Page 1

The Inside Issue

PRIVATE PLACES, SECRET SPACES


O U R S TO R E S AKRIS . ALEX ANDER Mc QUEEN ALICE + OLIVIA . ANNE FONTAINE BALENCIAGA . BANDIER BERETTA GALLERY . BLUEMERCURY BRUNELLO CUCINELLI CAROLINA HERRER A . CARTIER . CÉLINE CHANEL . CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN CHRISTOFLE . DIOR DIOR BEAUTY . ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA ESCADA . ETRO . FENDI . FR AME GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI . HADLEIGH’S HARRY WINSTON . HERMÈS JAMES PERSE . JIMMY CHOO KIEHL’S SINCE 1851 . LEGGIADRO LELA ROSE . LORO PIANA MADISON . MARKET . PEEPER’S R AG & BONE . R ALPH LAUREN ROLLER R ABBIT . SAINT LAURENT . ST. JOHN ST. MICHAEL’S WOMAN’S EXCHANGE STELLA Mc CARTNEY . THEORY TOM FORD . TORY BURCH TRINA TURK . TTH FORTY FIVE TEN VALENTINO . VERONICA BEARD VINCE . WILLIAM NOBLE PARTIAL LISTING

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The intrigue of the inside. Dickies in Fort Worth, where they come up with all those hard-working, hard-wearing clothes. (No publication has been in there in about 60 years. We were thrilled that our idea was given the green light.) And while what Gates and Dickies are creating couldn’t be more different — evocative sculpture and everyday workwear — their inner workings function much the same. It’s really all about craft and creativity. I think you’ll see the unconventional beauty in both. The other half of the issue is loaded with homes and interiors, too. That would be the special section starting on page 86 that features some of our top listings — and many of our expert agents. They are part of a team that is more than 500 now, across North Texas, and that has the scoop, every day, on houses, ranches, land, neighborhoods, commercial properties, financing, schools — even the best shopping and dining. Talk about your insiders. Enjoy the issue.

ROBBIE BRIGGS President + CEO 214-808-6107 rbriggs@briggsfreeman.com

Our team set their sights on some very special places and got unprecedented access to them. 4

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PORTRAIT: KENT BARKER

I

n my business, I see a lot of homes. And as much as I am an architecture buff and love what houses look like on the outside, I always love that little thrill of going inside one, especially if I have no idea what to expect. This issue of B magazine is all about that little thrill. Our team set their sights on some very special places — residential and otherwise — and got unprecedented access to them. Over several weeks, each place was visited, talked about, thought about and talked about some more. It took many more weeks, and the proverbial village, to pull off all the photo shoots and all the writing, all across Dallas and Fort Worth. What the team brought back is so exciting, in such different ways. We are inside three very distinct homes in North Texas: a tiny Dallas apartment that lives like Downton Abbey, a sleek house in Frisco filled with museum- quality Scandinavian furniture and an elegant Traditional house in Greenway Parks with a beautiful interior that is all about the blues. For our fashion story, we were given access to the University Club in all its untouched, 1980s glory. No one has seen it since it closed in 2002 — and our team thought it was the perfect backdrop for all the sleek new clothes that are popping up this spring and summer. Then we have two thought-provoking studios: the private spaces of sculptor Theaster Gates, who is the winner of this year’s Nasher Prize, and the design department of


SPRING + SUMMER 2O18 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1

The rundown DEPARTMENTS 12

THE THINK PIECE The inimitable Lee Cullum

on what your furniture is saying about you. (FYI: It’s a lot.)

14

FIRST THINGS FIRST A Sotheby’s score, an ’80s

interior rediscovered and one fashionable tea kettle

16

STATE OF MINE Skip Hollandsworth wades into

the Texas obsession with fishing. Plus: Reel style

18

SOCIAL STUDY Inside the private spaces of the

62

34

2018 Nasher Prize winner, from one man who knows

136

WHAT I KNOW NOW Decorator Joseph Minton

on love, social media and who should be in the design biz

FEATURES 24

INTERIOR What to do if a homeowner’s favorite color is blue, blue, blue? Designer Jody Hagan knows.

34

INTERIOR John Bobbitt creates a 700-square-foot apartment that thinks it’s a manor house.

42

STYLE Spring has sprung: What does your home need now? Accessories that are naturally chic.

48

FASHION Back to the future: Power dressing now,

with all the energy of the amazing ’80s

62

DESIGN Exclusive: B magazine goes inside the secret

prototype studios of a Texas (and American) icon

76

INTERIOR Understanding Joshua Rice: How details

make the difference for one meticulous designer

SPECIAL SECTION 86

PROPERTIES The exclusive listings and

expert agents of Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty

NE B MAGAZI INTERNAT IONAL REALTY 2O18 SPRING + SUMMER

TARTS, DESIGN’S UPS AND UPHOLDERS TERS EXPERIEMEN

ON THE COVERS WEST In Fort Worth, a storied shirt from the Dickies archive. EAST The pint-size but princely apartment of Dallas decorator John Bobbitt. Photographs by MEI-CHUN JAU. 6

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76

PHOTOGRAPHS: BUTTONS AND BUST: MEI-CHUN JAU. CHAIR: ADDISON JONES.

SOTHEBY’ S + BRIGGS FREEMAN LUXURY + LIFE

THE INSIDE IS SUE


6821 Preston Rd., Dallas 214.522.2400 │ 4444 Westheimer Rd., Houston 713.621.2400 │ deBoulle.com


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF + CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Rob Brinkley DESIGN DIRECTOR + ART DIRECTOR

Jamie Huckaby EXECUTIVE EDITOR + CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Melinda Obenchain SPECIAL-SECTION COORDINATOR

Melis Carpenter

PUBLISHER + CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING + DIGITAL INITIATIVES

Stephen Marston smarston@briggsfreeman.com DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENTS + SPECIAL PROJECTS

Maria Cintron mcintron@briggsfreeman.com

CONTRIBUTORS

56OO WEST LOVERS LANE, SUITE 224 DALLAS, TEXAS 752O9 214-35O-O4OO BRIGGSFREEMAN.COM © 2018 BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

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Writers Rob Brinkley, Anna Fialho Byers, Lee Cullum, Connie Dufner, Skip Hollandsworth, Kendall Morgan, Jeremy Strick Copy editors Molly Grace Brown, Anna Fialho Byers, Shaunna Coon Graphic designers Jamie Huckaby, Linda Lum Illustrator Rob Wilson Photographers Fredrik Brodén, Nan Coulter, Mei-Chun Jau, Addison Jones, Stephen Karlisch, Geof Kern, Allison V. Smith, Robert Yu Models Julian Machann, Holden Lower Creative directors Chandra North Blaylock, Georgia Christensen Stylists Georgia Christensen, Jamie Lyons, Michael Thomas

PHOTOGRAPH: FREDRIK BRODÉN. CO DRESS AND GUCCI BOOTS, BOTH NEIMAN MARCUS DOWNTOWN. DAVID YURMAN RING, BACHEDORF’S GALLERIA DALLAS.

Paul Wooldridge Briggs Freeman Sotheby's International Realty 214-353-5115 pwooldridge@briggsfreeman.com


LAST CHAPTER OF AN ICON Museum Tower is over 80% sold. With fewer than 20 finished residences remaining, time is of the essence to call the icon of the Arts District home. Experience the architectural artistry, irreplaceable location and unparalleled level of service in Dallas’ most exclusive community. LIMITED REMAINING OPPORTUNITIES TO OWN AT MUSEUM TOWER:

2 Bedroom/2 Bath homes from $1,350,000 3 Bedroom/3 Bath homes from $1,900,000 42nd Floor Penthouse $13,500,000

CALL OR EMAIL TO SET UP A PRIVATE TOUR. 1918 N. Olive Street, Dallas, TX 75201 MuseumTowerDallas.com • 214.954.1234 Info@MuseumTowerDallas.com

IMAGES PRESENTED MAY NOT REFLECT NEW CONSTRUCTION IN THE CONTINUALLY CHANGING DOWNTOWN URBAN ENVIRONMENT. THIS MATERIAL DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN OFFER TO SELL NOR A SOLICITATION TO BUY IN ANY STATE WHERE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED IF SUCH REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN FILED. CERTAIN DESCRIBED SERVICES ARE SUBJECT TO FUTURE MODIFICATION BY THE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION AND MAY BE SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL FEES. BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY AND THE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY LOGO ARE REGISTERED (AND UNREGISTERED) SERVICE MARKS USED WITH PERMISSION. EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED. WE ARE PLEDGED TO THE LETTER AND SPIRIT OF U.S. POLICY FOR THE ACHIEVEMENT OF EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY THROUGHOUT THE NATION. WE ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT AN AFFIRMATIVE ADVERTISING AND MARKETING PROGRAM IN WHICH THERE ARE NO BARRIERS TO OBTAINING HOUSING BECAUSE OF RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX, HANDICAP, FAMILIAL STATUS, OR NATIONAL ORIGIN.


CONNECTED + BRIGGSFREEMAN.COM

Something you’ll really click with Anywhere, everywhere: The SIR Mobile app

Your new house, in the palm of your hand Because Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty is a proud part of Sotheby's International Realty® — the extraordinarily powerful global network of more than 20,000 agents in nearly 70 countries and territories — its reach is unequalled, not only with briggsfreeman.com but also with the SIR Mobile app. Search for luxury homes and property in North Texas and around the world by neighborhood, city, ZIP code and more. Browse home pictures and details. Share favorites on Facebook and Twitter. View estimated mortgage payments. Then, get connected to your Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty agent. The complimentary app is easy to get: Just go to app.sir.com/briggsfreemansir for a link — and soon you will have a world of property possibilities in your hands.

8823 Briarwood Lane in Dallas, designed by Booziotis & Company Architects and with interior design by the homeowner and Emily Summers, $5,900,000

THE NEW SEARCH: BY STYLE With briggsfreeman.com/architecture, shop for your next home by its architectural style, everything from Contemporary to Colonial, Mediterranean to Midcentury Modern. Learn what makes each style so distinctive and from whence it came. (Do you know why a Tudor is called a Tudor?) Even famous examples of each are noted, and some reasons why the style works in Texas.

How to live where they learn

A virtual page-turner Big, beautiful, brilliant B is online at thisisbmagazine.com. Dig in to our one-of-a-kind luxury lifestyle magazine on your phone, tablet or computer. B’s fun and thought-provoking stories, incredible photographs — all from top-notch writers and contributors — are all yours, anytime, anywhere.

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher,” says a Japanese proverb. A great teacher and a great school inspire the greatness in every kid. That’s why we created briggsfreeman .com/schools, a guide to more than 300 schools — public, private and specialized — across North Texas. Learn about school missions, philosophies and histories. Search for schools by cities and districts. On

We’d love to click with you. 10

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each school’s page, all available homes nearby are represented on a regional map. A special feature of briggsfreeman.com/schools is the agent-alumni area, where you’ll see which of the expert agents at Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty attended a school, or who have family that did. Any one of them can help you decide which nearby home or neighborhood meets your unique needs.


Home, chic home.

BRIGGSFREEMAN.COM


THE THINK PIECE

Listen. Your dining table is talking about you. They’re not ‘just things,’ as some will try and tell you. Your furnishings telegraph all kinds of messages and meanings — and not just to those who come to visit. Journalist LEE CULLUM does some translating

T

Illustration by Rob Wilson

hings contain people.” So said Dallas-born novelist Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey. They also contain ideas, memories, places. For Hailey, it was all of those when she created The English Room at her house in Los Angeles. In it, she put pieces that she and her husband, Oliver Hailey, a playwright, had collected from shops in Rudgwick, West Sussex, for Eames House, a treasure of the 16th century that they bought and renovated. (The kitchen was redone thanks to her phenomenally successful first book, A Woman of Independent Means.) Generously apportioned and with radiant roses in front and back, Eames House was down the street from the pub and the Anglican church. There were bedrooms for everybody: Hailey and her husband; their daughters Kendall and Brooke; his mother, Hallie Mae; and his brother, Thomas, stricken with polio as a child but who, from a wheelchair, lavished attention on politics and chess. “When they first came to Rudgwick,” recalled Mr. Tilley, who sometimes drove the Haileys to theaters in London, “they were so full of life, every one of them.” Hallie Mae lived in the room in L.A. that later would recall Eames House, and now guests enjoy the fold-out bed and the ambience of antiques stores, where the Haileys found a drop-leaf dining table and six chairs — their first purchase — and a chaise longue called a duchess chair, Hailey’s favorite, now in her L.A. living room. Though Eames House has a half-timbered Tudor façade, the family’s taste, Hailey tells me, “ran to Bloomsbury, inspired by Charleston, the farmhouse in East Sussex where Virginia Woolf’s artist sister, Vanessa Bell, lived with, among others, the painter Duncan Grant.” It is not unusual to find special parts of oneself via another country. Interior designer Emily Summers, in her own Dallas house, has resonated with the elegant restraint of Germany’s Bauhaus modernism and, in her courtyards, with the gardens of Japan. Her furniture, she says, ranges “from the ’40s to the ’80s.” Paula Lambert of the Mozzarella Company has infused her new home with the colors and light that I associate with Italy, where she learned to make cheese. A spectacular coffee table, however, began in London at the restaurant Nopi, where Lambert was having dinner. She peeked beneath the tablecloth, admired very much what she saw and sent a photo back to her interior designer, Dan Nelson of Vision Design. Without telling her, Nelson drew a replica as a coffee table and had it built in Dallas. For biblical scholar Marjorie Currey and her husband, Fred, it’s the Middle East and their enduring hope for its three great religions of the book:

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Christianity, Judaism and Islam. A magnificent archway leading from the entrance hall to the living room is inscribed thus: “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.” On the other side is this from the Koran: “There is one God. His name is Allah and Muhammad is his prophet.” Everything in both rooms has been selected to support the idea of cultural convergence. Then there is Garrett Boone, co-founder of the Container Store and now chairman of TreeHouse, the Dallas and Plano home-improvement stores that are highly focused on green living. The Dallas Morning News featured Boone’s own Walking Table, an irregular slab of wood mounted on slender wood legs with feet moving ahead, filled with purpose, and his Jonah Bed, with its partial canopy inspired by the rib of a fish he found somewhere, hugging the shore. Both of these exuberant creations of his — made in his own wood shop across town — grace the Turtle Creek condominium he shares with his wife, Cecilia. And what could be more inviting than dining in the round, at a table that envelops a group and encourages intimate conversation. Bonnie Wheeler, director of medieval studies at Southern Methodist University, once had a long, splendid groaning board of “diamond mahogany and rosewood French Art Deco,” she explains, with “multiple leaves that could be extended to 22 feet — enough space to have dinners for whole classes of students, but also cozy enough for just a few friends when brought down to its basic size.” All this she traded for a round mahogany table, large enough to seat 12, worthy of King Arthur and his knights, though it’s from the much more recent 18th century. Gail Thomas, a founding fellow of The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture and the former CEO of The Trinity Trust Foundation, now the Trinity Park Conservancy, and her husband, Bob, a lawyer, have explored plenty of urgent issues at their dark circular table, hand-painted at the center with rich and glorious color. She found it at AOI Home, formerly Art of Old India, in the Dallas Design District years ago and around it has led full and fluent conversations — “soulful conversation,” Thomas would say — ever since. So, things — especially those that bear witness to our most closely held moments, to our love — do contain people, places, ideas and memories. They testify to our enthusiasms, our style, our emotions, to the quality of our intellect and the lasting impact of our lives. LEE CULLUM, a Dallas native and Southern Methodist University graduate, is an award-winning journalist and the host of CEO, a series of interviews with business leaders, on KERA. She is a columnist for The Dallas Morning News.


ILLUSTRATION: ROB WILSON/RENEE RHYNER & CO.

Our things testify to our enthusiasms, our style, our emotions, to the quality of our intellect.

BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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FIRST THINGS FIRST HOT STUFF

What all the best counters are wearing Room&Board’s Murphy sofa

NEST FEATHERING

F POP QUIZ: What do you get when

you cross an Italian appliance brand

If your spaces need some streamlining

urniture-philes who love sleek sofas, tables and beds may storm the sidewalks when Room&Board opens its doors in Dallas this April. The contemporary furniture store, whose designs channel the Shaker, Danish and modernist masters, was founded in Minneapolis in 1980 and has been a go-to among the style set ever since. The new store, in Dallas’ buzzy Knox-Henderson neighborhood, will be filled with pieces for every room in the house, plus accessories, lighting, rugs and more. Room&Board prides itself on its craftsmen collaborators in places such as Dallas, Italy and Japan, and the fact that more than 90 percent of its wares are made in America. The materials mix? Think leather, walnut and stainless steel — all the things a true-blue modernist —Rob Brinkley loves. 4524 McKinney Avenue, roomandboard.com

like Smeg with an Italian fashion label like Dolce & Gabbana? Some exclusively at Neiman Marcus this spring, the first small appliances in the Smeg x Dolce Gabbana collaboration are called the Breakfast Suite and consist of three curvaceous little numbers: an electric juicer, a two-slot toaster and a tea kettle, each of which is $600. (A virtual bargain, as a Smeg x Dolce Gabbana refrigerator goes for $50,000.) There may be no more stylish way to make your Bertazzoni stovetop pop than with a cheerful tea kettle like this, adorned with the fruits and flowers of Sicily. Plus, there’s just something about brewing a cup of tea in a kettle this fetching that makes it that much sweeter to drink. neiman marcus.com 14

—Anna Fialho Byers

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AT AUCTION

Fresh finds Spring offers a bumper crop of treasures at Sotheby’s salerooms around the world — everything from elegant automobiles to fine wines to important Chinese art. Just a handful of highlights? Edgy contemporary works by Banksy, Cindy Sherman and more will be sold on April 11 in London and a wedgy, white-and-gold Lamborghini gifted to Pope Francis by the Italian carmaker goes on the block on May 12 at the RM Sotheby’s sale in Monaco. Just two days later, art from Africa, Oceania and the Americas will be auctioned at the Sotheby’s flagship in New York. Not all the sales are in the auction house’s many luxurious locales: Some are online-only, including a multiday sale of Old Master paintings from April 10 to 24 and an outstanding selection of watches, ticking away from July 2 to 16. The full calendar and all the details are at sothebys.com. —R.B.

Peter Halley’s Breakdown, 1997, acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, pearlescent acrylic and Roll-A-Tex on two canvases, estimated at $70,000 to $100,000, to be sold at Sotheby’s Contemporary Curated sale in London on April 11.

THANKS-GIVING SQUARE: SHUTTERSTOCK FASHION PHOTOGRAPH: FREDRIK BRODÉN. UNIVERSITY CLUB: COURTESY GALLERIA DALLAS

seriously chic appliances. Launching


IN THE CLUB Our model Holden Lower wears a Theory jacket and shirt, Peter Millar pants, Gucci flip-up sunglasses and Balenciaga shoes, all Neiman Marcus downtown.

ON LOCATION

Cultured club Where this issue’s fashion story was worked out, one flashback at a time You’d be forgiven if you thought you saw Olivia Newton John twisting and turning in the aerobics room. For high above the hustle and bustle that is Galleria Dallas — all those shopping bags whizzing by, all those skaters whirling on the ice rink — there exists a vacuum. It is the three floors that once housed the University Club, a members-only social center where the A-list came to pump, grind and dine. It is a sprawling place, opened in 1982 and packed with racquetball courts, aerobics rooms, enormous tiled hot tubs for men and women — segregated on two floors — saunas, showers, locker rooms and a snack bar. (California roll, anyone?) A jogging track encircles Galleria Dallas’ famous skylights: Shoppers could look up and see some of Dallas’ finest, sprinting off all those pasta salads. On the very top floor are clubby rooms of paneled wood and leaded glass — a country club atop a shopping center, if you will, where luxurious lunches, dinners and weddings were held until the club

closed in 2002. The dining room’s chandeliers were glittery Waterford crystal and there were wingback chairs everywhere. But it’s the health club that is a time capsule of 1980s design: peach laminate, neon accent lighting and lots of taupe, burgundy and hunter green. It is where the B magazine crew spent 12 happy hours, channeling our inner Sheena Eastons and Patrick Nagels — a trip back to the future, in all its glossy glory. —R.B.

LET’S GET PHYSICAL The University Club, circa 1980s, where the A-list worked out, wined and dined

SNEAK PEEK

“One of the largest horizontally mounted stained-glass windows in the world … is best viewed by lying on the chapel floor.” My Story yellow-gold and diamond ring, $525 at Ylang 23

Preservation officer and author MARK DOTY, whose 10 favorite interiors in Dallas and Fort Worth are coming to the fall/winter issue of B

RETAIL THER APY

Some added sparkle A fashionable Dallas favorite has designs on Fort Worth Just when you thought The Shops at Clearfork couldn’t get any chicer — Neiman Marcus, Louis Vuitton, et al. — they just did. This summer, Ylang 23, a Dallas favorite for wonderfully offbeat and original jewelry, is heading west. Founded by Dallas couple Joanne and Charles Teichman in 1985, Ylang 23 is a curation of chic pieces from both celebrity-loved designers — think Jennifer Meyer, Cathy Waterman and Irene Neuwirth — and up-andcomers such as Raphaele Canot, Yannis Sergakis and Retrouvaí. The store’s customers are wildly loyal, and Fort Worth fashionistas will soon see why. The 2,200-square-foot Clearfork boutique joins the Dallas store (in The Plaza at Preston Center) as the second outpost for the Teichmans, whose daughter Alysa grew up working for the company and now heads its business development. The Fort Worth store will boast an all-new design concept that Ylang 23 will use as a prototype for new stores going forward. Its Clearfork neighbors include the aforementioned Neiman Marcus and Louis Vuitton, plus Tiffany & Co., Burberry and Tesla, too. That is some glittery company to keep. ylang23.com —A.F.B. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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STATE OF MINE

Hook, line and thinker Why do otherwise sane Texans throw boatloads of time and money into one of the most maddening pastimes of all? SKIP HOLLANDSWORTH goes fishing for some answers

REEL STYLE Clockwise from top of page: Scott SC bamboo rod, $3,250, scottflyrod .com. Roman Made handmade wooden Mother swimbait, $436, romanmade.com. Lamborghini Urus, 650 horsepower, 190 miles per hour and 21 cubic feet of cargo space, from approximately $200,000, lamborghini .com, lamborghinidallas .com. Xtratuf Legacy 2.0 neoprene fishing boot, $145 the pair, xtratuf.com. Fishpond Thunderhead Sling, fully submersible, $230, fishpondusa.com.

P

Fishing style edited by Rob Brinkley

eriodically, I drop into Shannon Wynne’s restaurant in Preston Center, Flying Fish, where hanging from the walls are more than 750 photos of Dallas citizens. They are mostly prominent people — hello, oilman and philanthropist Casey McManemin! — and they are staring at the camera, holding fish they have just caught. They are grinning triumphantly, like military generals who have just won a war. In a couple of photos, you actually can see fish blood dripping down the generals’ hands. Presumably, these fine citizens want their photos on Wynne’s walls so they can show the world that they have the strength and agility required to wrangle a gill-breathing beast from its underwater lair and onto a hook. Indeed, they are so devoted to this endeavor that they unabashedly spend crazy sums of money on sturdy rods and reels, hand-

crafted lures, shiny motorboats and, of course, fashionable fishing gear that is also perfectly suitable to wear to the office. They go on fishing vacations. They call you from the Pacific and shout, “Just landed a tarpon!” Needless to say, they pose for a photograph next to the tarpon. When a fishing outsider — that would be me — tries to get fishermen to explain why they spend endless hours on the water hoping to catch something that is already for sale at their neighborhood supermarket, the outsider will tend to receive a long lecture about the complicated craft of fishing: bait selection, casting accuracy, boat control, trolling-motor speed, and the ability to find the proper cover where fish will be hiding. But Wynne, who himself spends about 20 days a year fishing, says the answer is much simpler. Fishing, he declares, satisfies a primal urge. “We are hunters,” he says. “We love the thrill of catching our prey. When you feel a fish pulling on the end of your line, it’s exciting and addictive. We are just playing it out differently than the old caveman days.” So, the outsider asks, people should go fishing, even if they are really, really busy? “Everyone should,” says Wynne. “You can’t ignore millions of year of evolution.” But you’d better hurry, he says. “I don’t have much space left on my walls.” SKIP HOLLANDSWORTH is an award-winning journalist and the executive editor of Texas Monthly. His true-crime history, The Midnight Assassin: Panic, Scandal and the Hunt for America’s First Serial Killer, was published in 2016.

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CULTURE + TEXAS

RIGHT ANGLING Clockwise from top left: Fortnum & Mason wicker hamper with picnic blanket, approximately $145, fortnumandmason.com. HCB Sueños 53foot center-console fishing yacht, about $1 million, hcbyachts.com. Simms G4Z Bootfoot three-layer Gore-Tex waders, $1,000, simmsfishing.com. The Compleat Angler by Izaak Walton, first published in 1653 and still a defining book about fishing and friendship, approximately $500 to $2,500, Jonkers Rare Books, Oxfordshire, England, jonkers.co.uk. Filson Fly Fishing Guide Vest with sheepskin fly patch, $300, filson.com. Abel SDF reel, from $695, abelreels.com.

This day’s fortune and pleasure, and the night’s company and song, do all make me more and more in love with angling. IZAAK WALTON The Compleat Angler BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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SOCIAL STUDY

Interior motives There are reasons that the private spaces of the 2018 Nasher Prize winner work their way into his compelling art. (And vice versa.) JEREMY STRICK, the director of the Nasher Sculpture Center, reports from inside a singular, spellbinding world

C

hicago is famed for its architecture. And while the Frank Lloyd Wright houses that dot the landscape from south to north are justly celebrated, the city most owes its reputation to the magnificent skyscrapers that cluster downtown, making Chicago itself an icon of modernism. All of that seems distant from the low-lying neighborhoods on Chicago’s Southwest Side, some of which have been devastated by the legacies of racism and decades of regressive social policy. And yet, in one such neighborhood, Grand Crossing, a remarkable transformation is being effected. Buildings in Grand Crossing are being renovated and repurposed. These range from modest houses to a former elementary school to an abandoned bank. Only recently they sat empty, in states of extreme dereliction. Now they buzz with activity, some serving as cultural and community centers, others as repositories of collections of cultural and historical artifacts. Yet others are destined for housing, education and job training. And while the transformation of these structures is designed primarily to serve the immediate community, they are magnets for visitors from around the world. We might imagine that the impetus for this transformation would come from a government planning agency, or perhaps a private developer. And indeed, the person responsible holds a degree in urban planning. 18

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Principal photographs by Nan Coulter

ABOVE Wood objects arranged on a windowsill in Theaster Gates’ large, multiroom studio in Chicago. OPPOSITE PAGE Gates in a pottery room in his studio. In his work, he incorporates sculpture, ceramics, performance, music and more.


BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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Gates’ Aint I a Man, 2012, wood, roofing paper and membrane, tar, paper and Ebony magazine cover

Theaster Gates is adept at identifying and pulling the levers of civic power and leveraging the resources of philanthropy to realize his vision. But that vision is as much — or more — artistic as it is social.

LEFT Just part of Gates’ extensive book collection, in the bank building he has restored. ABOVE Gates and Jeremy Strick director of the Nasher Sculpture Center, look at more books, in Gates’ Archive House. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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ABOVE Gates’ Civil Tapestry (High Yellow), decommissioned fire hose on oilcloth mounted on wood panel.

LEFT A work incorporating shingles of wood. Gates’ father was a roofer. ABOVE Gates’ Migration Rickshaw for Sleeping, Playing, and Building, 2013, wood, fabric, metal, plastic, Huguenot House remnants.

We might imagine that the impetus for this transformation would come from a government planning agency, or perhaps a private developer. But this person is not by profession a developer or a planner. He is an artist. 22

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But this person, Theaster Gates, is not by profession a developer or a planner. He is an artist, and the winner of the 2018 Nasher Prize. Gates grew up in West Chicago and settled into Grand Crossing around 2006, when he was offered a position at The University of Chicago. He was a firsthand witness to the neighborhood’s decline, and is dedicated to its revival. He is adept at identifying and pulling the levers of civic power and leveraging the resources of philanthropy to realize his vision. But that vision is as much — or more — artistic as it is social, and it is the artistic vision realized in these buildings that makes them so extraordinary. Step into Gates’ Listening House, a modest domestic structure that now holds portions of the Prairie Avenue Bookshop archive as well as the collection of a beloved Chicago record store, Dr. Wax. These archives preserve an extraordinarily rich cultural and intellectual legacy, one that is far too little known. But these rooms, lined with shelves of books and records, look like no library you have ever seen. Walking into this house, you are immediately aware that you have entered a work of art. Not far away, Gates adapted a former Anheuser-Busch distribution facility to serve as his studio. The building houses Gates’ extensive personal library and includes

a woodshop, pottery studio and printing studio, plus private and administrative offices. Of these, the private offices are especially memorable. A true sanctuary, set in warm, dark tones of wood, punctuated with choice pieces of furniture — some classically modern, others of Gates’ own design — and surrounded by walls hung with Gates’ paintings, the offices offer a meditative space to retreat and re-center. The spare yet warm aesthetic reminds us that Gates lived and worked for a time in Japan, an experience that influenced his art and his thinking. Perhaps Gates’ most ambitious project to date is the restoration of the Stony Island Trust & Savings Bank building. An imposing classical structure, with a façade set off by massive Doric columns, it was built in 1923 and closed in 1979, after which for years it sat unoccupied and deteriorating. Gates purchased it from the City of Chicago for $1, with the promise that he would raise the funds required for its renovation. It reopened in 2015, rechristened the Stony Island Arts Bank. Uses of the bank are evolving: In addition to holding a range of archives and collections, the building accommodates meeting rooms, offices and gallery space, as well as the Black Cinema House, which holds weekly screenings of films by and about people of the African diaspora, and


PREVIOUS SPREAD: TAR WORK PHOTOGRAPH: BENJAMIN WESTOBY. COURTESY THEASTER GATES. THIS SPREAD: PHOTOGRAPHS: YELLOW WORK: SARA POOLEY, TODD-WHITE ART PHOTOGRAPHY, AND BENJAMIN WESTOBY. COURTESY THEASTER GATES. RICKSHAW SCULPTURE: SARA POOLEY. COURTESY THEASTER GATES. BANK BUILDING: SARA POOLEY. COURTESY THEASTER GATES AND THE REBUILD FOUNDATION. ALL OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS IN STORY: NAN COULTER.

ABOVE Gates’ Stony Island Arts Bank, a former bank building now restored and used for archives, collections, gallery space and film screenings. BELOW Gates’ Squirt, 2013, wood, tar and rubber, being readied for travel to Dallas for an exhibit of Gates’ works now at the Nasher Sculpture Center, through April 28.

holds free filmmaking workshops for young people in the neighborhood. The single most impressive space in the bank is its main-level atrium, just off the entrance. A vast, vaulted space, intended originally to express grandeur and power, the atrium speaks now to the aesthetic and historical themes that underlie much of Gates’ art. In restoring the atrium, the least expensive solution would have been to strip the ceiling of its coffers, many of which had fallen away. Instead, Gates chose the far more difficult and expensive course of keeping the ceiling as it was, while also determining not to retouch the atrium’s walls and arches, the paint of which was badly flaked and mottled. The idea was to preserve and reveal the building in all its complex history, to make it a center of contemporary life and culture that spoke unflinchingly of its past. Like a ruin, the space possesses a beauty that might seem romantic, and that beauty is in no way diminished by the urgent realism that underlies the enterprise; for the very causes of the bank’s near-disastrous disrepair are brought forward in the bank’s collections and programs. The beauty of this architectural space, like in so much of Gates’ art, results from a powerful aesthetic sensibility brought to bear upon a difficult social and personal history.

While the buildings Theaster Gates is transforming are rooted firmly in their neighborhood, the materials he finds in that neighborhood often find their way into his paintings and sculptures, and thus back into his interiors — and into museums and private collections around the world. Their powerful yet subtle beauty illuminates the artist’s approach to art, and the densely meaningful nature of his project. Five of Theaster Gates’ works will be on view through April 28 at the Nasher Sculpture Center. Gates is the 2018 recipient of the Nasher Prize, presented annually to a living artist who has had an extraordinary impact on the understanding of the art form. Each winner is chosen by a jury of renowned museum directors, curators, artists and art historians and receives a $100,000 prize, conferred in April of each year. More information nashersculpturecenter.org JEREMY STRICK has been the director of the Nasher Sculpture Center since 2009. He was the director of The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles, a senior curator at the Art Institute of Chicago, and has held curatorial posts at the Saint Louis Art Museum and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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Blue swoon

How do you make one beloved color work in every room of the house? Decorator Jody Hagan zings the blues Story by Connie Dufner Photographs by Stephen Karlisch

For clients, interior designer Jody Hagan devised a whole-house scheme built on a favorite color — blue — but gave each room its own personality. So cohesive is the result that furnishings from one room work in another. The dining room’s exuberant chairs, opposite page, are just as happy in the living room, near right. 24

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PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: MATT RODY

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he home of Chris and Christine Cook has plenty going for it, even before one steps inside. It is prettily situated in one of Dallas’ most sought-after neighborhoods, Greenway Parks, and was once owned by Dallas developer and civic leader John Stemmons. Step inside, though, and the real story unfolds — that of an understated, glamorous haven that came along at a perfect time in its owners’ lives. In 2014, the couple sold Sleep Experts, the successful mattress company they had built up over the previous decade. The entire family packed up and moved to Aspen for a year, where they have a second home. “It was our family sabbatical,” recalls Christine, whose familiar, friendly voice starred in the company’s ads. Before they left, though, they had bought the Greenway Parks home and turned to trusted friend and interior designer Jody Hagan to help make it theirs. They moved back in in 2015, to a transformed space. The kitchen and family room were enlarged to


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The feeling is traditional elegance with modern overtones: Think a Saarinen dining table and chairs rubbing elbows with inlay tables from India. accommodate the Cooks and their two children, now teenagers. Rooms feel cohesive, yet each has its own personality. The color choice throughout is overwhelmingly blue, a favorite of Christine’s, but with different secondary shades making a statement in each room: yellow here, coral there, splashes of green, too. (It’s no surprise, then, that the brightly upholstered dining room chairs can migrate effortlessly to other rooms of the house and settle right in.) “Christine loves patterns and textures,” says Hagan, who has worked with the couple for 10 years on three different houses. “We just found what she liked and put it all together.” Providing the perfect unifying backdrop to all the pairings of blues with pops of color are walls painted in soothing, pale Conservative Gray by Sherwin Williams. Cook is effusive in her praise of her designer and pal. Designer Jody Hagan, above, believes in a marvelous “She has a way of making a house mix. In the living room, right, antique Louis XVI–style arma home. She brings the cozy into chairs and a custom velvet sofa are played against a modernist shagreen coffee table and a contemporary it.” It helps, of course, that the work by Kate Rivers, from Conduit Gallery. The lamps two see eye to eye and love the were a find at Again & Again in Dallas. same things. They also believe in supporting local businesses, vendors and artists. The house contains pieces from top Dallas design destinations: furnishings from Ceylon et Cie, Legacy Antiques, Nick Brock Antiques and more; photographs by Grover Sterling and Jean Marie Alpert; art from Barry Whistler Gallery; fabrics by Lisa Fine Textiles; and rugs by Farzin and Abrash. The feeling is traditional elegance with modern overtones: Think a Saarinen dining table and chairs with exuberant Knoll fabrics in the kitchen rubbing elbows with inlay tables from Art of Old India. One of Christine’s favorite aspects of the house is its unfussiness. “Jody decorates a house that feels undecorated,” she says. “She finds so many unique pieces that work so well.” Yet, of all the gracious spaces in the home, Christine’s favorite is her tucked-away office, the nexus of family and business and an expression of her personal tastes. “It’s where everything comes together in my life,” she says. Curtains in a subtle floral pattern make for a feminine touch, silhouettes of the Cook children give it a mom feel, and a framed 2011 magazine article gives a nod to her working life. A treasured piece is a steel nest sculpture by Dallas artist Larry Whiteley, a gift from her husband. Another happy place? The guest room, enjoyed by visitors and even family members who have been known to sneak in for a nap. “The bed is super-comfortable,” says the former mattress executive. “No one ever has a bad night’s sleep here.” CONNIE DUFNER is a Dallas freelance writer and editor who contributes to numerous publications. She was the editor of the House & Garden section of The Dallas Morning News and an editor at Modern Luxury Dallas magazine, where she was also the editor-in-chief of its Interiors title.

PREVIOUS PAGE The dining room’s found chairs were covered in Ikat Vase linen by Jim Thompson Fabrics, from Culp Associates. The chandelier and mirror are from Legacy Antiques; the pair of yellow lamps are from Ceylon et Cie. The custom sisal rug is from Blackstone Carpets. 26

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The chic breakfast room is a place for laughter and long conversations. The table is from Eero Saarinen’s Pedestal Collection of 1957, by Knoll. The chairs, designed by Saarinen in 1950, are covered in Knoll fabric. Overhead is a pair of lanterns from Yang’s Double Happiness. The kitchen’s stunning tile is custom, by Tabarka Studio. 28

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THIS PAGE, clockwise from top: Chris Cook’s clubby office features found chairs, re-covered in mohair from George Cameron Nash, and a 1940s chandelier from Embree & Lake. The master bedroom mixes a posh tufted headboard and elegant side table — both custom-designed — with contemporary works by Linnea Glatt from Barry Whistler Gallery. The family room’s myriad chairs and velvet sofa surround a coffee table from Art of Old India, now AOI Home.

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Christine Cook’s cozy office is a favorite place “where everything comes together,” she says. The plump chair is an antique bergère, now in fabric from Lisa Fine Textiles; the iron birdnest sculpture, by Larry Whiteley, on the skirted console is a gift from Cook’s husband, Chris. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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ABOVE The elegant entry, with its as-found antique chair, is energized with a modernist work found at Brown & Co. in Dallas. OPPOSITE PAGE Noel the Maltipoo takes his ease amid a custom ottoman and chairs and a 1900s Persian rug from Farzin Rugs in Dallas. 32

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The micro manor A designer of grand, glorious spaces comes home each night to a tiny apartment with just the bare necessities — you know, like a Directoire desk and bronze busts. Here, the wonderfully big story of a terribly small place

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Story by Connie Dufner / Photographs by Mei-Chun Jau

oes the 18th-century French barometer work? It’s a reasonable question to put to John Bobbitt, longtime Dallas interior designer, antiques dealer, Maple Terrace resident and collector of superb curiosities. Well, it could work, Bobbitt says, but first he’d have to replace the original glass tubes with new ones custom-made by the one man in the country who restores old barometers, in Maine. Then he’d have to figure out how to safely buy and install the toxic mercury. All of that probably won’t happen, “so it’s just a historic artifact and a good piece of sculpture,” he says. And that’s OK with him. “I love history. I love buying pieces of material culture that are beautifully made.” Yesteryear’s weather app is just one of hundreds, if not thousands, of stories contained in Bobbitt’s diminutive flat — barely 700 square feet — which has the soul of a New York apartment or a European manor house, but in ever-shiny Dallas. (This may explain the latter: The 1927 building, once home to notables from Judy Garland to Todd Oldham, was designed by English architect Sir Alfred Bossom.) “This is a standard-size living room for Maple Terrace,” Bobbitt says of his 16-by-14-foot salon. “The rooms feel bigger than they are.” That feel is European New York, and Bobbitt is happy as all get-out that you can live that way without actually having to live in New York. But he did once, and the aesthetic honed from dealing in antiques there, and in New Orleans, has stuck with him. “I had never seen the kind of thing done in Dallas that I saw in New York,” Bobbitt says of his time as a young dealer just getting started. “It wasn’t always glitz and glamour. There were often period references and an intensity of seriousness and fashion.” Today, in addition to designing interiors for clients across

Dallas decorator John Bobbitt has packed his modest apartment with a mansion’s worth of worldly finds. NEAR RIGHT The cast-iron door surround was found in Missouri. The bust is a plaster cast by the British Museum of a marble one found in Hadrian’s Villa. Its marble pedestal is exceedingly rare, “not newer than the 15th century,” Bobbitt says. OPPOSITE PAGE Plain pine doors painted at Las Negras Studio in Dallas lead to the tiny bedroom, with its Persian rug, English chest and Japanese screen. 34

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John Bobbitt’s diminutive place, barely 700 square feet, has the soul of a New York apartment or a European manor house, but in ever-shiny Dallas. Texas and the country, Bobbitt offers splendid furniture, art and accessories from a large space within Nick Brock Antiques. Bobbitt’s cozy Dallas lair is yet another place where it’s easy to get lost in the stories of antiques, not-so-antiques and just plain wonderful stuff. Exhibits A and B: The tiny kitchen is entered through an elegant walnutand-glass door reclaimed from an East Dallas home. That door is framed by a cast-iron Neoclassical surround from a southeast Missouri bank, similar to the one his great-grandfather owned in Britton, Texas. If you spy something glimmering on the bookshelf, sidle over to the the picture of Bobbitt and his godson, in a frame covered in overlapping beetle wings. “I love rare, exotic, unusual materials that relate to decorative arts,” says its owner. And let’s not overlook the marble pedestal, originally believed to be of 18th-century Italian lineage. The pedestal came back to Bobbitt after he sold it 20 years earlier. He had planned to resell it through a store, and sent a picture to a friend for more information, who quickly called him. “He said, ‘Don’t sell that. It’s earlier than you thought it was. It’s probably Roman.’ So, it came home.” The kitchen is fashioned from a closet, fully appointed with an induction burner, a microwave, a dorm-sized

In the living room, Bobbitt’s life in design plays out. Around a lamp base, he has stacked his collection of antique dog collars. (Behind it, a painting of a bulldog, found at Nick Brock Antiques.) The room’s museum-quality mix includes an 18th-century French barometer, a 1940s Indian brass-tray cocktail table and a 1990s ceramic house. Bobbitt traded a bottle of gin for the Louis XVI–style chair, found by a friend in a trash pile and now covered in sumptuous green Rubelli velvet. 36

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Bobbitt’s cache includes a 19th-century French bronze chandelier from Nick Brock Antiques, an ivory chess set bought in Hawaii in the 1950s by his grandmother and a lamp he had made from an Indian alabaster hookah. The living room’s George III–style mahogany flip-top table (it converts for dining) is zinged by a vintage Brno chair, designed in 1930 by Mies van der Rohe. OVERLEAF The antiques in the apartment are balanced with a handful of contemporary pieces, including the long, low, suede sofa, designed for Knoll in 1971 by Charles Pfister. The tiny kitchen was a closet; it’s cabinet is a Craftsman toolbox.

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“I love history. I love buying pieces of material culture that are beautifully made.” DESIGNER JOHN BOBBITT

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Sub-Zero refrigerator and freezer tucked under a counter, a mirrored wall, two black granite countertops, two French presses and a cabinet that looks suspiciously like a supersized Craftsman toolbox. (It is, on wheels.) But no table? Ah, there is a Georgian card table in the living room that folds out to seat four for dinner, right in front of the plant-filled windowsill from which Bobbitt can watch a spectacular Dallas sunrise. A favorite contemporary piece is a glass-and-steel side table by Eileen Gray, which can be adjusted up or down to slide up to a chair, sofa or bed. “I’m such a fan of convertible furniture,” Bobbitt says, noting that multitasking furniture was de rigueur for people of earlier ages who lived in smaller spaces. “These pieces are made to be used. I feel like there’s nothing that can’t be restored.” Or repurposed or repositioned. Under Bobbitt’s skillful eye, antique dog collars wrap a lamp base. A whimsical ceramic house by artist Lisa Ludwig, circa 1990, with a roof of clay corn cobbs, peeks out from behind a massive, potted fiddle-leaf fig tree. Corn cobbs cohabitating with a Roman pedestal. An 18th-century Directoire roll-top desk sharing quarters with 1930s Mies van der Rohe chairs. Here, it’s not random at all. “Sometimes you see things and just know there was thought or spirit in it,” says the lord of this tiny manor. Or maybe it’s just he who knows. “I guess if everybody could do it, I’d be out of a job.” 40

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Bobbitt’s cozy lair is a place where it’s easy to get lost in the stories of antiques, not-so-antiques and just plain wonderful stuff.

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RIPE NOW Canopy wallpaper in Celadon by Christian Lacroix, christian-lacroix.com. Synthetic crystal stemware and Roberta pitcher by Mario Luca Giusti, Forty Five Ten. Chandelier by Canopy Designs, Casa di Lino. Crossbill porcelain bird by Nymphenburg, Grange Hall. Bahia handpainted plate by Alberto Pinto, Forty Five Ten. Orange silk orchid by The Ivy Guild, Casa di Lino.

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What comes

naturally Flora, fauna, fruits, fowl: The home accessories of the season are irresistible in nature

Creative direction and styling by Georgia Christensen Photographs by Geof Kern

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GOOD NATURE Agua Parati wallpaper in Perle by Christian Lacroix, christian-lacroix.com. Daphne plates designed by Veronique Villaret for Robert Haviland & C. Parlon, Forty Five Ten. Eye teapot by John Derian for Astier de Villatte, Grange Hall. White bisque hare, designed in 1913 by Theodor Kärner for Nymphenburg, Grange Hall. Palma ceramic vase by Kose, Forty Five Ten. Fleur cocotte by Le Creuset, Le Creuset Galleria Dallas. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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BEAUTY BOUNTY Malmaison wallpaper in Glauque by Christian Lacroix, christian-lacroix.com. Caribe porcelain teapot designed by Christian Lacroix for Vista Alegre, Forty Five Ten. Bisque hares by Nymphenburg from a selection at Grange Hall. Voyage en Ikat hand-painted porcelain bowl by Hermès, Forty Five Ten. Floral arrangement in found vessel, Grange Hall. Vintage jade grapes, Casa di Lino. Madone Nubienne porcelain tray designed by Christian Lacroix for Vista Alegre, Forty Five Ten. Gold teacup and vintage saucers by Richard Brendon, Forty Five Ten. OUR FARMERS Creative director and stylist GEORGIA CHRISTENSEN for GLC&Co. Design. Photographer GEOF KERN for The Photo Division. Photo assistant GEOFFREY KERN. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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members only Inside a hidden private gym — a time capsule of 1980s élan — the new power dressing never looked so good

Starring Julian Machann and Holden Lower Creative direction and production by Chandra North Blaylock Photographs by Fredrik Brodén Styling by Jamie Lyons Hair and makeup by Michael Thomas Photographed at the University Club atop Galleria Dallas

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PREVIOUS SPREAD On Julian: Cover Swim swimsuit, Cover Swim. Victoria Beckham jacket, Neiman Marcus downtown. Sea Scout flippers. On Holden: Gucci sunglasses, Neiman Marcus downtown. Cartier watch, Bachendorf’s Galleria Dallas. Sea Scout snorkel. LEFT Libertine shirt and Theory pants, both Neiman Marcus downtown. Vintage Weider barbell. 50

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Balmain dress and Gucci shoes, both Neiman Marcus downtown. Tiffany & Co. bangle (on model’s right wrist), Tiffany & Co. Galleria Dallas. Tights, stylist's own. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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Cathy Waterman ring (on ring finger), Ylang 23. David Yurman ring (on index finger) and earrings, both Bachendorf’s Galleria Dallas. Ralph Lauren towels, Macy’s Galleria Dallas. Massage table courtesy Lauren Galyean.

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LEFT Dolce & Gabbana coat and Dior shoes, both Neiman Marcus downtown. Tiffany & Co. earrings, Tiffany & Co. Galleria Dallas. Tights, stylist’s own. ABOVE Balmain blazer and trousers and Gucci sunglasses, all Neiman Marcus downtown. David Yurman necklace, Bachendorf’s Galleria Dallas. OPPOSITE PAGE Theory coat and Vince shirt, both Neiman Marcus downtown. Gucci sunglasses, Neiman Marcus downtown. Rolex watch, Bachendorf’s Galleria Dallas. 54

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Victoria Beckham dress, Manolo Blahnik shoes and Balenciaga handbag, all Neiman Marcus downtown. David Yurman ring, bracelet, necklace and pendant, all Bachendorf’s Galleria Dallas. Clinique compact and lipstick, Macy’s Galleria Dallas.

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LEFT Cashmere robe, model’s own. Salvatore Ferragamo PVC pool slides, Neiman Marcus downtown. Ralph Lauren towel (over locker door) and Clinique grooming products (on bench), all Macy’s Galleria Dallas. ABOVE Balmain dress and Gucci shoes, both Neiman Marcus downtown. Tiffany & Co. ring and earrings, Tiffany & Co. Galleria Dallas. Tights, stylist’s own. OPPOSITE PAGE Ivy Park jacket and shorts, Six:02 Galleria Dallas. David Yurman earrings, Bachendorf’s Galleria Dallas. 58

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Models JULIAN MACHANN and HOLDEN LOWER, both for Kim Dawson Agency Creative director and producer CHANDRA NORTH BLAYLOCK Assistant producer ROB BRINKLEY Photographer FREDRIK BRODÉN Stylist JAMIE LYONS for Seaminx Hair/makeup artist MICHAEL THOMAS for Seaminx Stylist’s assistant ASHLI VONDARA for Seaminx Best boy and property master DANIEL BLAYLOCK Special thanks MARTHA HINOJOSA and GALLERIA DALLAS, LAUREN GALYEAN, MILA GOLDMAN MOORE of CONTEXT VINTAGE, chairish.com/shop/contextvintage 60

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OPPOSITE PAGE Cover Swim swimsuit, Cover Swim. Balmain sweater, Neiman Marcus downtown. David Yurman bracelet, Bachendorf’s Galleria Dallas. Wilson headband and racquet. RIGHT On Julian: Simone Rocha dress, Nour Hammour jacket and Gianvito Rossi shoes, all Neiman Marcus downtown. Tiffany & Co. ring, Tiffany & Co. Galleria Dallas. Tights, stylist's own. On Holden: Burberry jacket, Balenciaga shoes and Theory blazer, pants and shirt, all Neiman Marcus downtown. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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FORT TEXAS The first-ever look inside today’s design department at Dickies, the great American company that is making something even more lasting than its workwear, overalls and steel-toe boots

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Essay by Rob Brinkley

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t’s a rags-to-riches story — where the rags are played by denim. We open in Fort Worth, 1922, where two men have just shaken hands on their new company. Their big idea? Bib overalls, made of tough cotton denim, the fanciest ones striped in fine lines of blue and white. With one of the men’s son, the three grow it into a mighty fine business. But some plot twists are necessary: The Great Depression will be a doozy, followed by World War II, wherein the company will be sequestered by the United States Armed Forces to make millions and millions of uniforms. Most of the civilian production will grind to a halt, all in the name of duty. Ah, but everyone loves a good comeback — and come back they will. With the troops back home, their unique wartime look — shirts and pants in the same exact color — will touch off a civilian trend for the same, in everyday workwear. Williamson-Dickie will switch back to consumer production and the son will set his sights on expansion. First the U.S., then Europe, then the world! Cut to 2018. That all happened, starring C.N Williamson, his son, C. Don, and E.E. Dickie. Today, the Williamson-Dickie Manufacturing Company is mostly known as just “Dickies,” and it is the No. 1 maker of workwear on the planet. Its brands include tough-sounding spinoffs such as Workrite, Kodiak and Terra, and the company is 5,000 people strong, spread across every continent imaginable. The goods are made in Uvalde, Texas, in Mexico and around the southern hemisphere. But it is back in Fort Worth, on a campus that includes the original 1922 headquarters, where the soul of the thing will always be. There, prototypes are designed and

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Photographs by Mei-Chun Jau refined, based on gut-honest feedback from field workers in various industries around the country. Over here, sewing machines are whirring, electric riveters are popping and shapes are being snipped out of denim more carefully than Matisse cut his shapes out of paper. Over there, fashion trends are being tracked, mood boards are going up and fabrics are being sourced and developed. Even a little mad-scientist tinkering is going on. One example? Temp-iQ technology, now woven into the company’s $17 Performance Cooling T-Shirt, which somehow traps cool air inside the yarn and holds it next to the skin. (Think of it as a shirt-shaped air conditioner.) For a worker — or a weekender — in the blazing sun, that is cool. Elsewhere, the company archivist is amassing a Louvre-like trove of overalls, shirts, letters and lore. Its oldest pant on file is a tough denim jodhpur, since, FYI, in the 1920s, a lot of work was still being done atop something called a horse. Dickies even employs a professional denim hunter, who traipses into old salvage yards and ghost towns, looking for left-behind Williamson-Dickie clothes. He brings back old pieces, labels and patterns that they have never even seen back in Fort Worth. It’s epic. Yes, it’s quite a story, this Dickies thing. Humble beginnings. Huge future. And a hometown that will cheer it on, no matter how big it gets. They should build a shiny new stadium there and name it Dickies Arena. (Wait. They already are.) Rags, riches, drama, romance: It’s got it all. It’s the American dream, all done up in denim, twill, snaps and stitching. Cut! Sew. That’s a wrap.


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QUALITY QUANTITY Left: Details matter at the Williamson-Dickie design studios. Thread in hues of blue will be matched to variously colored labels, which will be sewn onto garments. Opposite page: The skilled prototype makers use basic, nonelectronic (hence, more dependable) sewing machines by Union Special, a company founded in 1881. The embroidered shirt was made for C.D. Williamson, son of cofounder C.N. Williamson. 64

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NOW AND THEN Opposite page: Trends for upcoming seasons are worked out in the design department. This page: A stock-show work shirt, custom-embroidered for C.D. Williamson. His grandson, Philip Williamson, is president of Williamson-Dickie today. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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EVERY BODY Clothing forms in every size, even kids. (One child’s form wears diapers, for real-world accuracy.) The company has come a long way from its bib-overall beginnings: Today it makes workwear, uniforms, scrubs, shoes, boots, backpacks, jeans, chore coats and more — and sells it across the United States, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, Australia, Russia, Europe, Chile, Japan and Iceland. 70

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TOUGH STUFF Opposite page: The note is from 1947, from an Amarillo hospital worker who thought the company would like his 1933 khaki uniform back as an example of durability. (He wore it through the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl and World War II.) This page: 1940s denim coveralls next to bib overalls in the company’s signature Hickory stripe, a pattern in the Dickies line since 1922. (Today’s Hickory-stripe overalls will set you back about $37.) Behind them, founders C.N. Williamson, left, and E.E. “Colonel” Dickie. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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LONG-LASTING Opposite page: Durability is designed into every Dickies garment. Brass is used for zippers because there is no harder-working material for the job. This page: The company’s original headquarters, on West Vickery Boulevard in Fort Worth, is still in full swing. Today, Williamson-Dickie has offices in the United Kingdom, China, Japan and the Netherlands, because workwear must be designed for regional needs and tastes. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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A leather and steel FK 87 Grasshopper chair, designed in 1965 by Preben Fabricius and Jørgen Kastholm, exemplifies Rice’s love of “fine details. I like when every little aspect of something is considered.”

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All things

CONSIDERED Photographs by Addison Jones and Robert Yu

Designer Joshua Rice doesn’t just think about every chair, pillow and painting: He obsesses over every nut, bolt and stitch. KENDALL MORGAN goes inside the mind — and rooms — of a detail-driven modernist

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T

here are designers who follow the floor plan, designers who follow the trends and designers who follow their intuition. Joshua Rice fits solidly in that last category. Having honed his contemporary aesthetic at Bodron+Fruit, the Dallas-based architecture and design firm, Rice struck out on his own in 2007. Since then, he has been refining his sophisticated but warm interiors, complementing rare furnishings with art from up-and-coming talent. “I try to curate projects rather than just decorate projects,” says Rice of his ethos. “But I also don’t make it so fine and precious that people don’t want to live in it.” Clients Steven and Nicole Elieff were on the hunt for someone with just this approach, a designer who could bring their dream home to life. Nestled in an enclave of traditional homes near Legacy Drive in Frisco, the house and its footprint were already in place when the Elieffs met Rice via developer Diane Cheatham, who had worked with Rice on her own home in Dallas’ Urban Reserve. “Instantly,” says Nicole, “he understood exactly what we wanted. We love those homes you see on the West Coast that were built in the ’50s or ’60s. Josh comInterior designer Joshua Rice ing in fine-tuned [the house] a lot — everything from light fixtures to making sure certain doorways line up.” Reconfiguring the master suite and the music room and finessing the kitchen and bathroom, Rice opened up the floor plan to allow his carefully selected furnishings their space in the spotlight. Utilizing just five materials throughout the home — oak, walnut, black Venetian plaster, basalt and engineered stone — Rice devised the perfect neutral foundation for his textural mix. Using decoration “based on subtraction,” he says, he helped create spaces that were undeniably sophisticated yet remarkably livable. Even each furnishing and accessory from the Elieffs’ former home was thoroughly considered: Only the grand piano and a drawing by E.E. Cummings made the cut. Rice possesses a collector’s eye for every detail, and his office is full of little treasures he’s picked up over the years, now waiting for their forever homes. He has also cultivated his ability to hone in on The Next Big Thing

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Landscape designer Jason Pautz of Pautz Landscapes simplified the house’s gated entry with steel doors and greenery that “looks cultivated, but a little bit wild,” says interior designer Joshua Rice.


In the dining room, a custom marble-topped table from “gutsy, talented” Brooklyn-based design firm Rich Brilliant Willing was commissioned by Rice to accent the vintage Danish rosewood sideboard/bar designed by Ib Kofod-Larsen. A triptych of works by Andrea Rosenberg from Barry Whistler Gallery, a custom light fixture by Bocci made of raw-porcelain pendants draped over sandblasted glass diffusers, and 1970s cast-aluminum sculptures by Denis Wagner, found at Sputnik Modern, help make this one of Rice’s “favorite rooms in the house.” BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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in the furniture world, just before prices soar, such as the music room’s pair of Onkel Adam lounge chairs by the late Swedish designer Kerstin Hörlin-Holmquist, which have doubled in value since their installation at the Elieff house. “I’m into collectible design,” says Rice, “which is just like art. You get these things, then people get wise to the fact there’s a lot of design integrity to them, then, all of a sudden, the price skyrockets. I’ve been pretty good at it. The hard part is getting clients to understand that there are not that many things these days that are undiscovered.” Nicole Elieff has certainly learned more about the family’s acquisitions. “It’s all a credit to Josh and the time he takes to present [a piece] and show how it will work and the history behind it,” she says. “He’ll send me an e-mail: ‘That wood stool you have, the artist is blowing up like crazy,’ and I just prop my feet on it!” The finishing touch for any Rice project is an enviable art collection. Sourced mostly from local galleries — William Campbell Contemporary Art in Fort Worth and Barry Whistler Gallery in Dallas are favorites — each piece adds an additional textural element to his rooms. “I figure out the scale [of the works] and the walls they’re going on and go backward from there,” he says. “I’m not the guy to develop a blue-chip art collection, but I do have a sense of young talent.” Rice took the Elieffs on multiple trips to the Dallas Art Fair, searching for works that had the right scale for each available wall. An intimate quartet of paintings from the Shock Absorbers series of Dallas artist Travis LaMothe accents the space above the media center in the living room, while a large, abstract ink portrait by Belgian artist Johan Van Mullem is a highlight of the music room. If Rice’s interiors feel effortless, that’s perhaps because they almost are. Although he says he looks closely at each room before “balancing it out by volume or material,” the designer’s methodology is still so intuitive that only he could recreate it. “I don’t know if there is a game plan,” Rice admits. “I just curate a room until it feels right.” KENDALL MORGAN is a Dallas-based writer and editor who has covered art, design, style and pop culture for publications and sites such as The Dallas Morning News, 1530 Main, Highland Park Village Magazine, Patron magazine and CultureMap.

Rice has a knack for finding pieces that eventually reach collectible critical mass. Two of the house’s rarest furnishings are the Onkel Adam lounge chairs by designer Kerstin Hörlin-Holmquist, re-covered in neutral linen. Other finds are a stool of claro walnut by California sculptor Alma Allen, sourced at the Seattle boutique Totokaelo, and a trio of modernist artworks by, from left, Cath Campbell, Lily Hanson and Nicholas Wood. The sculptural works on the cabinet came from Emily Summers Studio in Dallas; an antique Turkish kilim rug underscores the whole mise-en-scène. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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“I’m into collectible design, which is just like art.”

—JOSHUA RICE

TOP The stairs sweep up to a large landing, highlighting a digitally manipulated photograph by Anthony Goicolea from his You and What Army series, purchased at Talley Dunn Gallery. Goicolea plays all the boys in the photograph, an image chosen by Rice as a whimsical nod to the clients’ then-teenage sons. “They’re fun people,” says Rice of the Elieffs, “and have a great sense of humor.” 82

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Rice’s ability to effortlessly mix textures and materials makes the living room a stylish but soothing destination. He offset the plush mohair sofa with more linear pieces such as the FK 87 Grasshopper chair and 1960s Danish rosewood-and-steel nesting tables by Knud Joos for Jason. The slat-motif Flax chairs, designed in 2010 by Philippe Nigro for Ligne Roset, are light on the eye. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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Rice “lightened up� the music room by unblocking the landing and tucking the piano under floating stairs of oak and steel. A pair of steel-and-wicker PK22 chairs, designed in 1957 by Poul Kjaerholm, face off over a 1960s rosewood-and-glass occasional table by Henning Norgaard for Komfort. A walnut, leather and steel CB-457 Geometric Daybed by BassamFellows for McGuire and an abstract portrait by Belgian artist Johan Van Mullem, sourced from the gallery 10 Hanover in London, complete the space. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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3525 Turtle Creek Boulevard #7AB Dallas, Texas

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Properties

The exclusive listings and expert agents of Briggs Freeman Sotheby's International Realty

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Near Aledo, Texas Price upon request MASTERFUL ELEGANCE This magnificent luxury ranch spans more than 188 private acres. Uniquely designed and superbly crafted, this estate is a masterful arrangement of structures — including a great room, master suite, guest casita and pool house. Amenities include a tennis court, a pool, a spa, a shooting range, an equestrian barn and an arena. An observation tower offers 360-degree skyline views making it the perfect place to relax and reflect over the Texas sunset night.

JOHN ZIMMERMAN

817-784-7249 jzimmerman@briggsfreeman.com

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3710 ARMSTRONG AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

4,750,000

SIMPLY SERENE With an open floor plan orchestrated to embrace contemporary living and a location just steps from the Katy Trail and Knox-Henderson shopping and dining, this home is a perfect blend of timeless and today. Designed by Dan Shipley and recently updated by Collins Interiors, welcoming spaces create a seamless flow. A separate studio/guesthouse with full bath above the carport offers tremendous flexibility. The large half-plus acre lot welcomes year-round entertaining with a pool, screened-in outdoor house and patio.

SUSAN BALDWIN

214-763-1591 sbaldwin@briggsfreeman.com

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4301 LORRAINE AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

4,200,000

HIGHLAND PARK TRADITIONAL Often described as the quintessential American neighborhood, the beautifully landscaped boulevards filled with parks and playing fields make Highland Park a premier pick for buyers. With a strong community, highly recognized schools and plenty of room to ride bikes or play ball, Highland Park is a perennial favorite. Situated on a corner lot in the coveted Highland Park neighborhood, this romantic Traditional home features a delicate blend of old and new with much of the original home intact. As you step inside this home you are greeted by handsome hardwoods throughout and a spacious interior with an elegant floor plan, suitable for everyday living and frequent entertaining.

BECKY FREY

214-536-4727 bfrey@briggsfreeman.com

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5626 GREENBRIER DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

2,995,000

LIGHT, BRIGHT, OPEN This striking transitional Tudor, built by an expert team of Kennington Premier and C.A. Nelson Architects, features luxury amenities, designer finishes and a fresh and functional floor plan. Downstairs, a serene master retreat with office and guest suite, plus a charming library, a spacious chef's kitchen, a great room and a three-car garage. Three guest suites and a game room are upstairs. Perfect home for indoor-outdoor entertaining in a highly coveted Devonshire neighborhood. LISTED BY BECKY FREY

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4209 SHENANDOAH STREET

University Park, Texas $

BECKY FREY

214-536-4727 bfrey@briggsfreeman.com

2,099,000

TIMELESS CHARACTER Exceptional single-owner home built in 2009 by Cy Barcus with a desirable Park Cities address that is within walking distance to Highland Park Village and Bradfield Elementary School. Elegant formals with handsome white oak hardwoods flank the entry. The beautiful kitchen opens to the breakfast room and family room with sliding glass doors that lead to outdoor living with covered patio and a refreshing pool. The third-floor game room or exercise room is complete with a half bath and wet bar.

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8823 BRIARWOOD LANE

Dallas, Texas $

5,900,000

CUSTOM-TAILORED Years of meticulous planning and study by a well-traveled and discerning owner resulted in a gorgeous home completed in 2001. Inspired by Regency design, the crisp and tailored custom detailing sets the tone for this sophisticated residence with a center hall floor plan that allows a gracious flow and rewarding views from room to room. This four-bedroom, four-and-a-half bath, 9,040-square-foot home is well sited on its 1.4-acre Bluffview Creekside lot. LISTED BY FAISAL HALUM

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10210 Strait Lane

Dallas, Texas $

FAISAL HALUM

214-240-2575 fhalum@briggsfreeman.com

23,000,000

ARCHITECTURAL LEGEND It is the rarest of them all: a Philip Johnson masterpiece, never to be repeated. Built in 1964, with an exquisite and sensitive update completed in 2008, the light-filled house boasts elegant living spaces, a stunning double staircase, a unique dining room with an arched canopy, five luxurious bedrooms, seven full baths and 11,387 square feet. The nearly 7 parklike acres include a media house, modernist cabana, pool and tennis court.

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4416 BEVERLY DRIVE

Highland Park, Texas $

5,600,000

DOUBLE-LOT TUDOR Gracing a double lot on coveted Beverly Drive, this handsome, five-bedroom Tudor-style home offers open living spaces and impeccable finishes, complemented by landscaped grounds and a sparkling pool. Its many luxuries include a media room, game room, exercise room and elevator. The sumptuous master suite boasts a fireplace, private office and luxurious dual baths, while the outdoor perks include a gated driveway, stunning loggia and fire pit — for those perfect Texas evenings. LISTED BY SUSIE SWANSON & FAISAL HALUM 98

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4926 DELOACHE AVENUE

Dallas, Texas $

14,500,000

PRESTON HOLLOW Situated on 1.645 acres, this breathtaking new Italian Mediterranean estate by architect Patrick Ford and Bella Custom Homes has been called the “Crown Jewel” of Dallas’ exclusive Old Preston Hollow neighborhood. Natural light and imported features are found throughout the three-story, 14,000-square-footplus manse, which boasts seven bedrooms, eight full and five half baths, seven living areas and a gourmet kitchen.

SUSIE SWANSON

214-533-4656 sswanson@briggsfreeman.com

FAISAL HALUM

214-240-2575 fhalum@briggsfreeman.com

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4441 SOUTH VERSAILLES AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

7,500,000

DETAILED-ORIENTED Sited on a beautiful corner lot in a one-of-a-kind location overlooking Versailles Park, this French Regency-style home is unsurpassed in quality and offers every amenity. Fabulous living and entertaining areas include a top-of-the-line wine room, theater and fitness room. The outdoor living area views the pool and beautifully manicured landscaping. An elevator, generator and three-car garage with lift capability are additional amenities. LISTED BY JOAN ELEAZER & LAYNE PITZER 100

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4415 LORRAINE AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

5,995,000

UNPARALLELED This timeless and state-of-theart property has been designed and built as one would specify for a custom home. No design element or expense has been spared in creating a home that is a complement to the French street neighborhood where it resides. Five bedrooms, each with a private bath and guest quarters above the garage, along with elevator-ready closets, are just some of the amenities that make this an exceptional property.

JOAN ELEAZER

214-537-5923 jeleazer@briggsfreeman.com

JEFF ELEAZER

214-566-4141 jceleazer@briggsfreeman.com

LAYNE PITZER

214-202-9998 lpitzer@briggsfreeman.com

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4417 SOUTHERN AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

2,079,000

CLASSIC CUSTOM DESIGN This grand Traditional home in Highland Park provides three floors of elegant and functional living space, with a spacious covered outdoor living area, just blocks away from Highland Park Village, Bradfield Elementary and the new Moody YMCA. Quality details are evident throughout this custom-built home with wide plank hardwood floors, beautiful finished millwork, high ceilings and abundant natural light making the house adaptable to traditional, transitional and modern furnishings. 6214 PARK LANE

Dallas, Texas $

2,295,000

EASY ELEGANCE Custom-built in 2000 on a 145x194 lot in the heart of Preston Hollow, 6214 Park Lane lacks no luxury or amenity. The front and rear elevations of the home are defined by deep, arched galleries framing large windows and French doors. Wide room transitions, natural light and expansive views of the mature landscaped grounds, fountains and pool create an open and comfortable environment for daily living and an elegant venue for entertaining.

ALEX TRUSLER

214-755-8180 atrusler@briggsfreeman.com

KARLA TRUSLER

214-682-6511 ktrusler@briggsfreeman.com

JENNIFER FERGUSON 214-769-8099 jferguson@briggsfreeman.com

LOLLY LANDWEHR

214-695-5000 llandwehr@briggsfreeman.com

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3821 SHENANDOAH STREET

Highland Park, Texas $

5,250,000

CLASSIC GRANDEUR Classic Greek Revival manse designed by Larry E. Boerder Architects and built by George Lewis. The center-hall plan creates an effortless flow through the living room, dining room, family room, library, butler's pantry, kitchen, keeping room and breakfast room. The master suite and three additional bedrooms — each with its own bath — share a second-floor landing, while the fifth guest room is on the third floor. An elevator, swimming pool, spa, two-car garage and guest quarters are just a few of the home's exceptional features.

RALPH RANDALL

214-533-8355 rrandall@briggsfreeman.com

KYLE BAUGH

214-980-3933 kbaugh@briggsfreeman.com

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6930 TURTLE CREEK BOULEVARD

Dallas, Texas $

9,100,000

VOLK ESTATES CLASSIC Architect Richard Drummond Davis designed this handsome 11,000-square-foot residence on almost an acre of land taking advantage of the property’s deep set back and generous, sweeping lawn to create a Greek Revival-style home in the Lower Mississippi Valley Plantation vernacular. A formidable floating staircase anchors the foyer with its polished marble flooring. Multiple fireplaces warm the formal areas of the home, including a study in the downstairs master suite. The adjacent lot can be combined to form 1.38 acres. LISTED BY MADELINE JOBST & RALPH RANDALL 104

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5315 ROCK CLIFF PLACE

Dallas, Texas $

3,900,000

ULTIMATE SPACE Rare offering Mid-Century Modern jewel on a private, 1.38-acre estate. This split-level home has walls of glass with views of the towering trees and rolling terrain to the sparkling pool and cabana. Designed by noted Palm Beach architect and Frank Lloyd Wright protégé Byron Simonson, the home boasts five spacious living areas including formals, a library, solarium, home office/game room and a basement, plus wine cellar, exercise room and a three-car garage.

MADELINE JOBST

214-906-3832 mjobst@briggsfreeman.com

RALPH RANDALL

214-533-8355 rrandall@briggsfreeman.com

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3709 AMHERST AVENUE

University Park, Texas $

1,395,000

PAST PERFECT This beautifully updated and expanded Tudor cottage in University Park features four bedrooms and four full baths, with the master suite on the first level. The living room boasts the original stained-glass windows and Rookwood tiles around the wood-burning fireplace. The eat-in kitchen is a cook’s delight with Viking appliances. University Park Elementary School, Curtis Park and Snider Plaza are all within walking distance. LISTED BY ANN SHAW

5309 WENONAH DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

995,000

HEAVILY TREED Fantastic opportunity in Greenway Parks on an 80-foot lot with mature trees and lush gardens. The home features three bedrooms, two baths, formals, a spacious den and a breakfast room overlooking the inviting deck with pergola in the expansive, beautifully landscaped backyard. LISTED BY ANN SHAW

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3231 GREENBRIER DRIVE

University Park, Texas $

ANN SHAW

214-532-4824 ashaw@briggsfreeman.com

2,350,000

LIGHT-FILLED An abundance of natural light fills this exceptional University Park home with four bedrooms, four full and three half baths, two study nooks with built-ins, a game room and a two-car garage. An oversized entry flanks the formal living and dining rooms, featuring beautiful architectural arches. The kitchen, with top-of-the-line appliances, marble counters and a large walk-in pantry, opens to the breakfast room and sitting area. A wall of windows in the den offers views of the beautifully landscaped backyard with a patio, built-in grill, outdoor living space and water feature.

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3860 CONSTITUTION DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

1,375,000

TIMELESS MODERN Sleek. Fresh. Open. Stunning. Just a few words to describe this 2016 home. Sitting on nearly half an acre, the appeal of this home is apparent upon arrival. The home is flooded with natural light from an abundance of windows. The rich hardwood floors, premium appliances, wine closet and four-car garage are but a few of the special features.

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PAM BRANNON

214-912-1756 pbrannon@briggsfreeman.com

JUSTIN FARMER

214-538-5100 jfarmer@briggsfreeman.com

JEANNE NETHERY

214-803-3787 jnethery@briggsfreeman.com


MEREDITH FERRELL

214-868-1177 mferrell@briggsfreeman.com

BRENDA RAY

214-864-9070 bray@briggsfreeman.com

4041 DRUID LANE

University Park, Texas PENDING Listed for $ 2,725,000 CLEAN-LINED A rare opportunity to own more than half an acre in Volk Estates. Stunning transitional with five bedrooms, five and a half baths, a game room and hardwoods throughout. The exterior boasts a large yard, porte cochére, four-car garage, pool, cabana with full bath and guest quarters with kitchen, sitting area and full bath. This home has everything one could want and more, in a prestigious Park Cities neighborhood. 4140 SHENANDOAH STREET

University Park, Texas

PENDING Listed for $1,149,000 CHARMED This beautiful Tudor has been updated from its original version, yet has retained all of its charm. An inviting formal living room with a fireplace welcomes you into the light and bright home with four bedrooms, three full baths and hardwoods throughout. The exterior features a two-car garage with a large game room above, a spacious yard and a patio. Just a few blocks from Highland Park Village, Moody Family YMCA and Bradfield Elementary School, this gem won’t last long.

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6322 CARRINGTON DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

2,495,000

GRAND MEDITERRANEAN Nestled behind the gates of the highly coveted Williamsburg Estates sits a meticulously maintained 7,209-square-foot Mediterranean estate perched on a finely groomed half-acre lot. The recent Furstenwerth + Bagley redesign introduced a new level of timeless, sophisticated elegance while maintaining warmth and usability. Interior and exterior spaces boast perfection at its finest.

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CHAD SCHULIN

214-529-1758 cschulin@briggsfreeman.com


JEFF WATSON

817-501-1923 jwatson@briggsfreeman.com

CHERYL STALEY

817-939-7131 cstaley@briggsfreeman.com

2002 SWALLOWTAIL CIRCLE

Westlake, Texas $

2,395,000

VAQUERO LIFE Elegant transitional home in the guard-gated golf community of Vaquero with private club and extensive amenities. Warm hardwood floors, stacked stone columns, stone fireplace, vaulted ceilings and exposed beams complement an open floor plan with a spacious living room open to kitchen and casual dining. The indoors spill out to an outdoor covered patio with stone fireplace, outdoor kitchen by the pool and pergola covered spa with fire bowls. 6808 PLEASANT RUN ROAD

Colleyville, Texas $

2,500,000

LARGE LIVING Estate-style home on 6.4 acres with a spacious open floor plan excellent for a family. The expansive backyard has a full tennis court with basketball hoop and lights, and is ready for horses with fenced paddocks, a five-stall horse barn with wash bay and temperature-controlled tack room.

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731 RAINBOW DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

995,000

HIGH IMPACT Zen-like chic home with vignette views to the outside, surround the property located in the East Kessler Park area. Water features and beautiful high-end finishes throughout. Master suite retreat with a Jacuzzi for two. Entertaining spaces with art lighting and display built-ins. This home is an exquisite jewel box near Sylvan/Thirty and minutes from downtown Dallas.

5337 SOUTHERN AVENUE

Dallas, Texas $

1,349,000

CLASSIC PLAY This home in the West Highland Park vicinity epitomizes style and sophistication. Five fireplaces accent certain rooms as well as decorative fixtures, lighting and thoughtful details. The master suite opens onto the patio as well as connecting to a cozy library with a vaulted ceiling. The pretty plunge pool has a gorgeous water feature as well as a spa. There are specimen trees throughout the property.

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KATE MOTE

214-562-4444 kmote@briggsfreeman.com

4427 MIDDLETON ROAD

Dallas, Texas SOLD Listed for $1,059,000 FRESH START Newer construction with quality amenities in the North Midway Hollow area. Master suite is downstairs with a keeping room featuring a wood burning fire place and built-ins. Hardwood floors throughout, craftsman trim work with tall ceilings and big windows. Gorgeous backyard with patios, raised beds for gardening and a fabulous tree house.

3141 GREENBRIER DRIVE

University Park, Texas SOLD Listed for $1,899,000 represented buyer NATURAL CHARM Center hall plan Traditional with beautiful windows, tall cellings and hardwood floors throughout. Open kitchen to the Great Room with a wet bar and butler’s pantry. Substantial built-ins with a large fireplace and beautiful mantle. Fabulous Master Suite with panned ceiling, separate attached quarters, and diving pool on a quiet corner lot just walking distance to Caruth Park.

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3505 TURTLE CREEK BOULEVARD #18C THE VENDÔME

Dallas, Texas $

4,500,000

LUXE LIVING Sophisticated and elegant, warm and inviting, this two-story penthouse is the ultimate in urban living. Located in The Vendôme — on the edge of Uptown and in the heart of Turtle Creek — every window provides a fabulous view. The well-planned 6,660-square-foot home features four spacious bedrooms, a 2,200-bottle wine cellar, a well-appointed study and two large entertaining areas for the perfect marriage of luxury and convenient living. 114

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PENNY COOK

214-384-2847 ptcook@briggsfreeman.com


2000 BRAZOS COURT

Westlake, Texas $

3,995,000

RIGHT PROPORTIONS This custom one story Platinum Home brings a little slice of Santa Barbara to Texas. Located on 1.3 acres in Westlake’s gated Vaquero golf community, this home boasts an open entertainer’s floor plan with outdoor living spaces. The chef’s kitchen has a separate catering kitchen, two dishwashers, a steam oven, double ovens, two refrigerators, an ice maker and a walk-in pantry. The master suite boasts a fireplace and a luxury bath with dual toilets and sinks. The expansive floor-to-ceiling steel windows and doors offer grand views of the resort-like backyard with an infinity pool, a waterfall and a fire pit.

JENNIFER SHINDLER 214-215-5181 jshindler@briggsfreeman.com

J.L. FORKE

214-695-8255 jforke@briggsfreeman.com

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3605 IRON MOUNTAIN RANCH COURT

Southlake, Texas $

1,600,000

SUBURBAN ELEGANCE Traditional on the outside, transitional on the inside. This home is situated atop a hill on a quiet cul-de-sac in the highly desirable town of Southlake, Texas. With 7,085 square feet of luxury detail, you’ll enjoy five bedrooms, a downstairs media room and intimate spaces to unwind. The backyard paradise is complete with a beach-entry pool and spa.

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MICHELE GEWENIGER

817-605-0607 mgeweniger@briggsfreeman.com


KC7 RANCH

Balmorhea, Texas $

JAMES SAMMONS III

214-701-1970 jsammons@briggsfreeman.com

52,000,000

WEST TEXAS This 31,737-acre ranch in Reeves and Jeff Davis Counties, less than an hour and a half from Alpine and Marfa. Mineral rights, seven constant flowing springs, mountains and more make it a truly special ranch in the highly desired Davis Mountains and foothills of West Texas. Elevation ranges from 3,450’ to 6,000 feet. Abundant wildlife includes mule deer, aoudad, quail and two fishing lakes stocked with tiger bass. The headquarters, built in the 1890s, has been completely restored and updated.

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RIDGE LAKES OF HEATH DEVELOPMENT

Heath, Texas

Lots ranging from $149,000-300,000+ BY DESIGN At Ridge Lakes of Heath, residents live, work and raise their families while enjoying life’s simple pleasures in an exclusive community. Experience Texas living distinguished by a combination of artistic ingenuity and timeless elegance. Masterfully designed on more than 109 acres of luxurious homesites to allow discerning home buyers the opportunity to build stunning forwardthinking homes. Residents can embrace a relaxed lifestyle of Rockwall amenities nearby and less than 10 minutes to Lake Ray Hubbard. Homesites are available from 0.515 to 2.4+ acres, and lots include custom homes ranging from $900,000 to $3,000,000+. LISTED BY CARLA WHITEFIELD TEAM 118

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2300 WOLF STREET #19CD RESIDENCES AT THE STONELEIGH

Dallas, Texas $

4,500,000

IN THE SKY Step into luxury through two private elevator entrances with awe-inspiring foyers. Modern Italian design with clean lines and rich warm beige, caramel and brown tones. The finest materials and fixtures were selected throughout, such as Level 5 drywall, natural polished stone flooring, Michelangelo marble countertops and exotic African wood paneling. Exquisite attention to detail with two built-in platform beds, floating cabinets, recessed ceilings and romantic back lighting. Spa-like master bath with dry sauna, steam shower and a soak-in tub with a view. Four bedrooms, four full baths and four balconies on a premium floor equipped with a media room, fitness/yoga room, two spacious storage units and six parking spaces.

SHELLI KNUTSON

214-762-0292 sknutson@briggsfreeman.com

CARLA WHITEFIELD

713-657-0946 cwhitefield@briggsfreeman.com

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4610 SCENIC DRIVE

Rowlett, Texas $

815,000

VIEWS CONTINUE Picturesque waterfront property on Lake Ray Hubbard with park-like setting and 250 feet of unobstructed shoreline with the ability to add a boat dock. Many updates round out this five-bedroom, fourbath home with two living areas, formals plus den, and walls of windows providing a view of the lake from almost every room. Lake-house living only 19 miles from downtown Dallas.

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ASHLEY AKIN PEARL 214-244-1084 apearl@briggsfreeman.com

CARLA WHITEFIELD

713-657-0946 cwhitefield@briggsfreeman.com


CHRISTOPHER MCGUIRE 214-454-1128 cmcguire@briggsfreeman.com

3411 HARVARD AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

1,569,000

HISTORIC CRAFTSMANSHIP Authentic architectural details combined with historic craftsmanship infuse this home with an imprimatur of class. Fashionably located in old Highland Park this home features walkable ease to schools, shopping and parks. Inside, gracious, light-filled living spaces provide welcoming comfort and modern conveniences that invite social occasions. A terrific opportunity to live in a remarkable home within a family-focused community. 9234 ROCKBROOK DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

1,395,000

MID-CENTURY MODERN GEM Step back in time with this 1950s vintage Mid-Century Modern gem. Set on more than half an acre, this home is privately tucked back from the street under a canopy of mature trees. Care has been taken to preserve authentic interior details from this period. Ambience and flow imbue the environment and floor-to-ceiling glass windows provide superb views of the backyard oasis. A perfect retreat for any fan of the era.

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3815 WESTRIDGE AVENUE

Fort Worth, Texas $

310,000

CITY LIVING Walk to dinner and drinks, boutique shops or charming tree-lined parks along Fort Worth’s historic Camp Bowie Boulevard from the convenience of this updated three-story, end-unit townhome. This three-bedroom, two-and-a half-bath, 2,300-squarefoot townhome also features a two-car garage. Located in the established Ridglea neighborhood, directly across from the Ridglea Country Club, this gated lock-and-leave-style community offers modern comforts and amenities, such as a private pool for its residents, nestled amongst rich history and culture. 302 WIMBERLY STREET

Fort Worth, Texas SOLD represented buyer SENSE OF PLACE  Located within walking distance of Fort Worth’s vibrant West 7th five-block urban village, this Contemporary custom-finished threestory-townhome offers modern luxury in the center of Linwood Park, a recently redeveloped post-World War II neighborhood. Boasting breathtaking views of the downtown skyline from its rooftop deck, this home offers sleek sophistication ideal for enjoying all the city’s unique attributes located mere steps from its front door.

MIKE & STEPHANIE GARZA 817-807-3620 mgarza@briggsfreeman.com 817-905-0215 sgarza@briggsfreeman.com

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CHRIS LELASH

214-843-3610 clelash@briggsfreeman.com

JENNIFER LELASH

214-701-5035 jlelash@briggsfreeman.com

6810 TURTLE CREEK BOULEVARD

University Park, Texas SOLD Listed for $11,700,000 MEDITERRANEAN This Paul Turney-designed five-bedroom home, with five full and four half baths, sits on 0.9 acres in Volk Estates – the most exclusive enclave in the Park Cities. The home boasts reimagined interiors by sought-after designer Lisa Luby Ryan. Unique touches include everything from a marble Evier sink sourced from a villa in Lyon to multi-finish Hippodrome marble. A twist on traditional, understated elegance in an impeccable location. 6901 BALTIMORE DRIVE

University Park, Texas

PRIVATE SALE Listed for $7,500,000 represented buyer VOLK ESTATES One-acre estate property in the ultra-exclusive Volk Estates. Once combined with the adjacent property, the planned new estate residence, which will encompass nearly two acres, will undoubtedly take its place among Dallas’ most iconic properties.

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7951 BELLA FLORA DRIVE

Fort Worth, Texas $

1,125,000

LIVE INSPIRED This nearly 2-acre transitional oasis in the gated Bella Flora community, designed by Flynn + Watson Architects and custom built by AG Builders, is a short drive to Benbrook Stables, Dutch Branch Park and Benbrook Lake for your outdoor and equestrian riding needs. Live the good life with smart-home technology via Control4, Jenn-Air appliances, LED lighting, art-ready gallery walls with Level 5 wall finish and top-of-the-line energy efficient features without any city taxes. The six-panel LaCantina folding door system opens the house to a 1,100-square-foot patio for immersing yourself in total relaxation with a fountain view. 124

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CARLEY J. MOORE

817-734-8185 cmoore@briggsfreeman.com


NANCY DENNIS

817-992-7889 ndennis@briggsfreeman.com

1813 STRATTON GREEN

Colleyville, Texas $

924,900

LUXE ON THE CORNER Custom home provides 5,205 square feet of exceptional quality and features five bedrooms, five full baths, two half baths and five living areas. The master suite is conveniently located on the main level, while additional bedrooms, game and media room are upstairs. A chef’s dream kitchen, with professionalgrade stainless steel appliances, opens to the large living area and breakfast room. A custom saltwater pool and beautiful covered outdoor living space with built-in grill complete this home built for family and entertaining. 4704 CRESTHAVEN DRIVE

Colleyville, Texas $

749,500

GATED & GUARDED Located in the Thornbury Estates of Colleyville, this 4,615-square-foot home features extensive outdoor living areas, covered and uncovered, for family and entertaining. The pool, sport court and outdoor living areas of stone have all been recently updated, extended and redesigned. The gourmet cook will enjoy the large gas cook top, dual ovens, a warming drawer, new SubZero refrigerator and freezer. Upstairs are two large bedrooms, three full baths, a media room with built-ins and a library loft. Enjoy the peaceful neighborhood with beautiful private parks and lake and jogging trails. BRIGGSFREEM AN.COM

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1352 ESTELLA WAY

Southlake, Texas $

1,229,000

RARE & UNIQUE Ideally set on 4.29 pristine wooded and private acres, this lovingly renovated Austin stone home is a welcome relief from the ordinary. With an open floor plan and a cozy cottage-like persona, you'll feel at home immediately upon entering. Carefully crafted updates include new red oak hardwood floors, a fully remodeled gourmet kitchen with commercial-grade appliances, a stunning master suite with a European-style wet room, a 16-foot reclaimed brick fireplace and new windows throughout. In addition, the pool/spa have been resurfaced and retiled, and the natural log pergola recently rebuilt. Situated in the heart of Southlake and Carroll ISD, this rare gem even boasts a full-size tennis court. 1843 BROKEN BEND DRIVE

Westlake, Texas $

1,999,000

EXQUISITE DESIGN Located in gated Glenwyck Farms and nestled on 1.04 acres of lush, private grounds, this French country estate is a rare offering zoned to the highly acclaimed Carroll ISD or premier Westlake Academy charter school. The main level boasts an open floor plan, hardwood and travertine floors, a gourmet chef’s kitchen with commercial-grade appliances and a theater room. The stunning owner’s suite features a gas fireplace, large spa-like bath and hand-painted barrel ceiling. The backyard oasis features a resort-size Claffey pool and spa, sport court, fire pit, two grill areas and a separate pool house/bath accented by high-end LED lighting.

ROBERT TYSON

817-980-0683 rtyson@briggsfreeman.com

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7350 MIMOSA LANE

Dallas, Texas $

SUSIE SWANSON

214-533-4656 sswanson@briggsfreeman.com

2,149,000

QUALITY DETAILS Experience the exceptional style of this stunning new-build by Elijah Kord Custom Homes, in The Meadows. The Contemporary Transitional home boasts a carefully conceived open plan and luxurious finishes, including quartzite, leathered natural stone and custom cast stone. Its timeless, airy feel is enhanced with high ceilings, skylights, steel-and-glass doors and white-oak floors, while its many green features include multizone air conditioning, smart thermostats, dualpane Kolbe windows and a home-automation system.

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6480 ROYALTON DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

3,385,000

MODERN UNDERTONES Unparalleled construction by Milan Design + Build, a sophisticated architectural aesthetic and impeccable interior design merge to create this outstanding Preston Hollow property. Reminiscent of a Hill Country Transitional, the home has nearly 7,000 square feet of seamless design, clean lines and striking views of the lot, a generous half-acre-plus. The many amenities include five bedrooms, five full baths, an outdoor kitchen, a covered veranda, a pool and a spa. Meticulous attention to detail and flawless execution make for a true Preston Hollow treasure. LISTED BY SUSIE SWANSON 128

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5923 PARK LANE

Dallas, Texas

SUSIE SWANSON

214-533-4656 sswanson@briggsfreeman.com

COMING SOON FLAWLESS The elegance of French country living combines with a platinum Preston Hollow location in this superb home by Milan Design + Build, coming this fall. Classic form meets modern sophistication in nearly 7,500 square feet of luxurious living, with sumptuous finishes and premium amenities. The majestic architecture will envelop an interior designed for today, including five bedrooms, five full baths and a chef’s kitchen with Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances, while the outdoor oasis will boast a loggia and sleek negative-edge pool.

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4800 PARK LANE

Dallas, Texas $

130

10,900,000

CALM & SERENE Affectionately known as “Park House,” this extraordinary four-plus-acre estate rests between the confluence of Bachman and Browning creeks offering a one-of-a-kind setting. The elegant 10,210-square-foot home exemplifies incomparable attention to detail and the best of craftsmanship — limestone and inlaid mahogany flooring, custom millwork and moldings, Venetian plaster walls and more. Standouts include a dreamy master retreat, a large family room with captive views of the estate grounds, a home theater with a full-wall projection TV screen and a guest house/fitness center. SPRING +  SUM MER 2O18

GRETCHEN BRASCH

214-460-9488 gbrasch@briggsfreeman.com

ELLY HOLDER

214-207-6708 eholder@briggsfreeman.com


3525 TURTLE CREEK BOULEVARD #7AB

Dallas, Texas $

1,950,000

MAGICAL MOOD Completely renovated three-bedroom, three-and one-half-bath condominium in the historically significant Howard Meyer designed beauty at 3525 Turtle Creek boasts nearly 5,000 square feet of luxurious living and entertaining space. With impressive south-, eastand west-facing views, this seventh floor masterpiece affords breathtaking panoramas of the downtown Dallas skyline, Turtle Creek and surrounding landscape, with a level of privacy and sophistication that is unrivaled. LISTED BY GRETCHEN BRASCH & ELLY HOLDER

5022 SHADYWOOD LANE

Dallas, Texas $

2,750,000

AMERICAN IDYLL Timeless and classic, this 1938 Georgian style home in Sunnybrook Estates is ideally situated on 1.155 acres of rolling lawn, mature trees and lush landscaping. The stately four-bedroom, five-and one-half-bath home offers gracious formals, flowing entertaining areas, classically detailed moldings and millwork, floor-to-ceiling windows and hardwood flooring. The scored concrete and Pennsylvania bluestone patio in the backyard offers the perfect place for entertaining with stunning views of the estate grounds. LISTED BY GRETCHEN BRASCH & ELLY HOLDER

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3305 CENTENARY AVENUE

University Park, Texas COMING SOON ELEGANT & CHARMING This stunning home with exceptional curb appeal is situated on an oversized lot. The much desired open floor plan features a huge kitchen with cozy sitting area opening to the breakfast room and den with a wall of windows. French doors lead to the patio and outdoor kitchen overlooking the pool, fountain and landscaped backyard. Beautiful study, wet bar, three fireplaces, third-floor living space and threecar garage complete this extraordinary property.

DIXEY ARTERBURN

214-232-5054 darterburn@briggsfreeman.com

JANNA SCHICK

214-354-2115 jschick@briggsfreeman.com

4201 POTOMAC AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

1,699,000

STATELY LIVING Striking Highland Park Traditional is situated just steps from Highland Park Village, Dallas Country Club and Bradfield Elementary. This threestory home features 11-foot ceilings, soaring windows, open floor plan, elevator and a pool with outdoor entertainment. A welcoming entry boasts tongue and groove parquet hardwoods and opens to a raised panel library, gourmet kitchen and spacious dining room. Other amenities include a gym, renovated master bath, grand living room on the second floor, oversized third floor, circle driveway and a two-car attached garage.

MICHAEL WONG

214-263-1853 mwong@briggsfreeman.com

RALPH RANDALL

214-533-8355 rrandall@briggsfreeman.com

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4647 SOUTH VERSAILLES AVENUE

Highland Park, Texas $

1,424,000

CLASSIC & TRUE Located on a generous 60-foot lot, this stunning home is a West Highland Park gem. Featuring 4,334 square feet, four bedrooms, three full and two half baths, the home is nestled in the heart of a charming and highly desirable neighborhood. Updated and freshly painted since its construction in 2006, with hardwood floors in every room, this home shows beautifully.

GAYLE JOHANSEN

214-662-5455 gjohansen@briggsfreeman.com

25 GLEN ABBEY DRIVE

Dallas, Texas $

5,450,000

BEAUTY & COMFORT Located in a premier gated and guarded community with winding creeks, ponds, large trees and jogging trails, this custom-built home boasts, more than 7,900 square feet. Large room dimensions create flexible spaces to accommodate functional living and expansive wall space for art. The inside/outside relationship is enhanced by French doors across the back of the house opening to multiple outdoor patio and dining areas. Centrally located to high-end shopping, dining and airports, this home is an intimate oasis.

DONA TIMM

972-333-3370 dtimm@briggsfreeman.com

TERRY TIMM

972-333-3370 ttimm@briggsfreeman.com

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4130, 4128, 4126 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD – TRIPLEX

University Park, Texas $

1,399,000

MULTI-TRIPLEX An inviting triplex with circular drive in University Park located on University Boulevard. The front two units, 4130 and 4128, are the upper and lower updated duplexes. The back three-story unit, with an elevator, was built in 2000 above the three-car garage. Each spacious unit has two bedrooms, two baths and a study. All units are leased.

MARTHA MILLER

214-769-4457 mmiller@briggsfreeman.com

6515 TULIP LANE

Dallas, Texas

PENDING Listed for $1,749,000 ELEGANT CUSTOM This home, by award-winning builder Zachary Custom Homes, can be described in one word: Elegant. The spacious and open living areas, with warm woods and wall colors, evoke luxury. A large but cozy wine room invites memorable gatherings. Overlooking the pool and spa is a magnificent living area. This home easily transforms from Traditional to transitional. Either way, you will feel absolutely at home the moment you arrive.

BEVERLY PITCHFORD

469-328-2068 bpitchford@briggsfreeman.com

3719 SOUTH HILLS

Fort Worth, Texas $

575,000

COMFORT & STYLE Located on a beautiful street in the desirable Westcliff neighborhood of Fort Worth, this 2,685-square-foot home with four bedrooms, three baths and an attached two-car garage is simply perfection. Overflowing with natural light, this home offers split bedrooms, two living spaces, a separate utility with storage, refinished original hardwood floors and crown molding. A wall of windows overlooks the large stamped concrete patio and backyard with pergola. This updated home is near the TCU fields for all sports enthusiasts.

CARLEY J. MOORE

817-734-8185 cmoore@briggsfreeman.com

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3515 NORMANDY AVENUE #1

Highland Park, Texas $

1,089,000

LIGHT-FILLED MODERN This light-filled townhome epitomizes the clean, contemporary lines that are sought after today. Elevator access allows a seamless transition from the first to fourth floor. Master bedroom with creative built-ins, an open kitchen with upgraded finishes and a private yard with conservation grass make this home perfect for any lifestyle. The fourth-floor flex space with skylights is ideal for an office or extended living.

GINGER NOBLES

KATIE HUGHES

214-212-4434 214-769-1452 gnobles@briggsfreeman.com khughes@briggsfreeman.com

6734 MIMOSA LANE

Dallas, Texas SOLD Listed for $1,449,000 CUSTOM PRESTON HOLLOW Sophisticated open floor plan, great for entertaining. Beautiful touches throughout the home include thoughtfully designed built-ins with storage, soaring ceilings, formal and casual living spaces and a library. A casita with private separate entry offers the perfect private space for guests, with a full bath and closet space. Mature landscaping and loggia with TV and wood-burning fireplace makes the outdoors enjoyable.

GINGER NOBLES

KATIE HUGHES

214-212-4434 214-769-1452 gnobles@briggsfreeman.com khughes@briggsfreeman.com

2814 PARK BRIDGE COURT

Dallas, Texas PENDING Listed for $ 2,350,000 INDEPENDENT SPIRIT This exceptional Contemporary, situated in the heart of the Turtle Creek corridor, was designed by noted architect Ken Burgess. Beautifully sited, this threestory, light-filled limestone townhouse, with abundant wall space for art, includes a stunning pool terrace nestled in the trees off the main living area. Other amenities include a dramatic stair hall, chef's kitchen, wet bar, dining room with a garden view and classic study with stone fireplace on the main living level. There are two bedrooms and a sitting room on the entry level. The entire third floor is devoted to the master suite.

SUSAN MARCUS

214-533-1015 smarcus@briggsfreeman.com

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WHAT I KNOW NOW

Joseph Minton The legendary Fort Worth and Dallas decorator (he has homes and businesses in both) has clients around the world, friends in high places and something to say about almost everything — including the decorating business and one “terrible necessity.” Interview by Rob Brinkley Portrait by Allison V. Smith PEOPLE Love them! LOYALTY A must for friends and colleagues. THE DECORATING BUSINESS is not easy. One

one has the urge from childhood and can’t escape. MISTAKES must be made in order to make progress. LOVE can be a problem. MONEY A terrible necessity. FREEDOM Another must — from many addictions. CLIENTS All kinds. Most become dear friends! FRIENDS don’t always make the best clients! TEAMWORK Another must!

FEAR Terrible. CONFIDENCE Nice to have. Often

comes with experience. SOCIAL MEDIA I’ve been learning! Like it! WHAT DESIGN CAN DO Make life happy. YOURSELF I like myself. 136

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PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: GABRIELLE SZTAMENITS FOR 10/9 DESIGN

should not be in it to make money. It should be because


UPCOMING AUCTIONS FORT LAUDERDALE 6-7 APRIL AUBURN SPRING 10-12 MAY MONACO 12 MAY MONTEREY 24-25 AUG AUBURN FALL 30 AUG - 2 SEPT LONDON 5 SEPTEMBER HERSHEY 11-12 OCTOBER

INQUIRIES: 1 800 211 4371

B magazine spring summer 2018, dallas  
B magazine spring summer 2018, dallas