception showcases the cultures with soft colors, low tables and chairs, while distinctive Thai classic woodwind and percussion music softly plays in the background. The award-winning spa offers a full range of treatments in three private luxury villas with indoor/outdoor treatment areas, private meditation platforms, Jacuzzi, and steam room.

Old & New Ancient remedies merge with modern techniques, giving Melati Spa the distinctive rank of Top 10 in Thailand. Timeless Journey – An Indigenous Coconut Experience honors the island’s affinity with the coconut tree, including a coconut shell massage. I’d opted for the signature treatment to relax and detoxify, the Melati Massage, recently recognized for outstanding achievements at the Koh Samui Spa Fair 2011. The spa’s interior reflects the exotic beauty of the Thai culture, and my treatment room was just to the right of a soothing waterfall and pond.

Melati Beach Resort & Spa

My Thai therapist spoke little English and I spoke less Thai, but we used general hand signals along with simple English to communicate. Within minutes, she massaged warm jasmine aroma oil into my left leg, then my right, and I was caught in the magic of the combination Ayurvedic, Balinese and lymphatic drainage massage techniques. The 90 minute signature Melati Massage was over far too soon. I slowly made my way back through the landscaped paradise, past my villa to the pool bar and terrace. I ordered a glass of Chardonnay while my eyes followed the massive infinity pool, known as “The See,” to the cerulean waters of Thongson Bay and neighboring islands.

‘Six Senses’ But my Samui spa experience wasn’t over. I’m already over the top relaxed. Six Senses Hideaway Spa, just 5 minutes away, was on the agenda the next day. Another secluded boutique resort spa, Six Senses’ expansive open terrace is the hotel’s reception, with inviting overstuffed, tropical-colored bamboo furniture. As enticing as it was, it’s the alluring glimpse of water that gets your attention. I can’t help but step closer to the edge of the hilltop parking lot to discover that Six Senses is perched above the Samrong Bay with a panoramic view of the Gulf of Siam and neighboring islands. It’s a reminder of how small Koh Samui is. Upon check in, again I’m drawn to toward the edge to enjoy that appealing view of the waters below you. Six Senses Hideaway Spa is more compact than the Melati Spa, with less tropical personality in the décor. Or so I thought until the therapist led me into my treatment room. And then, wow, there it is again – that distracting view. Rustic timber beams frame the windows, giving a picture perfect view of the Gulf of Siam – again. For a moment, I forgot my spa treatment. The therapist asked me if I needed a minute to change, jolting me back into the moment. Within minutes, I’m stretched out on a table draped with a simple white sheet.

Sound Therapy A Rattan Ball Massage sounded intriguing. Similar in technique to a hotstone massage, the therapist used handcrafted bamboo (rattan) balls to massage with lavender oil in soothing rhythmic strokes while applying deep pressure. It eased that last bit of travel tension. The finale of the Six Senses Spa treatment was the exotic Tibetan balls, apparently another nod to my Eat, Pray, Love theme. Tibetan balls are a form of sound therapy. The result was that I did walk away from Six Senses Spa feeling calmer, happy and very relaxed. But was that because of the sound therapy, or the fact that I received two amazing spa sessions in a row?

Getting there: 10

Six Senses Samui

Melati Beach Resort & Spa http://www.melatiresort.com/ Six Senses Samui – A Sala Property http://www.sixsenses.com/SixSensesSamui/index.php


Style

ELEMENTS OF

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ay

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et.

Jonathan Rosen It's all About the details

Warm greetings flow in a grand foyer detailed with rare, Monticello pattern floors and a hand-built wrought iron railing. Outside, a sweeping lawn and spacious patio extend the invitation to enjoy beautiful living in this French and Mediterranean masterpiece. 3507 Crescent – Available. Jonathan Rosen, Senior Vice President, 214-927-1313 jrosen@briggsfreeman.com, jonathangrosen.com

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Style

ELEMENTS OF

Caroline Summers Artfully Executed

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Inspired Mediterranean design that is both theatrical and soothing embodies the comfort and spirit of a hillside estate in Santa Barbara. Private living areas upstairs, a decadent first-floor master suite and a poolside loggia worthy of celebrity attention create an environment of elevated living. 4236 Lorraine – Available. Caroline Summers, 214-597-7513, csummers@briggsfreeman.com


Style

ELEMENTS OF

Ginger Nobles Susan Baldwin

Entrée to the Good Life

A cordial invitation awaits in this light and airy Italian estate exquisitely crafted with impeccable quality and artisan finishes. Introduce friends to the simplicity of graceful living surrounded by a private enclave of idyllic green space in one of Dallas’ most treasured neighborhoods. 4631 Valley Ridge Road – Available. Ginger Nobles, Senior Vice President, 214-212-4434, gnobles@briggsfreeman.com. Susan Baldwin, Senior Vice President, 214-763-1591, sbaldwin@briggsfreeman.com. noblesbaldwin.com

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Tiger Tracking no ‘roughing it’ is required

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U

nder a searing afternoon sun, red dust covering my clothes

and clinging to the sweat clotting at

On Safari in IndiA

By Terri Colby

the back of my neck, I head deep into Ranthambhore National Park, hunting grounds for maharajahs of old and modern-day royals. I’m on my very first safari, on my first trip to India, and ready for the thrill of coming face-to-face with a tiger. The guide, Yadvendra Singh, who goes by the name Yad, directs the driver down increasingly bumpy pathways through the dry terrain of the park, six of us in an open-air Gypsy vehicle that feels at times like a combination roller coaster-Tilt-A-Whirl, as we track tiger in the heart of India’s desert state of Rajasthan. Early on, Yad and our safari partners – Stuart and Rebecca Ramsey from York, England – hear a tiger’s roar. My husband and I didn’t hear it, but all three were convinced, so our truck picks up speed and kicks up dust heading in the direction of the roar. After some frenzied but fruitless minutes tracking the sound, things settle down and we begin a more deliberate course through the park, 252 square miles of dry deciduous forest in the Aravali Hills, with shallow lakes and rivers, and plenty of valleys and ravines that are hospitable to the roughly 30 Royal Bengal tigers that call this park home. Yad is a bona fide Indian character, telling us of the famous people he has helped search for tigers – Mick Jagger, for one – and that he is yadtiger on “The Facebook,” where he announces he has precisely 1,732 friends. As we first enter the park, he begins his shtick: “Wow, look at those two-legged

Tiger photos courtesy of Yadvendra Singh

Terri Colby is a Chicago-based freelance travel writer who can be reached at terricolby@gmail.com

Homo sapiens.”

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Tiger photos courtesy of Yadvendra Singh All other photos courtesy of Terri Colby

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S

everal hours on and we’ve seen an amazing mix of wildlife – great numbers of Indian varieties of deer, wild boar, crocodile, egrets, peacocks, monkeys, parakeets, an owlette, antelopes and mongoose – and Yad supplies us with the scientific name for each. But we’ve seen no sign of tiger. Rebecca is feeling ill, no doubt because of all the jostling around in the 100-degree heat, but she doesn’t want to head back. We have no more safaris scheduled. The sun is sinking toward the horizon, shadows growing longer, and still no tiger. This was it. Six o'clock was the witching hour – we had to be out of the park. After a few words from Yad, the driver heads to the park entrance where Yad chats up two park rangers, gesturing to us in the jeep before jumping back in. “OK, we look down here,” he says. One more chance. A few miles and a quick left takes us up a gently rising, tree-covered grassy space. The driver cuts the engine. We are facing some of the stone ruins that dot the park. Yad is very excited. Everyone stands. A tiger is lounging in the sun, sprawled atop part of a stone wall. I don’t see it at first, but when the tail moves, I catch a glimpse of the tail and of the white fur on the tiger’s belly.

A flash of white. I had seen the tiger. Next stop, back to camp. But don’t imagine we’ll be slugging beer around a campfire before pulling back the tent flap and climbing into our sleeping bags.

Our tent – and indeed it is a canvas tent – has a four-poster, king-size bed, teak wood floors, colonial-style wood furniture, a claw-foot tub, air-conditioning and a private outdoor garden and dining area. You see, we are staying at the Oberoi Vanyavilas, Ranthambhore, ranked the best hotel in the world in 2010 by readers of Travel & Leisure magazine.

What makes a hotel the best in the world? The 25 tents are the only accommodations at this hotel and they are amazing; spacious, at 790 square feet, luxurious and very private. The interior canvas of the tent is embroidered with images of tigers and trees, and flecks of gold glitter in the light. But there’s more than just the tents. At Oberoi’s Vanyavilas, there’s a spa, fine dining, a lovely pool and luxurious lounge areas throughout the facility where staff take care of the resident peacocks along with the mango and lime trees. There are activities including wildlife lectures, cooking demonstrations, trips to craft centers and rides on the two Oberoi pet elephants. The night we returned from safari, we headed to dinner in the hotel’s open-air dining room, where tables and chairs cushioned with the region’s bright-red fabrics surrounded an open fire. At one side of the room, a cross-legged Rajasthani musician played his flute, sending the ethereal notes into the star-filled sky. Even now, it’s easy to recall the magic of those moments. The food was exceptional, thanks to chef Deep Mohan Singh Arneja, who also is around to offer cooking demonstrations to guests. Among the memorable food items served at Vanyavilas during our stay was a tandoor chicken wrap, a Thai chicken salad, lamb and fish curries, spiced okra, spectacular garlic naan and a little extra that really tickled my husband’s fancy: sorbet of Earl Grey and mint. The spa delivers traditional Ayurvedic treatments as well as Western-style facials and massages. Rates during the time we were there at the end of March were 40,500 Indian rupees per night, or about $916 in U.S. dollars. Meals are not included. But this is a once-in-a-lifetime kind of vacation, and you won’t be disappointed if you’re looking for a luxurious adventure. We’ll definitely plan a repeat.

If you go:

By air: Delhi is a good jumping off point for any Indian excursion, especially to Jaipur and Ranthambhore. You can take a domestic flight from Delhi to Jaipur,

the capital of the state of Rajasthan and the closest large city to the hotel and to Ranthambhore. You could hire a driver from Delhi, for roughly $80 per day, for the eighthour drive from Delhi.

By car:

We had been staying in Jaipur, so we drove from there. The Oberoi Vanavilas, Ranthambhore, may be the world’s best hotel, but the road to get there could quite possibly be the world’s worst. It took us about four hours to drive the little more than 100 miles from Jaipur to the hotel. And while much of it must have been annoying for our driver, the excursion was a nonstop visual feast for travelers: camels pulling carts along the road, women in colorful saris harvesting crops with a sickle, traffic jams like none you’ve seen in the U.S., filled not only with trucks and cars, but with bicycle rickshaws pulled by strong young (and some old) men, motorcycles, horse- or camel-drawn carts, herds of goats, tractors, slow-moving cows, tuk-tuks – a kind of open-air taxi about the size of a bumper car – filled with as many as 14 passengers inside and out, and buses with passengers up top. The drive between Ranthambhore and Agra, site of the Taj Mahal, is about six hours. Trains are also an option.

A note about the driver:

I have never before been the type of traveler to hire guides or drivers, and generally don’t take tours. But, India is such a different place for most Americans, I would advise a first-time visitor to plan for tour guides and drivers. You’ll be glad you did.

When to go:

The best times to visit India in general are between October and March, avoiding monsoon season and temperatures that can exceed 110 degrees during the other months.

Tiger safari:

The hotel will arrange your safari, but you must book with them early, as only a limited number of vehicles are allowed into the park each day. The hotel offers two safaris a day: one at 6:30 a.m. and one at 2:30 p.m.

Hotel web site:

www.oberoihotels.com/oberoi_vanyavilas Toll-free number in the U.S.: 800-562-3764

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Style

ELEMENTS OF

Wynne Moore Perry Moore Distinctive Architecture

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Imaginative architectural details lift a home to a new level of fresh and sophisticated living. Well-placed windows draw natural light into each room and frame stunning views at every turn. And a curved stairway leads to breathtaking views of rolling countryside from a third-floor studio/ observatory. 3000 Burney – Available. Wynne Moore, Senior Vice President, 817-781-7060, wmoore@briggsfreeman.com, Perry Moore, 817-992-9856, pmoore@briggsfreeman.com, wynnemoore.com


Style

ELEMENTS OF

Joan Eleazer Jeff Eleazer Layne Pitzer A Place to Gather

People often refer to this Mediterranean delight as the prettiest home in Dallas’ prestigious Highland Park – its smart proportions and beautiful appointments graciously welcome a legacy of friends and family. A place to connect with loved ones, create memories, and cherish time together, this home makes it easy to enjoy life’s simple pleasures. 3821 Beverly – Available. Joan Eleazer, Senior Vice President, 214-537-5923, jeleazer@briggsfreeman.com. Jeff Eleazer, Senior Vice President, 214-566-4141, jceleazer@briggsfreeman.com. Layne Pitzer, Senior Vice President, 214-202-9998, lpitzer@briggsfreeman.com. eleazergroup.com

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Sunsets in San Miguel de Allende highlight the city’s beautiful architecture. Photos courtesy of Mexico Tourism Board / Ricardo Espinosa-reo.

S City of Inspiration

San Miguel By Diana Rowe

de Allende

Exterior of the Parroquia San Miguel Arcangel, the emblem of San Miguel de Allende and notable for its Neo-Gothic façade.

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The streets in the city center offer a visual feast – buildings from the 17th and 18th centuries to gaze at and explore.

Its beauty and history have earned San Miguel de Allende status as one of the “magical” towns of Mexico.

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Mexican Baroque Architecture

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ome say historic San Miguel de Allende is the soul of Old Mexico, integrating the best of small-town life

with the sophisticated pleasures of a big city, where locals, nationals, and expatriates live in harmony. Mild

weather and slow pace have attracted many Americans and Canadians to retire here, who instead of spoiling its charm have enhanced the appeal with a wealth of small restaurants and chic boutiques. Many are artists and writers who have flocked to this wellknown artist colony, adding galleries and shops to the menu of attractions. Located high in the Sierra Madre mountain range in the epicenter of Mexico in the state of Guanajuato, it is remote enough to discourage many with a 90-minute drive from the nearest airport. But once you’ve experienced the visual feasts, walked the winding cobblestone streets, soaked in the welcoming spirit of San Miguel de Allende, you are captivated.

The Neo-Gothic façade of the Parroquia de San Miguel Arcangel, the parish church of the city.

San Miguel de Allende is one of Central Mexico's most picturesque colonial and culturally rich cities, a model for historic preservation. Its cultural and architectural role in the Mexican Baroque era has earned the 68 blocks of the town’s historic center and the nearby Sanctuary of Atotoniclo a 2008 UNESCO World Heritage designation. It won’t take you long to realize that all of San Miguel de Allende is the main attraction, and you’ll need your walking shoes to truly enjoy what this city has to offer. Its streets, gardens, houses, plaza and churches embody the Baroque period of Mexico, the result of the Spanish conquerors influences in the 18th century. The Mexican Baroque design included strategic locations in a town square of churches, , such as the fortresslike Sanctuary of Atotoniclo complex, built by Father Luis Felipe Neri de Alfaro, a pilgrimage site since colonial times. Period mural work adorns the main nave in the sanctuary, brilliant enough to be dubbed “Sistine Chapel of Mexico.” The heart of San Miguel de Allende lies in its main plaza, Jardín Principal (Main Garden), surrounded by colonial buildings and archways, fountains, trees and pathways. Sundays, holidays and evenings the square is closed to traffic while locals and tourists alike enjoy the old-fashioned festivities with vendors offering Mexican ice pops or coffee and Mariachi bands playing. Meet new friends, or plant yourself on one of the ornate wrought-iron park benches and enjoy the bustle. The personality of the town is in its landmark La Parroquia, the parish church, built in 1683 by a local mason, Zeferino Gutiérrez. . The front of the church was inspired by a postcard of a European Gothic church, complemented by Mexican-influenced pink spires stretching into the blue skies of San Miguel. Another early Baroque church, the 18th century Oratorio de San Felipe Neri (San Felipe’s Neri Oratory), was built of pink stone by the local Indians. Another architectural delight are the grand mansions, built by the wealthy in the 1800s, and many of these are still privately owned. The local library, La Biblioteca, offers guided Sunday home tours. Leaving at noon from the library, the tours showcase the colonial architecture of these renovated homes and their thick, wooden doors opening onto inner courtyards. The library itself is inside another historic building and is

Mexico’s second-largest English library. Other places to visit include classic churches of Templo de San Francisco, Templo de la Concepción, , Santa Casa de Loreto, and Templo de Nuestra Señora de la Salúd. . Also put on your list Presidencia Municipal (Mayor’s Office); Casa del Mayorazgo de la Canal; Casa del Inquisidor; and the mid-18th century home of the town’s hero and namesake, Casa de Ignacio Allende.

Art-Centric San Miguel

San Miguel de Allende has come a long way since its ghost town days after the Mexican Revolution; the foresight of the country’s leaders to invest in the arts, celebrities and artists rejuvenated the city and created an artist colony in the early 1920s, with more international students arriving in 1948 and again in the 1970s. The result today is a substantial artistic imprint into the culture of this colonial Mexican city. The Instituto Allende is an international language and cultural learning center located in a former colonial hacienda. Its grounds also host six annual art fairs, and inside its complex are a modern art gallery and L’Invito, an Italian restaurant, open to visitors. In addition, the institute offers guided day trips for tourists. The local art school, Bella Arte (formally El Centro Cultural Ignacio Ramírez “El Nigromante” Bellas Artes) is in a former convent built in 1765 and houses the largest classic Spanish-colonial courtyard in the New World. From drawing and painting, ceramic and weaving, to music and dance, the Bella Arte also features exhibit galleries of internationally known artists; the most famous work of art in town is the unfinished mural by Davíd Alfaro Siqueiros. A public getaway under the arches of the cloister is the lovely Café Las Musas, serving coffee, sandwiches, and pasta. Performances still occur at the Teatro Angela Peralta, inaugurated in 1873 with its first performance by Mexican opera singer Angela Peralta. Fashionistas should include a visit to the art center, Fábrica La Aurora, a converted 1902 factory just 10 minutes from downtown San Miguel. Browse more than two dozen contemporary galleries and boutiques from local and regional designers and artists. Not artistically inclined but still appreciate fine art? The region is known for its wool, stonework, papier maché , hand-blown glass and pottery. The best discoveries are at the local boutiques and art galleries, such as Mercado de Artesanias. Several galleries are stocked with top local Mexican artesanias and cultural

activities, offering art workshops to language classes.

Festivals

San Miguel is well known for its yearround patriotic and religious festivals, many of them honoring the town’s six patron saints, such as Sanmiguelada, devoted to Saint Michael. If this “running of the bulls” festival sounds familiar, you would be correct. Sanmiguelada is a nod to the city’s Spanish heritage and Spain’s Pamplonada. Held the third Saturday in September, the festival sees bulls running through the streets, chasing the brave, red-scarved “fermines.” Other important religious celebrations in San Miguel include Semana Santa (Holy Week) and Fiesta de Navidad (Christmas). Other non-spiritual, yet no less spirited, festivals include Natalicio del General Ignacio Allende y Unzaga; Semana Celtica y Dia de San Patricio; Fiesta de San Antonio de Padua; Festival de Música de Camara; and Festival Internacional de Jazz.

Where to Stay

The seven-room Casa de la Cuesta is a colorful bed and breakfast, featuring Mexican colonial architecture, outdoor living spaces and impressive views, located 10 minutes from the Jardín. Inside the B&B, explore the Folk Art Gallery and Mask Museum, “The Other Face of Mexico.” The mask museum features Mexican artisans and showcases a private collection of Mexican ceremonial dance masks. www. casadelacuesta.com A cluster of historic buildings at the city center make up Casa de Sierra Nevada, San Miguel de Allende,an award-winning boutique hotel operated by Orient Express that offers two restaurants, spa, and a cooking school. www. casadesierranevada.com The 67-room Rosewood San Miguel de Allende is the newest and first international luxury resort near the city center featuring on-site spa, restaurants and roof-top lounge. Request a veranda overlooking La Parroquia cathedral for the best view in town. www.rosewoodhotels.com/en/ sanmigueldeallende/

Getting There Two international airports are near San Miguel de Allende: the Aeropuerto del Bajio (BJX) located 110 km (about 70 miles) from San Miguel near León, and the Aeropuerto Internacional de Querétaro (QRO), about 75 km (45 miles) from San Miguel de Allende. Mexico City is approximately a 3 1/2hour drive from San Miguel. 21


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Christy Berry A Hidden gem in the world of wine

The intimate and exquisite tones that compose a good wine also must mirror the personality of its home: the wine cellar. This hidden secret holds more than 2,200 bottles and encompasses all senses: the eye – beautiful tile craftsmanship; the feel – an infusion of character; and lastly, the sense of taste – an experience that is anything but ordinary. 9806 Inwood – Available. Christy Berry, Senior Vice President, 214-693-1600, cberry@briggsfreeman.com, christyberryrealestate.com

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Holly Deason

Texas is on the radar screen for companies looking to thrive, Business recently having been named America’s Top State for Business by Magnet CNBC. People come for the friendly economic environment but

are quickly captivated by the hip urban neighborhoods, grand estate properties, sprawling ranches, and welcoming communities. Holly Deason, 214-930-3000, hbockdeason@briggsfreeman.com, hbdeason.com

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John Zimmerman Global Design Local Style

Deeply rooted in Texas soil, this lushly wooded, private setting is a world away. Friends and family gather for a wonderful meal in a Spanish Colonial-inspired home that combines elements both rustic and elegant. 215 Lindenwood – Available. John Zimmerman, Senior Vice President, 817-343-0090, jzimmerman@briggsfreeman.com, jzdfw.com

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Penny Tower Cook

Breaking with Tradition

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Making guests feel welcome while creating your own space is the current trend in today’s living. People are breaking tradition when deciding how rooms are used – a formal dining room may be a beautiful study or a casual sitting area. Luxury is about having the ability to create your own style and following the rules according to You. Penny Tower Cook, 214-384-2847, ptcook@briggsfreeman.com, pennytowercook.com

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Becky Frey Contemporary Artful Living

Gated and secluded, yet filled with light, a contemporary masterpiece exemplifies living among the arts. Gallery walls await a collector’s passion, while broad windows showcase Mother Nature’s own verdant theater. A home is a creative source, a powerful force, for curating the life of your dreams. 2 Los Arboles Court – Available. Becky Frey, Senior Vice President, 214-536-4727, bfrey@briggsfreeman.com, beckyfrey.com

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Amy Detwiler

Visual Impact

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A well-designed room creates endless possibilities. One of my favorite designers, Shannon Bowers, inspires beautiful living with her uncommon vision. “By incorporating choice antiques mixed with current and sophisticated pieces, the interiors are kept fresh, timeless, and unique,� she says. Amy Detwiler, Senior Vice President, 214-536-8680, adetwiler@briggsfreeman.com, amydetwilerdallas.com


From Legacyto Modern Living

Gracie Paper

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n a comfortable studio in rural China, a hundred or more hands move in a synchronized dance. Some outline bold strokes of color across ivy trailing along a garden wall. Others deftly place hair-like antennae on butterflies in flight. Still others trace the geometry of an ancient turtle shell hidden among bamboo leaves. On any given day, scores of artists gather around panels of acid-free, artist-grade paper as they color and coax it into one-of-a-kind motifs destined to hang in distinguished homes around the world. For almost a century, designers have known that one way to make a room truly special is to cover the walls with Gracie’s hand-painted wallpaper. And today, the popularity of these vibrant

panels is appealing to a fresh, new audience that treasures both timelessness and innovation. In fact, the wallpaper renaissance is so great that the New York-based company recently opened its first regional showroom and chose Dallas for the launch. “Easily, our best market outside of New York is Texas,” says Jennifer Gracie, who grew up watching her grandparents and dad orchestrate the design, creation, and installation of these unique decorations. “Texans love history, and they truly appreciate our level of customization. When we were thinking of expansion, it was a natural fit to go to a place that has always been so welcoming to us.” The city’s central location also made it a good fit for West Coasters – many of whom live in homes with a decidedly modern twist.

Sepia Garden on antique silver ground courtesy of Gracie

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D

écor fans most often recognize the Gracie look in the Asian seascapes, landscapes, scenes of tea cultivation, and illustrations of agrarian life that have been the company’s core product since its inception.

From the very beginning, our clients have told us that, beyond the beauty and artistry, one of the most-appealing aspects of our papers is that they are one of a kind. Clients know that a room can never be replicated. It stands alone.

Yet today’s clients are craving designs and treatments that work with a more modern aesthetic – think single-color Chinois, midcentury metallics, and textured silks that work alongside high-tech gadgets, modern art, and sleek industrial surfaces. “We have a client in California who recently papered five rooms,” says Gracie. “They are all different, but we used complimentary color palettes to bring it all together and make it feel cohesive. These clients have an amazing contemporary art collection, which we took into consideration in the planning process. On the walls that display the significant pieces, the paper design was laid out specifically to showcase the artwork.”

– Jennifer Gracie

Dining room by Alexa Hampton with customized Parchment Vista design

History in a Contemporary World 30

At the Gracie studio in china, three generations of artists carefully paint each panel of wallpaper


the images are hand drawn with special attention to placement around In a business that is all about customization, it’s easy to see where windows and doors. The pattern is then sent to the company’s studio trends are going – especially when it comes to color. Each year the in China, where highly skilled landscape and portrait artists use milkcompany introduces six to eight new designs, some of which are based casein paint to bring the12-foot-long panels to life. inspired by papers or photos in their extensive archives. Many are rescaled to fit today’s generous The seasoned portrait and room sizes and recolored with landscape painters who vibrant hues. A recent addition, create Gracie’s custom a brilliant green wall covered wallpaper take part in a with a trellis pattern, began as legacy of craftsmanship that a scrap of green paper sold in is unparalleled in the home the 1950s. The clean, timeless décor industry. For more than design was updated and 50 years, the same family of introduced to a new generation painters has worked in the of clients. Gracie studio in China. Many As is true with all great design, of the current employees the beautiful motifs and murals are descendants of Gracie’s created by Gracie over the past original artists. eight decades are now inspiring Once complete, the panels artisans and creators in every are then numbered, area of the design world. Just packed, and shipped for last year clothing designer installation by experienced Tory Burch used a sample of paperhangers, who paste green paper patterned with the custom-design in place bamboo stalks and flittering with no margin for error. butterflies as a source point for her fall 2012 collection. In the Beginning Burch’s love of Gracie reaches The company founder, beyond her fashion collection Charles R. Gracie, began in to her New York City apartment. Jennifer Gracie the wallpaper business in the Guests entering the curved 1930s when a friend who Federalist foyer are greeted by was a textile trader returned Gracie walls sprouting a lush from Beijing with a few foliage pattern. samples of the delicate and intricately painted paper. This From Inspiration inveterate entrepreneur, who to Installation was already well-established The journey from idea to implementation begins with clients flipping in the Asian antiquities and furniture business, was intrigued by the through giant, wall-mounted frames that display more than 100 level of craftsmanship and the pastoral settings displayed on the colorful panels. Clients often bring their own design inspiration, rice paper scrolls. He predicted that it would appeal to a particular such as a pillow, a photograph, or favorite piece of art, to fuel the clientele that craved the rare and unique and ultimately introduced creative process. A sketch of the room is also helpful for his product to the great drawing rooms, parlors, and bedrooms assessing scale, and placement of motifs. As colors, of New York’s elite. Even Condé Nast, the publishing titan at the images, and ideas flow, clients are encouraged to helm of Vogue magazine, papered his storied penthouse with tweak and adjust until they’ve composed a wall antique Chinese wallpaper, which Gracie later purchased and has scape that is truly personal. reproduced in many variations. “The clients may love a pattern but want it in “From the very beginning, our clients have told us that, beyond the a different color. Or they may like a scene beauty and artistry, one of the most-appealing aspects of our papers but want fewer branches. Or they want to is that they are one of a kind,” says Gracie. “Clients know that a include magnolia leaves because they room can never be replicated. It stands alone.” grew up in the South,” says Gracie. Today Gracie fans from every generation appreciate the truly special "Some clients ask us to include their process of picking, choosing, tweaking, and refining that goes into children’s initials in the wings of a creating couture for the home, and many find it hard to walk away butterfly or an anniversary date in the when the time comes to move to a new address. “We’ve had clients ask veins of a leaf. The design process can to remove the paper from the walls, which can be done, but it’s nearly get incredibly personal, which means impossible to reinstall it in a new location because the room would that clients ultimately feel very connected have to be identical,” says Gracie. “Many choose, instead, to have a to the finished product.” new panel created for framing in their new home. Or they just start over Once the unique design is finalized, an and create a new custom room. Our customers tell us that once you’ve exact template of the room is created and lived with this paper, it’s hard to design a home without it.”

Some clients ask us to include their children’s initials in the wings of a butterfly or an anniversary date in the vein of a leaf. The design process can get incredibly personal, which means that clients ultimately feel very connected to the finished product. –

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Judy Sessions

Openly Fresh

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Kitchens and breakfast rooms have been gathering places for generations. Today they are just more welcoming and sunny – inviting the outside in with bright areas that allow green space in every view. While still using classic materials like stone, granite, and tile, designers just keep it light. Judy Sessions, Senior Vice President, 214-354-5556, jsessions@briggsfreeman.com


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Pogir

Modern Edition

Memoir, biography, mystery, romance – every home has a story to tell, even more so when it creates a beautiful space to lose oneself in the adventure of a thrilling read. Since 1919, this exceptional estate has born witness to Dallas history. Let the next chapter begin. 3617 Euclid – Available. Pogir, 214-244-3103, pogir@briggsfreeman.com, pogirandpogir.com

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Gayle Johansen

In the Neighborhood

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My buyers know that an appointment with me might very well include an introduction to a head of school at one of Dallas’ premier private schools. In today’s world, it’s important to find a home in a neighborhood that offers your family the exact experience you require. Gayle Johansen, Senior Vice President, 214-662-5455, gjohansen@briggsfreeman.com


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Jeannie Nethery Villa Vectura Italian Renaissance

An elegant evening begins when you welcome guests into a grand foyer crafted with inlaid marble floors, a hand-forged wrought iron staircase and 28-foot domed ceiling. This private estate rests on a breathtaking peninsula overlooking one of seven beautiful lakes. Bellissimo! 7711 Glen Albens – Available. Jeannie Nethery, Senior Vice President, 214-803-3787, jnethery@briggsfreeman.com

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F

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F U f f g h f a

B I o w c a g p

A W g b

T G L 2 h l o p C

Michelle Wood

A Manor of Speaking Modern English

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Chilly fall afternoons call for a steaming cup of tea beside an antique French limestone fireplace – an elegant respite in a room that blends clean lines and classic touches. Today, superb living relies on a subtle mix of timeless architecture with contemporary flow. Michelle Wood, Senior Vice President, 214-564-0234, mwood@briggsfreeman.com, michelle-wood.com

C s c m M t d

P T 2 s S t W a a n i a “


The First Couple Written by Dave Muscari

George and Laura Bush Redefine Their World Beyond the White House at Home in Dallas, and Inside a Stunning New Presidential Museum and Library It is hard to imagine Dallas without Laura and George Bush. For more than 40 years the former First Lady and President of the United States have been intimately linked to the area through family, education, business and government. Mrs. Bush graduated from Southern Methodist University in 1968. She taught second grade students in the Dallas Independent School District. Her husband once owned the Texas Rangers major league baseball franchise in nearby Arlington. The couple’s twin daughters, Jenna and Barbara, were born in Dallas and attended school here. Big D is definitely home In 1994 after George W. Bush was elected the 46th Governor of Texas, the family left Dallas for Austin. He served two terms, was elected President of the United States in 2000 and the couple relocated to Washington, D.C. In 2009, nearly 15 years after leaving Dallas, the Bushes returned to town, this time for good. Since then the couple has held a decidedly low profile, particularly when it comes to politics. As has become customary for most former U.S. presidents, George W. Bush followed a familiar pattern of settling into life outside of government. However, that does not mean the couple has not been busy. Just ask Laura Bush. These days the Bushes are basking in the glow of the $250 million George W. Bush Presidential Center, which opened on May 1. Located on the eastern edge of the SMU campus on roughly 25 acres, the sprawling 226,000 square foot interactive facility houses an assortment of areas within the complex including a library and museum, the George W. Bush Policy Institute and the offices of the George W. Bush Foundation. It is the second-largest presidential library behind President Ronald Reagan’s Simi Valley, California facility. Chain link fences and high walls obscured much of the area surrounding the construction zone since the groundbreaking ceremony in late 2010. It became a mystery to onlookers. For months giant cranes loomed large over the area a block off Mockingbird Lane and the North Central Expressway in a place that had previously seen only a modest amount of building during the economic downturn. Process in selecting the presidental Library Site The process for selecting the site of the Center began in the mid2000s, during President Bush’s second term in office. Bids were submitted by a number of colleges across the state including SMU, Baylor University in Waco, Texas Tech University in Lubbock, the University of Dallas in nearby Las Colinas, Midland College in West Texas as well as the University of Texas System. In late 2008, after much debate that included a well-publicized opposition among some faculty members, SMU was chosen as the site of the newest presidential library. By that time, the First Lady was already into project preparations. “I have a degree in education from SMU, and a library science degree from the University of Texas,” she said. “I worked as a librarian…so planning this was right up my alley.”

President and Mrs. Bush in front of the Bush Institute Entrance. Courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center


Architecture, well known for his modern traditionalist designs. He has been lauded for his work on projects ranging from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan to the master planning for the renovation of New York’s Times Square in the 90s “I also picked Michael R. Van Valkenburgh as our landscape architect,” she added. Van Valkenburgh is a respected professor and former chair of the landscape architecture department at Harvard.

Distinguishing Geographic Features

The Native Texas Park at the Bush Center. Photo by Grant Miller for the George W. Bush Presidential Center

Former advisor to President Bush and longtime associate Karen Hughes believes Mrs. Bush is well equipped for the task. “It’s a perfect role for her and one I have seen her excel at on many design projects,” said Hughes, “from the White House to Camp David to the restoration of the native prairie at their Crawford ranch. Her father was a homebuilder, so she grew up loving design and building, and her mother was a self-taught naturalist who passed on her love of nature to Mrs. Bush.”

The Original Presidential Library The original concept for a presidential library goes back generations. It began with President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whose center opened in 1941 on 16 acres of his Springwood estate in Hyde Park, New York. “He really had the idea himself, and he designed his own,” said Mrs. Bush. With a project of this size, the Bushes needed not only the private funding to make it happen, but also practical advice to help flesh out the foundational concepts of a contemporary museum and library. Prior to leaving Washington, Mrs. Bush reached out to a select group of experts inviting all of the directors of the various presidential libraries to meet at Camp David, Maryland. “I asked their advice and they were very forthcoming about what they wished they’d had when they built their library, what mistakes they made, and what worked out well.”

The National Archives Mrs. Bush also credits the National Archives and Records Administration, which own the libraries, for providing counsel and guidance. The Bush Center is the 13th presidential library in the NARA system. The day before the April 25 dedication there was a ceremony to present materials to the National Archives. “The papers of the president belong to the people of the United States of America, and the National Archives run all the presidential libraries,” she explained. “We built the building with privately raised funds, but we will give it to the National Archives.” Administrative personnel are a key component to the success of any such operations, and the Bushes believe they hired some of the best. “Our archivist is Alan Lowe,” said Mrs. Bush. “He has been here for the last two years, at least, in Dallas.” Lowe has a depth of history and experience including 14 years of working with the National Archives Presidential Libraries system. During his tenure he helped oversee 12 presidential libraries located across the country. “I really love my fellow presidential libraries, but they will be jealous when they see this,” Lowe told The Dallas Morning News in January during a preview of the facility. It has been his task to chronicle and detail all of the facilities’ contents, which reportedly includes some 70 million printed documents and 40,000 individual pieces. “All of George’s papers and artifacts were shipped to a warehouse in Lewisville (Texas) when we left Washington,” said Mrs. Bush. In November 2012, the bit-by-bit process of transferring materials from the suburban Dallas warehouse to the Bush Center began. “They literally unwrap every single item and document it, and then store it in the proper way; temperature and light controlled, just as any museum would with their artifacts.”

Presidential Library Architect Preparing a facility this large took time and energy. Mrs. Bush says she touched a variety of different areas during the years of planning of the new center. “I was very involved,” she said proudly, “and on the design committee that chose Robert A.M. Stern as our architect.” Stern is the Dean of the Yale University School of 38

One of the distinguishing geographic features that make the Bush Center unique is the fact that it all exists in an urban setting. “It will be the most urban of all the presidential libraries,” said Mrs. Bush. “There is a DART stop at Mockingbird Station; we’ll be the only library on a subway stop.” At the same time, the Van Valkenburgh Associates designed green spaces are of critical importance to the overall demeanor of the Center. “SMU gave us 15 acres surrounding the library that we landscaped as a native Texas prairie, “ said Mrs. Bush. “We planted native trees all over it.” Bluebonnets, the state flower of Texas, were also planted and bloomed just in time for the opening. Among the grasses planted around the Center’s red brick and Texas Limestone design is a hearty new mix known as “Habiturf.” It was developed with the assistance of the University of Texas at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. The native Texas grasses, Mrs. Bush says, should stand up to a lot of use, and Freedom Hall at the George W. Bush will not require mowing or watering as often Presidential Center. Photo Credit: Peter Aaron/Otto for Robert A M Stern Architects as others. The entire facility is eco-friendly, constructed to meet LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum certification requirements, the highest level in the rating system. “The grounds themselves will be an experience for people – a public park that everyone can come to, especially after you have been through the museum. I think it will nice for families.”

The National ARchives There is a deep sense of pride and excitement in Laura Bush’s voice as she describes the various sections inside the museum, and what people will see when they tour the facility. “One of the things that our architect, Bob Stern, did that I think is different from other libraries…he designed large vitreens (showcases) on both sides of this grand hall, so immediately while you are entering the museum, you will be able to see gifts from Heads of State to the President of the United States.” The exchange of unique and often elaborate gifts between kings, presidents and premiers is a tradition that dates back centuries. “So many foreign leaders generously gave gifts that represented their countries and cultures to President and Mrs. Bush, and viewing a selection of those will be a highlight for visitors,” said Hughes. This part of the museum is designed with an abundance of sunlight that streams in from a series of windows. “So we can only use items that won’t be bothered by light,” said Mrs. Bush, “such as the diamond and sapphire necklace that King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia gave me.” She explains that gifts from Heads of State are considered gifts to the American people “They don’t belong to us…we didn’t keep them. The Archives has all of them.”

“We had an experience that very few people do. We watched somebody that we loved in that role as president and first lady… It was a huge advantage for both of us.” ~ Laura Bush

Courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center


ts

“We are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift us above our interests, and teach us what it means to be citizens.” President George W. Bush, Inaugural Address, January 20, 2001 Dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Center. Photo by Eric Draper

To demonstrate the unforgettable events of the day, the museum uses Tour of the Museum newsreel footage to tell the story of the tense minutes, hours and days Mrs. Bush describes the opening section of the museum as “biographical” the world will never forget. “We have videos that go minute-by-minute of the in tone, with parts bathed in beautiful light. It includes information about morning,” said Mrs. Bush in a reflective voice, “…when the first flight hit… the couple’s childhood in west Texas, says Mrs. Bush. “George and I both grew the crash in Pennsylvania. We also have another wall of larger videos that are up in Midland,” she said. “The Bushes moved to Houston when we were in the day-by-day, from September 11 through eighth grade.” There is also a series September 20 when George spoke to the of stunning photographs of the joint session of Congress.” couple’s Crawford ranch by Texas landscape photographer Wyman While adults walk into the section devoted Meinzer. “The history is really the to September 11 and watch the videos, history of the eight years we lived in Mrs. Bush says there is a special reading the White House…the history of the area set aside for little children to take first decade of the new century.” a break around “…a little statue of Willie, Mrs. Bush says that there is a variety our cat, on her favorite book, ‘If You Take a of interesting personal touches on Mouse to the Movies,’” says Mrs. Bush. “I think the tour, intimate insights of her people will really like it.” As adults continue family’s life while in Washington, through the area, there is a good deal of D.C. “People will see the china, and information concerning terrorism. “About the way the tables were set at a State the war in Afghanistan, and in Iraq.” Dinner for the Queen. Some of my Replica of the oval office clothes, the Lincoln bedroom – that’s By the time people filter to the back of all part of the ‘Living in the White the museum, “the big box,” as Mrs. Bush House’ section.” The couple’s twin refers to it, once again the environment daughters are also represented, changes. “They say that people get narrating a short video about daily ‘museum fatigue’ in a large, dark space, life in the White House. so at that point you can walk into the There is a segment devoted to Oval Office,” she says. The replica was the landmark education reform constructed at full scale, complete initiative known as the No windows facing south that splash light Child Left Behind Act of 2001. It into the room. “You will be able to sit incorporates a small school bus down, and have your picture made at the that children are able to climb president’s desk,” said Mrs. Bush, adding All five living Presidents of the United States. Photo by Paul Morse inside. Videos feature former U.S. that while several of the presidential Secretary of Education Margaret Spelling describing NCLB. There is an libraries feature Oval Office facsimiles, this will be the only one constructed area focused on the Bush era tax cuts, and another that features the such that visitors can walk around inside without constraints. “We also have President’s private baseball collection, “Because we started T-Ball that a Texas Rose Garden,” said Mrs. Bush, who is an avid gardener. “Instead of the very first summer of 2001,” Mrs. Bush explained. The Bushes’ first State crabapples in the Rose Garden in Washington, we will have crape myrtles because they Dinner was held on September 6, 2001. “There is a case with my gown, do so much better in Dallas, and roses that are more appropriate for our climate.” the gifts that President Vincente Fox of Mexico and Mrs. Fox gave us, and Decision point theater other things about that evening,” she explains. “The first National Book Towards the end of the tour, there is information about a number of historic Festival was on September 8, so there is a big reading area for children initiatives that occurred during the Bush Administration. “The freedom movement with Festival posters.” and dissidents that we supported in the United States and from many parts of the Museum's signature Scenes world,” she said. “The AIDS initiative in Africa, as well as the Millennium Challenge Then the mood of the tour changes in rather dramatic fashion, she says, compact that we had with many countries.” There is also an area known as at one of the museum’s signature scenes. “You turn the corner and there is a “Decision Point Theater.” Desks are set up in the theater, she explains, so that great big piece from the World Trade Center,” says Laura Bush in a sober tone individuals, classes, groups, or families may participate. “Five different decisions… discussing the massive, twisted and charred steel beam from one of World the surge in Iraq, Hurricane Katrina, economic downturn…and a couple more,” she Trade Center towers. “It stands in the middle of the round space,” she says, “and says. “Big decisions that George made while he was in office, she explains. “You get it looks like a modern sculpture.” This portion of the museum is monumentally the same information that the president got at the time. You have the press asking different than the beginning of the tour. “Obviously…the first part is what we you, “What are you going to do?” Then, each person can make their own decision.” expected to spend our eight years on, then you turn the corner and see this. Groups can vote on what they would do, followed by a video featuring Mr. Bush I think it will be a very somber and very effective history of September 11th.” describing the actions he took in each scenario. 39


The sightseers, short list Photo by Grant Miller Photography

The Bush Presidential Library and Museum complex is chock full of interesting memorabilia. As with many archival facilities it will take more than a couple of hours to see it all. With that in mind, we compiled a short list of five “can’t miss” sections.

Artifacts From September 11: Walking into this section of the museum, the entire tone changes rather dramatically. The area includes large, charred metal beams from New York City’s World Trade Center towers, as well as the iconic megaphone that President George W. Bush used to address the legions of people working at “ground zero” just a few days after the deadly attacks. Oval Office Replica: While there are facsimiles of the historic office in other presidential libraries across the U.S., this one may be the most impressive. Unlike many of the others, it is full-sized and accurate down to the commanderin-chief’s Resolute desk and handsome rug, which was designed by Mrs. Bush. Rather than a view of the south lawn, this Oval Office replica looks towards downtown Dallas. There is also a view of a Rose Garden, complete with native flora that thrives in the state’s extreme heat. Freedom Hall: The main entrance to the exhibit areas is impressive by any measure. It is dominated by a large tower rising above the center of the structure, illuminated by day washed in beams of sunlight. Tis area features items such as an array of gifts including jewels, spectacular clothing and other objects presented by various heads of state during the Bushes years in the White House.

The Grounds: Renowned landscape architect Michael R. Van Valkenburgh was a central figure in the design of the green spaces. The 15-acre area is filled with a variety of native trees, flowing grasses and flowers, including blankets of Bluebonnets, Texas’ state flower. With an emphasis on sustainability, the ecofriendly grounds are stunning and a significant part of the complex’s attraction. “We hope that schoolchildren from all over the Metroplex have a yearly field trip there,” says Mrs. Bush. “They will be able to sit out in the park and have their lunch.” Café 43: The only restaurant on the grounds is delightful, and delicious too. There is something for all tastes – from burgers to beef tenderloin, a variety of garden salads and much in-between. With its lovely high ceilings, and open areas filled with sunlight, the café is open for lunch as well as brunch.

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She believes the new complex that has occupied so much of her time and energy over the past few years, fits nicely into the new architecture that has sprung up over the past few years, contributing to a fresh-look landscape that she says transformed Dallas during the years she was away. “It changed a lot. I am so proud of my friends who worked on the new arts buildings that are downtown and are so wonderful,” she said. “I’ve become a very serious opera buff, and love going to the beautiful Winspear Opera House. Of course the Nasher Sculpture Garden, and all of the other beautiful art museums downtown. As well as the new Klyde Warren Park…I have walked there with friends who have come to visit from out-of-town. I am very proud of Dallas.”

Life in Dallas Now that the couple is fully entrenched in Dallas, in retrospect, what did she miss most about it while living in Washington, D.C? “I missed the wide-open spaces of Texas. I grew up in west Texas. I missed how friendly people are. They have a can-do spirit here, they are optimistic… and you can tell by all the wonderful things people have built all over our state…in Dallas, particularly, and Fort Worth as well where there are so many great art institutions. People probably don’t think of Texans as art supporters, but in fact we are.” Mrs. Bush remains as active and devoted to education and arts as ever. In April, she served as honorary chair of the National Endowment for the Arts funded project called “The Big Read.” The citywide program prompted people of all ages throughout Dallas to read the same book, Fahrenheit 451, in the same month. Now that the slipper is on the other foot, and the couple is more than four years removed from life in the nation’s capital, does she miss the whirlwind pace of life as the First Lady? “I joke and say that the main thing I miss is the chef Photo by David Woo from the White House,” she laughs. “Both of us, I think, started looking forward with anticipation about moving here. I started coming before we left Washington, to look for an house to move to, so there is a lot of anticipation in those last few months about moving home, being back where all of our friends are – although now, of course we have friends all over the country and the world.” World leaders including former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, as well President Barack Obama and the other three living former presidents were in Dallas to attend the dedication ceremonies. An enthusiastic crowd of about 10,000 people was on hand, seated in front of the new complex. After all the former presidents spoke, George W. Bush had the last word. He made special note that his father, the 41st president, was able to attend. “41,” said the younger Bush tearing up, “it is awesome that you are here today." Mr. Bush closed his address saying, “I will always believe that our nation’s best days lie ahead.” This is the first facility of its kind in the area. The cultural effect of the new complex could be significant, as well as the potential economic boost it may provide to the local economy. And if early attendance figures are any indication, things are off to a good start. More than 170,000 visitors have toured the Bush Presidential Library and Museum in its first 100 days of operation. An estimated 500,000 people are expected to visit during the first year of operation.

“Eight years is a long time, and you know when you’re elected that four years later, unless you’re either reelected for one more term, you move out.” ~ Laura Bush Photo by David Woo


Style

ELEMENTS OF

Claire Dewar Breath of Fresh Air

Dallas will always be home. However, I recently bought another house in a location I love—Aspen, Colorado. While I was motivated by the solid investment, my purchase has also given me a connection to a new place with an excitement like my hometown. Celebrating 30 years in the real estate business I’m glad I took my own advice! Claire Dewar, Senior Vice President, 214-808-6045, cdewar@briggsfreeman.com

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Style

ELEMENTS OF

Jeff Watson

Material Matters

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Great architects agree – the best spaces just make you feel good. Created with stunning outdoor entertaining and extraordinary attention to detail – including travertine floors, vaulted groin ceilings, and a dramatic two-story study – this private estate in Vaquero succeeds at every level. 2254 King Fisher – Available. Jeff Watson, Senior Vice President, 817-501-1923, jwatson@briggsfreeman.com


Style

ELEMENTS OF

Ann Henry Redefining Address Life’s Location

Recently I sold a wonderful space in a nontraditional neighborhood and it brought to mind that, today, sophisticated urban homes, industrial lofts, and reworked spaces in art districts often appeal to the new buyer. If the space is exciting and embraces their lifestyles, these homes allow buyers to see themselves and their lives in new and invigorating ways. Ann Henry, 214-546-6712 ahenry@briggsfreeman.com, annhenrydallas.com

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Style

ELEMENTS OF

Susie Ryan It’s Different Now

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Pete Ryan

Good advisers and strategic pricing in today’s housing market are helping raise home values across the United States. We have been bold in pricing with successful results, setting records with three remarkable properties in Dallas’ renowned Highland Park, Preston Hollow, and Bluffview neighborhoods. Susie Ryan, Senior Vice President, 214-957-6886, sryan@briggsfreeman.com. Pete Ryan, Senior Vice President, 214-957-3547, pryan@briggsfreeman.com, susieandpeteryan.com


Style

ELEMENTS OF

Ellen Terry Todd Terry

A Fashionable Address

A great room fit for royalty and a balcony overlooking a fabulous courtyard – this luxurious home beckons elegant entertaining and an exceptional lifestyle. Like a hôtel particulier in Paris, an elevator whisks you to three floors of elevated living. A man’s home is his castle. 3901 Turtle Creek # 8 Place des Vosges – Available. Ellen Terry, 214-727-6767, eterry@briggsfreeman.com. Todd Terry, 214-675-3013, tterry@briggsfreeman.com, ellenterry.com

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Where

Wishes become

Reality

Imagine living in a neighborhood specifically designed to provide whatever intrigues you. At Museum Tower , Director of Resident

Relations Tanya Mendenhall and the talented concierge staff are entirely focused on bringing your lifestyle vision into reality. “Right now I’m working with an owner who asked me to help arrange a fun event for friends who are coming in from Midland for the weekend,” says Mendenhall. “We did a little brainstorming and have taken the event to a whole new level. There will be an amazing happy hour with food and drinks where adults and kids will enjoy a Paint Like Picasso class. Afterwards, the group of 40 will head over to Meso Maya for a private dinner designed by Chef Nico Sanchez.” Mendenhall’s specialty is “going beyond” and turning ordinary requests into extraordinary experiences. Next on her list is creating a fantastic sports weekend including Founder’s Club seats at AT&T Stadium for an owner who is hosting a group of Eagles fans for the Cowboys – Eagles December matchup. Maybe you would like help putting on an event to raise money for a charity close to your heart. Mendenhall can help create an elegant cocktail gathering that might include special guest speakers and a curated art showing onsite in the beautiful Owner’s Lounge.

“It’s the most wonderful job in the world, because I get to facilitate the spectacular,” says Mendenhall, who joined the Museum Tower team after spending 25 years in Dallas’ vibrant nonprofit community. “Our residents are exceptional. They are engaged with life—traveling the world and seeing the extraordinary. At Museum Tower, we continue those experiences by helping our residents pursue their passions, at home or wherever they travel.” In a world full of possibility, beauty and adventure, the role of Museum Tower’s Director of Resident Relations is limited only by the imagination. Each event will be planned to embrace the specific requests and interests of Museum Tower owners. “We don’t know of another luxury high rise community that provides this level of service,” says Steve Sandborg, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Museum Tower. “It’s another example of how Museum Tower reaches beyond the expected to the exceptional.” For more information go to museumtowerdallas.com Certain described services are subject to future modification by the Condominium Association and may be subject to additional fees.

Or perhaps an owner simply wants a fully stocked pantry when he returns from a month-long trip to Asia. The concierge staff will arrange for favorite food and drink to welcome home a weary traveler.

1918 N. Olive Street Dallas, TX 75201 www.MuseumTowerDallas.com • 214.954.1234 46


Tanya Mendenhall facilitates the spectacular as Museum Tower’s Director of Resident Relations.

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NATURAL PARADISE Golfers’ Retreat By Diana Rowe

In

the charming town of Pine Mountain, Ga., is Callaway Gardens, a legendary golf experience surrounded by a 13,000-acre yearround woodland and display garden, resort, residential community and preserve. Pine Mountain is a relaxing Mayberry-esque town, serving as the gateway to Callaway Gardens, which has attracted thousands of visitors since its opening in 1952. Yet, it Overlooking 17th Green somehow remains unspoiled. n Lake View Callaway Gardens is the perfect mix of championship golf and old-fashioned Southern hospitality. It’s a golfer's resort immersed in a natural environment where botanic gardens and indigenous wildlife are as much a part of the landscape as Speckled Heart grits and toast layered with muscadine jam. Callaway Gardens, opened first as the Ida Cason Gardens, is the vision of founder Cason J. Callaway, a former textile magnate, and his wife Virginia Hand Callaway. Callaway created a non-profit family-style golf and tennis resort from the dormant cotton fields, eager to connect man with nature in his beloved gardens. Today, thousands of visitors trek to this pristine paradise to breathe in the fresh mountain air, sweet aroma of the gardens, glimpse wildlife, and simply enjoy a getaway. After navigating the Atlanta airport, I pointed my rental car one hour southwest. A short 20 minutes, and we’d broken free of the stifling city traffic on the tree-lined interstate, inhaling the exhaust-free country air. Locating Callaway Gardens’ accommodations proved more difficult than I’d anticipated and mobile phone service was sketchy. However, once we’d arrived at check-in, the friendly smile and “hi y’all” more than made up for our delay when we were directed to our “cottage.” The Southern Pine Cottages are aptly named for the towering pine trees surrounding the cluster of secluded neighborhoods of cottages. The Cottages are one or two bedroom getaways, with a living and dining area, kitchen, fireplace, screened porch and deck. Other onsite accommodations include the Mountain Creek Inn and the more upscale one- to four-bedroom Mountain Creek Villas.

If a golfer looks up from his/her shot, Mr. Callaway says, I want them to be looking at something

beautiful.

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Callaway Mountain Creek Villas provide a luxury getaway from the greens

Rental cars are a necessity in navigating the Callaway Gardens’ thousands of acres. Most visitors start at the Virginia Hand Callaway Discovery Center, a 35,000 square foot facility offering guests an overview of what’s happening at the gardens, an auditorium, exhibit hall with rotating displays, and Discovery Café, one of eight dining options, ranging from casual to fine dining. Callaway Gardens offers outdoor adventures, such as water skiing, tennis, skeet shooting, fly fishing, biking, and hiking, and even a flying circus. Or take your adventure up, up and away at Callaway’s newest attraction, the TreeTop Adventure, an aerial challenge course with zip lines, swinging bridges and logs. To golfers, these diversions are only icing on the cake as their first call of duty is to play Callaway Gardens’ two distinctly different 18-hole layouts, both routinely ranked among the nation’s top courses by Golf Digest and Golf magazines. Start with practice swings at the 26-acre Twin Oaks Golf Practice Facility, one of the largest of its kind.

Signature Hole Lake View # 10, one of the more intimidating yet picturesque golf holes in West Georgia

Mountain View is the challenging, 7,057 yard, tree-lined Dick Wilson design and former home to the PGA Tour's Buick Challenge. It only takes a few swings to realize this course was made for advanced golfers with its uneven stances on the hilly terrain and risk/reward elements on both nines that have you double-checking your distance and club. I prefer the Lake View, Callaway Garden’s original golf course, as it reminds me of old-school golf. Lake View Golf Course, a 9-hole design collaboration of Dick Wilson, J.B. McGovern and the Gardens’ founder Cason Callaway, originally opened in 1951. “If a golfer looks up from his/her shot", Mr. Callaway says, “I want them to be looking at something beautiful.” He came through with a showering of Mother Nature’s best: azaleas, dogwoods, rhododendrons and native flowering plants, and a short course with wide fairways. Renovated in 2002, Lake View is one of those feel-good, challenging golf outings worth repeating. Its catchy name came from the water that comes into play on 9 of the 18-holes of this 6,051-yard (forward tees 4,473), par 70 layout. On Hole 7, the layout circles the lake counterclockwise to tee box 14. If your game is on, then enjoy the view of the shimmering lake and varied wildlife; if not, well, you might want to tuck a fishing pole in your bag. All photos courtesy of Callaway Gardens


GLOBAL CONNECTION

50 Miami, FL

Mayi de la Vega

First, it was the Brazilians and the Venezuelans. Now, it’s the French and Canadians who are snapping up South Florida’s real estate.

Insight and inspiration from our global partners 51 Telluride, CO

2013

has been a positive year for luxury residential real estate with the global market moving forward with a more confident stride. Cities like New York, London and Miami are seeing a dynamic revival in the sale of trophy properties while housing values are climbing in the double digits in Hong Kong, Dubai and Brazil. Robbie Briggs CEO and President Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty Dallas, Texas

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52 Seattle, WA

The Emerald City is turned golden as job growth and consumer confidence sprints past the national levels.

Nikki Field

Inventory is at historic lows with stock market advances contributing to a new “wealth effect” and sales momentum being pushed by foreign buyers.

54 San Francisco, CA

55

Arthur Sharif

The sales price to list price ratio has been over 100 percent for the past 17 months.

55 Santa Barbara, CA

54

Dean & Stacy Jones

51

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As primary markets continue their robust recovery, the second home markets of the mountain states are following suit.

53 New York, NY

ore gia

50

Bill Fandel

Suzanne Perkins

The market has improved dramatically with prices and demand rising, driven by cash buyers and foreign investors.

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META

Extraordinary

United States

Coral Gables, Florida 540 Leucadendra Drive is a French-inspired waterfront estate situated in the prestigious community of Gables Estates. With 160 ft. of water frontage, this recently renovated 6 bdr/5.5 bth home boasts a spacious split plan design, with master suite featuring direct lagoon views on the first floor, 4 bedrooms on the second floor, formal living and dining rooms, state-of-the-art LUBE Italian kitchen, office and elevator. A spacious loft/bedroom on the third floor complements this unique home. Mayi de la Vega 305-778-7990 mayi@onesothebysrealty.com Jorge Uribe 786-371-8777 juribe@onesothebysrealty.com United States

Coral Gables, Florida 210 Arvida Parkway is a magnificent waterfront estate located in the prestigious Gables Estates community. Expansive open areas with walls of windows allow for natural light filled spaces throughout. Poggenpohl designed kitchen. Private office. Sumptuous master suite with custom built-in closets. Inviting pool/patio area with gazebo, perfect for entertaining. 150 ft. of water frontage with no bridges to bay. Mayi de la Vega 305-778-7990 mayi@onesothebysrealty.com Jorge Uribe 786-371-8777 juribe@onesothebysrealty.com

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META

Extraordinary

Elk Park Ranch

Durango, CO Elk Park Ranch is the rarest of offerings, featuring over 1,000 acres of dramatic mountains, 他 miles of restored river frontage and a series of rolling meadows within a lush valley; all only less than 10 minutes from the resort town of Durango, CO. The property is ideally suited for a multi-generational family compound, corporate retreat, or philanthropic functions. Offered at $18,900,000 Bill Fandel 970-708-4141 bill.fandel@sothebysrealty.com

Cascabel River Retreat

Telluride, CO Cascabel is a private recreational fishing retreat & family compound set upon 3 miles of private water on the Lower San Miguel River. The fishery has been carefully cultivated for over 20 years, offering extensive river frontage and stocked ponds. Just 30 minutes from the resort town of Telluride, CO, Cascabel River Retreat provides year-round enjoyment. Offered at $12,750,000 Bill Fandel 970-708-4141 bill.fandel@sothebysrealty.com

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META

Extraordinary

United States

Gig Harbor, WA The equestrian jewel of the Pacific Northwest, Paddock Wood Ranch is comprised of 88-acres in Gig Harbor, WA just minutes from the majestic Puget Sound waterways and with convenient access to the thriving cities of Seattle and Tacoma and to the SeaTac International Airport. Discover this unparalleled opportunity to acquire a fully operational equestrian center complete with horse boarding, dressage training facilities, large turnouts and fields and miles of private trails for riding through the adjacent woods. Behold the future development opportunity build single family homes on a dozen fully-improved home sites, which connect to the surrounding horse trails as part of a potential planned unit development. Also available for future short plat development is additional acreage with opportunity to harvest timber while revealing gentle views of the ranch, surrounding countryside and Puget Sound. Paddock Wood Ranch and Estates affords a new owner the opportunity to acquire one the region’s largest contiguous land portfolios for either a personal retreat and land bank or to leverage existing entitlements with the future opportunity to development a master planned community. Dean & Stacy Jones I Owners Realogics Sotheby’s International Realty Jamie Michaud I Broker Jamie.Michaud@SothebysRealty.com 253-686-0806­ OwnPaddockwood.com $8,100,000 I Gig Harbor, WA

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META

Extraordinary

United states

New York, New York Landmark of the Future 34 East 62nd Street. Acclaimed architect Preston Phillips sets a new standard for Townhouse living in this prime location East Side neighborhood. This site is a development to be completed upon sale. The Townhouse will deliver an 8,040+/square foot, 5 story, 20' wide home, a sleek 21st century design, every technological convenience and will be the 1st green/LEED certified Townhouse to exist in the neighborhood. The Limestone and glass facade is simple and modern. The interior open and light. This home will offer 8 Rooms, 4 Bedrooms and 6 Baths, a glass door elevator, a swimming pool, a rear garden with waterfall, terraces and a roof garden. An oversized Living Room, Kitchen, Dining Room and Conservatory are also part of these spectacular plans for Townhouse living at its finest. Located in Manhattan’s premier residential neighborhood. Price: $40,000,000 Nikki Field Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker 212.606.7669 nikki.field@sothebyshomes.com www.nikkifield.com

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META

Extraordinary

United States

Los Altos Hills, California The Morgan Estate An architectural masterpiece said to have played host to presidents and kings. Originally built in 1914 and meticulously restored over an 8-year period by its current owners and a team of 1000. This magnificent approximately 30,000 square foot estate is situated on approximately eight manicured level acres and is arguably the finest example of Tudor and Jacobean revival architecture in the United States and one of the grandest homes in California. A seamless blend of old world luxury and twenty first century sensibility is evident in the home’s systems including climate control, entertainment, lighting, connectivity and security which are all state of the art and are not intrusive to the period detailing. Two outlier buildings include a gym, utility building and a caretaker’s house. Located in a premier Silicon Valley neighborhood a mile from downtown Los Altos and a world away from everything else. An official Town Historic Landmark, it is listed on the local, state and national register of historic places. The estate’s historic designation is rewarded with a tremendous property tax savings.

www.TheMorganEstate.com Arthur Sharif | BRE#01481940 Arthur Sharif & Associates 650.804.4770 Arthur@SVLuxRE.com www.SVLuxRE.com

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META

Extraordinary

United States

14,000 acres in Carmel Valley, California rana creek ranch Rana Creek Ranch is a 14,000+ acre working cattle ranch comprised of 12 legal parcels located in central Carmel Valley, California, just forty minutes from the world-famous resort of Pebble Beach and the coastal community of Carmel, California. This trophy property is being offered for sale for the first time in nearly 30 years and is a once in a lifetime opportunity for the discriminating buyer to own a true piece of California history. Offered at $59,950,000

www.ranacreekranch.com Suzanne Perkins 805.895.2138 suzanneperkins.com Sam Piffero 831.236.5389 sampiffero.com

55


META

Extraordinary

56


Villa at Trisara Phuket, Thailand 8,062 square feet

Three levels of luxury set amid acres of forest briggsfreeman.com

57


META

Extraordinary

Modern French Chic 15-Minute Drive from Cannes La Roquette sur Siagne, France 2,500 square feet

Modern villa with views of the Cote d’Azur. briggsfreeman.com

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The Carlyle_9x10 875_Layout 1 10/5/12 4:57 PM Page 1

H

ome to Princes, Presidents and New Yorkers alike.

Brilliantly positioned on Madison Avenue amidst designer boutiques, celebrated galleries, world-renowned museums and iconic Central Park, The Carlyle is a legend in its own right and is glorious proof that one need not be a Manhattan resident to feel like one. Revive your spirit and indulge your senses in a hotel rich with history.

Madison Avenue at 76th Street, New York, NY 10021 212.744.1600 www.rosewoodhotels.com/carlyle


Meta Luxe Fall 2013

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Journey to India METALUXEMAGAZINE.COM

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Treasures

World's Finest Spa Essence of Thai Relaxation

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

NEiMANMARCUs.CoM

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

1.800.365.7989

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Inside the Bush Library Viva la Vida in San Miguel Global Connections


Metaluxe fall 2013