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#3

march 2011


Nú vaknar þú Allt virðist vera breytt Eg gægist út En er svo ekki neitt Ur-skóna finn svo A náttfötum hún I draumi fann svo Eg hékk á koðnun? Með sólinni er hún Og er hún, inni hér En hvar ert þú.... Legg upp í göngu Og tölti götuna Sé ekk(ert) út Og nota stjörnurnar Sit(ur) endalaust hún Og klifrar svo út. Glósóli-leg hún Komdu út Mig vaknar draum-haf Mitt hjartað, slá Ufið hár. Sturlun við fjar-óð Sem skyldu-skrá. Og hér ert þú... Fannst mér..... Og hér ert þú Glósóli..... Og hér ert þú Glósóli..... Og hér ert þú Glósóli..... Og hér ert þú

Glósóli Sigur Rós (album Takk 2005)


The word of the r edito

, t is re i e e h M So n of , dicio m e l d a n c eco xt the s th ne precise i w e in d and magaz ul I sai f i t u a of . As t be s a i e t d i ar hole nt young prese r the w e r , e o r t i e s h i befo t e gh gazin as throu e s k Me ma t i s l arti hey t to g n f u e f o y cam stu I d n o . a t ec ted t work books use I wan k r , o c w i an mus eca dea b artists c ll i i t s s i th o ut ow tw her b to feel see h are toget g n i h ill try ut st and s fferent, rgy b i t`s e d a n h e y T sta lses es. e c a n r s t e n desig my someo hole e of w t m e o g e s h to g t leave makin ne trying m . ` y I t i how bil gazi sensi is ma of th o artists t close s heroe ld be u o c se we Becau e You M

B.A


What starts out as hope soon becomes debased into a dialectic of greed, leaving only a sense of what could have been and the prospect of a new understanding... 10-15

Known for his contempt for the government in labelling graffiti as vandalism, Banksy displays his art on public surfaces such as walls and even going as far as to build physical prop pieces. Banksy does not sell photos of street graffiti directly himself; however, art auctioneers have been known to attempt to sell his street art on location and leave the problem of its removal in the hands of the winning bidder... 16-21

Contents

V.V 22-25


Over the

rainbow It’s not surprising that long-time illustrators welcome this trend. Gerald Scarfe believes that overtly digital output can be problematic. “When you start depicting the human body, it feels wrong, and even in the case of scenery it’s never absolutely convincing,” he says. “There’s nothing better than touching the paper and drawing the figure, but then as an artist I would say that...” 26-33

The band was formed in 1997 by original members Gunnar Örn Tynes and Örvar Þóreyjarson Smárason, who were joined a year later by twin sisters Gyða and Kristín Anna Valtýsdóttir. According to Kristín, the band’s name was not intended to mean anything. In 2002, after the first American tour, Gyða left the band to return to her studies in Reykjavík... 34-39

The film deals with thematic elements of human evolution, technology, artificial intelligence, and extraterrestrial life. It is notable for its scientific realism, pioneering special effects, ambiguous imagery that is open-ended to a point approaching surrealism, sound in place of traditional narrative techniques, and minimal use of dialogue... 40-47


11

beard boys 2011

y work explores the relationship between the body and skateboard ethics. With influences as diverse as Nietzsche and Frida Kahlo, new combinations are crafted from both simple and complex textures. Ever since I was a child I have been fascinated by the theoretical limits of the human condition. What starts out as hope soon becomes debased into a dialectic of greed, leaving only a sense of what could have been and the prospect of a new understanding. As spatial phenomena become clarified through diligent and personal practice, the viewer is left with an insight into the possibilities of our world.

V.V


12

“Untitled”

2011


13


18

anksy is an anonymous British graffiti artist, political activist, film director and painter. His satirical street art and subversive epigramscombine irreverent dark humour with graffiti done in a distinctive stencilling technique. Such artistic works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world. Banksy’s work was born out of the Bristol underground scene which involved collaborations between artists and musicians. According to author and graphic designer Tristan Manco, Banksy “was born in 1974 and raised in Bristol, England.The son of a photocopier technician, he trained as a butcher but became involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom of the late 1980s.” Observers have noted that his style is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris and members of the anarcho-punk band Crass who maintained a graffiti stencil campaign on the London Tube System in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Known for his contempt for the government in labelling graffiti as vandalism, Banksy displays his art on public surfaces such as walls and even going as far as to build physical prop pieces. Banksy does not sell photos of street graffiti directly himself; however, art auctioneers have been known to attempt to sell his street art on location and leave the problem of its removal in the hands of the winning bidder. Banksy’s first film, Exit Through the Gift Shop, billed as “the world’s first street art disaster movie”, made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. The film was released in the UK on 5 March 2010. In January 2011, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary. Banksy began as a freehand graffiti artist 1992–1994 as one of Bristol’s DryBreadZ Crew (DBZ), with Kato and Tes. He was inspired by local artists and his work was part of the larger Bristol underground scene.


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He claims he changed to stencilling whilst he was hiding from the police under a rubbish lorry, when he noticed the stencilled serial number and by employing this technique, he soon became more widely noticed for his art around Bristol and London. Stencil on the waterline of The Thekla, an entertainment boat in central Bristol – (wider view). The image of Death is based on a 19th century etching illustrating thepestilence of The Great Stink. Banksy’s stencils feature striking and humorous images occasionally combined with slogans. The message is usually anti-war, anti-capitalist or anti-establishment. Subjects often include rats, apes, policemen, soldiers, children, and the elderly.

On 19 July 2002, Banksy’s first Los Angeles exhibition debuted at 33 1/3 Gallery, a tiny Silverlake venue owned by Frank Sosa. The exhibition, entitled Existencilism, was curated by 33 1/3 Gallery, Malathion, Funk Lazy Promotions, and B+. In 2003, at an exhibition called Turf War, held in a warehouse, Banksy painted on animals. Although theRSPCA declared the conditions suitable, an animal rights activist chained herself to the railings in protest. He later moved on to producing subverted paintings; one example is Monet’s Water Lily Pond, adapted to include urban detritus such as litter and a shopping trolley floating in its reflective waters; another is Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks, redrawn to show that the characters are looking at a British football hooligan, dressed only in his Union Flag underpants, who has just thrown an object through the glass window of the cafe. These oil paintings were shown at a twelve-day exhibition in Westbourne Grove, London in 2005.


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Banksy held an exhibition called Barely Legal, billed as a “three day vandalised warehouse extravaganza” in Los Angeles, on the weekend of 16 September. The exhibition featured a live “elephant in a room”, painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern. Banksy also made art works displaying Queen Victoria as a lesbian. He also created satirical art that incorporated art made by Andy Warhol and Leonardo da Vinci (Mona Lisa).

After Christina Aguilera bought an original of Queen Victoria as a lesbian and two prints for £25,000,[20] on 19 October 2006 a set of Kate Mosspaintings sold in Sotheby’s London for £50,400, setting an auction record for Banksy’s work. The six silk-screen prints, featuring the model painted in the style of Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe pictures, sold for five times their estimated value. His stencil of a green Mona Lisa with real paint dripping from her eyes sold for £57,600 at the same auction.[21] In December, journalist Max Foster coined the phrase, “the Banksy effect”, to illustrate how interest in other street artists was growing on the back of Banksy’s success.


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Banksy, along with Shepard Fairey, Dmote and others created work at a warehouse exhibition in Alexandria, Sydney for Semi-Permanent in 2003. Approximately 1,500 people attended. £10 notes to Barely Legal (2004–06). In August 2004, Banksy produced a quantity of spoof British £10 notes substituting the picture of the Queen’s head with Diana, Princess of Wales’s head and changing the text “Bank of England” to “Banksy of England.” Someone threw a large wad of these into a crowd at Notting Hill Carnival that year, which some recipients then tried to spend in local shops. These notes were also given with invitations to a Santa’s Ghetto exhibition by Pictures on Walls. The individual notes have since been selling on eBay for about £200 each. A wad of the notes were also thrown over a fence and into the crowd near the NME signing tent at The Reading Festival. A limited run of 50 signed posters containing ten uncut notes were also produced and sold by Pictures on Walls for £100 each to commemorate the death of Princess Diana. One of these sold in October 2007 at Bonhams auction house in London for £24,000.


V.V artist: V.V

place: stara kasarna, pg

year: 2010


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artist: V.V “Vendi im�

place: stara kasarna, pg

year: 2010


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artist: V.V

artist: V.V

place: stara kasarna, pg

place: stara kasarna, pg

year: 2010

year: 2010


Over the rainbow


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W

ith creative freedom at an all-time high within the industry, and the explosion of illustrators making a living, it’s no surprise that the invention and turnover of styles is more rapid than ever. Trends come and go quickly, and some commissioning editors warn that illustrators must be aware of what’s ‘out’, to avoid creating work seen as dated rather than something likely to lead somewhere new. Decorative swirls and repetitive patterns, largely comprising forms fashioned using vector graphics, is one style that was very popular but is now being avoided. Like its popular forebear – abstract 3D explosions of pixel chaos – vector art has had its day, mostly thanks to overexposure. Although the decorative has its place in specific circumstances, industry momentum is now towards conceptual, technique-based work. Handmade is being favoured rather than overtly digital, and clinical production values – at least in terms of output, if not the methods used to create illustrations. It’s not surprising that long-time illustrators welcome this trend. Gerald Scarfe believes that overtly digital output can be problematic. “When you start depicting the human body, it feels wrong, and even in the case of scenery it’s never absolutely convincing,” he says. “There’s nothing better than touching the paper and drawing the figure, but then as an artist I would say that.”

Younger creatives too are supporting the more human approach, even if their tools remain digital, unlike Scarfe’s pen and inks. US-based Autumn Whitehurst, who fashions her intricate figure work entirely digitally, says, “As soon as I can relax the Wacom-trained muscle memory in my hand, I’m going to try introducing some traditional methods into the work for the sake of variety.” She’s noticed a strong interest in hand-drawn work recently, and thinks this is because we’ve become enamoured with things that are handmade: “It’s a response to the clinical perfection of that streamlined aesthetic that has been so prevalent.”

Other reasons also explain the surge in popularity of this hand-made aesthetic. There’s an explicit desire to get more character into illustration, resulting in work that genuinely engages its audience on a conceptual and emotional level, rather than merely dazzling with eye-candy. With digital tools becoming endemic, the public is no longer impressed with visuals that have been pushed out quickly. What is captivating people is artwork with craft and technique behind it - obvious painting and drawing skills make more of a connection. Zeegen reckons what we’re seeing is just the beginning of a more open, honest return to the use of craft within illustration. “We’ve had a glut of Photoshop collages, followed by vector coolness, followed by pattern and overembellishment, but now the field seems far wider. There is no house style - everything and anything goes! The difference, I hope, is that now the best work floats to the top and the rest sinks,” he says.


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Although style can be important in getting noticed, substance is crucial when creating successful work. Now that we’re leaving a period in which too much illustration was devoid of any real essence, it’s important that illustrators marry visual flair with ideas. Mat Wiggins, the freelance designer who commissions UK Esquire’s illustrations, reckons ideas are the one place where an illustrator can really come into their own and make a difference. Despite the newfound emphasis on craft, a strong piece isn’t necessarily about whether an illustrator is more technically gifted than someone else, but about the ideas they can generate and communicate. The best illustrators today, he argues, are those who do something effectively, turn it around quickly and get the idea right first time, saying a lot with a little. Traditional-looking imagery is experiencing a definite revival, but those who work in other areas, such as vector output, needn’t panic so long as they can clearly put their own imprint, personality, character and ideas into their work.Terry Brown is director emeritus of the Society of Illustrators in the US, and he argues against the idea that one style kills another in commercial art. “I don’t believe scratch-board is dead,” he says. “I don’t believe big heads on little bodies is dead. If the artist is good, their work is going to get used. If you get right to the point with your picture – if you give the art director what they were looking for, and then some – medium doesn’t matter, size doesn’t matter and gender doesn’t m a tter. If the image is good, you’re there.”

Such thinking is evident in a recent set of illustrations Wiggins commissioned for Esquire on people who influence how our world is run. Noma Bar, known for depicting famous figures by using just a few lines, colours and objects (a notable example being integrating the Conservative Party logo into a portrait of Baroness Thatcher, comprising her eye and nose), created vivid, engaging portrayals beyond mere caricature. These demonstrated what the

people in the article were about much more effectively than any photograph. . In one fell swoop, the set of images showed that a supposedly tired method – vector drawing – can still be relevant and engaging if the idea is strong enough, and that illustration can take things to a different place, enabling readers to connect with the content of an article. “Illustration really comes into its own when you do something you can’t do with photographs,” explains Wiggins.


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“A few years ago, several automotive campaigns were suddenly illustrative rather than photographic,” he recalls. “Car advertising, being such a sleek, form-heavy product, had always been the bastion of the photographer, but the more earthy side of multimedia illustration was having a good crack at it.” From that point on, illustration gained real momentum. And once larger companies were on board, others followed suit. The benefits of illustration again started to become apparent to decision-makers in all industries: from a production standpoint, it’s often simple to manage illustration, since you’re typically dealing with a single self-sufficient individual whose location is largely irrelevant; and the lack of a need to set up a photographic shoot means production costs are usually lower.

Once a medium is deemed successful, it has a real chance of becoming self-perpetuating. More illustration commissions have resulted in more illustrators able to make a living, which has created a larger resource for commissioning editors. As more clients take risks, agencies relax and become comfortable with looser briefs. According to Cox, many of today’s valuable, high-risk campaigns arrive with only the vaguest visual ideas attached: “Artists are being given a greater level of intellectual responsibility to interpret briefs in an individual manner. And while some struggle with the notion of doing the art director’s job, most revel in the creative freedom of taking ownership of the concept, producing a more engaging personal response, while also feeling like an intrinsic part of the creative team.” Regardless of how many illustrators widen their remit or stay entirely focused on one area of creativity, it’s clear that the field is back to rude health, and an increasing and more varied amount of illustration work is thrown before the judgement of the public eye. So is illustration recapturing the success it enjoyed in the 60s and 70s? Well, no. “It’s not going to happen,” says Brown. “You don’t have the star art directors from the 60s who could walk down the hall and say to the editor, ‘Get these words off my page – this is going to be a beautiful picture!’


However, illustrators can do things to ensure the ride lasts for as long as possible, as Wiggins concludes: “Keep coming up with good ideas, and always be aware of how and where illustrations are used. Also, try to come up with new ideas where illustration can be used and demonstrate that in your work. Good illustration is – and has always been – down to strong ideas that are wellexecuted, and if illustrators can do that, there shouldn’t be any fear of work drying up.”


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úm (stylized as múm, Icelandic pronunciation: [muːm]) are an experimental Icelandic musical group whose music is characterized by soft vocals, electronic glitch beats and effects, and a variety of traditional and unconventional instruments. History The band was formed in 1997 by original members Gunnar Örn Tynes and Örvar Þóreyjarson Smárason, who were joined a year later by twin sisters Gyða and Kristín Anna Valtýsdóttir. According to Kristín, the band’s name was not intended to mean anything. In 2002, after the first American tour, Gyða left the band to return to her studies in Reykjavík. Shortly after Gyða left, Ásthildur Valtýsdóttir joined for singing duties and Serena Tideman replaced Gyða on cello for a European tour. . Then the ensemble evolved to include Ólöf Arnalds and Hildur Guðnadóttir. In early 2006, Kristín also left the band, although it was not officially announced until November 23 of that year.Despite the departure of some of its members Múm has remained together as a collective of musicians.


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Their fourth album, recorded during 2006, was released on 24 September 2007, entitled Go Go Smear the Poison Ivy. Múm toured the East Coast of the US with German musician Volker “Hauschka” Bertelmann In November 2007. They returned in Spring 2008 with the same set list. Both tours included songs from the album, Go, Go Smear the Poison Ivy. On 27 August 2008, they announced on their official website that “Múm is quietly but surely [working on] their new album. No release date has been etched in stone, but every day will bring it closer.” Múm also released several pictures of themselves during the recording process on their My Space page. During a 22 May 2009 concert in Burgos, Spain, Múm played songs from their newest album Sing Along to Songs You Don’t Know. It was released as a downloadthrough Gogoyoko on 17 August 2009, and on CD on 24 August 2009. Discography Yesterday Was Dramatic – Today Is OK (TMT, 2000; reissue Morr Music, 2005) Finally We Are No One (Fat Cat Records, 2002) Loksins erum við engin (Smekkleysa Records, 2002) — the Icelandic version of “Finally We Are No One” Summer Make Good (Fat Cat Records, 2004) Go Go Smear the Poison Ivy (Fat Cat Records, 2007) Sing Along to Songs You Don’t Know (Morr Music, 2009)


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from the album: summer make good 2004


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2001 A SPACE ODISSEY


2 44

0 0 1: A Space Odyssey is a 1968 American epic science fiction film produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick, and co-written by Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke. The film deals with thematic elements of human evolution, technology, artificial intelligence, and extraterrestrial life. It is notable for its scientific realism, pioneering special effects, ambiguous imagery that is open-ended to a point approaching surrealism, sound in place of traditional narrative techniques, and minimal use of dialogue. The film has a memorable soundtrack - the result of the association that Kubrick made between the spinning motion of the satellites and the dancers of waltzes, which led him to use The Blue Danube waltz by Johann Strauss II, and the famous symphonic poem Also sprach Zarathustra by Richard Strauss, to portray the philosophical evolution of Man theorized in Nietzsche’s work of the same name. Despite initially receiving mixed reviews, 2001: A Space Odyssey is today recognized by many critics and audiences as one of the greatest films ever made; the 2002 Sight & Sound poll of critics ranked it among the top ten films of all time. In addition, in 2010 it was named the #1 greatest film ever made by The Moving Arts Film Journal. It was nominated for four Academy Awards, and received one for visual effects. In 1991, it was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Title

In the beginning, Kubrick and Clarke privately referred to their project as How the Solar System Was Won as an homage to MGM’s 1962 Cinerama epic, How the West Was Won. However, Kubrick chose to announce the project, in a press release issued on February 23, 1965, as Journey Beyond The Stars. “Other titles which we ran up and failed to salute wereUniverse, Tunnel to the Stars, and Planetfall”, Clarke wrote in his book The Lost Worlds Of 2001. “It was not until eleven months after we started - April 1965 - that Stanley selected2001: A Space Odyssey. As far as I can recall, it was entirely his idea.”Intending to set the film apart from the standard “monsters and sex” type of science-fiction movies of the time, Kubrick used Homer’s The Odyssey as inspiration for the title. “It occurred to us”, he said, “that for the Greeks the vast stretches of the sea must have had the same sort of mystery and remoteness that space has for our generation”.

Style

Clarke and Kubrick wrote the novel and screenplay simultaneously, but while Clarke ultimately opted for clearer explanations of the mysterious monolith and Star Gate in his book, Kubrick chose to make his film more cryptic and enigmatic by keeping dialogue and specific explanations to a minimum. “2001”, Kubrick says, “is basically a visual, nonverbal experience” that avoids the spoken word in order to reach the viewer’s subconscious in an essentially poetic and philosophic way. The film is a subjective experience which “hits the viewer at an inner level of consciousness, just as music does, or painting”. The film conveys what some viewers have described as a sense of the sublime and numinous. Roger Ebert notes: North’s [rejected] score, which is available on a recording, is a good job of film composition, but would have been wrong for 2001 because, like all scores, it attempts to underline the action -- to give us emotional cues. The classical music chosen by Kubrick exists outside the action. It uplifts. It wants to be sublime; it brings a seriousness and transcendence to the visuals.


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The Dawn of Man

A tribe of herbivorous ape-like early humans is foraging for food in the African desert. A leopard kills one member, and another tribe of man-apes drives them from their water hole. Defeated, they sleep overnight in a small exposed rock crater, and awake to find a black monolith has appeared in front of them. They approach it shrieking and jumping, and eventually touch it cautiously. Soon after, one of the apes (Daniel Richter) realizes how to use a bone as both a tool and a weapon, which the apes then use to kill prey for food. Later they reclaim control of the water hole from the other tribe by killing its leader. Triumphant, the ape leader throws his weapon-tool into the air, switching (via match cut) from a bone to an orbital satellite millions of years in the future.

TMA-1

A Pan Am space plane carries Dr. Heywood R. Floyd (William Sylvester) to a space station orbiting Earth for a layover on his trip to Clavius Base, a US outpost on the moon. After making a videophone call from the station to his daughter (Vivian Kubrick), he encounters his friend Elena (Margaret Tyzack), a Russian scientist, and her colleague Dr. Smyslov (Leonard Rossiter), who ask Floyd about “odd things” occurring at Clavius, and the rumor of a mysterious epidemic at the base. The American declines to answer any questions about the epidemic. At Clavius, Floyd heads a meeting of base personnel, apologizing for the epidemic cover story but stressing secrecy. His mission is to investigate a recently found artifact— ”TychoMagnetic Anomaly One” (TMA-1)—”deliberately buried” four million years ago. Floyd and others ride in a Moonbus to the artifact, a black monolith identical to the one encountered by the apes. The visitors examine the monolith, and pose for a photo in front of it. While doing so, they hear a very loud radio signal coming from the monolith.

Jupiter Mission

Eighteen months later, the American spaceship Discovery One is bound for Jupiter. On board are two mission pilots and scientists astronauts Dr. David Bowman (Keir Dullea) and Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood), and three other scientists who are in cryogenic hibernation. “Hal” (voiced by Douglas Rain) is the ship’s HAL 9000 computer, which runs most ofDiscovery’s operations. While Bowman and Poole watch Hal and themselves being interviewed in a BBC show about the mission, the computer states that he is “foolproof and incapable of error.” Hal also speaks of his enthusiasm for the mission, and how he enjoys working with humans. When asked by the host if Hal has genuine emotions, Bowman replies that he appears to, but that the truth is unknown. Hal asks Bowman about the unusual mystery and secrecy surrounding the mission, but interrupts himself to report the imminent failure of a device which controls the ship’s main antenna. After retrieving the component with an EVA pod, the astronauts cannot find anything wrong with it. Hal suggests reinstalling the part and letting it fail so the problem can be found. Mission control concurs, but advises the astronauts that results from their twin HAL 9000 indicate the ship’s HAL is in error predicting the fault. When queried, Hal insists that the problem, like all previous issues with the HAL series, is due to “human error”. Concerned about Hal’s behavior, Bowman and which he sings for Bowman.


A MAN IN SPACE IS A CHILD ON EARTH. Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999)


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Design and editor: Brigita Antoni Artist: Vuksa Vujosevic Text is a combination of thoughts and wikipedia You can find this magazine in all libraries in Montenegro with a price of 55 eur (you can also pay in 6 months installments);


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